2017 Expressive Therapies Summit: NYC - Registration Site

SATURDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES

SHAPING COHERENT NARRATIVES WITH CLOTH, COLLAGE & MOVEMENT: MENDING THROUGH METAPHOR
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Deborah Armstrong, PhD, LMFT, RPT-S
Elizabeth Walker, MA

Objectives:
1. Identify and describe cohesive & coherent narratives & how these each affect the well-being of the human being.
2. Describe how the multimodal practice can be used to develop one or more coherent narratives, personally, familially, & culturally.
3. Evaluate and describe how the narrative processes can be used to create effective mending experiences in clinical work.

Collier, A. F. (2012). Using textile arts and handcrafts in therapy with women: weaving lives back together. London; Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Marks-Tarlow, T. (2008). Psyche’s veil: psychotherapy, fractals, and complexity. London; New York: Routledge.

Siegel, Daniel. (1999). The developing mind: how relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are. Guilford Press. New York, N.Y.



AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT AND OPEN STUDIO PROCESS: WITNESSING AND EMPATHIC ATTUNEMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Julie Miller, LCSW, BC-DMT, LCAT
Kimberly Bush, MFA, ATR-BC, CCLS, LCAT, LP
Judith Luongo, LCAT, LP, ATR, MPS

Objectives:
1. Describe the term and the meaning of "embodied experience".
2. Identify 3 or more ways in which embodied experiences can be manifested through visual imagery and art making.
3. Apply 3 or more principles of authentic movement and open studio process to increase empathic attunement in their work with their clients.
 
Pallaro, P. (2007). Authentic Movement: Moving the Body, Moving the Self, Being Moved. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London, UK.

Allen, P. (2014). "Intention and Witness: Tools for Mindfulness in Art and Writing." In Laury Rappaport (Ed.) Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies (pp. 51-61). Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London, UK.

McNiff, S. (2014). "The Role of Witnessing and Immersion in the Moment of Arts Therapy Experience." In Laury Rappaport (Ed.) Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies (pp. 38-50). Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London, UK.


COPING SKILLS TOOLBOX FOR MANAGING THE SYMPTOMS OF TRAUMA
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Lisa Miller, LMFT
Erin Edwards, MDiv
Denise Anima, LMFT

Objectives:
1. Define 3 or more types of trauma and trauma symptoms.
2. List 3 or more of SAMSHA's 6 key principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach.
3. Identify 3 or more 'tools' that can be created using various art media to manage symptoms of trauma safely.

Herman, J. L. (1997). Trauma and recovery. New York: BasicBooks.

Malchiodi, C. A. (2008). Creative interventions with traumatized children. New York: Guilford Press.

A., V. D. (2015). The body keeps the score: brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma. NY, NY: Penguin Books.


MULTIMODAL TECHNIQUES FOR MOVING BEYOND ILLNESS & STRESS FROM THE WORK OF LUCIA CAPACCHIONE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Vicki Muir, MEd, MSW, LCSW
Iiris Bjornberg
Marsha Nelson, PhD, CJEA

Objectives:
1. Facilitate 1 or more methods for releasing emotions though simple scribbles.
2. Facilitate at least 3 inner body journeying and mapping activities with written dialogues with the body parts and identify at least 1 clinical population that would benefit.
3. Facilitate 1 or more guided heart yoga of Tibet-Opening Our Hearts to Giving and Taking and describe an appropriate method of integrating it within clinical practice.

Capacchione, Lucia (2001) The Art of Emotional Healing, 69-80

Capacchione, Lucia (2017) Hello, This Is Your Body Talking, A Draw -It-Yourself Coloring Book 19-36

Roach, Geshe Michael (2004) The Tibetan Book of Yoga: Ancient Buddhist Teachings on the Philosophy and Practice of Yoga


FROM ADDICTION TO RECOVERY THROUGH COLLAGE, DRAMA AND SONGWRITING: THREE CREATIVE & PRACTICAL INTERVENTIONS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

Collage Self-Portraits for Self-Integration in Addiction Therapy
Bethany Perryman
Megan Torres, MAAT, LPC

