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2013 New York State Veterinary Conference

Link to see and print the full agenda


Veterinary Conference Agenda

Below is only a list of lectures and laboratories where space is limited and preregistration is required.
All other classes are first-come, first-serve.
Registrants will receive an admittance ticket in their conference materials.

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  • Thursday, October 3, 2013
  • 6:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Welcome Reception Only
    The conference begins with a welcome reception on Thursday evening from 6:00-8:00 pm in the Atrium. Join us at the reception to greet friends and colleagues and enjoy light refreshments after you pick up your registration materials in the Centennial Room.
    Fee  Optional 
    6:15 PM  -  7:15 PM
    Welcome Reception and Hospital Director's Tour
    The Hospital Director, Lorin Warnick, DVM, PhD, will conduct a special tour of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals. The tour will meet Thursday evening outside of the Centennial Room at 6:15 p.m. and will last one hour. Highlights will include the Imaging Suite and MRI, equine treadmill, and our resident equine blood donor Mike and his companion Minnie. Please indicate on the registration form if you would like to participate. This tour is limited to 25 attendees.
    Fee  Optional 
    6:15 PM  -  7:15 PM
    Welcome Reception and Technology Lecture
    Dr. Eric Bregman -- Are any of these names familiar to you: Dropbox, Workshare, Evernote, Smartsheet, iCloud, iPhone, SurveyMonkey, Clickbook.net, MailChimp, Carbonite, Facebook? If you said no to more than half, then you need to attend this special evening session to find out how these technologies are revolutionizing veterinary practices.

    The drive for mobility is creating a new business universe for all businesses, not just veterinary practices. This session will show you how to link your phones, laptops and office computers into one integrated system that will increase your day-to-day office productivity while also increasing the personal service you can deliver to your clients. Explore the tools available, for free, that can help you manage your emergency calls, back-up your computer data systems, and process payments directly from your client during a house call. We’ll show you how.

    Taught by a veterinary business owner, this session will speak in “everyday language” and will show you how these and other software tools are best suited to your veterinary hospital.
    Fee  Optional 
  • Friday, October 4, 2013
  • 7:30 AM 
    Parking Permit for B Lot and TRB Lot
    A parking permit for the conference is required only for Friday, October 4. Parking is limited on Friday, please consider taking the hotel shuttle.

    Parking is free and plentiful on Saturday and Sunday.
    Fee  Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    8:00 AM  -  8:50 AM
    Discussion: Acid-Base Case Discussions
    Dr. Daniel Fletcher -- Limited to 20 participants. Critically ill patients can have serious underlying acid-base disturbances. In this session, we'll work through case examples of common acid-base disturbances, discuss how to diagnose them from a blood gas with a simple 7-step method, and learn how to treat them.
     Optional  Closed 
    9:00 AM  -  9:50 AM
    Discussion: Not All Vomiting Dogs Are Created Equal
    Dr. Gretchen Schoeffler -- Limited to 20 participants. This session will consist of interactive case discussions revolving around the emergency clinician’s approach to dogs presented to the emergency service for vomiting. The audience will participate in the development of problem lists and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic plans. Imaging, laboratory results, and other clinical data will be interpreted by the group. Audience participation will be encouraged.
     Optional  Closed 
    12:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Friday lunch
    Fee  Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    1:10 PM  -  2:50 PM
    Lab: Basic Poultry Necropsy
    Dr. Eva Wallner-Pendleton and Dr. Paul Virkler -- Limited to 25 veterinarians. This laboratory will provide a refresher on avian necropsy techniques and applied avian anatomy.
     Optional 
     

    Equine

    2:10 PM  -  3:25 PM
    Lab A: Equine Ophthalmic Examination and Techniques
    Dr. Nita Irby and Dr. David Wilke -- This lab will allow participants to practice a complete equine eye examination on sedated patients, as well as to perform or observe specialized equine eye exam techniques and procedures. Detailed handouts will be provided, outlining the perferred routine equine eye examination sequence and will point out subtle observational and examination skills that the instructors feel are important and helpful when examining horse eyes. The lab will be staffed by at least two board-certified ophthalmologists.
     Optional  Closed 
    2:10 PM  -  3:25 PM
    Lab B: Equine Upper Airway Lab
    Dr. Norm Ducharme and Dr. Jonathan Cheetham -- (case-based) Using a series of cases we will discuss the approach to the management of complicated upper airway cases, and options to handle complications of upper airway surgery in the horse.
     Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    3:20 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Lab: Clinical Techniques to Maximize Diagnostic Yield of Cytology and Hematology Tests
    Dr. Deanna Schaefer and Dr. Heather Priest -- Lab limited to 50 participants. The quality of the clinical sample and the information provided along with it can have a large impact on the ability of the Clinical Pathologist to provide a diagnosis. This session will include a short lecture followed by a wet-lab to demonstrate techniques to maximize sample quality. It will be an interactive, hands-on session which will include a review of aspiration techniques and slide preparation methods for solid tissue cytology, body fluid, and blood.
     Optional 
     

