15th Hawai`i International Summit on Preventing, Assessing & Treating Trauma Across the Lifespan

Agenda

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  • Pre-Summit Workshop
  •  

    April 16, 2018

    9:00 AM  -  4:30 PM
    (April 17, 2018)
    PS1/A1/B1: The Journey of Forgiveness; Destination Peace

    PLEASE NOTE THIS IS DAY 1 OF A 2 DAY WORKSHOP. YOU MUST ATTEND THE WORKSHOP IN ITS ENTIRETY. (APRIL 16 AND 17TH)

    Session Timing:

    Monday, April 16th, 2018 - 9:00 AM - 4:30PM
    Tuesday, April 17th, 2018 - 9:00 AM - 4:30PM

    (*This is a 2-day workshop on April 16 and 17. Attendance on both days is required.) Everyone experiences loss in one way, shape or form. No matter nationality, age, religion or race, we all must grieve the departure of loved ones in our lives. How are we to process the loss clearly, cleanly and completely? Azim Khamisa provides the pathway from grief to purpose in sharing his story of losing his son Tariq, starting the foundation in Tariq’s name and most recently experiencing the passing of his mother, who was the emotional and spiritual foundation upon which he stood. By transforming grief and loss into acts of service, Azim shifted a negative into a positive and created purpose for himself and uplift for a community. In the process, he created spiritual currency for the departed so their soul’s journey could be lifted ever higher on the other side. Join Azim as he guides you to embrace a grieving process that takes you from sadness and loss to hope, action, service and positive change

    Speaker:
    Fee  Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    PS2: Creating Trauma-Informed Systems of Care: Integrating Core Concepts for a Common Vision
    In this presentation, participants will learn the fundamental elements of a trauma-informed approach to training and practice for programs, organizations, and systems. Individuals will learn to understand the widespread impact of trauma and potential pathways to recovery. They will learn to recognize signs and symptoms associated with trauma in clients, families, practice, and systems and will learn key strategies to reduce the impact of trauma and resist active re-traumatization across systems. A trauma-informed approach can be implemented by any individual, in any type of service setting or organization and is distinct from trauma-specific interventions or treatments that are designed specifically to address the consequences of trauma and to facilitate healing. Integrating the National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s (NCTSN) 12 core concepts for Understanding Child Traumatic Stress will provide common language and a trauma lens that can be used to understand the impact on the children and families we serve as well as the opportunity for reflective practice that incorporates provider wellness and the impact of trauma on staff and systems as a whole.
    Speaker:
     Optional  Closed 
    12:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    PS3: The Cost of Caring: Compassion Fatigue, Vicarious Trauma, and Self-Care
    We will explore compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma, and the impact it has on those working in the helping profession. We will review common signs and symptoms experienced by those in the helping profession and discuss the importance of self-care for providing quality care to the most vulnerable populations. In addition, we will identify techniques and strategies for coping with the stressors associated with helping to live a more balanced life.
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    12:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    PS4: Adverse Childhood Experiences- Overview to Health, First Responders & all other Human Services
    The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study is the largest study of its kind. It demonstrates the strong, dose related associations between childhood adversity and many long-term diseases and dysfunction. Since its original publication in 1998, there have been over 85 publications presenting various findings. Other studies, using representative statewide and national population samples, have found similar strong associations among all socioeconomic classes and nationalities. This half-day pre-summit provides an introduction to the study's findings, other similar work, resilience, and its significance to child maltreatment and intimate partner violence prevention and intervention. Additionally, this workshop includes applications to first responders in various settings.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    PS5: Ike Mauli Ola: The Knowledge in the Power of Healing
    Self-Care includes building our cultural awareness, including psychologically, physiologically, and spiritually. As human beings, we all as indigenous peoples have been traumatized and suffered much as a result of contact with colonizing systems, including generational post-traumatic stress that may manifest in situations of violence and abuse. There have been concerted efforts toward cultural reconstruction and recovery throughout the indigenous world. Sharing the Hawaiian life source spirit of Aloha, these panelists will share Hawaiian chant (oli), dance (`ai ha`a), and traditional ho`oponopono practice as holistic, interactive ways of recovering from individual and family trauma. These exemplify the possibilities for cultural revitalization in the 21st century. The audience will be invited to engage in an open discussion about the implications for an enriched way of understanding and being that rests upon the Hawaiian notion of Aloha, creating wellbeing for all involved.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    PS6: Paper Tigers: Captures the pain, dangers & hopes of struggling teens/Trauma Informed Schools
    Part I. Paper Tigers: Captures the pain, the danger and the hopes of struggling teens and the teachers FILM SCREENING.-More than two decades ago, two respected researchers, clinical physician Dr. Vincent Felitti and CDC epidemiologist Robert Anda, published the game-changing Adverse Childhood Experiences Study. It revealed a troubling but irrefutable phenomenon: the more traumatic experiences the respondents had as children (such as physical and emotional abuse and neglect), the more likely they were to develop health problems later in life's problems such as cancer, heart disease, and high blood pressure. To complicate matters, there was also a troubling correlation between adverse childhood experiences and prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse, unprotected sex, and poor diet. Combined, the results of the study painted a staggering portrait of the price our children are paying for growing up in unsafe environments, all the while adding fuel to the fire of some of society's greatest challenges. James Redford Part II. Trauma Informed Schools -Leading with Compassion - zero suspensions and expulsions for 4 years- Creating a culture of compassion in schools. Compassionate Schools Result in Positive Impact: To address the "whole Child" and to engage families and communities. -create social connectedness -provide concrete support in times of need -teaches social and emotional competence Terminology that is resulting in a National Movement -Trauma Sensitive Schools -Trauma Informed Services -Compassionate systems -Safe and Supportive Communities Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) Take the ACES test Get your ACES Score Understanding Long Term Consequences of ACES Impact of ACES on Learning Compassionate Practices Identification of behavior associate with trauma -Trauma Symptoms- Depression, Anxiety, Drugs, Risky sex - learning memory problems -Dis-regulated emotions and behavior Promote Resilience Community, Culture, Spiritually Attachment and belonging
    Main Presenter:
    Panelists:
    Moderators:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION A
  •  

    April 17, 2018

    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A2: MEGA♪ Specialized Risk Assessment Training: Assessing Sexually Abusive Youth, Ages 4-19 PART A

    PLEASE NOTE THIS IS PART A OF AN ALL DAY WORKSHOP, WITH A WORKING LUNCH. YOU MUST ATTEND BOTH A & B IN ORDER TO RECEIVE YOUR CERTIFICATION.

    Let it be known that L.C. Miccio-Fonseca, Ph.D, author and sole creator of the MEGA♪ Risk Assessment Tool, receives profit from product sales which funds the ongoing multiple research projects. To date, the MEGA♪ studies are the largest contemporary research on risk assessment of coarse sexual improprieties and/or sexually abusive behaviors in youth, ages 4-19 years, male, female, and/or transgender, including youth with low intellectual functioning.

    MEGA♪ is robustly anchored in scientific methods, evidenced by sizeable samples in validation and the multiple cross-validation studies. The MEGA♪ studies are the largest in risk assessment research on youth, with combined samples of over 4,000 adjudicated and non-adjudicated youth. Participating research sites included national and international locations. MEGA♪ is administered in several types of facilities (residential programs, psychiatric hospitals, community agencies, day treatment, outpatient clinics, detention facilities, etc.). MEGA♪ has several unique features; one is ability to follow changes in the youth’s risk level and protective factors over time (an outcome measure). MEGA♪ provides a comprehensive individualized risk assessment report according to age and gender identifying specific risk factors and protective factors contributing to assessed risk level (Low, Moderate, High, or Very High). MEGA♪ is applicable for youth ages 4-19 years, adjudicated or non-adjudicated, males, females, and transgender, including youth with low intellectual functioning. A specialized certification training is required to learn how to administer. Dr. Miccio-Fonseca is assisted in MEGA♪ training by Dr. L.A. Lee Rasmussen, Senior Research Consultant to the MEGA♪ International Project (Israel).

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A3: Risking Connection: RICH Relationships for Healing
    This one-day workshop assists skilled helpers in viewing those they serve through a different lens that allows them to respond in ways that foster more healing and sturdier relationships using the RICH model, expansion of self-capacities, and managing vicarious trauma. This workshop is good for anyone who works with people who are survivors of trauma and is grounded in relational psychology and constructivist self-development. Embedded in the one-day are the universal definition of trauma, trauma's impact on six specific areas, the RICH model, and managing Vicarious Trauma. Accompanied by a generous reference guide with handouts.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A4: Foundations and Innovations in the Treatment of Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorders
    Complex posttraumatic conditions often develop in the aftermath of chronic cumulative trauma, particularly severe child abuse and neglect. It can also develop over the course of adulthood. The objective of this workshop is to provide clinicians with an increased understanding of the nature, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions, drawing upon recent clinical writings and empirical findings. The following topics to be covered: types of trauma and complex trauma, variable responses and adaptations to trauma, description of the diagnostic criteria for complex forms of PTSD and the dissociative disorders, assessment issues, treatment philosophy, treatment frame issues, sequenced and evidence-based treatment strategies, and specific strategies and approaches, especially those directed towards affect regulation, ego-enhancement, symptom stabilization, and the maintenance of the client’s functioning. Treatment of various durations and intensities will be discussed, including emerging neurophysiological and attachment/relational approaches. Attendees will learn of current advances in treatment and the strategies currently recommended in clinical practice guidelines as well as controversial issues. The importance of the therapeutic relationship to the treatment will be stressed; discussion of transference and countertransference issues will be interwoven throughout the presentation. The vicarious traumatization of the therapist will also be discussed, as will strategies for therapist self-care.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    ''A5: Resilience (Screening & Panel) | Trauma Informed Schools: Promoting Resiliency & Hope

    Part I. RESILIENCE: Examining the emerging science around Toxic Stress and how it negatively alters the brains and bodies of children if left untreated. The child may not remember. But the body remembers. Researchers have recently discovered a dangerous biological syndrome caused by abuse and neglect during childhood. As the new documentary Resilience reveals, TOXIC STRESS can trigger hormones that wreak havoc on the brains and bodies of children, putting them at a greater risk for disease, homelessness, prison time and early death. While the broader impacts of poverty worsen the risk, no segment of society is immune. Resilience, however, also chronicles the dawn of a movement that is determined to get back. Trailblazers in pediatrics, education and social welfare are using cutting-edge science and eld-tested therapies to protect children from the insidious effects of toxic stress and the dark legacy of a childhood that no child would choose.

