2016 PCORI Annual Meeting

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Event Schedule

    • Thursday, November 17, 2016
    •  
      9:00 AM  -  2:00 PM
      Pre-Conference Session for Trainee Scholarship Recipients (by invitation only)
      9:00 AM  -  2:00 PM
      Pre-Conference Session for Patient Scholarship Recipients and Ambassadors (by invitation only)
      2:30 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Onsite Registration Opens  (Potomac Ballroom Foyer)
      3:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
      Plenary: How Can We Make Patient Needs and Values Central to Health Research and Decision Making?  (Potomac Ballroom A-B)

      Our opening plenary session will put the voices of patients, caregivers, and their advocates front and center in a discussion of why their needs and values matter in health research and decision making. Our keynote speaker and plenary panel will talk about what has and still needs to change in health research and delivery to be sure studies and outcomes that matter to patients become the rule rather than the exception. And they will look at the opportunities patient-centered outcomes research and comparative clinical effectiveness research present to help patients and those who care for them make better-informed healthcare decisions.

       

      PCORI 2016 Plenary Session One Slides 11.16.16

      5:30 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Welcome Networking Reception  (Potomac Ballroom Foyer)
    • Friday, November 18, 2016
    •  
      7:00 AM  -  5:30 PM
      Registration  (Potomac Ballroom Foyer)
      7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
      Morning Networking Breakfast  (Potomac Ballroom A-B)
      8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Plenary: Taking Stock: How Is Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Advancing Patient-Centered Care?  (Potomac Ballroom A-B)

      There has been a surge in recent years in efforts to make healthcare research and delivery more patient-centered. This includes the 2010 creation of PCORI as the Nation’s main funder of comparative clinical effectiveness research that focuses on outcomes important to patients. During the session, we will look at the evolving changes in the healthcare landscape in recent years and how patient-centered outcomes research has led or can lead to care that is more effective and useful to patients, their families, and clinicians. This session will focus on the potential drivers of change in health care at the individual, community, institutional, health system, and public health levels. Finally, there will be a discussion of what research directions need greater emphasis and how patient-centered outcomes research can contribute going forward.

       

      PCORI 2016 Plenary Session Two Slides

      Moderator:
      10:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
      Break
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Morning Breakout Sessions
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Golden Years and Easing Fears: Complex Medical Decision Making Among Older Adults  (Chesapeake D-F)

      The older adult population is the fastest growing portion of the population worldwide. Older adults make up the majority of patients for certain health conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and Parkinson’s disease. Typically, clinical trials conducted in adult populations include patients between the ages of 18 and 64 years. Improving communication about age-related concerns that could affect health outcomes is needed for individuals age 65 years and older. This session will highlight three research studies focused on improving complex medical decision making among older adults as it relates to cancer treatment, advanced care planning, and health plan selection for Medicare Part D enrollees. This session will highlight the projects individually, the work done to date, outcomes, and how to engage patients and stakeholders. The session will also include a panel discussion focusing on the challenges and successes panelists have had applying patient- centered outcomes research concepts in this field.

       

      Golden Years (All Speakers)

      Discussant:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Goldilocks Conundrum ̶ PCOR and How It May Help to Ensure That Care Interventions Are "Just Right"  (Chesapeake A-C)

      Maximizing the use of effective high-value care across the care continuum is a priority for all stakeholders within the healthcare system. One of the barriers slowing progress toward the optimal use of health care is the lack of rigorous comparative effectiveness research that evaluates patient-centered outcomes, including benefits and harms at the individual level. Multi-stakeholder-led research has the potential to capture the most relevant aspects of the decisional dilemmas encountered when considering the appropriate use of more versus less care. This interactive session will highlight several PCORI-funded studies that are evaluating the appropriate use of alternatives to immediate or continuous treatment. Discussion will explore the barriers and facilitators to initiating a comparative effectiveness study evaluating how to de-escalate treatment, and will consider how cultural readiness and stakeholder partnerships influence the capacity to generate rigorous and robust evidence.

       

      Goldilocks

      Moderator:
      Discussant:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in Research: Identifying Challenges and Developing Solutions  (Potomac D)

      This session will be an opportunity to share emerging practices in engagement of patients and other stakeholders in patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. PCORI staff will present recent data about engagement collected from PCORI awardees and their partners to provide an overview of how patients and other stakeholders are involved in PCORI-funded projects. A panel of current funded investigators and partners will address challenges that awardees and their partners have faced and their strategies for resolving those challenges. Breakout groups will provide an opportunity for attendees to discuss reactions to the presentations, share promising practices from their own experiences, and identify other challenges and solutions.