    Equine

    3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Lab A: Equine Ophthalmic Examination and Techniques
    Dr. Nita Irby and Dr. David Wilke -- This lab will allow participants to practice a complete equine eye examination on sedated patients, as well as to perform or observe specialized equine eye exam techniques and procedures. Detailed handouts will be provided, outlining the perferred routine equine eye examination sequence and will point out subtle observational and examination skills that the instructors feel are important and helpful when examining horse eyes. The lab will be staffed by at least two board-certified ophthalmologists.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Lab B: Equine Upper Airway Lab
    Dr. Norm Ducharme and Dr. Jonathan Cheetham -- (case-based) Using a series of cases we will discuss the approach to the management of complicated upper airway cases, and options to handle complications of upper airway surgery in the horse.
     Optional 
    5:30 PM  -  7:30 PM
    Purple Party and Silent Auction
    The Purple Party celebrates the NYS-VC partnership between the NYSVMS and the College of Veterinary Medicine. This partnership is reflected in the NYS-VC logo and the prominent use of the color purple. Why purple? When Cornell’s Big Red and the blue of NYSVMS are blended, the two colors become one – PURPLE! At the Purple Party, you will enjoy a delightful selection of food and beverages and be entertained by the veterinary college’s student a cappella group, UltraSound.
     Optional 
  • Saturday, October 5, 2013
  • 7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
    NYSVMS Annual Business Meeting and Breakfast
    NYSVMS members can register to receive a complimentary ticket to breakfast at the NYSVMS Annual Business Meeting on Saturday, October 5. Every member who attends the Annual Business Meeting will receive a raffle ticket and one lucky member, present when the drawing is held, will receive FREE 2014 NYSVMS membership dues!
     Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    8:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Lab: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
    Dr. Daniel Fletcher and Dr. Gretchen Lee Schoeffler -- (Break 9:40-10:20 am) Did you know that up to 50% of small animal patients that experience peri-anesthetic cardiopulmonary arrest can survive to discharge? And did you know that new evidence-based CPR guidelines were recently published? This highly interactive lab will teach the basic concepts from the new guidelines using a high-fidelity simulator, with teams of participants running codes.
     Optional  Closed 
    8:00 AM  -  9:40 AM
    Lab: Poisonous Plants
    Dr. Karyn Bischoff -- Limited to 20 participants. We'll tour the poisonous plant garden (rain or shine!) and plant collections in the Flower-Sprecher Library and the AHDC. Plants we'll see include Japanese yew (Taxus spp), nightshades (Solanum spp), wolfsbane/monkshood (Aconitum spp), poison ivy (Toxicodendron spp), kalanchoe, false sago palm (Cycas spp), pencil tree and poinsettia (Euphorbia spp), milkweed (Asclepias spp) and dozens more. The focus will be on plant identification with phytotoxin basics, expected clinical signs, prognosis, and treatment of plant exposures.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Laboratory Animal

    8:00 AM  -  8:50 AM
    Lab: Tips for Rodent Fur Mite Detection Techniques
    Dr. Rodolfo Ricart-Arbona -- Limited to 10 veterinary technicians. In this lab attendees will be exposed to vrious cage-side techniques commonly used to detect fur mites in rodents. We will conduct a 50 minute didactic and hands-on training session for those who want to improve their sampling and diagnostic methods.
     Optional  Closed 
    9:00 AM  -  10:40 AM
    Lab: Introduction to Laboratory Mouse Procedures
    Erin Jeannette, LVT -- Limited to 10 veterinary technicians. More mice are used in laboratory settings each year than any other research animal species. The intention of this live animal wet-lab is to familiarize new laboratory animal technicians with basic mouse handling and procedures. This session is also appropriate for those mouse users that would like to refresh their skills. Class size is limited in order to provide individualized instruction within the group setting. We will begin with a discussion regarding physical examination and health check at the cage level. Three types of restraint (mechanical, physical and chemical) will be demonstrated and practiced. Instruction will be provided for the following techniques: sexing of males and females, identification (ear notch/punch, ear tag application, and tail snip), subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injections, and both the maintenance and monitoring of rodent anesthesia. We will also review species specific methods of humane euthanasia.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Bovine

