2017 Expressive Therapies Summit: NYC - Registration Site

FRIDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES & INTENSIVES

EXPRESSIVE WRITING & JOURNALING FOR ENHANCED NEUROPLASTICITY: FOUR KEYS TO WELL-BEING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Kathleen (Kay) Adams, LPC
Deborah Ross, CJT, LPC
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 4 keys to well-being that can be cultivated through expressive writing.
2. Discuss the role of mindfulness in expressive writing.
3. Practice 5 or more journal techniques to explore well-being.
 
Weiser, J. (1993). Phototherapy techniques. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ross, D., & Adams, K. (2016). Your Brain on Ink: A Workbook on Neuroplasticity and the Journal Ladder. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Siegel, D. (2012). The Pocket Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology. New York: W.W. Norton. 

FOCUSING & ART THERAPY: ACCESSING BODY WISDOM THROUGH CREATIVE EXPRESSION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Elizabeth Baring, MS, ATR-BC, NCPsyA, LCAT, LP
 
Objectives:
1. Describe the 4 key components of the Focusing attitude and their application to clinical treatment goals.
2. Identify, describe, and apply the 6 steps of Focusing with various clinical populations.
3. Identify and describe the properties of a bodily “felt sense” and state at least 3 ways to facilitate clients in accessing their "felt sense."
 
Gendlin, E. T. (1996). Focusing-oriented psychotherapy: A manual of the experiential method. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
 
Cornell, A.W. (2013).  Focusing in clinical practice. New York: W.W. Norton.
 
Rappaport, L. (2009). Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy Accessing the Body’s Wisdom and Creative Intelligence.  London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


ENGAGING ANGRY & RESISTANT CLIENTS THROUGH DRAMA, PSYCHODRAMA & ART

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

Working with Angry & Resistant Clients: Techniques for Attunement and Connection
John Bergman, MA, RDT, MT, BCT

Using Art & Psychodrama to Explore and Overcome Resistance
Bonnie Hirschhorn, LCSW, LCAT, LP, NCPsyA, ATR
 
Objectives:
1. Learn to create basic improvisation/role plays to explore resistance, fera and anger with complex resistant clients. (Bergman)
2. Identify 3 ways to begin a session with resistant clients such as aggressive adolescents, incarcerated men, probationers irritated by treatment demands. (Bergman)
3. List 3 simple techniques to experientially ground neurobiological reactivity/attunement in resistant clients. (Bergman)
4. Identify 2 different types of resistances. (Hirschhorn)
5. Clarify when to and when not to confront client resistance. (Hirschhorn)
6. Describe 3 different ways to use creative modalities to help clients overcome their resistances. (Hirschhorn)
 
Bergman, J & Hewish, S (2003). Challenging Experience. Oklahoma City: Wood ‘N’ Barnes.
Bergman, J, Hewish, S, Robson, M, and Tidmarsh, P (2006). "Experiential treatment resistance in the use of drama therapy with adolescents who sexually offend." In Current Perspectives: Working With Sexually Aggressive Youth & Youth With Sexual Behavior Problems (2006) Robert E. Longo & David S. Prescott (Editors) NEARI Press. Holyoake, Mass.
Bergman J (2013) “The theatre of meeting: the history of drama and other experiential therapies as neurological analogs” in Current Perspectives and Applications in Neurobiology: Working With Young Persons who are Victims and Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse. Eds: Longo R, et al. MA: Neari Press.

 
Robbins, A. (1980) Expressive Therapy, Human Service Press, NY.
 
Greenson, Ralph (1967) The Technique and Practice of Psychoanalysis, Karnacbooks, Great Britain.
 
Stark, Martha (1994) A Primer on Working with Resistance, Jason Aronson.
 

TREATMENT OF EATING DISORDERS USING EXPERIENTIAL THERAPY
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Rebecca Berman, LCSW-C, CEDS, MLSP
Lisa Luse, LCSW-C
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more types of eating disorders.
2. Clarify 3 or more ways avoidance is used to maintain eating disorders.
3. Facilitate 3 or more experiential therapies that encourage leaning into avoidant patterns.
 
David H. Barlow, Kristen K. Ellard, Christopher P. Fairholme, Todd J. Farchione, Christina L. Boisseau, Jill T. Ehrenreich May, and Laura B. Allen, (2011) Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders.
 
K. Carnabucci & L. Ciotola. (2013) Healing Eating Disorders with Psychodrama and Other Action Methods: Beyond the Silence and the Fury.
 