       

      Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in Research

      Moderator:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Know Before You Go: Planning Upstream for Successful Recruitment in PCOR and Clinical Trials  (Chesapeake 1-3)

      Data from systematic reviews have shown that there are promising strategies for increasing recruitment to trials, yet recruiting participants into clinical trials remains one of the biggest challenges in the research field today. This session will feature discussions of public awareness of clinical trials, including how American knowledge and perceptions of public health research impact the research field. Presentations by three PCORI-funded PIs, and investigators, and their partners will also cover (1) strategies to assess trial feasibility and site selection, (2) effective modes of delivery and partnerships, and (3) recruitment communication planning. The focus by PCORI awardees will be on the upstream planning necessary for successful recruitment launch and trial success, specifically on data-driven approaches to selecting appropriate sites and patient/stakeholder engagement required to design outreach/communication efforts. Participants will engage in a session designed to provide insight and tools to inform the development of stronger studies and successful recruitment efforts.

       

      Consolidated_Slides_Know Before You Go

      Discussant:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR): Filling the Evidence Gap in Obesity Treatment Options  (Chesapeake J-L)

      While obesity trends have plateaued in recent years, prevalence remains unacceptably high, affecting over one-third of adults and around 20 percent of children and adolescents. Working with limited knowledge of personal preferences, and against cultural and community obstacles, healthcare providers often have little success in influencing their patients to make necessary behavioral changes. This panel highlights select obesity research funded by the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute to fill specific evidence gaps in the treatment and management of obesity. Patientcentered outcomes research involves stakeholders in helping to identify relevant research questions and in collaborating on the design and implementation of studies that will improve their ability to make informed choices among treatment options. The presentations evaluate a range of interventions, with a common theme—the design and implementation of each one has been guided by patients and other stakeholders to provide critical information on how to best treat obesity. Presenters will focus on the evidence gap their project is aiming to fill and how the findings will likely impact practice.

       

      Obesity Breakout Session Slides- All Compiled Fina

      Moderator:
      Discussant:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Conducting Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Rare Diseases: Success and Challenges  (Chesapeake G-I)

      This session will explore the challenges and opportunities associated with conducting patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) related to the treatment and management of rare diseases. It will describe ongoing PCOR studies of management approaches for two different rare conditions as well as a prospective registry designed to support clinical research on pediatric rheumatic diseases. Presentations will provide an overview of current progress, discuss the challenges associated with conducting research and building registries, explore strategies for overcoming those challenges, and consider how lessons learned can help inform future research activities. A representative of PCORI’s Advisory Panel on Rare Disease will moderate the session. Panelists will include three PCORI awardees currently engaged in rare disease research activities and their patient/stakeholder partners; their projects fall under PCORI’s broad funding initiatives and PCORnet (National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network).

       

       

      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Novel Delivery of Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders  (Chesapeake 4-6)

      Anxiety and depressive illnesses are some of the most common mental health disorders in the country, with a lifetime prevalence of 28.8 percent and 16.6 percent of the population, respectively. They are associated with a significant public health burden due to medical costs, missed days from work and school, and decreased productivity. However, less than half of Americans with mental health disorders receive treatment annually. Although many patients prefer behavioral interventions to pharmacological treatments, and some behavioral interventions are highly effective for depression and anxiety, many Americans are unwilling or unable to access these treatments in their current forms—including those who cannot afford treatment, those who do not seek treatment due to stigma, and many who have a dearth of trained professionals in their area. Interest in novel methods of delivering evidence-based interventions has emerged in response to these barriers to evidencebased care. Investigators will discuss PCORI-funded projects featuring novel delivery methods for evidence-based interventions, including peer-led support groups, telehealth, and co-location of mental health clinicians in primary care settings. Both investigators and patient partners will discuss their experiences and challenges conducting these trials, which are at various stages of completion.

       

      Novel Delivery of Evidence-Based Behavioral Interv

      Discussant:
      12:00 PM  -  12:30 PM
      Break
      12:30 PM  -  2:30 PM
      Plenary: How Can PCOR/CER Improve Care for People With Multiple Chronic Conditions?  (Potomac Ballroom A-B)

      An estimated one in four Americans lives with more than one chronic condition. This is a major challenge for individuals, their families, and the US healthcare system as a whole given the need for substantial levels of care and, in many cases, poor health outcomes. Managing chronic conditions is often uncoordinated, focusing on addressing individual diseases or conditions rather than focusing on the whole person and their challenges. During this session, we will discuss ways in which evidence from patient-centered outcomes research and comparative clinical effectiveness research can improve the health outcomes of people with chronic conditions, with a particular focus on children and older adults.

