2017 Expressive Therapies Summit: NYC - Registration Site

 

THURSDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES & INTENSIVES

LISTENING TO CLAY: JANIE RHYNE'S GESTALT ART EXPERIENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT
 
Objectives:
1. Apply 2 methods to describe form as defined by Rhyne's Gestalt Art experience.
2. Define 2 methods to assist clients to describe what is seen in their artwork, facilitating enhanced potential for clinical insight.
3. Identify 2 methods of reflective writing, transcribing what their hands 'know' into the metaphors that can be recorded for exploration in treatment.
 
Kagin, S., Lusebrink, V., (1978). "The Expressive Therapies Continuum." Art Psychotherapy, (5)4, 171-180.
 
Rhyne, Janie.  (1996). Gestalt art experience: Patterns that connect (2nd ed.).  Chicago, IL:  Magnolia Street.  (Original work published in 1973)
 
Hillman, J.  (1977). An inquiry into image.  Spring 1977, 62-88.

 
POETRY THERAPY AND JOURNAL THERAPY: DISCOVERING POSSIBILITIES AT THE INTERSECTION OF STORY & METAPHOR
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Kathleen Adams, LPC
Nancy Scherlong, MS, PTR, LCSW
 
Objectives:
1. Define and describe the 4 stages of the poetry/journal therapy experience.
2. List and discuss the 8 criteria for effective poetry therapy literature selection.
3. Experience 2 or more therapeutic writing techniques.
 
Adams, K. (2013). Expressive Writing: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Chavis, G. (2011). Poetry and Story Therapy: The Healing Power of Creative Expression. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Mazza, N. (2017). Poetry Therapy: Theory and Practice, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.
 

HORSES & MOVEMENT IN NATURE: ENHANCED EQUINE FACILITATED PSYCHOTHERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jackie Ashley MA, LPC, BC-DMT
Kristen Brookes, RDT, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. List 3 creative arts therapy activities applicable to traumatized populations, as well as care providers, with a focus on nature and animal assisted therapies; specifically horses.
2. Describe the healing potential of being in nature with non-human animals; specifically horses for traumatized populations as well as self-care for care providers.
3. Define 2 ways in which trauma-informed nature based EFP (Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy) can be measured for its efficacy for traumatized populations and self-care for care providers.
 
Shambo, Leigh, (2013). "The Listening Heart. The Limbic Path Beyond Office Therapy." Human-Equine Alliance For Learning, Chehalis, WA.
 
Ashley, Jackie (2016). "A Longing in the Soul: Healing Sexual Trauma with Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy." Shadows & Light: Theory, Research and Practice in Transpersonal Psychology Vol. II. Kaklauskas et. al. Colorado Springs, Co. University Professors Press.pp 161-178.
 
Levy, Fran J. (2005) "Dance Movement Therapy: A Healing Art." American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Dance. Reston, VA.


WORKING WITH SELF-HARMING & SUICIDAL TEENS: ART, THEATER, PLAY

(Group Dynamics and Counseling)

Engaging Suicidal Teens by Leveraging the Survival Function of Art & Play

Lucy Barbera, PhD
 
Theatre of the Oppressed Techniques in the Treatment of Self-Harming Youth
Scott R. Koenigsberg, LPC
 
Objectives:
1. State and describe at least 1 theory which grounds the use of art modalities with suicidal and self-injurious teens to become active participants in treatment. (Barbera)
2. Discriminate when to apply 3 different arts-based strategies for working with adolescents with suicidal ideation, have attempted suicide, or exhibit self-injurious behavior, in various clinical settings. (Barbera)
3. Describe how to use a Past-Present-Future sequence, using masks, triptych, or portal and discriminate how and when these strategies may be applied in practice to facilitate healing. (Barbera)
4. Identify 4 Theatre of the Oppressed techniques to use with the self-harm population in group treatment settings. (Koenigsberg)
5. Describe 4 Theatre of the Oppressed techniques: Forum Theatre, Image Theatre, Rainbow of Desire, and the Cops in the Head. (Koenigsberg)
6. Facilitate 4 Theatre of the Oppressed techniques: Forum Theatre, Image Theatre, Rainbow of Desire, and the Cops in the Head, with a self-harming population of clients. (Koenigsberg)
 
Dissanayake, E. (1992). Homo aestheticus: Where art comes from and why. Seattle:University of Washington Press.
 