May, R (1975) Courage to Create.


THE BROKEN BOWL PROJECT: ADDICTION TREATMENT AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF WABI SABI
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Christa Brennan, ATR-BC, CASAC, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 models of addiction treatment approaches used today such as the medical model, legal model and moral model.
2. Define the following terms: wabi sabi, kintsukuroi, self-destructive behaviors, and resiliency.
3. Explain comorbidity between PTSD and substance use disorders.
 
Leslie K. Jacobsen, M.D., Steven M. Southwick, M.D., and Thomas R. Kosten, M.D. "Substance Use Disorders in Patients With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Review of the Literature."
Published online: August 01, 2001 http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.158.8.1184
 
Rasmussen, Sandra. (2000) Addiction Treatment: Theory and Practice. SAGE Publications
 
Chen, Gila. "The Meaning of Suffering in Drug Addiction and Recovery from the Perspective of Existentialism, Buddhism and the 12-step program." Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Volume 42, Issue 3, 2010.


DOLL MAKING - WORKING WITH ATTACHMENT AND LOSS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kimberly Bush, MFA, ATR-BC, CCLS, LCAT, LP
Nicole J. Inniss, MPS, CAT-Limited Permit
 
Objectives:
1. Describe 3 ways that doll making processes can support attachment and bonding in response to grief and loss.
2. Identify 1 or more doll making interventions and/or directives that would therapeutically benefit clients with attachment and/or loss issues.
3. Explain 1 or more rationales for using sensory materials in therapeutic work to support bonding, attachment, and transform loss.
 
Wallin, D. (2007). Attachment in psychotherapy. New York: The Guilford Press.
 
Feen-Calligan, H., McIntyre, B., and Sands-Goldstein, M. (2009). "Art Therapy Applications of Dolls in Grief Recovery, Identity, and Community Service." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 26(4) pp. 167-173.
 
Hastings, P. (2016). Doll making as a transformative process. Saugerties, NY: Author.


DOUBLING UP: INTEGRATING MUSIC THERAPY & PSYCHODRAMA TECHNIQUES TO SHIFT AWARENESS & ACTION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Amy Clarkson, MMT, MT-BC, LCAT, CP, PAT
Barbara McKechnie, MA, LPC, LCAT, RDT/BCT, CP, PAT

Objectives:
1. Define 3 key psychodrama terms:  enactment, doubling, role reversal.
2. Facilitate 1 musical doubling intervention through role play.
3. Describe 1 potential application of musical doubling or role reversal within their current clinical practice.
 
Austin, D. S. (2001).  In search of self: The use of vocal holding techniques with adults traumatized as children.  Music Therapy Perspectives, 19(1), 22-30.
 
Garcia, A. & Buchanan, D. R.  (2000).  "Psychodrama."  In Lewis, P. & Johnson, D. R. (Eds.).  Current approaches in drama therapy.  Springfield, Ill:  Charles C. Thomas.
 
Moreno, J.  (1999).  Acting your inner music:  Music therapy and psychodrama. Gilsum, NH:  Barcelona Publishers.


FOSTERING RESILIENCE & INCLUSIVITY WITH DIVERSE POPULATIONS: PROJECTS FOR PERSONAL & SOCIAL CHANGE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Lani A. Gerity, DA, ATR
Susan Ainlay Anand, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPAT (MS)
Jordan S. Potash, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT, LPCAT (MD), LCAT (NY)

Objectives:
1. Clarify at least 3 factors that encourage a positive sense of community during difficult and uncertain times.
2. Apply 3 or more activities in the art room which build community and support social change in a variety of populations.
3. Describe 3 or more resilience strategies that can be easily implemented within any art therapy practice.
 
Greene, M.  (1995)  Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts, and social change.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
 
King, M. (1956) "Alabama’s bus boycott: What it’s all about," US News and World Report, 3 August 1956, pp.82, 87-89.
 
Figley, C. R. (1995). Compassion fatigue: Coping with secondary traumatic stress in those who treat the traumatized. London: Brunner-Routledge.


YOGA, MEDITATION & ART THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR GROUPS
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Karen Gibbons, ATR-BC, LCAT, PYT

Objectives:
1. Apply 1 or more yoga poses for use with clinical groups.
2. Apply 1 or more intentions for mindful meditation with groups.
3. Apply 1 or more art directives integrated with yoga and mudra for clients in groups.
 
