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16th Annual Environmental Health Sciences Summer Institute for K-12 Educators

 

2017 Workshops


    • Workshops
    •  

      Monday, July 24, 2017

      NEW - Invent-a-wheel (PreK-1)

      This workshop develops concepts of gravity and friction by exploring how to get an object to move. Participants try to make a cardboard sled to slide down a ramp, by varying the height and surface material of the ramp. They explore how rollers can reduce friction, and then incorporate the rollers into the sled, turning the rollers into wheels and the sled into a car. All worksheets and material ordering information will be provided.

      This workshop will engage participants in exploring gravity and friction through experiments with ramps and sleds.

      Full Description

      Developed by City College of New York
      Presented by Jody Hilton and Gary Benenson

      Remaining Capacity: 8 
      DNA is Elementary (K-5)

      This workshop provides a set of hands-on, engaging activities designed to teach students about DNA, genetics and its applications. The activities present DNA as an instruction manual that makes us who we are. Our goal is to produce students who can ultimately make informed decisions about the numerous genetics-related topics (e.g., cloning, genetic engineering, stem cell research) that will impact their lives.

      Full Description 

      Developed by The Georgia State University Bio-Bus Program
      Presented by Michelle Venturea, M.S. and Lorna Gitari-Mugambi

      Remaining Capacity: 22 
      Journey of Water and You (2-5)

      The Journey of Water of Water and You includes classroom presentations supplemented with related hands-on activities. Topics covered are the importance of water, non-point source pollution, water conservation, effects of drought on a community.

      • Properties of the Water Cycle. Students create a model of the water cycle using pots of water, ice cubes in aluminum plates held over a heat source representing the sun.
      • Soil & Water Properties: Does the soil Matter? Sand, loam, and clay soils are used to show how water percolates through different soils. The tests are performed on dry soil and repeated on the wet soils. The percolation results are compared. The students evaluate how the results may effect erosion or pollution.
      • What Dissolves in Water? Several household substances are added to water creating a solution. The solutions are poured through a filter (coffee filter) into a cup. The observations include: What disappeared into the water when stirred, what did not mix, were there any substances remaining in the filter? How might the results contribute to pollution?
      • All the Water In the World. A measured amount of water is added to an aquarium, representing all the water on earth. Water is removed from the aquarium in a measuring cup representing the water in the world that is not ocean water. Water from the measuring cup is removed, reflecting the water held in glaciers. The remaining amount represents the world’s available fresh water.
      • How Much Water Do You Use? Worksheets are used to calculate daily usage. Groups are formed, simulating a household, and total the amount of water they use each day is calculated. An interactive website is also used to demonstrate water usage inside and outside the home.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Chuck Kellogg and Dinah Breeden
      Remaining Capacity: 13 
      NEW - The Good, Bad & Ugly of Energy...and Beyond (3-5)

      The objective of this presentation is to Energize the Earth Science Instruction in the classroom by utilizing a myriad of activities including QR codes, IMovie to YouTube videos, hands on activities and more. Participants will go through the creation of videos using a various apps including IMovie, Educreations, etc. Experience various games and mini competitions throughout the day to win Door Prizes!!!

      Handouts as well as ready to use lessons will be given to each participant. Please bring an iPad, tablet or laptop.

      Full Description

      Presented by Kirah Diaz and Joy Sloane, Lamar CISD

      Remaining Capacity: 1 
      Make your own Electric Car (4-8)

      Participants will explore basic circuit concepts by investigating how to turn on a motor and determine its direction of rotation. They will learn to design and make their own switches and use these to control their motors, create gravity-powered vehicles, and then combine the motor circuits with their cars to make electric-powered cars. They will document their work by creating Instruction Manuals and Troubleshooting Guides. All worksheets and material ordering information will be provided.

      This workshop will engage participants in exploring the circuits and mechanisms needed to build a small-scale electric car.

      Full Description

      Developed by City Technology Project
      Presented by Donna Johnson and Cherubim Cannon

      Remaining Capacity: 1 
      Raising Your Water IQ (6-8)

      Raising Your Water IQ is an inquiry-based, hands-on and minds-on approach to teaching middle school students about Texas water resources. Have fun and build your understanding with this interactive workshop taught by water science professionals.