Huninzinga, J. (1950). Homo ludens: A study of the play element in culture. Boston: The Beacon Press
 
Dissanayake,, E. (1974). A Hypothesis of the evolution of art from play. Leonardo, Vol.7, pp. 211-217. Pergamon Press.
 
Boal, A. (1985). Theatre of the Oppressed. Theatre Communications Group, Inc. New York, NY.
 
Boal, A. (1995). The Rainbow of Desire: the Boal method of theatre and therapy. Routledge. London and New York.
 
Boal, A. (1992). Games for Actors and Non-Actors. Routledge. London and New York.


MIND/BODY INTEGRATION & CHARACTEROLOGICAL CHANGE THROUGH MOVEMENT, REICHIAN AND LABAN APPROACHES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Corinna Brown, MA, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT
Johanna Climenko, LCSW-R, BC-DM, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. Describe 3 or more theoretical concepts of Reichian Character Analytic Mind/Body Therapy.
2. Identify 3 or more movement elements described in Laban Movement Analysis.
3. Apply 3 or more dance/movement therapy or Reichian interventions to their clinical work.
 
Reich, W. (1949). Character Analysis, 3rd Edition. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
 
Bartenieff, I. & Bartenieff D. L. (1980). Body Movement: Coping with the Environment. New York: Taylor & Francis
 
Schmais, C. (1985). "Healing processes in group dance therapy." American Journal of Dance Therapy, 8(1), 17-36


APPS IN TREATMENT: DIGITAL ART & VIDEO THERAPY TECHNIQUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jon Ehinger, ATR-BC, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more clinical needs for digital media in therapeutic environments while understanding the unlimited creative possibilities available with tablets and video techniques presented.
2. Identify 3 or more traditional and alternative uses for applications inviting creative manipulation.
3. Explain 1 way that the 'Alt-Use' concept can be integrated through a clinical lens.
 
Malchiodi, C. (2000). Art therapy and computer technology: A virtual studio of possibilities. London: Jessica Kingsley.
 
Winnicott, D. W. (1971). Playing and reality. New York: Routledge/Tavistock Publications.
 
Garner, R. (2016). Digital Art Therapy: Material, Methods, and Applications. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES WITH CBT INTERVENTIONS: CREATIVE FACILITATION OF TREATMENT GOALS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Miki Goerdt, ATR-P, LCSW
 
Objectives:
1. Identify at least 2 CBT interventions that can be incorporated with the printmaking process.
2. Evaluate pros and cons of 4 different printmaking techniques during the workshop and explore how to utilize the techniques in therapeutic settings.
3. Describe 2 benefits of using printmaking in a group setting.
 
White, L. M. (2002). Printmaking as therapy: Framework for freedom. London, United Kingdom: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 
Rosal, M. (2001). "Cognitive-behavioral art therapy." In Rubin, J. A. (Ed.). Approaches to art therapy:
Theory and technique (2nd Ed). (pp. 210-225). Routledge: New York, NY.
 
Leahy, R. (2003). Cognitive therapy techniques: A practitioner’s guide. Guilford Press: New York, NY.


GENDER, SEXUALITY, IDENTITY AND THE PRESENTATION OF SELF: IMPLICATIONS FOR CREATIVE TREATMENT
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
 
My Voice, My Self: Vocalizing Identity Beyond the Binary
Susan Hadley, PhD, MT-BC
Maevon Gumble, MT-BC
 
How Do We Experience and Perform Identity? A Creative and Embodied Exploration
Brian T. Harris, PhD, MT-BC, LCAT
Britton Williams, MA, RDT, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 dimensions of vocal timbre that contribute to perceptions of gender and sexuality. (Hadley/Gumble)
2. Identify at least 2 ways that assumptions of gender or sexuality, based on vocal timbre, can be harmful to clients. (Hadley/Gumble)
3.Identify at least 3 ways to queer our understandings of both gender and sexuality.  (Hadley/Gumble)
4. Label 2 aspects of their unique identities and examine the ways in which they embody these identities. (Harris/Williams)
5. Identify 2 current theories on embodied and performed identity. (Harris/Williams)
6. Identify 3 creative interventions for exploring identity. (Harris/Williams)

Bonenfant, Y. (2010). "Queer listening to queer vocal timbres." Performance Research, 15(3), 74-80. 
 