Khalsa, K. K. (2011).  Art & yoga: Kundalini awakening in everyday life, Santa Cruz: Kundalini Research Institute.
 
Weintraub, A. (2012). Yoga Skills for Therapists: Effective Practices for Mood Management, New York, NY, W. W. Norton and Company.
 
Gibbons, K. (2015). Integrating Art Therapy and Yoga Therapy; Yoga, Art and the Use of Intention, London, Jessica Kingsley Publishing.


WORKING WITH SEXUAL TRAUMA ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN: CREATING HEALING POSSIBILITIES 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Craig Haen, PhD, RDT, CGP, LCAT, FAGPA
Einat Metzl, PHD, LMFT, ATR-BC
Jillien Kahn, MFT, MEd

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 current theoretical approaches to treating sexual trauma through the expressive arts.
2. Describe 3 creative interventions used to assess and treat sexual trauma with clients.
3. Apply their understandings of the expressive tools discussed to 2 cases centered on sexuality and/or abuse issues.
 
Pifalo, T. (2009). "Mapping the maze: An art therapy intervention following disclosure of sexual abuse." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 26(1), 12-18. doi: 10.1080/07421656.2009.10129313
 
Metzl, E. S. (2016). Where art therapy meets sex therapy: Creative explorations of relationships, gender, and sexuality. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Haen, C. (2007). "Fear to tread: Play and drama therapy with boys who have been sexually abused." In S. Brooke (Ed.), The use of the creative therapies with sexual abuse survivors (pp. 235-249). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.


RIBBON, CORD, TWINE, & STRING: WEAVING THREAD ARTS INTO PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Betty Jackson, STA/ISST, LSW

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more myths or fairy tales from different cultures that use thread, cord, or string to symbolize human life and destiny.
2. Facilitate 3 therapeutic thread arts exercises in individual or group psychotherapy practice.
3. Apply 3 or more therapeutic Thread Arts exercises to psychotherapy practice with clients who have experienced trauma or loss.
 
Siegeltuch, M. (2010). The thread spirit -the symbolism of knotting and the fiber arts. 1: 1-21.
 
Siegel, D.J. (2003). Healing trauma - attachment, mind, body, and brain.
 
Badenoch, B. (2008). Being a brain-wise therapist.


DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment)
Kathryn Johnson, PhD, ATR
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations.
2. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice.
3. Report results from at least 3 normative DDS studies of psychiatric diagnostic groups.
 
Mills, A., Cohen, B. M., & Meneses, J. Z. (1993). "Reliability and validity tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 20(1), 83-88.
 
Betts, D. (2013). "Art therapy assessments with diverse populations: The Diagnostic Drawing Series" (addressed by Cohen, Mills, and Ichiki). In P. Howie, S. Prasad, & J. Kristel (Eds)., Using art therapy with diverse populations: Crossing cultures and abilities (pp. 46-47). London: Jessica Kingsley.
 
Mills, A. (2003) "The Diagnostic Drawing Series." In C. Malchiodi (Ed.), Handbook of Art Therapy, pp. 401-109. New York: Guilford.


INTERNAL FAMILY SYSTEMS (IFS) AND ART THERAPY: AN INTRODUCTION USING COLLAGE & CLAY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Salicia Mazero, MA, ATR, LPC

Objectives:
1. Define 3 groups of inner parts and their roles: Exiles, Firefighters and Managers, as well as basic principles of IFS.
2. Identify 3 or more of the 6 F's of the IFS model and the 8 qualities of Self in understanding Self Leadership.
3. Apply 4 ways IFS and Art Therapy complement each other using art interventions via case presentations and art experientials using clay and collage.
 
Sweezy, M. and Ziskind, E, editors.(2017). Innovations and elaborations in Internal Family Systems. Routledge.
 
Schwartz, R. (1995). Internal family systems. Guilford Press. NY.
 
Glass, M. (2016). Daily parts meditation practice; a journey of embodied integration for clients and therapists. Michelle Glass. Eugene, Oregon.


MONEY MATTERS: AN EXPERIENTIAL APPROACH TO ASSESSING & TREATING FINANCIAL TRAUMA
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Maria Kratsios, LCSW, MIA
Peter Lazar, LCSW

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 or more disordered patterns of financial behavior, and their corresponding corrective patterns of financial health.
2. Facilitate 3 experiential exercises for healing financial trauma.
3. Identify 3 or more common counter-transferential responses that can be a barrier to effective treatment, and tools for minimizing their impact.
 