      The Raising Your Water IQ curriculum is designed to be flexible, scaffolded, and interdisciplinary. Hands-on activities align with the TEKS and include brief, straightforward background information for students that articulate the big ideas, as well as assessments to help teachers gauge understanding.
      Raising water activities explore the basic concepts of the water cycle, surface water and groundwater interactions, point and nonpoint source pollution, and watershed dynamics. Learn about how water is managed in Texas, what projects are in the State Water Plan, and how you can bring the message of water science and conservation to your students.

      All attendees receive a digital copy of the complete Raising Your Water IQ teacher guide. Handouts, data sheets, and water-related maps of Texas will also be provided.

      Full Description

      Developed by Texas Water Development Board and Hamline University Center for Global Environmental Education
      Presented by Mindy Conyers and Shae Luther

      Remaining Capacity: 13 
      It's Elemental (6-10)

      This year teachers from Cedar Creek Middle School of the Bastrop Independent School District will be presenting the “Its Elemental”. This curriculum was created by teams of teachers from Cedar Creek Middle School with MD Anderson over the last several years. “It’s Elemental” was designed with cross curricular modules with activities for several subjects.

      Deborah Zoda, Kristin Stevenson and Becca Bunting will be offering the training this year with a vocabulary twist. We have recognized that both our English speaking students and our ESL students struggle with the academic vocabulary of science. Therefore, we will be focusing on reinforcing the vocabulary of the lessons with anchor charts and interactive notebooks. We also utilize proven Sheltered Instruction strategies to help all our students to succeed! Come prepared to make anchor charts and learn how we integrate them with the interactive notebooks.

      Participants in this workshop will walk away with an electronic copy of the curriculum including activities that you can use in your classroom immediately. Come experience doing our favorite labs, lessons and activities while we discover new ways to incorporate these lessons by sharing ideas with other teachers.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Deborah Zoda, Kristin Stevenson and Susan Rebecca Bunting

      Remaining Capacity: 17 
      NEW - Planet, People, Policy (6-10)

      Texas educators have an opportunity to deepen their content knowledge and expand teaching resources to effectively bring climate change – one of the most relevant, controversial, and misunderstood scientific and societal topics of our time – into their classrooms. In this workshop, secondary teachers will engage in data- and inquiry-rich activities using an Earth system approach and look at climate change impacts globally to locally. Workshop content will be aligned to Texas TEK standards and the needs of individual teachers. After covering activities that address the basic science of climate change, participants will turn to consequences attributed to our changing climate; effective interdisciplinary communication/education methods; and policies proposed locally, nationally, and internationally to reverse impacts and vulnerabilities to people and the planet. Join the discussion, strengthen your teaching effectiveness, and expand your understanding of this complex issue.

      Full Description

      Developed by University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and presented by Teresa Eastburn 

      Remaining Capacity: 19 
      NEW - Beyond the Lab (9-12)

      The Application of Insects in Explorations of Health and Environmental Sustainability. This workshop will focus on medical entomology and the role of insects in human health and environmental sustainability. Participants will explore these topic areas by completing three major investigations designed with the high school science classroom in mind. Throughout the session, participants will have ample opportunity to discuss the implementation and scientific content of these lessons with our team of experts. We will also provide suggestions and discussion of how these and other insects can be incorporated into additional activities, thereby providing the ability to maximize the use of module supplies. Participants will be provided with access to full lesson plans and associated worksheets for all investigations discussed. Materials for the investigations are available and affordable through science education supply companies, pet supply shops, electronics providers, and pharmacy or grocery stores. The eight NGSS Science and Engineering Practices are incorporated throughout these investigations.

      Full Description

      Presented by Emily Kuehn, Edgar Rowton, Asia Liza Morales, Kim Aguilar, Nate Dizon

      Remaining Capacity: 45 
      NEW - The Archaeology of Texas (9-12)

      Course will focus on basic archaeology principals, relation of archaeology to other anthropology sub-disciplines,general archaeology of Texas and specifically central Texas as to time periods, key sites there, etc., technology used in modern archaeology such as radio carbon age dating, ground penetrating radar, aerial drone high definition photography, technology to analyze human bone and lithic tools with food residue to determine ancient peoples’ diets, geoarchaeology and its use as a predictor of where ancient sites may be, environments during those site formations, lithic technology utilized by ancients to make tools and weapons. Throughout the course there will be hands on demonstrations of authentic ancient artifacts along with the lectures. There will possibly be a demonstration of tool making from flint by local "flint knapper".