Songwriting with a Substance Abuse Population
Melissa Nilles, MA

Eating Disorders and Addictions: A Drama Therapy Perspective
TJ Alton, LMFT, RDT

Objectives:
1. Describe with greater equanimity the scope and impact of current addiction treatments and state of recovery advocacy in the United States. (Perryman/Torres)
2. Facilitate 1 or more collage activities designed to help patients in addiction treatment explore their fractured selves and begin or continue the process of re-integration. (Perryman/Torres)
3. Identify 3 or more pieces of the self as described by their patients and their collage work, via identifying symbols with the patient or through active listening and framing. (Perryman/Torres)
4. Facilitate 1 or more music and poetry therapy-based group songwriting exercises with adults in substance use treatment settings. (Nilles)
5. Identify 3 elements of basic song structure and how to apply them to clinical songwriting. (Nilles)
6. Apply 2 techniques for working with common resistances found in substance use population in order to improve client engagement in group songwriting process (or other music therapy-based group work). (Nilles)

7. Identify 3 or more fundamentals of Drama Therapy and how it can be useful as a treatment modality for Eating and Substance Use Disorder Treatment. (Alton)
2. Apply at least 3 experiential interventions to help their clients externalize the internal while gauging a client’s readiness for change. (Alton)
3. Identify at least 3 ways to help clients reintegrate the positive aspects of their eating and/or substance use disorder after helping client’s identify the role that Eating or Substance abuse disorder played in their lives. (Alton)
 
Richman, S. (2014.) Mended by the muse: Creative transformations of trauma. New York: Routledge.

Carr, R. & Haas-Cohen, N. (Eds.). (2008.) Art therapy and clinical neuroscience. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Dowell, M. L., Henningfield, J. E., & Santora, P. B. (Eds.). (2010). Addiction and art. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Wigram, T., & Backer, F. (2014). Songwriting: methods, techniques and clinical applications for music therapy clinicians, educators and students. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley.
Aldridge, D., & Fachner, J. (2010). Music Therapy and Addictions. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley.
Perlin, E. (2009). Breaking addictions with biblio/poetry therapy. Bloomington, IN: Author House.

Dayton, T. (2005). The living stage: A step-by-step guide to psychodrama, sociometry and experiential group therapy. Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications, Inc.

Emunah, R. (1994). Acting for real: Drama therapy, process, technique and performance. New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.

Schaefer, J. & Rutledge, T. (2004). Life without ed: How one woman declared independence from her eating disorder and how you can too. New York, NY: Mc Graw Hill Education.


SENSORY GARDENS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN AND OTHERS IN TREATMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Kelvin Ramirez, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT
Anne Meore, LMSW, HTR
Rebecca Hervieux
Elizabeth Youngs, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. Understand the general history of horticultural therapy, define its contemporary functions, and identify 2 benefits of therapeutically engaging the senses.
2. Identify and Integrate 3 convergent and 3 divergent theoretical foundations among the expressive arts therapies, play therapy, and horticultural therapy.
3. Demonstrate through workshop experientials and discussions 3 benefits of integrating the expressive arts therapies and/or play therapy within the therapeutic framework of sensory gardens/horticultural therapy.

Hussein, H. (2011). "The Influence of Sensory Gardens on the Behavior of Children with Special Education Needs." Asian Journal of Environment-Behavior Studies, 2(4), 77-93.

Kaplan, S. (1995).  "The Restorative Benefits of Nature:  Toward an Integrative Framework."  The Journal of Environmental Psychology 15 169-182.

Cooper Marcus, C. and Barnes, M (1999). Healing Gardens:  Therapeutic Benefits & Design Recommendations. John Wiley & Sons.


MORNING WORKSHOPS

QUICK COLLAGES FOR CLIENTS OF ALL AGES: PIECING TOGETHER POSSIBILITIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 2 ways to use Quick Collage techniques in therapy with clients of all ages in psychotherapy and counseling.
2. Practice 2 methods of writing in response to a Quick Collage to enhance treatment objectives with clients in therapy.
3. Describe 3 ways to use Quick Collage techniques to further specific goals in clinical work with clients of all ages.
 