Klontz, Brad, Psy.D. & Ted Klontz, PH.D.  Mind Over Money: Overcoming the Money Disorders That Threaten Our Financial Health. Broadway Books, 2009. Print.
 
Badenoch, Bonnie. Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology. Bonnie Badenoch, 2008. Print.
 
Clason, George S. The Richest Man in Babylon. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform: 2008. Print.


REFUGEES, RESETTLEMENT & RESTORATION: HOW CREATIVE ARTS THERAPIES FACILITATE SAFETY & EMPOWERMENT

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
 
Drama Therapy with Refugees and Displaced Persons: Establishing Safety, Envisioning Possibilities
Heidi Landis, RDT-BCT, LCAT, TEP, CGP
Nisha Sajnani, PhD, RDT-BCT
 
Seeking Refuge: Restoring Belonging after Large Scale Loss with Refugee Survivors of War
Amber Elizabeth Gray, MPH, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, LPCC
Annie King, ATR-BC
Ashley Fargnoli, MA, BC-DMT, LCPC
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 therapeutic techniques that may be used when working with people who have experienced displacement. (Landis/Sajnani)
2. Define and differentiate between terms such as refugee, asylum seeker, migrant, and immigrant. (Landis/Sajnani)
3. Identify and describe at least 1 theoretical assumption underpinning a minimum of 3 different drama therapy techniques. (Landis/Sajnani)
4. Understand The Triple Trauma Paradigm as it relates to displacement, loss and belonging. (Gray/King)
5. Learn a public-mental health approach to co-create an empowering, therapeutic group with group members. (Gray/King)
6. Learn 3 Dance/Movement Therapy structured activities to help restore safety, connection and belonging. (Gray/King)
 
Dokter, D. (1998/2017) Arts therapists, refugees, and migrants: Reaching across borders. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley.
 
Landis, H. (2014). "Drama therapy with newly-arrived refugee women." In N.Sajnani and D.R. Johnson (Eds.) Trauma-informed drama therapy: Transforming clinics, classrooms, and communities (pp. 287-306). Springfield, Il: Charles C. Thomas.
 
Sajnani, N., Linds, W., Wong, A., Ndejuru, L., Lu, L., Gareau, P., and Ward, D. (2015). "The Living Histories Ensemble: Sharing authority through play, storytelling, and performance in the aftermath of violence." In D. Conrad and A. Sinner (eds.), Creating together: Participatory, community-based and collaborative arts practices and scholarship across Canada. Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier University
 
Citations Forthcoming

BOOKMAKING & VISUAL STORYTELLING: MAKING COMICS, BOOKS, AND COMIC BOOKS IN THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Melissa Meyer, LMHC, ATR
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more narrative and sequential arts based expressive therapy activities, including simple book binding and comic strip creation.
2. Describe 1 or more ways in which using comics and visual storytelling in a therapeutic setting can help to facilitate change.
3. Identify 3 or more populations that could benefit from experiential techniques learned in this session and how to adapt activities accordingly.
 
Barry, Lynda (2014). Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor. Montreal: Drawn and Quarterly.
 
Moon, Catherine Hyland (2010). Materials & Media in Art Therapy: Critical Understandings of Diverse Artistic Vocabularies. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Brunetti, Ivan (2011). Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice. New Haven: Yale University Press.


BUILDING & MANAGING YOUR PRIVATE PRACTICE: FINDING A PROFESSIONAL VOICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Emery Mikel, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT, LCPAT
Reina Lombardi, LMHC-QS, ATR-BC, ATCS
Erika Hamlett, MA
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more ways to serve clients ethically in private practice.
2. Clarify a 5-sentence vision statement and state its importance to ethical private practice.
3. Apply therapeutic intervention of creating a fabric mandala to address at least 2 different treatment goals.
 
Mikel, E. (2013). The art of business: A guide for creative arts therapists starting on a path to self-employment. London: Jessica Kingsley Publisher’s.
 
Carroll, M. (2007). The mindful leader: Awakening your natural management skills through mindfulness meditation. Boston: Trumpeter.
 