      Full Description

      Presented by Steve Stoutamire, Hill Country Archaeology Association

      Remaining Capacity: 27 
      NEW - Human Embryology, Stem Cells and CRISPR (9-12)
      1. Human Embryology: Natural stem cells: Embryonic & Adult Pluripotent, Multipotent and Totipotent.
      2. Lab Made Human Stem Cells: iPSCs induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from human skin using ‘Dolly’ Signals
      3. CRISPR/Cas9: bacterial immune system used for genome editing: quick, easy and precise way to delete or correct the DNA of any organism……including humans!

      Full Description

      Developed by and presented by Sam Rhine

      Remaining Capacity: 16 
       

      Tuesday, July 25, 2017

      Wannabee Healthy? Promoting Healthy Behaviors in the Early Childhood Classroom (PreK-2)

      In this workshop participants will engage in discussions about developmentally appropriate health science instruction and hands-on activities for young children. Wannabee Healthy is an integrated math, science, creative expression, and language/literacy curriculum that explores health-related topics to enhance school success.

      Full Description 

      Developed and presented by Dr. Julie Parker and Dr. Lori E. Staton, School of Human Sciences, Mississippi State University

      Remaining Capacity: 24 
      NEW - Engaging Strategies (K-2)

      This workshop will provide teachers with different hands on strategies to use in their classrooms. We will show teachers how to use puzzles, foldables, QR codes, scavenger hunts, songs, chants, matching games, project presentation ideas, baggie books, and mobiles as a framework for teaching. The activities can be used in learning centers, as whole group, or as a small group lesson

      Students will be able to make the connections of ideas, concepts, and vocabulary as a result of these experiences.

      Objective: To help students make the connection of ideas, scientific concepts and vocabulary by providing teachers with different ways to present information to guide students to independently engage, explore, evaluate, and expand their knowledge.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Kirah Diaz and Joy SLoan

      Remaining Capacity: 17 
      Fantastic Elastic (2-5)

      Energy concepts are often considered too abstract for children to learn in the elementary grades. This workshop will present an approach to understanding energy through hands-on design and testing of vehicles which are powered by elastic energy. All worksheets and material ordering information will be provided.

      During this workshop, participants will make and test their own wind-ups and other elastic powered vehicles.

      Participants will engage in the following activities involving wind-up vehicles:

      Observing home-made wind-up vehicles and starting to make them
      Completing wind-ups & recording issues
      Exploring wind-ups and the variables that govern their operation
      Developing the concept of troubleshooting
      Writing a wind-up troubleshooting guide
      Writing an instruction manual
      Redesigning wind-ups
      Exploring the concepts underlying how a wind-up works
      Then participants will be introduced to other elastic powered vehicles which they will be able to make. The materials are inexpensive and the curriculum is available at no charge at http://citytechnology.org/energy-system/fantastic-elastic-

      Full Description

      Developed by City Technology Project, City College of New York
      Presented by Gary Benenson and Jody Hilton, M.S.

      Remaining Capacity: 6 
      Junior Master Gardner Program - Learn, Grow, Eat & Go (3-5)

      The Junior Master Gardener program and curricula is an award winning program that is offered through Texas AgriLife Extension Service part of the Texas A&M system that grows good kids through igniting a passion for learning, success, and service. This workshop is designed for elementary teachers and engages “hands-on” group and individual learning experiences that promotes a love of gardening, develops an appreciation for the environment, and cultivates the mind while teaching TEKS. This presentation will showcase all of the JMG Elementary focused curricula and will have special emphasis on the newest curricula Learn, Grow, Eat & GO! which focuses on garden based science lessons, vegetable gardening, cooking and eating from the garden. Teachers will discover how to use plants and the garden environment for students to participate in the scientific process of collection, observation, synthesis and expository writing through science. Participants will leave with many hands-on activities ready to use in their classroom that integrate gardening based science activities with math, literature, writing, and social studies content. Participants will learn techniques on garden bed design and how to create sustainability with school garden programs.