    Part II. Trauma Informed Schools - Promoting Resiliency and Hope: Creating a culture of compassion in schools. Compassionate Schools Result in Positive Impact: To address the "whole Child" and to engage families and communities:
    - Create social connectedness
    - Provide concrete support in times of need
    - Teaches social and emotional competence
    Terminology that is resulting in a National Movement:
    - Trauma Sensitive Schools
    - Trauma Informed Services
    - Compassionate Systems
     - Safe and Supportive Communities
    Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES)
    Take the ACES test
    Get your ACES Score
    Understanding Long Term Consequences of ACES
    Impact of ACES on Learning Compassionate Practices
    Identification of behavior associate with trauma:
    - Trauma Symptoms--Depression, Anxiety, Drugs, Risky sex
    - Learning memory problems
    - Dis-regulated emotions and behavior
    Promote Resilience Community, Culture, Spiritually Attachment and belonging Capability Youth Empowerment

    Main Presenter:
    Speakers:
    Panelists:
     Optional  Closed 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A6: Helping Youth & Families Tell Their Story Using Family Narratives -The Foundation of Wraparound
    We all have a story or history that shapes who we are and how we respond to others and situations. In Wraparound, the development of the family narrative is the foundation upon which all planning is built and provides us with a way of organizing, interpreting and creating meaning from a family's unique experiences, culture, values and beliefs. Development of the family narrative also provides youth and families with an opportunity to tell their stories in a way that enables them to feel heard, recognized and acknowledged by others. Developing a deeper understanding of the family story also leads to greater connection between what youth and families need and the support they receive.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A7: The Intersection of IPV & Co-occurring Combat-Related Conditions
    Over 2.7 million people served in Iraq and Afghanistan over more than a decade, including National Guard and Reserve personnel. These veterans returned to communities throughout the country with visible and invisible wounds of war sometimes leading to involvement with the criminal justice system for a range of crimes, including intimate partner violence (IPV). This workshop will address the importance of establishing the context of IPV, which is an important lens through which to view IPV and co-occurring combat-related conditions. The workshop will also focus on how to differentiate the symptoms of co-occurring combat-related conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and substance abuse from IPV tactics, how to approach screening, assessment, and intervention, and the importance of risk and danger assessment and safety planning. The workshop will address the importance of collaboration between DoD, the VA, and community-based programs.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A8: Strategies for Supervisors: How to Manage Secondary Traumatic Stress and build staff resilience
    In this session you will learn the new supervisorial competencies outlined by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) for addressing secondary traumatic stress (STS). You will gain knowledge of the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of STS and its impact on employees; organizational options for support, a gold standard for the referral process for employee assistance, or external support resources for supervisees who are experiencing symptoms of STS. How to assess STS for yourself and your staff, and guidelines for how to reduce the risk in the work environment will be discussed. Guidelines to balance supporting staff in reflective practice while setting clear boundaries for when to encourage to seek support outside the supervisorial setting will be addressed.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A9: Ethical Issues in Clinical and Forensic Practices
    This workshop focuses on advanced ethical issues for mental health professionals. The presentation emphasizes: a 5-part model on the standard of care to facilitate decision-making when faced with potential, ethical, legal, and clinical dilemmas. The workshop also addresses what issues are most commonly raised in civil lawsuits and licensing board complaints. Types of claims arising from forensic settings and evaluations will be explored. The legal and ethical risks from the use of the Internet and social media will be discussed. Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Explain 2 complex ethical issues that arise in every day clinical practice. 2. Identify 2 high-risk situations that most frequently lead to ethics, licensing board complaints, and civil law suits and ways to resolve them. 3. Explain the systematic structured process by which ethical issues can be resolved.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A10: Cultural Historical Trauma, Resilience, and Practice Tips for Culturally Resonant Practice
    This workshop will provide an overview of the cultural historical trauma that occurred in the Hawaiian Islands and the resiliency that exists among the Native Hawaiians in their homeland. Given the fact that many other cultural groups have experienced cultural historical trauma, experiential exercises and small group discussions will be provided to explore the impact of cultural historical trauma that is applicable to all cultural groups. Specific culturally resonant practice tips for assessment and engagement will be provided to workshop participants, with an emphasis on Native Hawaiian frameworks and metaphors that can be used to restore balance and harmony for individuals and families.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    A11: Dynamics of Elder Abuse: She Fell – What’s Really Happening?
    This training module presents new information on understanding elder abuse; information which differs in significant ways from the traditional understanding of elder abuse on which professionals have been trained and under which they have operated for many years. Early elder abuse research thought that caregiver stress was the root cause of elder abuse; i.e. the high care needs of the older person caused the caregiver to snap and then abuse or neglect the victim. Most professionals were thus trained to provide the caregiver with support services, and to approach cases with a family systems perspective wherein each person needs and deserves empathy and assistance. Research in recent years has debunked the theory of caregiver stress by finding that many elder abuse cases involve the same dynamics of power and control as underlie other domestic violence cases.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION B
  •  

    April 17, 2018

    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B2: MEGA♪ Specialized Risk Assessment Training: Assessing Sexually Abusive Youth, Ages 4-19 PART B

    PLEASE NOTE THIS IS PART B OF AN ALL DAY WORKSHOP, WITH A WORKING LUNCH.

     

    MEGA♪ is a tool for assessing risk for coarse sexual improprieties, and/or sexually abusive behaviors in youth ages 4-19 years. MEGA♪ is applicable for adjudicated or non-adjudicated, males and females, including youth with low intellectual functioning. Tested on over 2200 youth internationally (largest validation studies in its field) - MEGA♪ is state of the art and unique. It provides a comprehensive individualized risk assessment report according to age and gender. MEGA can follow changes in the youth’s risk level over time (is an outcome measure).

    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B3: Risking Connection: RICH Relationships for Healing
    PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS PART B OF AN ALL DAY WORKSHOP. This one-day workshop helps skilled helpers consider a different frame, rethink the people they serve through a different lens, and respond in ways that foster more healing, sturdier relationships using the RICH model, expansion of the self-capacities and managing Vicarious Trauma. Good for anyone who works with people who are survivors of trauma. Grounded in relational psychology and constructivist self-development. Embedded in the one-day are the universal definition of trauma, trauma's impact on six specific areas, the RICH model, and managing Vicarious Trauma. Accompanied by a generous reference guide with handouts.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B4: Foundations and Innovations in the Treatment of Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorders
    *Attendance at this session requires Tuesday morning attendance. Complex posttraumatic conditions often develop in the aftermath of chronic cumulative trauma, particularly severe child abuse and neglect. It can also develop over the course of adulthood. The objective of this workshop is to provide clinicians with an increased understanding of the nature, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions, drawing upon recent clinical writings and empirical findings. The following topics to be covered: types of trauma and complex trauma, variable responses and adaptations to trauma, description of the diagnostic criteria for complex forms of PTSD and the dissociative disorders, assessment issues, treatment philosophy, treatment frame issues, sequenced and evidence-based treatment strategies, and specific strategies and approaches.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B5: Applications of ACEs Research for Educators and Practitioners: Promoting Resilience
    This session reviews the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study findings and related research with a focus on what educators can do to integrate this knowledge into schools and their work with students who are having behavioral and emotional difficulty. What schools can do to develop a more trauma sensitive culture, and how to use the emerging research on protective factors and resilience will be addressed. Opportunities to help prevent major childhood adversities and for identifying children who have experienced adversity are included.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B6: An Introduction to Interventions for Youth w/ Complex Trauma Histories: SPARCS
    SPARCS is a group intervention that was specifically designed to address the needs of chronically traumatized adolescents who may still be living with ongoing stress and are experiencing problems in several areas of functioning. These areas include difficulties with affect regulation and impulsivity, self-perception, relationships, somatization, dissociation, numbing and avoidance, and struggles with their own purpose and meaning in life as well as worldviews that make it difficult for them to see a future for themselves. Overall goals of the program are to help teens cope more effectively in the moment, enhance self-efficacy, connect with others and establish supportive relationships, cultivate awareness, and create meaning. This clinical workshop will provide an introduction to SPARCS and overview of interventions designed for youth with complex trauma histories and presentations.
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B7: Thriving After Trauma: The Next Step Beyond Surviving Domestic Abuse
    No longer a victim or even survivor, she is a thriver, creating a new life for herself and her children. Learn innovative, evidence-based practices that have successfully been used with women who have experienced abuse (e.g. domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse) to help them push through their fears, discover their creative potential and take the critical next-step to thriving after abuse. This session will demonstrate techniques that can build the resiliency and self-confidence of survivors by countering negative, limiting beliefs about themselves that sabotage movement forward and exploring positive story-telling that allows them to set and accomplish new, exciting goals for their future.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B8: When Things Get Messy - Clinicians on Traumatic Stress and How to Heal in the Moment

    When working with trauma cases do you see clients go into flight, fight, and/or freeze? Do they yell at you, insult you, or leave the session? Are there times you find yourself getting angry at your clients? Do you recognize your own flight, fight, and/or freeze response? Welcome to the messy, often confusing world of trauma treatment. In this workshop, you’ll explore practical in-session techniques as well as a framework to help you recognize what’s happening when things heat up and get intense.