Harrison, H, and Grasdal, P. (2003).  Collage for the soul: Expressing hopes and dreams through art.  Gloucester, MA: Rockport Publishers,  p. 7.
 
Hillman, J. (1977). "Inquiry into image." Spring: An Annual of Archetypal Psychology and Jungian Thought, pp. 62-88. Zurich: Spring.  

Whiting, L. (2008).  Living into art: Journeys through collage.  Paper Lantern: Boyes Hot Springs, CA. 

THE ENIGMA OF DESIRE: SEX, LONGING AND BELONGING 
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Galit Atlas, PhD, LCAT, LP

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 links between attachment and sexuality.
2. Outline 3 implications of infant research for adult treatment.
3. Analyze 2 patterns of distress and regulation presented in a case.

Atlas, G. (2016). The enigma of desire: Sex, longing and belonging in psychoanalysis. New York, NY: Routledge.

BeBeebe, B., & Lachmann, F. M. (2013). The origins of attachment: Infant research and adult treatment. New York, NY: Routledge.

Benjamin, J. (2004). "Revisiting the riddle of sex." In I. Matthis (Ed.), Dialogues on sexuality, gender, and psychoanalysis (pp. 145-172). London, UK: Karnac.

EXPRESSIVE WRITING AS ACTIVISM
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathleen Adams, LPC
Nancy Scherlong, MS, PTR, LCSW
Deborah Ross, CJT, LPC

Objectives:
1. Demonstrate 2 or more ways that writing can be used for personal change and collective activism.
2. Describe 2 or more metaphors that can be used in treatment to facilitate conscious change.
3. Articulate 2 or more individual action plans for personal or community activism.

Adams, Kathleen (Editor). 2013. Expressive Therapy: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Dunlap, D. (2007). Undoing the Silence: Six Tools for Social Writing Change. New York: New Village Press.
 
Pipher, M. (2006). Writing to Change the World: An Inspirational Guide for Transforming the World with Words. New York: Berkeley Publishers.


ADVENTURE-BASED EXPERIENTIAL ARTS GROUPS FOR PROMOTING CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING & TEAMWORK
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Jane Bishow-Semevolos, LCAT, ATR-BC, PCL2

Objectives:
1. List 3 adventure based counseling “ice-breaker” activities that energize a group and also correspond to a therapeutic goal.
2. Explain 3 art therapy directives for individuals and groups that promote creative thinking.
3. Identify 3 reasons why challenging oneself as a therapist/facilitator benefits clients.

Schoel, J., Prouty, D., & Radcliffe, P. (1989). Islands of healing: a guide to adventure based counseling. Hamilton, MA: Project Adventure.

Rohnke, K. (1989). Cowstails and cobras a guide to games, initiatives, ropes courses & adventure curriculum. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2009). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper Row.


SHADOW PARTS OF SELF: A MULTIMODAL EXPLORATION OF THE GIFTS THEY HOLD
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Beth Charbonneau, LCSW-C

Objectives:
1. Define 3 or more psychotherapeutic perspectives on shadow parts of the self.
2. Facilitate 4 different creative arts interventions, from various modalities, to challenging shadow material.
3. Describe 3 ore more therapeutic benefits of working with shadow parts of the self.

Zweig, C., & Wolf, S. (1997). Romancing the shadow: Illuminating the dark side of the soul. New York: Ballantine Books.

Schwartz, R. C. (1995). Internal family systems therapy. New York: Guilford Press.

Jung, C. G. (1933). Modern man in search of a soul. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.


PROCESS-ORIENTED SOCIAL SKILL-BUILDING: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH FOR AUTISM & SPECIAL NEEDS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Rachel Cimino, LCAT ATR-BC
Faith Condon Thayer, PhD, LPC, LCAT, ATR-BC
Matthew Brady, MS, LCAT, MT-BC

Objectives:
1. Describe 1 or more way of viewing goal progress through group process.
2. Explain 3 ways DIR/Floortime can be used in conjunction with Creative Arts Therapies.
3. Apply 1 or more techniques for determining students’ best creative modality “fit.”