      Full Description

      Developed by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
      Presented by Lisa Whittlesey, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

      Remaining Capacity: 4 
      Using LEDs to Make Masks & Puppets Light Up! (4-8)

      Participants will begin by conducting experiments with red, yellow, green and blue (LEDs): How does one make them turn on? How many can you light at once? How can you make them brighter or dimmer? How can you use them to mix colors? These experiences will support a review of basic circuit concepts and optics. Next, attendees will develop and understanding of switches by conducting a “Switch Scavenger Hunt” (or Switch Hunt) to list and categorize switches in their environments. Based on the outcomes, they will design and create their own switches from common materials, such as paper fasteners, bulldog clips and paper clips, and use these to control their LEDs.

      Full Description

      Curriculum developed by City Technology Project, City College of New York
      Presented by Donna Johnson and Cheribum Cannon

      Remaining Capacity: 6 
      Raising Your Water IQ (6-8)

      Raising Your Water IQ is an inquiry-based, hands-on and minds-on approach to teaching middle school students about Texas water resources. Have fun and build your understanding with this interactive workshop taught by water science professionals.

      The Raising Your Water IQ curriculum is designed to be flexible, scaffolded, and interdisciplinary. Hands-on activities align with the TEKS and include brief, straightforward background information for students that articulate the big ideas, as well as assessments to help teachers gauge understanding.
      Raising water2Inquiry based activities explore the basic concepts of the water cycle, surface water and groundwater interactions, point and nonpoint source pollution, and watershed dynamics. Learn about how water is managed in Texas, what projects are in the State Water Plan, and how you can bring the message of water science and conservation to your students.

      All attendees receive a digital copy of the complete Raising Your Water IQ teacher guide. Handouts, data sheets, and water-related maps of Texas will also be provided.

      Full Description

      Developed by Texas Water Development Board and Hamline University Center for Global Environmental Education
      Presented by Mindy Conyers and Shae Luther

      Remaining Capacity: 11 
      NEW - Simplify Your Life (6-8)

      We are so obsessed with teaching students WHAT to learn that our neglect of teaching them HOW to learn makes learning difficult, requires an unnecessary amount of repetition, and yields disappointing test scores. Your job as a teacher becomes easier when students take responsibility for their own learning and they know how to do it. This workshop applies to almost any subject area and any grade. Attendees should bring an academic concept that students have trouble understanding, a bit of academic information that students have trouble remembering, and one school challenge for which they need a creative solution.

      This workshop will engage teachers in practicing the "Learning Skills Cycle," which involves showing students how to:

      • take responsibility for their own learning,
      • train themselves to be more attentive and to focus,
      • develop learning strategies and organizing learning materials accordingly,
      • gain understanding of concepts they do not yet understand,
      • use memory techniques to remember vast amounts of information long term
        solve problems,
      • be more creative.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Dr. Bill Klemm, Texas A&M University

      Remaining Capacity: 16 
      It's Elemental (6-10)

      This year teachers from Cedar Creek Middle School of the Bastrop Independent School District will be presenting the “Its Elemental”. This curriculum was created by teams of teachers from Cedar Creek Middle School with MD Anderson over the last several years. “It’s Elemental” was designed with cross curricular modules with activities for several subjects.

      Deborah Zoda, Kristin Stevenson and Becca Bunting will be offering the training this year with a vocabulary twist. We have recognized that both our English speaking students and our ESL students struggle with the academic vocabulary of science. Therefore, we will be focusing on reinforcing the vocabulary of the lessons with anchor charts and interactive notebooks. We also utilize proven Sheltered Instruction strategies to help all our students to succeed! Come prepared to make anchor charts and learn how we integrate them with the interactive notebooks.