    You’ll discover how to:

    1. Assess the client’s motivation, stage of change, and preferred mode of learning
    2. Effectively build a therapeutic collaboration around each client’s individual needs
    3. Understand the importance of therapist transparency, and empower clients by making the therapy process as safe and explicit as possible
    4. Explore intrafamily violence and include additional family members in your session
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B9: Testifying in Court: Practical Tips
    This workshop will provide a range of front-line professionals, and expert witnesses with the skills needed to effectively testify in court, reduce stress, and, conversely, it will also provide litigators with the skill sets needed to conduct effective direct and cross-examination of lay and expert witnesses. The workshop is focused on various types of cases that can be complex, including child abuse and domestic violence, and will include case examples, practical suggestions, and mock testimony. Objectives: As a result of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Understand the subtle aspects of testifying in court 2. Better handle or conduct cross examination of witnesses 3. Identify practical techniques they can use for testifying in court 4. Feel more comfortable testifying in court cases, even complex ones
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B10: Hawaiian Art & Values in the Practice of Healing; Visual story, Reimaging Historical Trauma
    The arts heal. Visual images can be used to illustrate experiences that allow us to share, memorialize or document for self/others- their stories, past and present. Using specific creative processes will allow for naming, and making concrete--difficult aspects of our stories through the use of color, line, light, scale, perspective; artist tools, inclusive of context, space and time. Cultural traditions and values figure significantly into this work, using a value set grounded in Hawaiian Cultural practices and beliefs. Use of the double -sided Aloha mural will encourage participants to identify and name historical pain that may be worked with during the session, utilizing story-telling techniques to begin a journey towards healing- beginning a process of bringing necessary light and truth to personal realities of those who are grieving from any sort of pain- in a safe environment, through creative work that energizes, recalls and redirects positive efforts together.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    B11: Prosecuting Financial Exploitation of Older Adults
    Deputy District Attorney Paul Greenwood from San Diego County California will draw upon his 22 years of prosecuting elder financial exploitation crimes to show how such crimes can too easily be mistaken as “just civil” in nature. He will provide examples of cases that have been successfully investigated and prosecuted and will offer suggestions as to how to get law enforcement to recognize that such exploitation is criminal. DDA Greenwood will invite questions about techniques and strategies that are effective in proving these cases and will also demonstrate how a multi-disciplinary approach is vital.
    Speakers:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION C
  •  

    April 18, 2018

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C1: Brains, Behavior and Regulation: Understanding Trauma Through a New Lens
    Our experiences and relationships have all laid a foundation to how we react and respond to a variety of situations and experiences. When trauma is woven into these experiences and interactions, our behaviors may become inappropriate or "maladaptive." Parenting is stressful enough, but when you add a child or youth to the mix with a complex trauma history, day to day life can be downright exhausting. This session will take a more in depth look at the trauma behind the behaviors, uncover the function of these behaviors (there is a function to every behavior!) and how caregivers as well as professionals can begin the process of responding to our children from a trauma sensitive perspective!
    Speaker:
     Optional  Closed 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C2: Project Kaeru: Interagency Collaboration Using Team Decision Making for High-Risk Youth
    In 2016, the State of Hawaii Child and Adolescent Mental Health Division (CAMHD) was awarded a four-year SAMSHA grant to create a program to deliver best practices in team decision-making and evidence-based practices for high-risk youth. In collaboration with EPIC Ohana and Child and Family Services, Project Kaeru was created to support youth in their home community. In our presentation, we will first describe the goals of Project Kaeru. Next, we will highlight our interagency collaboration and team-decision making progress. Finally, we will share our clinical model and progress monitoring. Our goal is to share our conceptual model and implementation plans for Project Kaeru to increase awareness of this new service for CAMHD youth.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C3: Stemming the Rising Tide of Elder Abuse – A Prosecutor’s Perspective
    Deputy District Attorney Paul Greenwood will draw upon his 22 years of prosecuting serious criminal elder abuse to illustrate ways that we can all be part of a solution to reduce the escalation of such incidents. He will discuss common misconceptions that often hinder successful investigation and prosecution. For example, a typical response from law enforcement to an allegation of financial elder abuse is “It’s just a civil matter.” He will demonstrate effective methods of collaboration in a multi-disciplinary setting and will highlight was in which the community can learn how to identify, report and respond to allegations of physical, emotional, sexual, and financial abuse of elders. Throughout the session DDA Greenwood will support his concepts with actual case studies.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C4: The Peace Path Protocol: A Restorative Practice Approach for Students in Schools
    Trauma informed school and classrooms are focused on both relationship building among teachers and helping teachers facilitate relationship building among students. When relationships are secure among students and teachers, then the ability to facilitate restorative practices in the the classroom become the social, emotional learning skills to repair harm that is done to others and to restore the relationship. The Peace Path protocol was adapted for Hawaii from the Wellness and Restorative Practices Partnership in San Diego, California and Cherokee Point Elementary School.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C5: IPV in the LGBTQ+ Community; Resolving the Conflict Between LGBTQ & Anti-Gay Religious arguments

    Part I. IPV in the LGBTQ+ Community-The presentation IPV (Intimate Partner Violence) in the LGBTQ+ Community- looks at a community that is often left on the fringes of society. Domestic Violence research, as it pertains to the LGBTQ+ community, is lacking at best, non-existent at worse. Our presentation/workshop compiles national and the limited local data and statistics on Intimate Partner Violence within the LGBTQ+ community, unique tactics of power and control experienced, and unique challenges and barriers faced by the LGBTQ+ community experiencing IPV. In addition, the workshop explores ways in which mainstream Domestic Violence agencies can work toward becoming more welcoming and affirming of LGBTQ+ employees and potential clients through our own work training staff, assessing the agency's cultural competence with the community, and conducting outreach and education in the LGBTQ+ community.

    Part II. Resolving The Conflict Between LGBTQ Issues and Anti-gay Religious and Secular Arguments-Despite many gains in the LGBTQ equal rights movement, recent setbacks necessitate revisiting this long-standing conflict. This type of prejudice has roots in multiple traditional religious and secular arguments. Certain religious institutions maintain this oppressive stance, teaching their constituents that God hates gays, encouraging them to deny/detest their sexual identity. For many LGBTQ persons with religious upbringings the internal conflict of being gay and having a relationship with God contributes to maladaptive coping, homelessness, victimization, and suicidality. Gays who have not made peace between their spirituality and their sexuality are at a higher risk for perpetuating prejudice against the LGBTQ community as conflicted individuals discriminate against others what they hate within themselves. This presentation redefines and dispels some of these arguments and provides tools to help LGBTQ persons and others successfully cope and heal from the wounds of prejudice.

    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C6: Resiliency Enhancing Relationships: A Study of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resiliency
    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have long been known to be associated with multiple psychosocial problems developing in adulthood. Equally well documented is that after 16 years of continuous conflict military personnel are experiencing increased levels of psychological distress such as anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation. This study examined the relationship between ACES and resiliency in adulthood by surveying 250 active-duty personnel to determine the number and types of adverse experiences the individual was exposed to during childhood and their current level of resiliency. Furthermore, by interviewing volunteers who reported a high number of ACEs and a high degree of adult resiliency, we identified protective relationship themes that support the mitigation of negative impact of childhood trauma. The study's findings showed a significant negative relationship between ACEs and resiliency as well as an emergence of protective relationship characteristics.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C7: Trauma-Informed Care and Practice for Eating and Related Disorders: History and Overview
    The history and evolution of trauma-informed care and trauma-informed practice for those with eating disorders (ED) and related comorbidities are reviewed. ED are not widely recognized to be associated with trauma, despite evidence showing that those with ED report very high rates of childhood maltreatment, other lifetime traumatic events, and adverse consequences from trauma (e.g., PTSD) that may predispose to/precipitate/perpetuate ED. Principles of treating ED comorbid for PTSD and other trauma-related disorders are reviewed, including the necessity of moving beyond sequential treatment to the development of integrated treatment protocols. Integration of existing evidence-based treatments, including family, cognitive behavioral, dialectical behavior, cognitive processing, prolonged exposure, and eye movement desensitization reprocessing therapies are recommended. TIC needs to be embraced by all clinicians and treatment programs that assess and treat eating and related disorders.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C8: Trauma Informed Police Responses to Rape: Issues and Innovations for the South Pacific Islands
    The South Pacific Islands comprise a cultural melting pot; when sexual violence occurs, cultural values may impact the definition, report rate, and response to reports by police officers. In addition officer gender, training, age, rank, values and interview skills may determine whether police responses are trauma informed. This workshop, designed for professionals assisting rape victims in a variety of capacities, will include a dramatization of a re-victimizing police report. Following this, research will be presented on how South Pacific Island residents may be uniquely affected by stigma, cultural bias, and survival concerns. Data from a recent study on police responses locally, and across the United States, will follow. Recent innovations in trauma informed police work in the South Pacific (including Hawaii) will be highlighted. Interactive discussion will be encouraged, as it is only through such dialogue that innovations can be developed and sustained.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C9: The Human Element of Working with Human Trafficking Victims
    Most people who work with human trafficking victims have no first hand experience of what it feels like to be trafficked. Aside from brave survivors who partner with law enforcement and community based organizations, most people who work with trafficking victims lack the common experience necessary to connect on an emotional level. Influenced by stereotypes, prejudice, and preconceived notions about how a trafficking victim should act, many who attempt to help these young women are confused at best, turned off at worst at the often counterintuitive reactions they have to being rescued. This program will delve into the psychology behind the complicated relationship trafficking victims have with their abusers, how it was cultivated and maintained, and how to break the invisible, emotional chains that bind the victim to the traffickers which are often stronger than real ones.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C10: Medical evaluation of child sexual abuse
    Children who are sexually abused often present with a history long after the abuse itself. A forensic interview is most important, but the medical examination may reveal residual findings in a small percentage of cases. Teenagers may more often be victims of acute sexual assault and have a somewhat higher incidence of physical findings. This session will explore the dynamics of sexual abuse at various ages and concentrate on the normal anatomy often seen in such examinations and the findings that are most significant supporting the diagnosis of sexual abuse. Examination techniques will be described. Some conditions that might be confused with sexual abuse will also be presented.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    C11: Psychotherapeutic Integrated Approaches for Treatment of Comorbid PTSD & Substance Abuse dis.
    Over the past several years there have been advances in treatment options that address both PTSD and SUD disorders concurrently in a single treatment episode. Specifically, trauma focused interventions have proven to be safe and effective when implemented in SUD populations. Concurrent Treatment for PTSD and SUD using Prolonged Exposure (COPE) is a manualized intervention that combines the best evidence based approaches for the treatment of SUD and PTSD. This presentation will review outcome data related to the use of COPE in both civilian and combat populations. One of the challenges in implementing exposure based interventions in patients with SUD is the persistent and overwhelming fear, avoidance and resistance to engage in exposure to trauma reminders and/or memories. Mindfulness meditation, an intervention that addresses emotional dysregulation and avoidance will be discussed as another treatment option that may also facilitate engagement in exposure based treatment.
    Speaker:
     Optional 