Greenspan, S.I., & Weider, S. (2006). Engaging autism: Using the floortime appraoch to help children relate, communicate, and think. Philadelphia, PA: Da Capo Lifelong Books.

CDC Features - New data on autism spectrum disorders. (n.d.). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved March 29, 2013, from http://www.cdc.gov/Features/CountingAutism/

Carpente J. A. (2016). "Investigating the effectiveness of a developmental, individual difference, relationship-based (DIR) improvisational music therapy program on social communication for children with autism spectrum disorder." Music Therapy Perspectives Advance Access. doi: 10.1093/mtp/miw013


JOURNEYING WITH DEATH IN THE PLAY THERAPY SANDTRAY
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Theresa Fraser, MA, CCW, CYC-P, CPT-S
Tammi Van Hollander, RPT, LCSW


Objectives:
1. Identify 1 or more elements of an effective sandtray and play-based self-care plan for teaching to clients. 
2. Explain 2 or more ways that sandtray techniques can be used in play therapy with clients of all ages to process beliefs, values, and attitudes about death and dying.
3. Describe 2 or more ways that integrating miniatures into your play therapy or expressive arts practice can enhance its efficacy.

Becher.,E,H.,Ogasawara,T.Harris,S.(2012) "Death of a Clinician: The Personal, Practical and Clinical Implications of Therapist Mortality," Contemporary Family Therapy 34,(3)

Scaletti.,R.,& Hocking,C.(2010). "Healing through story telling: an integrated approach to children experiencing grief and loss." New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy 57(2).

Vlachos, I. I. (2011). "Children of a mortal God: A therapy group’s journey in the wake of their therapist’s unexpected death." British Journal of Psychotherapy, 27(1), 93–110. doi:10.?1111/?j.?1752-0118.?2010.?01224.?x.


COMBINING ART THERAPY WITH BIBLIOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN'S GROUPS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment; Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Laura Fuller-Cooper, MAAT, ATR-L BC, NCC

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 books from children's literature which can be paired with art therapy directives to create a thematic expressive therapy group for young child clients.
2. Facilitate multimodal therapy groups for child clients based on 3 therapeutic themes inspired by children's literature.
3. Describe 3 common visual and content motifs in client artwork which emerge following experientials using specific children's books in combination with expressive art therapy directives.

Bettelheim, B. (1976).  The uses of enchantment.  New York:  Random House, Inc.

Malchiodi, C.A. & Ginns-Gruenberg, D. (2008).  "Trauma, Loss and Bibliotherapy:  The Healing Power of Stories."  In Malchiodi, C.A.  (Ed.).  (2008). Creative interventions with traumatized children.  New York:  Guilford Press.

The Behavior Advisor (2015).  Bibliotherapy with a focus on teachers.  Retrieved January 23, 2015 from http://www.behavioradvisor.com/Biblio.html


MANAGING TRAUMA-BASED ANGER, AGGRESSION & RAGE: A CREATIVE ARTS APPROACH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Lynn Hazard, MSW, LICSW-PIP, CAMS-II

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 main ways trauma survivors express anger, aggression, and rage.
2. List 5 signs or symptoms that indicate the presence of a nuerophysiological 'fight' state.
3. Describe 5 components of processing and mastering anger-based traumatic memories and responses.

Porges, S.W. (2011). The polyvagal theory: Neurophysiological foundations of emotions, attachment, communication, and self-regulation. New York, NY: W.W. Norton Company, Inc.

Gladding, S. (2016) The creative arts in counseling, 5th ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Silberg, J.L. (2013). The child survivor: Healing developmental trauma and dissociation. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Group.


AUTO-REGULATION AND PLAY THERAPY INTERVENTIONS: HEALING THE BODY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jennifer Lefebre-McGevna, PsyD, RPT-S

Objectives:

1. Describe 3 or more movement patterns, gestures or non-verbal cues that indicate a child’s psychological experience.

 

2. Identify 3 or more embodied play techniques for working with trauma-related symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults.