      Participants in this workshop will walk away with an electronic copy of the curriculum including activities that you can use in your classroom immediately. Come experience doing our favorite labs, lessons and activities while we discover new ways to incorporate these lessons by sharing ideas with other teachers.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Deborah Zoda, Kristin Stevenson and Susan Rebecca Bunting

      Remaining Capacity: 14 
      NEW - Planet, People, Policy (6-10)

      Texas educators have an opportunity to deepen their content knowledge and expand teaching resources to effectively bring climate change – one of the most relevant, controversial, and misunderstood scientific and societal topics of our time – into their classrooms. In this workshop, secondary teachers will engage in data- and inquiry-rich activities using an Earth system approach and look at climate change impacts globally to locally. Workshop content will be aligned to Texas TEK standards and the needs of individual teachers. After covering activities that address the basic science of climate change, participants will turn to consequences attributed to our changing climate; effective interdisciplinary communication/education methods; and policies proposed locally, nationally, and internationally to reverse impacts and vulnerabilities to people and the planet. Join the discussion, strengthen your teaching effectiveness, and expand your understanding of this complex issue.

      Full Description

      Developed by University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
      Presented by Teresa Eastburn 

      Remaining Capacity: 17 
      Teaching Science through Digital Media (9-12)

      The number one benefit of technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn't think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential.”

      For this workshop, attendees are asked to bring their own laptops (not iPads or tablets) to access online activities in this workshop. 

      Full Description

      Developed by Partnership in Education.
      Presented by Brinley Kantorski and Devan Rodgers

      Remaining Capacity: 1 
      NEW - Beyond the Lab (9-12)

      This workshop will focus on medical entomology and the role of insects in human health and environmental sustainability. Participants will explore these topic areas by completing three major investigations designed with the high school science classroom in mind. Throughout the session, participants will have ample opportunity to discuss the implementation and scientific content of these lessons with our team of experts. We will also provide suggestions and discussion of how these and other insects can be incorporated into additional activities, thereby providing the ability to maximize the use of module supplies. Participants will be provided with access to full lesson plans and associated worksheets for all investigations discussed. Materials for the investigations are available and affordable through science education supply companies, pet supply shops, electronics providers, and pharmacy or grocery stores. The eight NGSS Science and Engineering Practices are incorporated throughout these investigations.

      Full Description

      Developed by 
      Presented by Emily Kuehn, Edgar Rowton, Asia Liza Morales, Kim Aguilar and Nate Dizon

      Remaining Capacity: 8 
       

      Wednesday, July 26, 2017

      NEW - Poverty, Sleep, and the Classroom: What can Teachers Do?(PreK-2)

      The first component of this workshop provides an overview of the far-reaching impact of poverty on children and families. We will discuss the effects of poverty on the classroom with a particular focus on language development, social/emotional development and biophysiological implications. Discussions and recommendations of classroom approaches will be had. The second component of this workshop will review sleep and how it influences health and learning. Sleep hygiene, including recommendations for children and adults, will be discussed. An emphasis will be placed on what teachers can do to address this problem.

      Full Description

      Developed and Presented by Julie Parker and Lori Elmore-Staton, Mississippi State University 

      Remaining Capacity: 29 
      Journey of Water and You (2-5)

      The Journey of Water of Water and You includes classroom presentations supplemented with related hands-on activities. Topics covered are the importance of water, non-point source pollution, water conservation, effects of drought on a community.

      • Properties of the Water Cycle. Students create a model of the water cycle using pots of water, ice cubes in aluminum plates held over a heat source representing the sun.
      • Soil & Water Properties: Does the soil Matter? Sand, loam, and clay soils are used to show how water percolates through different soils. The tests are performed on dry soil and repeated on the wet soils. The percolation results are compared. The students evaluate how the results may effect erosion or pollution.
      • What Dissolves in Water? Several household substances are added to water creating a solution. The solutions are poured through a filter (coffee filter) into a cup. The observations include: What disappeared into the water when stirred, what did not mix, were there any substances remaining in the filter? How might the results contribute to pollution?
      • All the Water In the World. A measured amount of water is added to an aquarium, representing all the water on earth. Water is removed from the aquarium in a measuring cup representing the water in the world that is not ocean water. Water from the measuring cup is removed, reflecting the water held in glaciers. The remaining amount represents the world’s available fresh water.
      • How Much Water Do You Use? Worksheets are used to calculate daily usage. Groups are formed, simulating a household, and total the amount of water they use each day is calculated. An interactive website is also used to demonstrate water usage inside and outside the home.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Chuck Kellogg and Dinah Breeden
      Remaining Capacity: 14 
      Project Learning Tree- Explore the Environment (3-5)