  • Opening Plenary & Ceremony
  •  

    April 18, 2018

    10:30 AM  -  12:20 PM
    Opening Plenary & Ceremonies

    Keynote Speakers: AngelaMarie Pacley- A MOTHER'S PRAYER: SAVING MY DAUGHTER FROM HUMAN TRAFFICKING At the age of sixteen, Sadé was kidnapped in Atlanta, GA, and sold into a world of human trafficking. AngelaMaire Pacley actively worked with Atlanta police department to rescue her daughter and eventually that case brought ten other young victims home safely. She will provide personal stories and case examples involving trauma and human trafficking. This presentation will help identify how to respond, and provide research and personal experiences to improve services for victims, survivors, and families of sexual human trafficking. Pacley will also lead a breakout session on Thursday where handouts and more details will provided.

    Cathy Betts-ENDING VIOLENCE Description coming soon.
    Keynote Speaker:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION D
  •  

    April 18, 2018

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D1: Trauma and Brain Development: Implications for School Practice
    Significant numbers of students have been impacted by traumatic experiences. Traumatic stress in childhood affects students learning and behavioral adjustment by altering neurological development. Problems may be experienced at school across several domains, including: emotional and behavioral regulation, attachment, social interaction, executive functions, logical and abstract reasoning, and mind-body connection. School-wide systems of support must incorporate an understanding of traumatic stress in order to address the needs of the student body at every level, from universal through intensive approaches. Strategies that have been shown to help include: increasing mindfulness, learning how to regulate physiological arousal, improving affect regulation, and engaging the imagination.
    Speaker:
     Optional  Closed 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D2: Are We Making a Difference: Individualizing Outcomes in Mental Health
    Did you know that overt tracking of progress is the component of Wraparound and other human service planning approaches most correlated with positive outcomes for youth and families? Interestingly, research has found that while many Wraparound and human service initiatives wholly embrace other defining principles in practice most continue to struggle with implementing the principle of outcome-based when partnering with youth, families and teams. Research conducted by Walker, Koroloff and Schutte (2003) found that fewer than one third of child and family teams across 11 states tracked success using indicators of progress or even completion of tasks. It is therefore essential that we increase understanding of the importance of being outcome-based and operationalize what outcomes should be measured in practice.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D3: Undue Influence: Parallels to Domestic Violence, Stalking, Sexual Assault, and Other Abuse
    Too many older individuals are being financially exploited. Some cases of financial exploitation involve undue influence (UI). Undue influence occurs when people use their role and power to exploit the trust, dependency, and fear of others (Singer, 1996; Quinn, 2001). The tactics used in UI also have striking similarities to the strategies used in domestic violence, stalking and grooming, which occurs in some sexual abuse cases. In these situations, the exploiter uses a pattern of tactics in combination to get his or her desired goal. The purpose of this training is to explore the parallels between UI and domestic violence, stalking, and grooming so that professionals can better understand the dynamics of some financial exploitation cases and implement effective investigative strategies. Professionals will learn to use expertise they already have in domestic violence and sexual abuse cases to effectively identify and investigate financial exploitation where UI may be present.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D4: Beyond Calming the Emotional Fire: Incorporating Mindfulness Into Our Daily Life and Work
    Mindfulness is a state of being present achieved by putting our attention on our current feelings, thoughts and bodily sensations without passing judgement. It is imperative that we are present and attentive to those we serve from moment to moment and by being present, we avoid getting lost in our own experience and the speculation and judgment about what might be going on with them. Through formal mindfulness practice we can enhance our personal and professional life and positively impact our work. We will practice simple yet effective mindfulness techniques that can be incorporated in small groups, classrooms or one on one with those we serve. We will review and discuss current research on mindfulness, how and where it's being implemented, and promising outcomes.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional  Closed 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D5: The Journey Out of Trauma Identity & Into Spiritual Self | IPV in Christian & Muslim Communities

    Part I. FINDING SELF AGAIN: THE JOURNEY OUT OF TRAUMA IDENTITY AND INTO SPIRITUAL SELF - This workshop looks at the process of the "loss of sense of self" resulting from trauma and related mental and addictive illnesses including eating disorders and substance abuse. It examines how sense of self is lost, roadblocks and obstacles to connection to self, and themes, processes, principles, and interventions to help clients regain their "sense of self" and reclaim their spiritual identity. It examines how clients become "bonded" or "connected " to a "broken" and "empty" sense of self which connected to trauma, and it examines how clients can understand, accept, value, honor, and share themselves again, and by so doing, reconnect to self, others, and higher power. This workshop will briefly look at related research, theoretical constructs, and practical interventions. Modalities of learning may include didactic information, reflection, imagery, discussion, sharing, and/or experiential activity. Speaker: Michael E. Berrett

    Part II. TREATING INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN CHRISTIAN AND MUSLIM COMMUNITIES - Religion, culture, and intimate partner violence interact in complex ways. This presentation discusses how Christianity and Islam have been used to minimize or condone IPV. Spiritual resources useful in the treatment of IPV survivors and perpetrators will be outlined. Finally, effective principles for collaborating with religious leaders will be discussed. Speaker: Andy Johnson; Co-presenter: Sande Traudt

    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D6: Moving Toward Evidence-Based Practice in the Army Family Advocacy Program
    The use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in the Army Family Advocacy Program (FAP) has been and continues to be a top priority. However, FAP social worker attitudes toward, knowledge and use of EBP has not been systematically assessed. The current presentation is intended to provide participants with a common and working definition of the term "Evidence-Based Practice" and also share the Army's efforts to increase EBP throughout its programs. It will include EBP survey results of Army FAP social workers. Presenters will ask participants to complete an EBP attitude survey and participate in discussion on their attitudes and factors that influence use of EBP in their work. Finally, participants will participate in a hands on activity to practice using an evidence-based practice method in responding to a gap in knowledge about fictitious client scenarios.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D7: Caring for the Gender Nonconforming Client: A Humanistic Approach to Being an Ally
    Persons whose gender identity differs from the sex assigned to them at birth; whose gender expression varies significantly from what is traditionally associated with or typical for that group •Includes people who label themselves as transgender, transsexual, and genderqueer, as well as people who do not adopt such labels but experience and/or express their gender outside of the expected male-female binary are gender nonconforming or non-cisgender. The minority stress model proposes that negative experiences (e.g.,stigma, homeless, traumatic childhood experiences, violence) projected onto minority groups negatively influences their health (Lick, et al. "Minority stress and physical health among sexual minorities." Perspectives on Psychological Science 8.5 (2013): 521-548.) Anticipating (and experiencing) discrimination by service providers affects access to care, as well as outcomes. Our biases and understanding as service providers can greatly impact this as well.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D8: Hula as Healing in Women's Corrections
    The Windward Community Correctional Center (WCCC) is the only womenʻs prison in Hawai’i. The majority of inmates are Native Hawaiian and Polynesian. In 2007, WCCC adopted a trauma informed care (TIC) model of rehabilitation and moved to transition the facility to a healing community. This initiative incorporated Native Hawaiian principles and practices into existing correctional programming and new activities. One of these activities is hula, a revered, traditional cultural practice. Hula at the prison is taught as a cultural practice that has the potential to heal from trauma and pain. Through chants, song and storytelling, hula connects us to our ancestors and ancestral lands, to our beloved chiefs, mythological heroes and heroines, and spiritual guides. This presentation will discuss hula as a cultural healing "tool" and will feature WCCC inmates who participate in the hula class, and who will also speak about their healing journey through the power of hula.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D9: Strategies for Coalition Building to Address Sex/Labor Trafficking/Prostitution Impact Panel

    Part I. EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR COALITION BUILDING TO ADDRESS SEX AND LABOR TRAFFICKING-This presentation addresses effective strategies for building an effective Anti-trafficking Coalition comprised of law enforcement, victim service organizations, survivors of trafficking, and community advocates across multiple counties. Topics include (1) selecting, expanding, and maintaining an Executive Committee, (2) structuring and supporting the work of Coalition subcommittees, (3) coordinating the work of different subcommittees (e.g. law enforcement and victim services), (4) utilizing social media to engage and inform the coalition and the wider community, and (5) using process data to inform the Coalition on its advancements and areas that still need to be addressed. Along with effective strategies, this presentation will include data collected from the Southern Arizona Anti-trafficking Unified Response Network (SAATURN) to provide examples process data that informs on coalition planning and activities.