Hadley, S. & Gumble, M. (forthcoming). "Beyond the binaries: Negotiating gender and sex in music therapy." In S. Hogan (Ed.), Inscribed on the body: Gender and difference in the arts therapies. London: Routledge.

Rolvsjord, R. & Halstead, J. (2013). "A woman's voice: The politics of gender identity in music therapy and everyday life." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 40(4), 420-427. 

Powell, A. (2016). "Embodied multicultural assessment: An interdisciplinary training model." Drama Therapy Review, 2(1), 111–122. doi: 10.1386/ dtr.2.1.111_1
 
Butler, J. (1990). Gender trouble: feminism and the subversion of identity. New York: Routledge.
Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Anchor Books.


ALTERED BOOKS & ORIGAMI FOR ENHANCING CLINICAL RAPPORT, MINDFULNESS, AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Mindy Jacobson-Levy, MCAT, ATR-BC, LPC, DVATA HLM
Laura Bauder, BA
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 4 clinical goals that can be met using a combination of origami and book altering processes.
2. Facilitate 2 origami folded methods and 2 altered book techniques that promote cognitive problem solving and self-expression.
3. Identify 2 ways that origami and altered books foster relationship building.
 
Boruga, A. (2011). "Origami art as a means of facilitating learning." Procedia -Social and Behavioral Sciences, 11, 32-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.01.028
 
Taylor, H. A., & Tenbrink, T. (2013). "The spatial thinking of origami: evidence from think-aloud protocols." Cognitive Processing, 14(2), 189-191. doi:10.1007/s10339-013-0540-x
 
Lang, R. J. (1988). The Complete Book of Origami. Step by step Instructions in Over 1000 Diagrams. New York: Dover Publications Inc.


DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment)
Kathryn Johnson, PhD, ATR
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations.
2. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice.
3. Report results from at least 3 normative DDS studies of psychiatric diagnostic groups.
 
Mills, A., Cohen, B. M., & Meneses, J. Z. (1993). "Reliability and validity tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 20(1), 83-88.
 
Betts, D. (2013). "Art therapy assessments with diverse populations: The Diagnostic Drawing Series" (addressed by Cohen, Mills, and Ichiki). In P. Howie, S. Prasad, & J. Kristel (Eds)., Using art therapy with diverse populations: Crossing cultures and abilities (pp. 46-47). London: Jessica Kingsley.
 
Mills, A. (2003) "The Diagnostic Drawing Series." In C. Malchiodi (Ed.), Handbook of Art Therapy, pp. 401-109. New York: Guilford.


TF-CBT, EMDR, CPP IN PLAY THERAPY & TRAUMA TREATMENT: EVIDENCE-BASED AND CREATIVE ARTS PRACTICES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jennifer Lefebre-McGevna, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
1. Define 3 or more of the core components of trauma-informed therapies.
2. Facilitate 5 sensory and play-based activities that can be used by child and play therapists within their trauma-informed practice.
3. Identify 3 of most prevalent diagnostic categories related to children with histories of complex trauma.
 
Cavett, A.M. (2015) "Playful Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for School-age Children." In Drewes, A.A. & Schaefer, C.E. (Eds.) Play Therapy in Middle Childhood. Washington: APA.
 
Adler-Tapia, R. & Settle, C.  (2008).  EMDR and the art of psychotherapy with children.  New York:  Springer Publishing Company.
 
Green, E. J. (2012). "Facilitating resiliency in traumatized adolescents: Integrating play therapy with evidence-based interventions." Play Therapy, 6(3), 10-15.