      Enjoy a day of hands-on activities that will help you teach students how to think, not what to think about complex environmental issues. Activities integrate core discipline areas, including STEM subjects, reading, writing, and social studies. Participants receive PLT's Environmental Education Activity Guide for PreK-8th Grade containing 96 interdisciplinary, TEKS-correlated activities. Activities will take place both indoors and outdoors, weather permitting

      Project Learning Tree (PLT) is an environmental education program that presents a balanced approach to teaching children about trees and the environment. It uses the forest as a "window" into the natural world, helping young people gain an awareness and knowledge of the world around them, as well as their place within it.

      Full Description

      Developed by Project Learning Tree
      Presented by Misty Bowie, Texas Forestry Association

      Capacity Full 
      Teaching Science Through Digital Media (4-6)

      “The number one benefit of technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn't think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential.”

      For this workshop, attendees are asked to bring their own laptops (not iPads or tablets) to access online activities in this workshop. 
      Full Description

      Developed by Partnership in Education.
      Presented by Brinley Kantorski and Devan Rodgers

      Capacity Full 
      NEW - Simplify Your Life (6-8)

      We are so obsessed with teaching students WHAT to learn that our neglect of teaching them HOW to learn makes learning difficult, requires an unnecessary amount of repetition, and yields disappointing test scores. Your job as a teacher becomes easier when students take responsibility for their own learning and they know how to do it. This workshop applies to almost any subject area and any grade. Attendees should bring an academic concept that students have trouble understanding, a bit of academic information that students have trouble remembering, and one school challenge for which they need a creative solution.

      This workshop will engage teachers in practicing the "Learning Skills Cycle," which involves showing students how to:

      • take responsibility for their own learning,
      • train themselves to be more attentive and to focus,
      • develop learning strategies and organizing learning materials accordingly,
      • gain understanding of concepts they do not yet understand,
      • use memory techniques to remember vast amounts of information long term
        solve problems,
      • be more creative.

      Full Description

      Developed and presented by Dr. Bill Klemm, Texas A&M University

      Remaining Capacity: 19 
      Teaching DNA and Protein Synthesis (6-8)

      In previous years we have offered workshops with prototype models of DNA and proteins to teach cell processes. However, this year is the breakthrough year--- we have designed and manufactured DNA/ RNA, Protein, and tRNA models of our own injection-molded design for distribution. This year we also completed instructional booklets at basic and advanced levels for the DNA and Protein Sets. See the URL for the flyers. Our molecules are made to be manipulated; they teach cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and translation. Overall, our models can demonstrate DNA and protein structures, including protein folding and show how a protein’s shape determines its function. The lessons for the models are easily adjusted to meet different standard levels.

      Full Description

      Developed by Kathleen M. Vandiver, Ph.D.
      Presented by Amanda Mayer, Ph.D., COEC instructor, MIT

      Remaining Capacity: 17 
      Teaching Cancer (9-12)

      Come learn about the benefits and challenges of our collaborative approach to teaching Cancer in Biology II classrooms, see our engaging, literacy- rich lesson plans, and find out how you can gain FREE access to all our materials, professional development trainings, and implementation support programs.

      In this workshop we will briefly introduce our collaborative approach to designing and implementing biomedical curricula in the high school classroom. We will teach you how to navigate The Great Diseases curriculum materials, gain access to professional development trainings, and implementation support programs. Then we will spend most of the workshop learning about current infectious diseases or cancer topics and case studies on these topics that we will relate to the high school classroom.

      Full Description

      Developed by The Great Diseases Partnership - a collaborative approach to bring biomedical science to high school classrooms,Center for Translational Science Education (CTSE), Tufts Medical School
      Presented by Revati Masilamani, Ph.D.

      Remaining Capacity: 25 
      Brains Change During Learning (9-12)

      Participants will run experiments with goggles that shift visual perception to determine how quickly the brain can adapt during learning. Discussions will focus on the neurobiology of learning, how understanding that synapses change influences students and how to implement these ideas in classrooms.