    Part II. SAN DIEGO'S PROSTITUTION IMPACT PANEL: AN INNOVATIVE JOHN SCHOOL- Since 2002, the Office of the San Diego City Attorney has coordinated the Prostitution Impact Panel (PIP). PIP is an alternative sentencing option for first-time, consumer side (john) prostitution offenders. As the lead agency, the City Attorney's Office works in partnership with the San Diego Police Department (SDPD), community-based organizations, and community members. Through a series of panel presentations, offenders are exposed to different perspectives illustrating the impacts of prostitution. Eligible offenders who choose to participate in PIP plead guilty to their original offense and are sentenced. If the offender completes PIP, HIV education, and testing by a 90-day court date, he can withdraw his plea and reenter a guilty plea to a reduced charge with the same terms and conditions of probation. PIP has had a measurable reduction in recidivism, with only 3 percent of participants recidivating.

    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D10: Organizing Treatment in Cases of Child Maltreatment when Reunification is the desired outcome

    When working with trauma cases do you see clients go into flight, fight, and/or freeze? Do they yell at you, insult you, or leave the session? Are there times you find yourself getting angry at your clients? Do you recognize your own flight, fight, and/or freeze response? Welcome to the messy, often confusing world of trauma treatment. In this workshop, you’ll explore practical in-session techniques as well as a framework to help you recognize what’s happening when things heat up and get intense.

    You’ll discover how to:

    • Assess the client’s motivation, stage of change, and preferred mode of learning
    • Effectively build a therapeutic collaboration around each client’s individual needs
    • Understand the importance of therapist transparency and empower clients by making the therapy process as safe and explicit as possible
    • Explore intrafamily violence and include additional family members in your sessions
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D11: Preparing Students for Clinical Practice w Traumatized Children & Adults/Collective Healing
    Part I. PREPARING STUDENTS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE WITH TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN AND ADULTS-Often, individuals who are seeking professional training in order to work with traumatized children and adults, have themselves experienced some degree of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. This workshop will outline the challenges to educators whose goal is to prepare students with knowledge, skills and the emotional fortitude to work effectively with traumatized populations. This includes the introduction of techniques to regain emotional calm, group interventions that create a supportive environment, and concepts that help future clinicians maintain boundaries when the client's trauma activates their own memories. The workshop will focus on how learning and practice is effected when the student clinician has experienced a specific trauma, and ways to generate self awareness and acceptance in the student. This will also involve emotional regulation techniques and shaping a supportive group environment that allows students to explore new approaches and manage their reactions. Part II. COLLECTIVE HEALING & INTEGRATED PROCESS TRAUMA MODEL- Treatment for trauma often focuses on the individual and while successful, may not address the needs of some trauma survivors who culturally identify as more collectivist, and may wish their treatment to occur within the context of the family or community system. In addition, with limited trauma models based in family systems available, emerging family therapists may not feel prepared to treat trauma within a more individual -focused framework, though the results of having loved ones in the room could be positive. Drawing from feminist ethics, attachment theory, interpersonal neurobiology, and trauma systems therapy, this proposed treatment model incorporates the family into the individual's treatment to address the trauma wound together. This presentation proposes this model for discussion, describes the readiness of students to implement treatment for trauma, and its preliminary use at the East Carolina University's Family Therapy Clinic.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION E
  •  

    April 18, 2018

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E1: Emotional Memory Networks: Unlocking the Past to Strengthen the Present
    Neurobiology research suggests that memories are stored according to emotional valence, and are intrinsically involved in the way current triggers are processed. Understanding the ways that the past influences the present allows clinicians to help clients identify beliefs and conclusions that complicate responses to present situations, and to identify the components of revived emotional memory networks. It also helps clinicians identify memories that generate peacefulness and security, as guided images that can help individuals manage intense emotional states.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E2: Journey Through Grief: Creating Spiritual Currency in the Name of the Departed
    Everyone experiences loss in one way, shape or form. No matter nationality, age, religion or race, we all must grieve the departure of loved ones in our lives. How are we to process the loss clearly, cleanly and completely? Azim Khamisa provides the pathway from grief to purpose in sharing his story of losing his son Tariq, starting the foundation in Tariq's name and most recently experiencing the passing of his mother, who was the emotional and spiritual foundation upon which he stood. By transforming grief and loss into acts of service, Azim shifted a negative into a positive and created purpose for himself and uplift for a community. In the process, he created spiritual currency for the departed so their soul's journey could be lifted ever higher on the other side. Join Azim as he guides you to embrace a grieving process that takes you from sadness and loss to hope, action, service and positive change.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E3: Interagency Collaboration to Develop an Effective System of Care for Hawaii's Youth & Families
    Can government agencies ever overcome turf battles and break down the barriers to real collaboration? Is there any hope of fixing the public mental health system for children and families? The Hawaii Interagency State Youth Network of Care (HISYNC) is a collaborative group of state-level leaders from the main state government agencies that serve youth and families. This roundtable/panel discussion will feature members of HISYNC representing several agencies within the Department of Health, Child Protective Services, Office of Youth Services, Med QUEST Division, and the Department of Education. HISYNC members will discuss barriers to working together and sharing resources within our state bureaucracy, recent successes in the area of interagency collaborative projects, and hopes for the future. Some examples of creative inter-agency efforts on behalf of multi-agency involved youth with complex trauma will be shared, and audience participation will be elicited.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E4: Hoʻohuli Ke ʻAla (The Pathway of Transformation)
    Toni and her Pūʻā Foundation team will present its efforts involving trauma, healing and justice - "Hoʻohuli Ke ʻAla" - The Pathway of Transformation, going from trauma to transformation. The workshop will focus on the Foundation's ʻaina (land) based initiative that incorporates Hawaiian traditional and cultural practices working with women from prison and those transitioning out of incarceration back to community. 3 - Objectives: 1. Increase awareness of Hawaiian traditional and cultural practices within the context of trauma, healing, and justice working with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women; 2. Learn about the importance and benefit of integrating Hawaiian traditional and cultural practices by creating places and spaces of healing; 3. Develop new knowledge of effective gender and culturally-responsive, trauma-informed approaches through an ʻaina (land) based initiative.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E5: Preventing and Treating Interpersonal Violence and Abuse Among Transgender Persons
    Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) persons are at high risk of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and trauma from a number of sources and in a wide range of settings, including intimate or romantic relationships. Working with TGNC persons requires an understanding of the ways in which the dynamics of their relationships may differ from relationships in which neither person is gender-variant. After revealing the scope of interpersonal violence and abuse (IPVA) among TGNC persons, the presenters will offer examples of triggers and types of interactions that may increase the risk of IPVA in relationships with TGNC persons. They will then discuss ways of working with TGNC survivors and perpetrators of IPVA to reduce the occurrence and impact of such events.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E6: Masculinity's Contribution to Negative Psychosocial Outcomes in Men: A Multi-cultural Approach
    Masculinity influences daily interactions and contributes to an overall belief of what is expected of "being a man". As a result, men are likely to seek help for mental and physical health concerns at significantly lower rates than their female counterparts. Research also indicates that males view themselves differently than females in regards to vicitimization. The role of counselors, therapists, and psychologists is to assist male clients in reducing the effects of gender role distress experienced when dealing with trauma by embracing men's maleness. Counselors can approach working with male clients by understanding their identities and their context in order to develop a therapeutic alliance that allows for compassion, reducedreduced defensiveness, and achieves mutual respect between client and counselor. This multi-cultural approach works exceptionally well with the military population, a population in which strict male gender roles has been reinforced.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E7: Domestic Violence, Concussion & TBI/Impacts of couple violence on health of older Chinese women
    Part I. Domestic Violence, Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injuries- According to the Centers for Disease Control (2017), assault was the leading cause of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)-related death in children ages 0 – 4 in 2013. Being struck by or against an object was the leading cause of non-fatal TBI-related Emergency Department visits for ages 15 – 24 in 2013 (Centers for Disease Control, 2017). Given that the head and neck are frequent targets by abusers, TBI is common in victims of domestic violence (Zieman, Bridwell, and Cardenas, 2017). This presentation provides statistics and information on the relationship between domestic violence and Traumatic Brain Injuries, including concussions. It also introduces the Hawaii Neurotrauma Registry Project, a collaboration between the Hawaii State Department of Health and the Pacific Disabilities Center, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, to examine the post-injury needs of survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury with the goal of planning for services and policies. Part II. Differential impacts of different types of couple violence on the health of older Chinese women survivors- description coming soon
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E8: House of Horrors: The Mills and Akers Investigation
    This case study will detail the investigation of a married couple, Bailey and Elizabeth Mills, who operated a day care and mentoring program for children. As it turned out, the husband was a two time registered sex offender and also his wife's pimp. The investigation revealed that the husband had sexually molested 10 children and recorded the acts with his cell phone camera, including some in which his wife participated. Bailey Mills also arranged for a person known as Peter Gilbert but later identified as William Akers to have sex with three of the children in his care. The presenters will discuss their investigation of this multi-victim/multi-offender case and how "Peter Gilbert" was identified. This case was awarded the HERO AWARD by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E9: Human Trafficking: Managing Complex Trauma in a Shelter Recovery Model
    Managing the complex trauma of a human trafficking victim in a shelter recovery model presents unique challenges. This workshop will provide an overview of sex trafficking including the prevalence, indicators, recruitment tactics, screening techniques, protocol responses, and the complex trauma suffered by victims. This workshop will also provide an in-depth look at the complex trauma associated with sex trafficking victims through multiple cases studies. Finally, this workshop will present a model of service using shelter recovery and case management and identify promising practices along with challenges of integrating services into a shelter model.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E10: Treatment of Survivors of Sexual Abuse, Assault, and Harassment in a New Era
    It is an unfortunate fact that sexual abuse, assault, and harassment occur on a very routine basis. A majority of women and many men will experience sexual violence of some sort over the course of their lifespan. While this prevalence is not new, what is new is the number of individuals who are disclosing having been abused, leading to an expanded public recognition and discourse. When the perpetrator is related to or otherwise known to the victim, when family, friends and colleagues don't believe the victim or advise her to forget it or put it behind her, and when organizations engage in cover-ups or protect the perpetrator at the expense of the victim, betrayal, disillusionment, and alienation compound the victimization. After effects may occur in the immediate aftermath or later and can disrupt many life domains.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    E11: Screening and Assessing Children and Adolescents with Complex Trauma Histories
    Screening and assessment are critical to providing trauma-informed care for children and adolescents, particularly those with complex trauma histories. This workshop will provide participants with foundational information about core concepts of trauma, problem based learning, screening and assessment tools, and case conceptualization. Role plays and vignettes will be used to explore issues related to differential diagnosis and how to provide feedback to youth and families. Resources that clinicians can employ to strengthen their clinical practice will also be shared during this clinical workshop.
     Optional  Closed 