      PCORI 2016 Plenary Session Three Slides

       

       

      Keynote:
      Moderator:
      2:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Break
      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      Afternoon Breakout Sessions
      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      The Transitional Care Evidence to Action Network: Approach, Accomplishments, and Exemplars  (Chesapeake 1-3)

      Transferring from one healthcare setting to another, or even to home, can be a vulnerable time for patients and those who care for them, prompting researchers and policy makers to identify and validate strategies that improve transitions of care. For this reason, PCORI has invested more than $68 million in 20 transitional care research projects. The studies in the Transitional Care Evidence to Action Network (TC-E2AN) represent five PCORI science programs and multiple funding mechanisms. These studies are designed to reduce readmissions, enhance patient experience, and improve outcomes by evaluating transitional care interventions in diverse populations. TC-E2AN connects PCORI-funded research teams working in transitional care to facilitate collaborative learning and leverage promising practices. This session (1) describes the TC- E2AN’s approach to engaging researchers and stakeholders, noting accomplishments from the first 18 months and highlighting upcoming activities; and (2) showcases two studies utilizing robust evidence and strategies for translating evidence into action.

       

      Consolidated TC-E2AN Panel Discussion Slides

      Moderator:
      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      PCORnet Functionality: Achievements in Data, Research, and Engagement  (Chesapeake D-F)

      PCORnet (National Patient- Centered Clinical Research Network) is in the second phase of infrastructure development to make clinical research faster, easier, and less costly. In August 2015, the PCORnet Governance Policies were approved, establishing three key content committees to drive forward PCORnet development. The Data, Engagement, and Research Committees enhance the distributed leadership of PCORnet by harnessing the power of the Clinical Data Research Networks (CDRNs) and Patient- Powered Research Networks (PPRNs). This session, led by the Data, Engagement, and Research Committee Chairs, will emphasize advancements in increasing the focus on enhancing public trust, models of engagement for participants and clinicians, research resources within PCORnet, current research underway utilizing the network, and advancements in the data infrastructure. This breakout session will showcase the progress in the areas, led by the Data, Engagement, and Research Committees, in strengthening PCORnet’s ability to conduct more robust patient/participant- centered research.

       

       

      PCORnet Breakout Session_Compiled (final)

      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      Meet the Journal Editors  (Potomac 1-3)

      Potomac 1-3 As PCORI-funded studies near their end dates, PCORI wants its awardees to get advice on how to succeed with top- tier journals. This 90- minute breakout session is an opportunity to engage in conversation with journal editors who are interested in attracting manuscripts that describe patient-centered comparative effectiveness studies. Each editor will speak for about 10 minutes. A brief moderated panel discussion will follow. A question- and-answer period will conclude the session.

       

      Christine Laine Meet the Editors

      Howard Bauchner--Meet the Editors

      Jose Merino--Meet the Editors

      Larry Peiperl--Meet the Editors

      Robert Ferrer--Meet the Editors

      Moderator:
      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      Interventions to Reduce Disparities in the Home, Hospital, Clinic, and School  (Potomac 4-6)

      Previous research has identified pervasive disparities in access to high- quality health care and worse health outcomes for specific populations across multiple conditions and multiple settings, outcomes that are based on race/ethnicity, gender, geographic location, socioeconomic status, disability, and other factors. This panel highlights research funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute aimed to improve outcomes for populations at risk for disparities. The panel will discuss interventions set in the home, schools, hospitals, and clinics for a range of health conditions and topics. Presenters will focus on preliminary findings from their research as well as lessons learned related to implementing comparative effectiveness research in diverse populations.

      Interventions to Reduce Disparities (all slides co

       

       

      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      Comparative Effectiveness Research on Nonpharmacologic Approaches for Chronic Pain  (Chesapeake G-I)

      Chronic pain exerts a significant burden on the general population, with approximately 35 million Americans suffering from chronic pain and costs of $635 billion per year to the US healthcare system. Although opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat chronic noncancer pain, little is known about the safety and effectiveness of long- term opioid therapy. At the same time, mounting evidence suggests that opioids are associated with increased risk of significant harms including misuse, dependence, and overdose. Subsequently, interest in nonpharmacological strategies has increased. The current symposium will discuss several projects, including two funded by PCORI, that address alternative approaches for chronic pain, and implementation challenges, as well as solutions to conducting comparative effectiveness in this area.

       

      ALL SLIDES -- Comp Effectiveness Reserach on Nonph

      Discussant:
      3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      Smarter, More Appropriate Use of Antibiotics  (Chesapeake J-L)

      Researchers agree that antibiotic resistance is a growing public health concern in the United States. Patients infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria are challenging to treat and pose a greater threat to others because the resistant bacterium may spread. Antibiotics do not work as well as they once did because of years of misuse or overuse, which can lead to: • Longer and more complicated illnesses • More clinician visits • Increased use of stronger and more expensive drugs • More deaths The more that is known about how antibiotics are used in all healthcare settings, the more effective efforts can be to improve how antibiotics are used in the right infections and right people. When almost half of all antibiotic prescriptions may be unnecessary or inappropriate, it is important to focus on comparative effectiveness of management options for antibiotic treatment choices in a range of conditions in hospitals and community settings.

       

      Smarter Antibiotics Facebook Live Workshop

      Moderator:
      Discussant:
      5:30 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Closing Networking Reception  (Woodrow Wilson Ballroom)
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