      Full Description 

      Developed and presented by Dr. Janet Dubinsky, University of Minnesota.

      Remaining Capacity: 19 
      NEW - Using Sickle Cell Anemia to Understand Gene Expression (9-12)

      Sickle Cell is one of the most common genetic disorders in the world and it is a fascinating point of inquiry for students. Sickle Cell is a great example of the rare human heterozygous advantage in which one allele for a life-shortening trait increases survival rate but only under specific environmental conditions. In this session we will explore hands-on models for understanding gene expression, investigate real data to discover the connection between sickle cell and perform an agarose gel electrophoresis to diagnose patients’ genotypes. We will share all lessons and protocols including for how to do simulated or paper-based “gels”.

      This module is a great way to engage high school students in a very real conversation about and investigation into how the environment can shape the genes of a given population.

      Full Description 

      Developed and presented by Katie Busch, Director, Alabama Hands On Activity Science Program

      Remaining Capacity: 12 
       

      Thursday, July 27, 2017

      Project Learning Tree- Growing up Wild (PreK-2)

      Experience hands-on, interactive lessons that teach young children (ages 3-7) about the natural world around them. Join us for this fun and educational day and learn how to implement these activities into your own classroom, camp, or educational program. Participants will receive TWO nationally acclaimed curriculum guides, Growing Up WILD and Project Learning Tree’s Environmental Experiences for Early Childhood. Workshop activities will take place both indoors and outdoors, weather permitting

      Growing Up WILD is a curriculum for exploring nature with children ages 3–7. This program builds on children’s sense of wonder about nature and invites them to explore wildlife and the world around them. Through a wide range of activities and experiences, Growing Up WILD provides an early foundation for developing positive impressions about the natural world and lifelong social and academic skills. Participants will receive a full-color activity guide that includes age-appropriate crafts, art projects, music, conservation activities, reading and math connections and much more.

      Full Description

      Developed by: Project Learning Tree
      Presented by Misty Bowie, Texas Forestry Association

      Remaining Capacity: 5 
      NEW - “EARTH RIGHT NOW”- YOUR PLANET IS CHANGING (K--5)

      This session will focus on how we can engage students in learning real Earth Science, using image-based lessons, hands-on lessons, role-playing, technology, and plenty of real data to meet the needs of most 
      all of the multiple intelligences in our classroom. With these resources, we can help students build a greater understanding of our impacts, both good and bad on our environment. The activities will include:

      • Think Scientifically: The Sun and the Water Cycle Booklet Activity
      • Making a Paper Sun
      • The Case of the Wacky Water Cycle
      • Earth System in a Bottle

      Full Description

      Presented by Veronica M. Leija, NASA Learning Expert and Joshua Martinez

      Remaining Capacity: 32 
      NEW - Teaching Big Science Concepts with Tiny Protozoa (3-5)

      The concept of a cell may be a difficult one for students to grasp, but the use of microscopic organisms can illustrate this concept in a visually compelling way. This workshop is tailored to provide elementary/middle school teachers with stimulating and enjoyable hands-on activities for teaching biology. 

      Tetrahymena thermopila
      is a fun, safe, and easy to work with protozoan. Through the use of the ASSET (Advancing Secondary Science Education through Tetrahymena) program developed at Cornell University, this workshop will explore self-contained biology teaching modules that stimulate critical thinking and foster a fundamental understanding of key biological concepts, using a hands-on, inquiry-based approach. Participants will be guided through detailed protocols for laboratory modules in which experiments are carried out using living cells.  

       

       

      Full Description

      Developed by ASSET Program, Cornell University
      Presented by Mike Gonzales and Jeff Kapler, Texas A&M University

      Remaining Capacity: 41 
      Teaching Science Through Digital Media (4-6)

      “The number one benefit of technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn't think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential.”