  • Poster Session & Welcoming Reception
  •  

    April 18, 2018

    5:00 PM  -  7:00 PM
    Poster Session & Welcoming Reception
    A great opportunity to mix and mingle! Music, appetizers, and refreshments will be provided as a relaxing backdrop for posters on display. A perfect setting to meet the poster creators and engage in topical discussions. Awards to be presented.
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION F
  •  

    April 19, 2018

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F1: Changing the Norms: Creating No Hit Zones for Family Safety
    Corporal punishment or hitting of children has been clearly linked to physical and psychological risks factors creating significant negative immediate and long-term consequences that can last through adulthood. Although the research is very clear on the detrimental effects of hitting children, the majority of school-aged children report being hit by their parents and almost one-third of parents self-report hitting their infant. According to a majority of parents, medical professionals serve as a trusted and reliable source of parenting information including effective discipline techniques. With the role of the medical professional in mind, pediatric hospitals have initiated implementation of No Hit Zones (NHZ) in an effort to change social norms. Other organizations such as a District Attorney's Office, Family Court, homeless shelter, and a county health department have become NHZs. Learn the steps in making your agency, home, and community a safe space for children and families.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F2: Youth Mental Health, First Aid, and Bullying Prevention: The Keys to an Evidence Based Approach
    This presentation looks at Hawai'i Youth Mental Health First Aid and the Hawai'i Bullying Prevention Toolkit and how these evidence based practices and resources support our youth. Youth Mental Health First Aid is a public evidenced based education program, provided by Hawaii Department of Education Project AWARE, that can help communities understand mental illnesses, seek timely intervention, and save lives. The Hawai'i Bullying Prevention Toolkit was put together by Mental Health America of Hawai'i with funding from the Hawaii State Department of Health Emergency Medical Services Injury Prevention Systems Branch to serve as a resource for parents, guardians, teachers, and students who may face bullying in their lives. Both of these programs are interventions to address the needs and understanding so important for our youth. All of us in all disciplines have a role in violence prevention and mental health awareness for the children of today.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F3: You Got Play? A Parents’ Approach to Understanding Their Adolescent’s Traumatic Healing
    DESCRIPTION COMING SOON
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F4: Designing pre-service program to prepare trauma-informed teachers and administrators
    Preparing teachers to identify ACEs and the effects of trauma in children and to build their teaching style and curriculum around trauma-informed practices cannot be achieved in a two-hour workshop or even a week-long immersion conference. Understanding trauma as well as developing the skills to avoid re-traumatizing students and teachers in the school environment must be incorporated throughout the teacher-preparation process, in every course, from How to Teach Children to Read to Supporting English Language Learners and Cultivating Parent and Community Involvement. This presentation describes the commitment of the Alliant International Child Development faculty to prioritizing the preparation of trauma-informed teachers, and how the faculty integrated trauma-avoidance as well as identifying and ameliorating trauma in every aspect of the online, two-year educator preparation program.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F5: Treating Male and Female Domestic Violence Offenders
    This workshop presents some of the controversies surrounding the treatment of male and female offenders of intimate partner violence and abuse, the differences in treating male vs female offenders, the use of an alternative couples approach, as well as practical techniques that have been shown to be effective in changing attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. A trauma informed approach that is assessment based and emphasizes solution focused techniques is presented. Specific treatment programs published by IVAT are shown for males, females, and couples.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F6: Military Sexual Trauma: What Providers Need to Know
    Military Sexual Trauma (MST) is a common experience for both male and female veterans. Given the number of returning veterans and the high rates of MST within the veteran population, mental health clinicians in all settings need to be prepared to address MST within their practices. This breakout session will provide an overview, discussion, and clinical tools for assessment of MST. In addition, an overview of common forms of MST and common reactions to MST including psychological disorders will be described.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F7: Perpetrators & Victims-How do we care for both?/Engaging a Multidisciplinary Team to Provide TIC
    Part I. PEARLS-PERPETRATORS & VICTIMS-HOW DO WE CARE FOR BOTH?-Hospital-based violence intervention encompasses a vast array of services both for primary and secondary victims as well as perpetrator along a continuum of care. A multi-disciplinary team, comprised of forensic nurses, patient advocates, social workers, and violence intervention specialists, delivers care to victims of violence from acute injury through case management, ongoing counseling, and prevention efforts. How is it feasible to supply services to both at the same facility? Are there moral implications? We propose looking at perpetrators not as suspects but as individuals in need of services. Consider them as victims of violence who has suffered from adverse childhood experiences and poor choice and direction. How do we offer this person service and care? Let us examine the real life and hypothetical circumstances experienced by a Level I Trauma Center that focus on reducing recurrence of violence by addressing the core issues the create environments for violence to occur. Part II. ENGAGING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM TO PROVIDE TRAUMA INFORMED CARE AT A LEVEL ONE TRAUMA CENTER-The Level One Trauma Center at Eskenazi Health houses two programs to collaborate to provide comprehensive trauma informed services to victims of violence. The Center of Hope is the forensic services program that provides forensic nursing services, victim advocates, social workers, and an attorney who focuses on the acute care needs and ongoing care of sexual assault, domestic violence, physical assault, and child and elder abuse and neglect. The Prescription for Hope is an injury prevention program for the Trauma Department that focuses on wrap around services utilizing violence intervention specialist, social workers and a program manager. The Prescription for Hope focuses on helping victims of violence address core issues that put them at risk for serious bodily injury, and ways to make positive changes to reduce their risk of violence in the future. Both programs collaborate to maximize interventions and services to victims and perpetrators to impact violence in the community.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F8: A SMART Approach to Substance Abuse and Homelessness/The Serial Inebriate Program
    Part I. A SMART APPROACH TO SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND HOMELESSNESS-The San Diego Community Justice Initiative (CJI) is an alternative sentencing option for eligible offenders. Eligible offenders have the opportunity to avoid a criminal conviction by completing conditions that include 16 hours of work service. Screening and assessments are completed to identify high-risk offenders and provide services that help address participants' underlying needs such as housing, employment, and professional counseling. Building on this foundation, the City Attorney's Office launched the San Diego Misdemeanants At-Risk Track (SMART) pilot program. SMART provides substance abuse treatment, case management, and housing to individuals facing chronic drug addiction and homelessness. In June of 2017, SMART was recognized by the Board of State and Community Corrections as the state leader in this field, and was awarded a $3 million state grant to expand the program. Part II. THE SERIAL INEBRIATE PROGRAM: TREATMENT FOR CHRONIC HOMELESS INEBRIATES- The Serial Inebriate Program works in collaboration with the Mental Health Systems, Inc., San Diego Superior Court, Police Department, District Attorneys Office, Sheriff's Department, and collaborative agencies in providing intervention, housing, and case management services for chronic homeless inebriates. This presentation will outline the collaborative effort, structure and process of the program, along with research outcomes from a comprehensive study by the Institute for Public Health on cost-effectiveness and treatment outcomes.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F9: Historical Trauma & Intersectionality: The Impact on Sex Trafficking for Victims of Color
    Historical trauma and intersectionality are root factors in the rates of sex trafficking in black and brown communities. Both of these communities have multiple traumas that intersect with various forms of oppression to create the vulnerabilities that lead to sex trafficking. Strategies to eliminate sex trafficking in these communities need to use a trauma-informed approach coupled with an intersectional analysis and cultural humility. Participants will learn how to "unpack" the risk factors and empower communities, families and individuals to address trafficking by increasing protective factors.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F10:Trauma and Chronic Stress Under the Rainbow
    While visibility, awareness, and acceptance has increased in the last few years, trauma and chronic stress is still typical in the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Whether it be careless comments, discriminatory institutional practices, or overt prejudice, the LGBTQ+ community continues to face challenges and dangers beyond the experience of its cis gender and heterosexual peers. This is especially true of LGBTQ+ youth who do not often have the resources and support to deal with problems that would waylay many adults. The impact of this is apparent in the increased number of reported suicide attempts, drug and alcohol abuse, homelessness, and sexual exploitation affecting LGBTQ+ youth. In this session we will work to establish practices that address the safety and empowerment of all youth, including LGBTQ+ youth, to prevent and support healing of trauma and chronic stress.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    F11: Making Trauma-Informed Care Work for Your Community
    What's the buzz behind the buzz word Trauma-Informed Care? Learn the key principles, best practice methods, and learn about what outcomes can be achieved with adopting a Trauma-Informed Care approach. This panel will discuss the role that culture plays in trauma with emphasis on the historic, systemic and intergenerational transmission of trauma. We will also explore how trauma-informed care is being implemented in diverse community settings including healthcare, mental health and substance abuse services as well as schools, law enforcement, civil (family) courts and the criminal justice system and discuss barriers to successful implementation. Specific examples to be discussed will include use of a trauma-informed approach in police investigations of sexual assault crimes and a trauma-informed practice for treating those with eating and other related disorders.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION G
  •  