Lee, J. (2011). The right-brain business plan: A creative, visual map for success. Novato, California: New World Library


BODY-BASED TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONAL COMMUNICATION IN THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
 
Deniz Oktay, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT
Cara Aubrey Gallo-Jermyn, MS BC-DMT/LCAT NYS
Joan Wittig, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT
Laura Raffa, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT
 
Objectives:
1. Apply mind/body understanding to use in forming successful therapeutic relationships.
2. Identify thoughts, feelings and sensations that arise in the body and this can help identify emotional communication which occurs in the therapeutic relationship.
3. Facilitate more informed interventions when working with clients.
 
Wittig, Joan. (2015) Embodied Experience: Authentic Movement in Dance/Movement Therapy.
 
Adler, J. (2002). Offering from the conscious body: The discipline of Authentic Movement. Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions.
 
Chodorow, J. (1991). Dance therapy and depth psychology: The moving imagination. London; UK. Routledge.


ENVIRONMENTAL ART THERAPY: INTEGRATING THE INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dina Schapiro, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Jean Davis, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Learn an overview of theory and application of Environmental Art Therapy.
2. Begin contemplating how this work makes contact with their personal and/or professional selves through an increased understanding of both subjective and objective external conditions and material.
3. Identify the intersections between Attachment Theory, Gestalt Theory, Social Activism, and Environmental Art Therapy.
 
Hinz. Lisa D. (2009). Expressive Therapies Continuum. New York: Taylor and Francis Group
 
Ausubel, K. (2012). Dreaming the future: Reimagining civilization in the Age of Nature. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing
 
Alexander K. Madeline R. (2016) Green Studio: Nature and the Arts in Therapy. Nova Publishers: New York


SANDTRAY FOR TREATING TRAUMA, ANXIETY & DEPRESSION: CONTAINMENT AND HEALING FOR CLIENTS OF ALL AGES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tammi van Hollander, RPT, LCSW
 
Objectives:
1. Discover 5 or more specific ways to integrate sandtray into play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy with children in clinical practice. 
2. Apply at least 4 creative solution-focused interventions using sandtray and play therapy with teens and adults in play and expressive therapies practices. 
3. Describe 3 or more ways that sandtray work in play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy can help enhance brain function, release affect, and stimulate insight. 
 
Hunter, L. (1998). Images of Resiliency: Troubled Children Create Healing Stories in the Language of Sandplay. Palm Beach, FL: Behavioral Communications Institute.
 
Bradway, Kay. (1992). "Transference and Countertransference in Sandplay Therapy." The Journal of Sandplay Therapy Volume 1, Number 1.
 
Homeyer, Linda E. & Daniel Sweeney.(2013). Sandtray: A Practical Manual. Canyon Lake, MI.












FRIDAY EVENING WORKSHOPS

SCULPTING RELATIONSHIPS: A DYNAMIC TECHNIQUE FOR COUPLES & FAMILY THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Paula Ochs LCSW, CP, PAT
Jude Webster, DSW, MA, LCSW
   
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 1 of the steps involved in the concept of using sculpts to address a therapeutic impasse.
2. Explain how to distill 1 verbal problem and translate it into a sculpt.
3. Apply 1 or more ways to execute a new intervention using sculpting.

Papp, P. et al. (2013). "Breaking the Mold: Sculpting Impasses in Couples’ Therapy" in Family Process, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2013©FPI, Inc. doi: 10.1111/famp.12022

Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Moreno, J.L. (1994). Psychodrama & Group Psychotherapy First Volume. McLean, VA: Beacon House.

 

 

INTEGRATING SOMATIC & SENSORY THERAPIES WITH PLAY FOR TREATING COMPLEX TRAUMA ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jennifer Lefebre-McGevna, PsyD, RPT-S   
 
Objectives:
1. Describe 3 or more movement patterns, gestures or non-verbal cues that indicate a child’s psychological experience.
2. Identify 3 or more embodied play techniques for working with trauma-related symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults.
3. List 2 or more strategies to improve affect regulation and foster resilience in people with complex trauma.

Ogden, P., & Fisher, J. (2015). Sensorimotor psychotherapy: Interventions for trauma and attachment. WW Norton & Company.

Courtois, C. A., & Ford, J. D. (Eds.). (2009). Treating complex traumatic stress disorders: An evidence-based guide. Guilford Press.

Langmuir, J. I., Kirsh, S. G., & Classen, C. C. (2012). "A pilot study of body-oriented group psychotherapy: Adapting sensorimotor psychotherapy for the group treatment of trauma." Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 4(2), 214. 

 





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