THE HEALING POWER OF MANDALAS AND THE MARI
(Psychotherapy Theory/Practice)
Evie Lindemann, LMFT, ATR-BC, ATCS

Objectives:
1. Learn how to utilize 3 types of mandala making directives with applications to a variety of clinical populations.
2. Discern their own unique patterning of symbols and color choices through completion of a hand drawn mandala and a mini MARI self assessment.
3. Articulate the theoretical underpinnings of the mandala through Jungian theory and its history in western art psychotherapeutic practice and apply it in clinical practice.
 
Jung, C. G. (1997). Jung on active imagination. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
 
Kellogg, J. (2001). Mandala: Path of beauty. Belleair FL: ATMA, Inc.
 
Lindemann, E. (2014). Mandalas as Spiritual Medicine. Making Sense: Beauty, Creativity, and Healing. New York: Peter Lang.


EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPISTS AS SUPERVISORS: DIFFERENTIATING ROLES  
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Daphna Markman Zinemanas, PhD, ATR
 
Objectives:
1. Explain at least 4 differences between Art Therapy supervision and art psychotherapy.
2. Acquire at least 3 principles of the additional value of artistic activity to enhance working through of complicated professional issues.
3. Implicate artistic expression to their supervisory and teaching activities through at least 3 new art based techniques.
 
Geller, J., Farber, B.' & Schaffer, C. (2010). "Representations and the supervisory dialogue." Psychotherapy Theory, Research, Practice, Training. 47 (2) 211-220
 
Miller, A (2012). "Inspired by El Duende: One-Canvas Process Painting in Art Therapy Supervision." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 29(4).   
 
Watkin, C. E. (2015). "The Learning Alliance in Psychoanalytic Supervision, A Fifty – Years Retrospective and Prospective," Psychoanalytic Psychology, 32 (3), 451-481.


LISTENING DEEPLY: INQUIRY, ATTUNEMENT & HEALING THROUGH INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY AND THE ARTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Carol Merle-Fishman, MA, FAMI, CMT, LCAT, LMHC
 
Objectives:
1. Describe the centrality of listening, both verbal and non-verbal, to all healing modalities, and be able to apply this concept to their practice/specialty area(s).
2. Describe the “Self-In-Relationship” model of Integrative Psychotherapy and be able to apply an understanding of the inter-relatedness of the 4 domains of the self, as it relates to therapeutic listening.
3. Define the concepts of “Inquiry” and “Attunement,” as delineated by Integrative Psychotherapy, and be able to apply these concepts to therapeutic listening in all domains of the self, and apply them to their practice/specialty area(s).
 
Erskine, R.G., Moursund, J., Trautmann, R.L. (1999). Beyond empathy: A Therapy of contact-in-relationship.  Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel.
 
Katsh, S., and Merle-Fishman, C. ( 1998).  The music within you.  Gilsum, N.H. : Barcelona Publishers.
 
Guistolise, P. ( 1996).  "Failures in the therapeutic relationship: Inevitable and necessary?" Transactional Analysis Journal, p 284 -288.


COMPLICATED GRIEF, COLLAGE & TRAUMA THEORY: AN ARTFUL INTEGRATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Sharon Strouse, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPA
 
Objectives:
1. Describe 3 ways the creative process of collage can help the bereaved “revision narratives” of loss and create meaning.
2. Identify 4 features of Complicated Grief as a form of Complex Trauma.
3. Explain 4 ways that trauma and grief work support the effectiveness of creative interventions in addressing somatic and neurobiological impact on clients.
 
Thompson, B.E. & Neimeyer. R.A. (Eds). (2014). Grief and the expressive arts: Practices for creating meaning. New York: Routledge.
 
Neimeyer, R. (Eds). (2012). Techniques of Grief therapy: Creative practices for counseling the bereaved. New York: Routledge.
 
Chapman, L. (2014). Neurobiologically informed trauma therapy with children and adolescents: Understanding mechanisms of change. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.