3. List 2 or more strategies to improve affect regulation and foster resilience in people with complex trauma.   

 

Citations Forthcoming

OVERCOMING PERFORMANCE ANXIETY: COGNITIVE & CREATIVE TOOLS FOR SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Adele Paxton, MS, PPRNCM, LPC

Objectives:
1. Identify 5 types of situations where we place pressure on ourselves to achieve.
2. Describe at least 3 cognitive techniques that address performance anxiety.
3. Apply 3 or more somatic approaches that can prevent performance anxiety and make space for new ways of behaving

Cuddy, A. (2015). Presence: Bringing your boldest self to your biggest challenges. New York: Little, Brown and Co.

Boone, D.R. (1997). Is your voice telling on you? How to find and use your natural voice. San Diego: Singular Publishing Group.

Campbell, D.G. (1989). The roar of silence: Healing powers of breath, tone, and music. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books.


UNDERSTANDING PHYSICAL & EMOTIONAL CUES WHEN TREATING EATING DISORDERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Maggie Ritnour, LMHC, LCAT, ATR-BC
Liz Carrara, MS, RDN, CDN
Courtney Dowdell, LCAT, RDT

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 chronic disease states influenced by increased stress secondary to excessive worry and distress.
2. Facilitate understanding and utilization of a hunger/fullness scale tool to measure physical sensation.
3. Describe at least 1 way creative arts therapies modalities can serve as complimentary tools for collaborating with dietitians in treatment for people struggling with eating disorders.

van der Kolk, Bessel A. (2014). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma. New York: Penguin Books.

Bacon, Linda. (2008). Health at every size: The surprising truth about your weight. Dallas: Benbella Books, Inc.

Citation Forthcoming


INTERVENTION, HOLDING ENVIRONMENT, AND TRANSITIONAL OBJECTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Arthur Robbins, EdD, ATR, HLM

Objectives :
1. Identify 2 or more ways that empathy and mirroring impact developmental expression in treatment.
2. List 3 or more ways in which transitional objects function within a creative arts therapy approach to treatment.
3. Identify 1 or more elements of an effective sandtray and play-based self-care plan for teaching to clients.
 
Citations Forthcoming
 










LUNCH & LEARNS

PROVIDING EFFECTIVE CLINICAL TREATMENT IN A MANAGED CARE WORLD
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Kristy Rapp, LMHC
Sabrina Askari-Dougherty, LMFT

Objectives:
1. Understand and describe the 8 aspects of the clinical framework used by managed care entities.
2. Learn 3 communication strategies for conversations with managed care entities regarding the clinical treatment of clients.
3. Identify 3 ways to partner with managed care entities and other client-serving systems in the treatment of clients.

Chambliss, Catherine (1998). Preparing Psychotherapy Students for the New Demands of Managed Care. U.S. Department of Education; Office of Education Research and Improvement, Ursinus College, Collegeville, PA. pp. 1-32.

Hocutt, Anne; McKinney, James; Montague, Marjorie (2000). The Impact of Managed Care on the Effects to Prevent Emotional Disturbance in Young Children. U.S. Department of Education; Office of Education Research and Improvement, A System of Care for Children’s Mental Health: Expanding the Research Base. Tampa, FL. Pp 1-4.

Hinz, L. (2009). Expressive Therapies Continuum: A Framework for Using Art in Therapy. New York: Routledge. pp 217-240.

 

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Neal King, LCSW
COMEDY IMPROV THERAPY & CBT FOR WORKING WITH SOCIAL ANXIETY ISSUES
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 basic principles of comedy improv techniques needed to facilitate a group specific to Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).
2. Describe how to incorporate the 4 necessary elements specific to comedy improv into group therapy.
3. Explain 1 or more ways—and when to—incorporate CBT into the group experience to address co-existing challenges such as low self-confidence, low self-image and fear of failure in group members.


Norton, P. (2012).  Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Anxiety: A Transdiagnostic Treatment Manual.  The Guilford Press.

Wiener, D. (1994).  Rehearsals for Growth: Theater Improvisation for Psychotherapists.  W. W. Norton & Company.