    April 19, 2018

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G1: Trauma, Challenges, & Triumphs: Current Perspectives on Foster Care in Hawai'i
    Panel members will provide different perspectives on: * Trauma as experienced in foster care * Challenges and current issues that we are facing in Hawaii * Sharing of strategies/progress/triumphs * Legal perspectives and progress * Perspectives on achieving permanency—reunification, adoption, guardianship, kinship care/Hanai *Resources and services *Foster youth transitions into adulthood (homelessness, resources, success stories)
    Moderator:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G2: Youth in Bullying Prevention w Cultural Video/Cops Building Relationships w challenged youth
    Part I. INVOLVING YOUTH IN BULLYING PREVENTION THROUGH CULTURALLY REVELANT VIDEO PRODUCTION- Hawaii's ethnic mix and island geography have created a unique culture, and materials developed for other cultures are often not effective there. When Hawaii's teens view these materials, they see young people who do not look or speak like they do, in unfamiliar settings and they do not feel that the content is relevant to their lives. Hawaii Youth Services Network has involved youth in creating bullying videos that are medically accurate and culturally relevant for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations. The workshop will address the challenges and benefits of Making adaptations to evidence-based curricula while ensuring that key elements essential to effectiveness are not lost; Working with youth to create professional quality video; Creating videos that effectively engage minority youth; Evaluating the effectiveness and appropriateness of adapted materials. Part II. COPS BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH CHALLENGED YOUTH THROUGH TEACHING PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT CLASSES- For the past 7 years, I have been working in Waipahu Elementary School, Honowai Elementary School, Waipahu High School and recently in the past 2 years have worked with CSAP students at Waipahu Intermediate School. In the elementary schools I teach in we have a program called R.A.P. (Real And Powerful). The purpose of the program was to build relationships with the students in who live in a high crime area. We started with give basic presentations such as Internet Safety, Juvenile Laws and Drug Education. It has evolved into teaching personal development classes, such as, The ABC's (Attitude, Believe, Courage/Choice) of Success and Qualities of a Leader.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G3: Trauma Resilience: What is it and How to Measure and Implement it
    Machelle Madsen Thompson will address her current psychometric research and clinical work with trauma resilience and protective factors as they develop across the lifespan and across cultures. She will define and describe the ten Protective Factors leading to resilience and how to implement them across diverse youths and adults living in Central and North America. Dr. Thompson will discuss research progress concerning protective factors with a specific focus on cultural differences between Chinese and American youths as part of her appointment as a Fulbright U.S. Scholar program in Hong Kong.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional  Closed 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G4: Multi-cultural, Embodied Approach to Violence Prevention with Children & Dance/Movement Therapy
    The body and the mind must both be involved for children to develop cognitively and emotionally into healthy learners. Techniques to increase resilience and make peaceful social connections are essential for creating healthy children and safe schools. This workshop provides an experiential and cognitive overview of the researched-based curriculum, Disarming the Playground that integrates movement, discussion and creativity to develop pro-social skills, improve learning and decrease violence. Topics include breath as movement, mindfulness and resilience, proximity to others with attention to awareness and respect for cultural differences, movement strategies for dealing with conflicts, social attunement, self-settling, safe expression of feelings, ability to resist temptation and increase inner focus. Presenters are dance/movement therapists, who in addition to the original curriculum have developed material related to resilience, cultural diversity and youth based culture.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G5: Two Kinds of Love: A locally produced prevention education film for the young adult population
    A locally created dating violence educational film and toolkit was developed to support prevention education efforts throughout the Islands. The panel will discuss effective and comprehensive prevention strategies addressing the multiple levels of influence for dating violence victimization and perpetration in the social ecology. These levels include characteristics of individuals, their relationships, and their physical, social and cultural environments.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G6: Secondary Trauma in Children: The Impact of Having a Parent with P.T.S.D.
    Children, regardless of their age, are greatly impacted when a parent has Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. As thousands of soldiers have returned from deployment, there has been a surge in the number of parents with PTSD. Of course, the problem is much broader than this. Survivors of natural disasters, domestic violence, sexual assault, gang and neighborhood violence, and childhood abuse all have children. So do first responders in community disasters. Studies of children of Holocaust victims, Vietnam veterans, and 911 survivors show that children are greatly impacted by their parent's P.T.S.D. Symptom by symptom, the behaviors of PTSD will be explained and how each might impact parenting. We will explore research on how children are affected, typical response styles, risk of child abuse, and risk and resilience factors in children. Information will be presented on how children are affected pre-natally and by genetics. The final focus is on the children's needs and helping them cope.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional  Closed 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G7: Santa Fe Indian School: A Restorative Justice Model/Trauma, Indigenous Resilience & the Law
    Part I. SANTA FE INDIAN SCHOOL: A RESTORATIVE JUSTICE MODEL- Santa Fe Indian School has been successful in implementing the Restorative Justice component using an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) process. Our restorative justice model is very unique way SFIS responds to discipline by incorporating the efforts, timeless philosophy and teachings of our fore fathers, which focuses on the core values and respect of one's community. The model is a partnership and involves the participation of the parents, home community, and the school community following the Pueblo model of discipline, reminding the parent and student about Pueblo/Native values and belief systems by providing advice to stay on the good path. The ADR is utilized as both prevention/intervention and as a disciplinary consequence, focusing on the needs of everyone involved, emphasizing direct accountability, responsibility, and redirecting. It is in every sense of the word culturally sensitive and empowering for all involved. Part II. TRAUMA, INDIGENOUS RESILIENCE AND THE LAW: THE CASE OF GLADUE REPORTS IN CANADA-Indigenous peoples in Canada have endured multiple forms of trauma ranging from forcible relocations, residential schools and intergenerational trauma. Their cumulative impacts, combined with the rise of a coercive, non-Indigenous state, have encouraged high rates of violence within Indigenous communities and commensurate levels of over-incarceration. In 1999 the Supreme Court decision in R. v. Gladue directed that where an Indigenous person is facing incarceration, the judge must consider their unique background and circumstances, and any alternatives to incarceration that are reasonable. This measure has lead to the implementation of Gladue reports which provide the courts with social context evidence to craft fit sentences. While the reports speak to the moral blameworthiness of the offender, this paper will expand discussions of Gladue by unpacking the power of the story telling at the heart of Gladue in providing Indigenous subjects with greater insight into their experiences.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G8: Batterer Intervention Programs in relation to criminal justice systems' response to IPV
    The purpose of this course it to review the empirical evidence regarding current trends and best practices for Batterer Intervention Programs (BIP), with a specific emphasis on evidence-based best practices. This session will explore aspects of how the original intent of the Duluth curriculum has become a bit distorted by some criminal justice system practices and discuss the implications of this distortion. A specific focus will be placed upon the criminal courts misuse in court ordering a BIP in cases where “battering” or “power and control”is not the fundamental root cause of the individual’s use of violence against their intimate partner. It will discuss how this misuse of court-ordered BIPs contributes to the contradictory research findings regarding the effectiveness of BIPs. Finally, it will discuss the most important challenges facing BIPs today and the need to shift some criminal justice practices to address these challenges.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G9: The Unseen & Unheard Voices of Human Trafficking/Intersection of Narcotics & Human Trafficking
    Part I. THE UNSEEN AND UNHEARD VOICES OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING- Sex trafficking is the recruiting, harboring, or transporting of a person for commercial sex acts through the use of fraud, force, or coercion. The Obama Administration has estimated that "more than 20 million, men, women and children are victimized by forced labor and sex trafficking worldwide, including in the United States." In the past, we have assumed that all traffickers were part of well-organized crime networks. We now know that traffickers are a diverse group. The introduction will describe this diversity; the global nature of trafficking, the stages involved in trafficking; and the macro networks that support this phenomenon. While the trafficking of women and girls for sexual exploitation has received much attention, the sexual and labor exploitation of men and boys has garnered minimal consideration. The second presentation will present research data on the prevalence of men, boys, and LGBTQ youth among victims. Part II. THE INTERSECTION OF NARCOTICS AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING- This workshop will explore the intersectionality of human trafficking and drug trafficking. As the two leading sources of criminal enterprise profits globally, these criminal enterprises are now hiding within one another using drugs to recruit and control victims. This workshop will explore the non-linear connections between these enterprises, the recruitment and control tactics used by traffickers, and examine real-life cases experienced by PAATH15, Pennsylvania's largest anti-human trafficking initiative.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G10: Sexual Assault in the Military: What You Need to Know!
    This workshop will address the magnitude of the problem of sexual assault in the military and the context in which is occurs. It will also address adverse childhood experiences and how that trauma history impacts military personnel. It will discuss Congressional and Department of Defense sexual assault legislative and policy initiatives. The workshop will include discussion about the similarities and differences between military sexual assault and sexual assault that occurs in the civilian community to include system issues, institutional betrayal, and short- and long-term consequences of the assault affecting all areas of a survivor's life.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G11: Wandering Grief: Finding a Path Home through Poetry
    Talk therapy seems to be the dominant form of therapy utilized by counselors. Expressive therapies such as creative writing can be more effective particularly when working with those who are dealing with grief, loss, and trauma. By combining the artistic process of creative writing with the desire to heal, one can benefit from journaling, diary writing, memoir, letter writing, storytelling, and poetry therapy. This workshop will focus specifically on writing as a therapeutic intervention for the individual who seeks out therapy through a non-conventional format: poetry. Biblio-therapy, particularly poetry, taps into conscious and unconscious thoughts through the use of language, symbolism, and sensory modes that provide clients with guided ways to deal with internal struggles. Creative writing can be used as a therapeutic process to assist a patient in confronting pain. Healing from grief occurs when an individual can develop a personal sense of meaning.
     Optional 

  • Networking & Awards Luncheon
  •  

    April 19, 2018

    12:00 PM  -  1:45 PM
    ATTENDING Networking & Awards Luncheon
    I am attending the Networking & Awards Luncheon. PLEASE MAKE YOUR LUNCH SELECTION. YOU HAVE THE OPTION BETWEEN A VEGETARIAN AND NON VEGETARIAN DISH. Join us for our Networking & Awards Luncheon, as we present our Youth Art Contest Awards and enjoy local comedian Augie T as Guest Emcee (invited)! Ann Mahi will speak about "Teaching the Mind, Heart and Spirit to Dream, Believe and Achieve."
    Host:
    Comedian:
    Fee  Optional  Closed 