      For this workshop, attendees are asked to bring their own laptops (not iPads or tablets) to access online activities in this workshop. 
      Full Description

      Developed by Partnership in Education
      Presented by Brinley Kantorski and Devan Rodgers

      Remaining Capacity: 3 
      NEW - The Archaeology of Texas (6-8)

      Course will focus on basic archaeology principals, relation of archaeology to other anthropology sub-disciplines,general archaeology of Texas and specifically central Texas as to time periods, key sites there, etc., technology used in modern archaeology such as radio carbon age dating, ground penetrating radar, aerial drone high definition photography, technology to analyze human bone and lithic tools with food residue to determine ancient peoples’ diets, geoarcheology and its use as a predictor of where ancient sites may be, environments during those site formations, lithic technology utilized by ancients to make tools and weapons. Throughout the course there will be hands on demonstrations of authentic ancient artifacts along with the lectures. There will possibly be a demonstration of tool making from flint by local "flint knapper".

      Full Description

      Presented by Steve Stoutamire, Hill Country Archaeology Association

      Remaining Capacity: 38 
      Brains Change During Learning (6-8)

      Participants will run experiments with goggles that shift visual perception to determine how quickly the brain can adapt during learning. Discussions will focus on the neurobiology of learning, how understanding that synapses change influences students and how to implement these ideas in classrooms.

      Full Description 

      Developed and presented by Dr. Janet Dubinsky, University of Minnesota

      Remaining Capacity: 8 
      NEW - The Story of Carbon (6-8)

      Try to imagine your day without coming into contact with a single plastic item. Plastics are a critical part of our daily lives and a huge pollution problem. The origin of plastics is a great story linking huge concepts in earth science including age of the earth, distribution of natural resources, cycles, and more. When we get to acquiring, refining, and using petrol we see another part of the story which includes energy and climate change. Air and physical pollution lead to a host of difficult stories about human, animal, and global health in peril. There are many great data sets and real-world problems and stories to engage students in discussions and investigations. There is also a true need for solutions and students can participate in everything from recycling initiatives to designing bioplastics.

      In this session, we will try out some hands-on activities to engage middle school students in learning a great deal of earth science content through the story of the carbon cycle. You will get to engineer you own bioplastic to try to develop a solution to this growing problem. We hope you will join us for a day of making some of the biggest ideas in earth science come to life and using real-world data to develop working solutions. You will receive lesson plans, data sets, and protocols for all activities conducted in this session.

      Full Description 

      Developed and presented by Katie Busch, Director, Alabama Hands On Activity Science Program

      Remaining Capacity: 4 
      Teaching DNA and Protein Synthesis (9-12)

      In previous years, we have held workshops with our prototype molecules designed to demonstrate key concepts in cellular biology.  Now, Agile Atoms DNA/RNA kits are available for distribution. The Agile Atoms DNA/RNA kits are made to be manipulated; they teach cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and translation.  Overall, our models can demonstrate DNA and protein structure, including protein folding and how a protein’s shape determines its function.  The lessons are easily adjusted for different learning levels; allowing teachers to vary the level of detail and vocabulary.

      Full Description

      Developed by Kathleen M. Vandiver, Ph.D.
      Presented by Amanda Mayer, Ph.D., COEC instructor, MIT

      Remaining Capacity: 14 
      NEW - Teaching Infectious Diseases & Case Studies (9-12)

      Come learn about the benefits and challenges of our collaborative approach to teaching Infectious Diseases in Biology II classrooms, see our engaging, literacy- rich lesson plans, and find out how you can gain FREE access to all our materials, professional development trainings, and implementation support programs.

      In this workshop we will briefly introduce our collaborative approach to designing and implementing biomedical curricula in the high school classroom. We will teach you how to navigate The Great Diseases curriculum materials, gain access to professional development trainings, and implementation support programs, then we will spend most of the workshop learning about current infectious diseases that we will relate to the high school classroom.

      Full Description

      Developed by The Great Diseases Partnership - a collaborative approach to bring biomedical science to high school classrooms,Center for Translational Science Education (CTSE), Tufts Medical School
      Presented by Revati Masilamani, Ph.D.

      Capacity Full 
       

      Friday, July 28, 2017

      9:00 AM  -  2:00 PM
      MENTORS Workshop
        The Friday session is required for teachers at Mercedes High School and the South Texas High School for Health Professions (Med High). Please select this session only if you teach at one of these schools.
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