Wiener, J. (2003).  Action Therapy with Families and Groups: Using Creative Arts Improvisation in Clinical Practice. American Psychological Association.
 

DEEPENING APPROACHES TO IMAGE & METAPHOR FOR EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPISTS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 ways in which in working imaginally differs from Jungian therapy practices.
2. List 3 methods used in archetypal psychology to explore the image for metaphor.
3. Apply 3 or more gadgets, as defined by Hillman et al, to imagery i order to access metaphor and listen for poetic insight.

Hillman, J. (1977). Inquiry into image. Spring: An Annual of Archetypal Psychology and Jungian Thought, pp. 62-88. Zurich: Spring.

Abbenante, J. & Wix, L.  (2015).  "Archetypal Art Therapy."  In The Wiley Handbook of Art Therapy, D. Gussak & Rosal, M. Eds., (pp. 37-46).  London: John Wiley & Sons.

Berry, P. (1982). Echo’s subtle body: Contributions to an archetypal psychology.  Dallas: Spring Publications.


VOCAL PSYCHOTHERAPY: SELF-DISCOVERY THROUGH BREATH & SOUND
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Diane Austin, DA, ACMT, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Discuss at least 3 ways in which the voice can be used effectively in psychotherapy.
2. Define "vocal psychotherapy."
3. Explain "vocal holding techniques," and be able to apply at least 1 of these techniques in clinical practice.

Bruscia, K. E. (Ed.) (1998). The dynamics of music psychotherapy. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.

Miller, A. (1981). The drama of the gifted child. New York: Basic Books.
 
Newham, P. (1998). Therapeutic voicework: Principles and practice for the use of singing as a therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


HELPING LGBTQ YOUTH CREATE A COHERENT SELF-NARRATIVE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Mark Beauregard, RDT-BCT, LCAT
Kristin Long, RDT, BCT, LCAT, LP

Objectives:
1. Name 3 ways LGBTQ youth face specific social and emotional obstacles, and how narratives that are often projected onto these youth by society can affect them. 
2. Verbalize the difference between relational (complex or little t) trauma and simple (big T) trauma, and state at least 2 ways traumas can impact the development and self-image of LGBTQ youth.
3. Learn 3 specific arts-based interventions they can apply safely in their work settings to help youth create and tell self-narratives.

Klein, A., & Golub S. A. (2016). "Family rejection as a predictor of suicide attempts and substance misuse among transgender and gender nonconforming adults." LGBT Health, 3, 193–199.

Green, J.A. (2003). "Growing up Hidden: Notes on Understanding Male Homosexuality." Am. J. Psychoanal., 63:177-191.

Human Rights Campaign (2013), Growing Up LGBT in America: HRC Youth Survey Report Key Findings, Washington, DC: Human Rights Campaign.


POST-DISASTER TREATMENT AND PTSD PREVENTION: ART, BODY & PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Sunhee Kim, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT
Nayung Kim, PhD, BC-DMT, CMA, SEP

Objectives:
1. List 5 concepts of psychosocial intervention areas to prepare as arts therapist at times of disaster.
2. Apply and experience ‘drawing breath’ as a psycho-education method for stress management using marker in both hands in life-size paper.
3. Apply and experience 3 and more ‘kinesthetic grounding’ methods as psychological first aid using bodily sensation.

Malchiodi, C. A. (Ed.). (2014). Creative interventions with traumatized children. New York: Guilford Publications.

Lusebrink, V. B. (2010). "Assessment and therapeutic application of the Expressive Therapies Continuum: Implications for brain structures and functions." Art Therapy, 27(4), 168-177.

Calhoun, L. G., & Tedeschi, R. G. (2006). The foundation of posttraumatic growth: Expended framework. Handbook of posttraumatic growth: Research and practice. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.


PLAYING WITH A FULL DECK: TAROT & NOTE CARDS AS CREATIVE CLINICAL TOOLS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Andy Matzner, LCSW

Objectives:
1. List and describe 3 or more ways to utilize blank cards and magic markers for therapeutic purposes.
2. Identify 3 or more clinical settings in which to use the cards.
3. Facilitate 3 or more therapeutic activities using blank cards and markers.