  • BREAKOUT SESSION H
  •  

    April 19, 2018

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H1: Why Does It Matter? How Normalcy and Prudent Parenting Impacts Foster Children
    The 2014 Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act provided guidelines for state child welfare systems around normalcy and prudent parenting. Requirements included training for professionals and foster parents, more decision-making authority for foster parents, foster rights for youth and a charge for foster youth to be involved in age and developmentally appropriate activities. These efforts are geared towards ensuring a more 'normal' experience for children and youth while in foster care and contributing to their physical, mental, emotional and social well-being. Participants will learn about the requirements of the law, discuss normalcy and social capital and hear from young people who have experienced foster care.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H2: Building Trauma Informed Schools
    When children and youth come to school each day from neighborhoods where trauma impacts the community, it is no wonder that their readiness to learn is impacted. Often behavior problems that arise from trauma are ways that a student communicates what is going on, but often an unsuspecting teacher or administrator is not always prepared to know what to do. On the Nanakuli-Waianae Coast, schools and the community are learning about the impact of trauma on learning and what skills are necessary to build a trauma-sensitive school that understands what is happening to children and how to respond with compassion.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H3: Historical Trauma, Resilience, and Health Inequities among Native Hawaiians
    Native Hawaiians experience higher rates of chronic diseases and behavioral health conditions, such as depression and substance use, compared to other ethnic groups. Much attention has been given to the biological and behavioral determinants of health in explaining their higher risk. Less attention has been paid to the social and cultural determinants of health, such as the role of historical trauma, cultural loss, and compulsory acculturation strategies and resulting psychological trauma, and the effects of racism on the physical and mental health of Native Hawaiians. This presentation will 1) provide a brief overview of historical trauma and detail the contemporary social and cultural determinants of health for Native Hawaiians; 2) review studies examining the effects of historical trauma and discrimination on physical and mental wellbeing of Native Hawaiians; and 3) discuss the cultural strengths and resilience of Native Hawaiians to overcome adversity and flourish.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H4: Adult survivors- child trauma & psychorelational health/Intersectionality to train peer educator
    Part I. ADULT SURVIVORS OF CHILD INTERPERSONAL TRAUMA, MINDFULNESS, AND PSYCHORELATIONAL HEALTH- Couple relationships are the most significant life-context for a majority of adults, and a satisfying couple relationship is one of the key predictor of happiness, well-being, and longevity. Yet, survivors of childhood interpersonal trauma tend to experiment long-lasting psychological distress and suffering, which might interfere with key variables for psycho-relational health, such as the disposition to be mindful and the development of secure attachment. Although the concept of mindfulness recently emerged as a potential key variable to understand and treat the effect of trauma, few empirical data are available on this topic. This talk will present our recent empirical data on the role of mindfulness in the relation between trauma and psychological, relational as well as sexual functioning. Based on empirical data from community and clinical samples, this talk discuss comprehensive models of interpersonal trauma, mindfulness, and functioning, which may guide efficient interventions. Part II. USING INTERSECTIONALITY AND POPULAR EDUCATION FRAMEWORKS TO TRAIN IPV PREVENTION PEER EDUCATORS- In the summer of 2017, the training curriculum for Princeton University's IPV peer educators was revised, utilizing Intersectionality and Popular Education as theoretical frameworks to guide training content, learning activities and approaches. In particular, both frameworks speak to methods that: 1) enhance knowledge and critical consciousness, 2) address power dynamics and reflexivity of identities, 3) validate experiences of marginalized communities and 4) pursue social justice and self-care This presentation will describe Intersectionality and Popular Education, highlight the intrinsic value of using both frameworks as well their illustrate compatible training or program components. Lessons learned from the revised curriculum, including student feedback, will also be discussed.
    Main Presenter:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H5: Creating 'No Wrong Doors' for Interpersonal Violence Survivors with Disabilities
    There should be “no wrong door” for survivors with disabilities seeking help. In other words, persons with disabilities who experience interpersonal violence should be able to contact clergy, mental health professionals, domestic violence advocates, disability specialists, or any other professional and be treated in a way that acts to ensure safety, to accept and respect the person, to empower the person to make choices, and to connect with other appropriate sources in a network of help and support. Survivors should not have to determine which door of which professional is going to be supportive and helpful. Each segment of society needs to be transformed so that no door is the wrong door for a survivor with disabilities. This presentation is based on the work “Religion, Disability, and Interpersonal Violence” and will explore implications for diverse professionals to be competent, accessible, respectful, and connected to ensure effectiveness.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenter:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H6: Trauma-Informed Practice: The Collaborative Change Model with Military Couples
    Military couples face challenges, from deployment, to reintegration, to traumatic stress caused by systemic events outside their control. These challenges often impact the couple relationship and make it difficult for partners to create the safe haven needed to help them face their stress-filled lives. Extraordinary scholarship, fueled by the intersection of research from the fields of neuroscience, developmental and attachment theories, and interpersonal neurobiology, can help couples learn how to heal their wounded relationships. Dr. Stone Fish will present on the Collaborative Change Model, a trauma-informed practice that integrates this research and over 30 years of clinical practice, to help practitioners work with military couples to enhance their relationship satisfaction.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H7: Sex trafficking and Exploitation of Hawaii’s Youth
    Child and Adolescent Sex Trafficking is a topic that we all wish we did not have to know about, however it has invaded all 50 states and is more prevalent in our state than one has expected. A literature search and interactions over the past few years with adolescent trafficking victims have resulted in an understanding of the scope of the problem, the risk factors associated with trafficking, and how these factors relate to Native Hawaiian youth and the youth of Hawaii. Advancements over the past year include an increase in training programs for providers, an organized way to report victims within our state, and possible resources to provide treatment. With this information, one should be able to identify trafficking victims in a sensitive manner and understand what resources are available to them with in our community.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H8: Treatment of Adult Sexual Offenders in Correctional Programs
    With successful treatment and supervision, sex offenders can present an acceptable risk to the community. Without successful treatment and supervision, the risk becomes unacceptable. Corrections recognizes the critical nature of assessing, treating and supervising sex offenders in the community. It is the goal and direction of Corrections to assess, manage, treat, and supervise sex offenders in the community using accepted techniques and practices. The purpose of this presentation is to provide agents, caseworkers, providers, volunteers and family members with the necessary tools and concepts to assist them in their management of this critical population. SOTPs are committed to providing treatment that is grounded in evidence-based treatment practices focused on helping offenders define their own goals and strategies for finding purpose and meaning in their lives. The most significant objective is to establish community and family re-integration to increase public safety.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H9: Labor Trafficking, The Hidden Population/Home But Not Free: Breaking The Mental Bars of Trauma
    Labor Trafficking, The Hidden Population-Outstanding Problem: Currently little knowledge exists on how to effectively identify, screen, and serve labor trafficking victims. No model programs are available for adoption or evaluation. But community service providers and law enforcement agencies are all interested in learning and exploring ways to identify trafficking victims. Agencies screening for and serving labor trafficking victims face three practical obstacles. In order to describe and explain labor trafficking, we must analyze and assess labor violations, vulnerable victims and the work force. Research has demonstrated that victims exist and in order to properly identifying these traumatized communities, a plan and model must be created. Labor trafficking victims are not visible and mostly unwilling to seek or receive help. Research and methodology is necessary in order to prepare and apply best practices and achieve a high degree of effectiveness for victim's ability to cope with their trauma. Home But Not Free: Breaking The Mental Bars of Trauma- According to Polaris Project, there are 100,000-300,000 children trafficked in America and many more at risk. Most of the literature focuses on the victim being trafficked and recovered. Who is dealing with the aftermath? The emotional, physiological, mental, and spiritual ramifications are life-long. Learn first hand from a mother of a survivor and a Licensed Counselor on how trauma impacts every fragment of a family, not just the survivor.
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H10: Nowhere Safe: Realities of Homelessness and Sexual Violence
    Many survivors of DV and sexual assault flee unsafe situations and face homelessness as a result. Often homeless shelters are not equipped to meet the specific unique needs of DV/SA survivors. This presentation will identify the severity of the problem and providing timely wrap-around services specific to Indy's homeless population that are survivors, can also be applied in any community. This presentation aims to provide critical analysis of the current resource system and proposes recommendations for future practice and policy.
    Main Presenter:
    Co-Presenters:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    H11: Culturally Based Practice: Understanding the impact of microaggressions on American Indians
    Microaggressions are brief and commonplace verbal, behavioral or environmental indignities that communicate hostile, demeaning messages and insults to people of color. Whether intentional or unintentional, perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware that they are doing it and how it impairs their working relationships with racial/ethnic minorities. There are three forms of transgressions: microinsults, microassaults, and microinvalidation. Nearly all interracial interactions can be predisposed to some form of microaggression and these effects can be compounded by historical trauma. This presentation will include examples of microaggressions, define historical trauma and include implications for helping professions.
    Speaker:
     Optional 

  • Closing Plenary & Ceremony
  •  

    April 19, 2018

    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Closing Plenary & Ceremonies

    Keynote Speaker: Judge Richard Bissen - “The Hero Within”
    This presentation from a Native Hawaiian Judge’s perspective discusses the roles of culture, community and kuleana for men in Hawai`i as we re-establish our intergenerational traditions by understanding the lessons from our very own past and present “Hawaiian Heroes” who inspire us to re-learn our identity and re-gain our place in society in order to strengthen our families and communities. This talk is also intended for those unsung heroes who work with trauma survivors who do not always receive the recognition they deserve.

    Special performance by Halau Hula Olana – Na Keiki Hula

    Closing Oli

    Keynote Speaker:
     Optional 
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