    10:00 AM  -  12:50 PM
    Lab & Lecture: Bovine Ultrasonography (prerequisite 8:00-9:40 am)
    Dr. Rob Gilbert -- Limited to 20 veterinarians.
    Lecture: 8:00-9:40 am, will briefly review ultrasound physics and image generation, image interpretation and common artifacts before concentrating on practical use of ultrasonography in bovine reproduction, emphasizing cyclic changes in the uterus and ovaries, pathological conditions, pregnancy diagnosis and monitoring, management of twin pregnancy, fetal sexing, management of estrus and ovulation and transvaginal oocyte pickup. Color Doppler ultrasound will be introduced. Some aspects of ultrasonography of the male tract will be discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of ultrasonography and economic considerations will be considered.

    Ultrasound laboratory: Dr. Rob Gilbert and Dr. S.H. Cheong -- 3 hours. After demonstration of equipment and basic techniques, participants will have the opportunity to learn and practice early pregnancy diagnosis, monitoring of fetal wellbeing, fetal sexing, and interpretation of cyclic changes of the uterus and ovaries in cows.
     Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    10:20 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Lab & Lecture: Simple and Surgical Dental Extractions in Small Animals (prerequisite 9:00-9:50 am)
    Dr. Santiago Peralta --
    Lecture - In this 1-hour lecture, the indications, surgical principles and pertinent surgical anatomy of simple and surgical dental extractions in small animals will be reviewed. Additionally, basic information on specialized instruments, equipment and materials will be presented. Finally, a brief review of dental regional nerve blocks will be offered.

    Lab - Limited to 15 veterinarians. Using cadaver specimens (dog heads), participants will have the opportunity to practice simple and surgical dental extraction technique, as well as dental regional nerve blocks. During surgical extractions, participants will have the opportunity to perform full-thickness mucogingival flaps, alveolectomy and odontosectioning using a high-speed handpiece, and suturing of flaps raised.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Laboratory Animal

    11:10 AM  -  12:50 PM
    Lab: Advanced Laboratory Mouse Procedures
    Erin Jeannette, LVT -- Experience required. Limited to 10 veterinary technicians. As we strive to meet our goal of refinement in laboratory animal procedures, it is becoming increasingly important for technicians to receive training in advanced techniques. The intention of this live animal wet-lab is to familiarize laboratory animal technicians with advanced mouse procedures. This session is also appropriate for those mouse users that would like to refresh their current skills. Class size is limited in order to provide individualized instruction within the group setting. We will begin with a brief review of handling and restraint techniques. Instruction will be provided for the following procedures: intramuscular, intravenous, and retro-orbital injections, blood collection (lateral tail, lateral saphenous, and submandibular), and oral gavage.
     Optional  Closed 
    12:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Saturday lunch
    Fee  Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    1:30 PM  -  3:10 PM
    Lab & Lecture: Feline Perineal Urethrostomy (prerequisite 11:10 am-12:00 pm Friday)
    Dr. James Flanders --
    Lecture: held Friday, 11:10-noon, is the prerequisite for Dr. Flanders' lab on Saturday, 1:30-3:10 pm. This lecture will cover the surgical technique for feline perineal urethrostomy in a step-by-step, well-illustrated manner. Helpful hints and common pitfalls will be discussed in detail.

    Dr. James Flanders, Dr. Heather Knapp-Hoch, Dr. Ariane Jay --
    Lab: Saturday, 1:30-3:10 pm, Dr. James Flanders and Dr. Heather Knapp-Hoch -- Limited to 12 veterinarians. Each attendee of this laboratory will perform a perineal urethrostomy on a cat cadaver under the guidance of a Board Certified Veterinary Surgeon. Surgical scrubs and surgical instruments will be provided.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Equine

    2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
    Lab B: Best Cases of the Year
    Dr. Haley Lang, Dr. Wade Walker, Dr. Kathleen Mullen, Dr. Emily Barrell -- Patients that require follow up with their referring veterinarians - The Large Animal Medicine and Surgery residents will present a selection of interesting and complex cases they have seen at the Cornell University Equine and Farm Animal Hospital. These cases required collaboration and cooperation with the clients’ regular veterinarians throughout the hospitalization, and especially through the follow-up and recovery stages. There will be time for questions and discussion.
     Optional 
    2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
    Lab A: Wound Management in Horses
    Dr. Earl Gaughan and Dr. Rolfe Radcliffe -- Horses often are prone to various injuries during their lifetime. Trauma from other horses, collision with objects or fencing, and falling during exercise are common accidents where horses suffer traumatic wounds. Many types of wounds occur at different locations throughout the limbs, body and head of horses making an understanding of wound repair and healing essential to the equine practitioner. Through this laboratory, the instructors will introduce important techniques that can be applied to many of the common equine wounds presented to veterinarians. Participants will be allowed to repair various wounds on cadaveric limbs of horses under instructor guidance. A basic understanding of suture materials and patterns and wound healing will be essential prior to the laboratory.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Companion Animal