IN THE STORY CIRCLE: ORAL HISTORY & ACTION METHODS WITH GROUPS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Judy Swallow, MA, CRS, TEP, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 action forms that 'play back' a teller's story and describe how to be applied in clinical groups.
2. Apply 3 or more action introductions in the 'story circle'.
3. Facilitate 3 styles of dramatization of personal stories in the group.
 
Fox, Jonathan. Acts of Service, Tusitala Publishing, 1994.
  
Salas, Jo. Improvising Real Life : Personal Story in Playback Theatre, Kendall/Hunt, 1993.
 
Blatner, H. Adam. Acting In: Practical Applications of Psychodramatic Methods, Springer, 1973


FACILITATING DRUM CIRCLES FOR COUNSELING, PSYCHOTHERAPY, AND COMMUNITY
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Suzanne Tribe, MA, MT-BC, LCAT
Mary Knysh

Objectives:
1. State 3 ways to use breath and voice as a physical warm up to develop group cohesion within psychotherapy groups. (Tribe)
2. Use 3 group psychotherapy ice breaker activities that facilitate affect regulation through basic rhythmic skills. (Tribe)
3. Identify and use 3 kinds of improvisational techniques to facilitate coping skill development with different types of clinical groups. (Tribe)
 
Bittman, B., Berk, L.S., Felten, D.L., Westengard, J., Simonton, O.C., Pappas, J., Ninehouser, M. (2001). "Drumming strengthens immune system: composite effects of group drumming music therapy on modulation of neuroendocrine-immune parameters in normal subjects." Journal of Alternative Therapy 7. 38-47.
 
Friedman, R. L. (2000). The healing power of the drum: A psychotherapist explores the healing power of the drum. Reno, NV: White Cliff Media.

Tomaino, C. M. (2008). "Using rhythmic auditory stimulation for rehabilitation." In J. Berger & G. Turow (Ed), Music, science and the rhythmic brain (pp. 111-121). London & New York: Routledge. 

RE-SHAPING BODY IMAGE: TAPE SCULPTURE AS ARTS-BASED SOCIAL JUSTICE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Laura Wood, PhD, RDT/BCT, CCLS, LMHC
Laura Teoli, MS, ATR-BC, LPC
 
Objectives:
1. Identify and describe 4 factors contributing to the self-perception of body image.
2. Name 3 ways to use tape sculptures in social action art therapy processes.
3. Learn 3 different ways to use art and drama therapies clinically within a post-modern context  to deconstruct and reconstruct new narratives regarding the client's experience of body image.
 
Cash, Thomas F., and Thomas Pruzinsky. Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice. New York: Guilford, 2002. Print.
 
Landy , R.J.(1997). Persona and Performance. Jessica Kingsley, London. 
 
Frederick, D. A.; Saguy, A. C.; & Gruys, K. (2016). "Culture, health, and bigotry: How exposure to cultural accounts of fatness shape attitudes about health risk, health policies, and weight-based prejudice." Social Science & Medicine, 165, 271-279. doi: 10.1016/j.socisciemed.2015.12.031












THURSDAY EVENING SESSIONS

RHYTHMIC TRANSFORMATION THROUGH DRUMMING, SOUND & MOVEMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Suzanne Tribe, MA, MT-BC, LCAT
Mary Knysh
 
Objectives:
1. Learn 3 group ice breaker activities to facilitate basic rhythmic skills, promote group teamwork, and improve focus and concentration when working with clients in treatment. (Tribe)
2. Describe 3 techniques for moderating group drumming activity in therapy groups with people of all ages. (Tribe)
3. Identify and demonstrate 3 types of improvisational techniques for enhancing non-verbal communication and increasing independent behavior in therapy groups. (Tribe)
 
Friedman, R. L. (2011). The healing power of the drum: A journey of rhythm and stories. Reno, NV: White Cliffs Media.

Hull, A. (1998). Drum circle spirit: Facilitating human potential through rhythm. Tempe, AZ: White Cliffs Media.

Knysh, M. (2013). Innovative drum circles: Beyond beat into harmony. Millville, PA: Rhythmic Connections Publications.


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