Buchalter, S. (2009). Art Therapy Techniques and Applications. London: Jessica Kingsley.

McNiff, S. (2004). Art Heals: How Creativity Cures the Soul. Boulder, CO: Shambhala Publications.

Allen, P. (1995). Art Is a Way of Knowing. Boulder, CO: Shambhala Publications.


DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS: ASSESSMENT, ALLIANCES & ANGER ISSUES

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Assessment)
Anne Mills, MA, ATR-BC, LPC

Objectives:
1. List 1 or more benefits of focusing on pacing and containment in the clinical process. 
2. Name at least 1 evidence-based finding of distinctive characteristics of Diagnostic Drawing Series created by people diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder.
3. Identify 2 main ways trauma survivors express anger, aggression, and rage.

Mills, A. (2009). Teaching affect tolerance to anger-avoidant trauma survivors: An art therapy-based approach using The Anger Protocol. Alexandria, VA:  Guild Press. 

Mills, A.  (2011).  "Therapist’s Page:  Adjunctive Therapy."  In Many Voices (Ed. Lynn Waznak), April. p. 6 – 7. Available at http://www.manyvoicespress.org/backissues-pdf/2011_04.pdf

Mills, A., & Cohen, B. M.  (1993).  "Facilitating the identification of multiple personality disorder through art:  The Diagnostic Drawing Series."  In E. Kluft (Ed.), Expressive and functional therapies in the treatment of multiple personality disorder.  Springfield:  Charles C Thomas.


WORKING WITH CHILDREN OF DIVORCE USING PLAY THERAPY & YOGA

(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Michelle Pliske, MSW, LCSW, RPT-S
Lindsay Balboa, MSSW, LCSW

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 areas of the brain: Brain stem, limbic system & cortex associated with the stress response cycle and be able to successfully pair two-three reflective statements which target each one of these areas for integrated neural networking within the nervous system.
2. Understand how to successfully combine 5 play therapy techniques with yoga for children to develop adaptive regulation skills.
3. Increase their ability to document cases effectively and preserve the therapeutic relationship within the court process by applying 2 areas of the code of ethics in preparing for potential records requests or testimony within divorce cases.

Anderson, J. (2014). "The impact of family structure on divorce in children: Effects of divorce." The Linacre Quarterly, 81 (4), 378-387.

Galantino, M. L. (2008). Therapeutic effects of yoga for children: A systematic review of the literature. Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association, 20, 66-80.

Gaskill, R. L. & Perry, B. (2014) "The neurobiological power of play: Using the neurosequential model of therapeutics to guide play in the healing process." In C. A. Malchiodi & D.A. Crenshaw (Eds.) Creative arts and play therapy for attachment problems. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
 

PSYCHODYNAMIC & CREATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGING DIFFICULT CLIENT-THERAPIST ISSUES

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Allison Reynolds, LCSW, LCAT, MT-BC

Objectives:
1. Define the following 3 clinical terms: transference, countertransference and projective identification.
2. Apply 3 new techniques to help deepen their understanding and awareness of the clinical process.
3. Describe 1 or more new insights into their clinical work that they have gained through this workshop.

Austin, D. (2008). The theory and practice of vocal psychotherapy songs of the self.
 London,UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Racker, H. (1957). "The meanings and uses of countertransference." Psychoanalytic  Quarterly, 26(3), 303-357.

Sedgwick, D. (1994). The wounded healer: Countertransference from the Jungian  perspective. London: Rutledge.
 

EXPLORING MASKS: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS & COUNTERTRANSFERENCE POTENTIAL

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kara Rothschild, MS, ATR-BC
Leah Floyd, LCAT, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more symbolic functions of masks.
2. Apply 2 specific techniques to approach mask making with client populations.
3. Identify at least 3 populations with which mask making can be clinically relevant and appropriate to use.

Edson, G. (2009). Masks and masking: Faces of tradition and belief worldwide. MacFarland & Company Inc. Publishers: Jefferson, NC.