    3:50 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Lab & Lecture: Simple and Surgical Dental Extractions in Small Animals (prerequisite 9:00-9:50 am)
    Dr. Santiago Peralta --
    Lecture - In this 1-hour lecture, the indications, surgical principles and pertinent surgical anatomy of simple and surgical dental extractions in small animals will be reviewed. Additionally, basic information on specialized instruments, equipment and materials will be presented. Finally, a brief review of dental regional nerve blocks will be offered.

    Lab - Limited to 15 veterinarians. Using cadaver specimens (dog heads), participants will have the opportunity to practice simple and surgical dental extraction technique, as well as dental regional nerve blocks. During surgical extractions, participants will have the opportunity to perform full-thickness mucogingival flaps, alveolectomy and odontosectioning using a high-speed handpiece, and suturing of flaps raised.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:50 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Lab: Emergency Procedures for Companion Animals
    Dr. Gretchen Schoeffler, Dr. Daniel Fletcher, and Pati Kirch, LVT -- Limited to 18 veterinarians. This emergency procedures laboratory will provide veterinarians the opportunity to practice operative procedural skills in a controlled, comfortable setting. A variety of emergency procedures including emergency venous access, temporary tracheostomy tube placement, thoracostomy tube placement, and open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation will be taught and practiced using cadaver dogs. One laboratory session is offered.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Equine

    4:15 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Lab A: Wound Management in Horses
    Dr. Earl Gaughan and Dr. Rolfe Radcliffe -- Horses often are prone to various injuries during their lifetime. Trauma from other horses, collision with objects or fencing, and falling during exercise are common accidents where horses suffer traumatic wounds. Many types of wounds occur at different locations throughout the limbs, body and head of horses making an understanding of wound repair and healing essential to the equine practitioner. Through this laboratory, the instructors will introduce important techniques that can be applied to many of the common equine wounds presented to veterinarians. Participants will be allowed to repair various wounds on cadaveric limbs of horses under instructor guidance. A basic understanding of suture materials and patterns and wound healing will be essential prior to the laboratory.
     Optional  Closed 
    4:15 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Lab B: Best Cases of the Year
    Dr. Haley Lang, Dr. Wade Walker, Dr. Kathleen Mullen, Dr. Emily Barrell -- Patients that require follow up with their referring veterinarians - The Large Animal Medicine and Surgery residents will present a selection of interesting and complex cases they have seen at the Cornell University Equine and Farm Animal Hospital. These cases required collaboration and cooperation with the clients’ regular veterinarians throughout the hospitalization, and especially through the follow-up and recovery stages. There will be time for questions and discussion.
     Optional 
  • Sunday, October 6, 2013
  •  

    Companion Animal

    8:00 AM  -  9:40 AM
    Lab: Abdominal Ultrasound - Introductory
    Dr. Meg Thompson and Dr. Sarah Pownder --
     Optional  Closed 
    9:00 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Lecture Series: Disaster Preparedness
    Attend this special series on disaster preparedness sponsored by the AVMF. The issue of disaster preparedness has been made relevant to all New Yorkers with the advent of both Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Irene within the last two years. The most recent and memorable Hurricane Sandy devastated a significant portion of New York City/Long Island, rendering hundreds of veterinarians out of work, out of a job, or out of practice entirely. In addition, many New Yorkers are still recovering from the aftermath of Hurricane Irene in 2011 that resulted in total damages of $15.6 billion, making it the seventh costliest hurricane in United States history. Hurricane Irene claimed damages from very rural towns and villages in Greene County, the Catskills and surrounding rural areas due to flooding from Schoharie Creek and other water tributaries. The New York City Veterinary Response Team (NYCVERT) will conduct a three-part series on the lessons learned from Hurricanes Irene and Sandy, sheltering issues and challenges facing homeowners during an evacuation, the resources available to pets and their owners displaced by a disaster, and the steps necessary to create a disaster plan for your veterinary practice.
     Optional 
     

    Companion Animal

    10:10 AM  -  11:50 AM
    Lab: Abdominal Ultrasound - Intermediate
    Dr. Meg Thompson and Dr. Sarah Pownder -- 10:10-11:50 am
     Optional  Closed 
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