Mack, J. (1994). Masks and the art of expression. Harry N Abrams: New York, NY.

Sivin, C. (1986). Maskmaking. Davis Publications, Inc: Worcester, MA.
 

ALONG THE BUDDHIST PATH: POETRY, JOURNAL & ACTION METHODS FOR MINDFULNESS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Nancy Scherlong, MS, PTR, LCSW

Objectives:
1. Define and describe 4 of the basic tenets of Buddhist practice.
2. Experience 2 or more therapeutic writing techniques.
3. Experience action methods of doubling and sculpture.
4. Experience a body focused breathing meditation that incorporates writing.

Wegela, K.K.  (2014).  Contemplative Psychotherapy Essentials:  Enriching Your Practice with Buddhist Psychology.  New York:  Norton.

Kornfield, J.  (2017). No Time Like the Present:  Finding Freedom, Joy and Love Right Where You Are.  New York:  Atria.

Hanh, T.N. (2009). Happiness: Essential Mindfulness Practices. California: Parallax.


ACCESS THE TRANSFORMATIONAL POWER OF YOUR DREAMS: A PSYCHODRAMATIC EXPLORATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Ingrid Schirrholz, Dipl-Psych, MA, TEP

Objectives:
1. Identify 1 or more ways to warm up a group to work with dreams.
2. Describe 1 or more techniques to enter right-brain consciousness.
3. List 1 or more ways to maximize significant elements of dreams and their underlying feelings.

Bratnick, Raechel (2003): Awakening the Dreamer

Robert Moss (2012): Dreaming the Soul Back Home

Wanda Easter Burch (2003): She Who Dreams
 

THE HERO'S JOURNEY TO A HEALTHY BODY IMAGE: MULTIMODAL EXPLORATIONS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Nancy Sondag, MA, LCAT, RDT/BCT, CDP, CADDCT

Objectives:
1. Facilitate 3 or more warm-up exercises that promote empathy and safety.
2. Facilitate 1 Spectrogram to help the client recognize core beliefs regarding body image and food.
3. Facilitate 3 different enactments (i.e., role-play, tableau, hero's journey) in the creation of goals to a healthy body-image.

Wood, L.L. and Schneider, C. (2015), "Setting the stage for self-attunement: Drama therapy as a guide for neural integration in the treatment of eating disorders", Drama Therapy Review 1: 1, pp. 55-70, doi: 10.1386/dtr.1.1.55_1

Maine, M. and Kelly, J. (2005) The body myth: Adult women and the Pressure to be perfect. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: Hoboken, NJ

Carnabucci, K. and Ciotola, L. (2013) Healing eating disorders with Psychodrama and other action methods: Beyond the silence and the fury.  Jessica Kingsley Publishers: Philadelphia, PA
 

POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY IN CLINICAL SETTINGS: CREATIVE INTERVENTIONS FOR COUNSELING & PSYCHOTHERAPY

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Dan Tomasulo, PhD, TEP, MFA, MAPP
Andrea Szucs, LMSW, RDT, SIFI

Objectives:
1. Identify 5 areas of PERMA model by Martin Seligman. (Positive emotions, Engagement, Relationship, Meaning, Achievement) and 3 key moments in the history of the positive psychology movement. Learned Helplessness, Learned Optimism, &Martin Seligman contributions as APA president.
2. Describe 3 or more evidence-based interventions to improve human flourishing, resilience, and positivity in themselves and others.
3. Explain the term character strengths as an untapped driver of achievement and well-being.

Tomasulo, D., and Szucs, A. (2016). "The ACTing cure: Evidence-based group treatment for people with intellectual disabilities." Dramatherapy. DOI:10.1080/02630672.2016.1162824

Seligman, M. E. P., Rashid, T., & Parks, A. C. (2006). "Positive psychotherapy." American Psychologist 61,774–788.

Fredrickson, B. L. (2009). Positivity: Groundbreaking research reveals how to embrace the hidden strength of positive emotions, overcome negativity, and thrive. New York, Crown Archetype














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