2017 Expressive Therapies Summit: NYC - Registration Site

SUNDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES

STRENGTH-BASED ART & PLAY INTERVENTIONS THROUGH NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND THE ETC
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Dawn Burau, ATR, LMHC, SpEd
Daniel Reinstein, PhD

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more neuropsychological functions and how they impact art making in play therapy and related clinical approaches. 
2. Identify 3 strengths and 3 vulnerabilities within a neuropsychological case profile that could impact play therapy work and daily life functioning for the client. 
3. Name 3 levels of the Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC) and relate each level to 1 or more neuropsychological functional domains in order to generate effective interventions for art and play therapy sessions.

Hinz, L. (2009). Expressive Therapies Continuum: A Framework for Using Art in Therapy. New York, NY: Routledge, Inc.

Riccio, C. A., Sullivan, F. R. & Cohen, M. J. (2010). Neuropsychological Assessment and Intervention for Childhood and Adolescent Disorders. Hoboken, NJ; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Pellis, S. and Pellis, V. (2009). The Playful Brain: Venturing to the Limits of Neuroscience. New York, NY: One World Publications.


SELF-CARE AND STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR COUNSELORS, THERAPISTS AND OTHERS: CREATIVE ARTS, IMAGERY, YOGA
(Wellness and Prevention; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)

Addressing Compassion Fatigue: A Toolkit for Creating Balance & Sustaining Caregiver Health
L. Claire Campbell, LPCC-S, ATR

Ethics of Self-Care for Creative Arts Therapists: Beyond the Basics
Angela Guerrerio, MA, MM, MT-BC, RYT 200
Gregory Perkins, MT-BC
 
Care for Caregivers: Guided Imagery, Art Therapy & Yoga
Emily Nolan, DAT, LPC, ATRL-BC

Objectives:
1. Identify the differences and connections between PTSD symptoms, vicarious trauma, epathetic distress and burnout. (Campbell)
2. Identify key concepts of practicing from a present centered and mindfulness based perspective. (Campbell)
3. Apply mindfulness based and expressive arts intervention strategies for use in both self care and client work. (Campbell)
4. Identify at least 3 areas in their association’s Code of Ethics that relate to self-care. (Guerrerio/Perkins)
5. Describe 4 barriers to self-care. (Guerrerio/Perkins)
6. Identify 2 self-care strategies and when to employ them.(Guerrerio/Perkins)
7. Apply 3 ways to work with intention: Yoga, Guided Imagery, Art making. (Nolan)
8. Apply 2 types of embodied practices, art and yoga, to self-care. (Nolan)
9. Identify 3 ways to apply this work with clients who can develop self-awareness and effective self-care practices. (Nolan)

Malchiodi, C. A. (2002). The soul’s palette: Drawing on art’s transformative powers for health and well-being. Boston, MA: Shambhala.

Levine, P. (2008). Healing Trauma. Boulder, Colorado: Sounds True.

Degges-White, S. and Davis, N.(2011). Integrating the Expressive Arts Into Counseling Practice. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Taylor, K. (1995). The Ethics of Caring: Honoring the Web of Life in Our Professional Healing Relationships. Santa Cruz, California: Hanford Mead Publishers.

Dileo, C. (2000). Ethical Thinking in Music Therapy. Cherry Hill, NJ: Jeffrey Books.

Guy, J. & Norcross, J.(2007). Leaving It at the Office: A Guide to Psychotherapist Self-Care. New York, NY: Guilford Publications, Inc.

Gibbs, K. (2015). Integrating art therapy and yoga: Yoga, art and the use of intention. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley.

Horovitz, E. (2015). Yoga therapy: Theory and practice. London, UK: Routledge.

Goodman, R. and Calderon, A. (2012). "The use of mindfulness in trauma counseling." Journal of mental health counseling. 34(3) 254-268.

FACING, FIGHTING & SURVIVING CANCER THROUGH THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS
(Human Growth and Development)

LISTENing to Cancer through Movement, Music & Voice
Allison DeCamillis, MS, ATR, LPC
Suzanne Costello

When the Medical Expressive Therapist Becomes the Patient: A Journey with Cancer
Kandia Bouzioti, MA, AVPT

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 multidisciplinary modalities (movement, music and voice) along with at least 2 techniques utilized during this project to elicit story and transform those stories from word into non-verbal and physical expression. (DeCamillis/Costello)
2. Describe 5 psychosocial benefits of incorporating dance/movement and performance into expressive arts therapies work with people impacted by cancer. (DeCamillis/Costello)
3. Describe 4 ways in which collaborative partnership between a therapeutic entity and arts organization can potentially enhance client experiences, elevate project outcomes, and deepen community impact connections and understanding. (DeCamillis/Costello)
4. Describe the different music therapy techniques used with cancer patients. (Bouzioti)
5. Define countertransference and parallel process, and how they could affect the therapeutic relationship. (Bouzioti)
6. How did the therapist work with these issues? (Bouzioti)

Bradt, J., Goodill, SW., Dileo, C. (2011). "Dance/movement therapy for improving psychological and physical outcomes in cancer patients." Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 10, 1-34. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007103.pub2.

Butler, M., Snook, B., & Buck, R. (2016). "The Transformative Potential of Community Dance for People with Cancer." Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 26(14), 1928-1938.

Best (2000). "Theoretical diversity and clinical collaboration: Reflections by a dance/movement therapist." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 27, 197-211.

Rogers, A. G. (1995). A Shining Affliction: A Story of Harm and Healing in Psychotherapy. New York, NY, US: Penguin Press.

Sutton, J. P. (2002). Music, Music Therapy and Trauma: International Perspectives. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Austin, D. (2008). The Theory and Practice of Vocal Psychotherapy: Songs of the Self. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


INTEGRATING DBT WITH EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES TO ENHANCE TREATMENT OF TRAUMA & ADDICTION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)

Bringing DBT to Life with Expressive Therapies to Treat Trauma and Addiction
Maria Kratsios, LCSW, MIA
Carolyn Licht, PhD

DBT and Art Therapy: Phenomenological Integration of Trauma
Xiao Yu, MS, NCC
Yejin Yoo, MFA, MPS, LCAT-LP

Objectives:
1. Facilitate at least 3 self-contained experiential exercises for teaching DBT skills in early treatment of trauma and addiction. (Kratsios/Licht)
2. Apply at least 3 basic building blocks, or experiential templates, that can be used to design one’s own exercises for DBT skills training. (Kratsios/Licht)
3. Identify 3 or more common mistakes when using expressive therapies in early recovery and thus minimizing the risk of re-traumatization and relapse. (Kratsios/Licht)
4. Describe 3 or more impacts of the Sacred Silence structure in a group setting. (Yu/Yoo)
5. Clarify 1 or more ways of integrating DBT and art therapy techniques in trauma treatment. (Yu/Yoo)
6. Identify 3 benefits of Phenomenal Intuiting. (Yu/Yoo)

Linehan, Marsha M.  DBT Skills Training Manual, Second Edition. Guilford Publications, Inc., 2014. Print.

Dayton, Tian. "Neuropsychodrama in the Treatment of Relational Trauma."  HCI, 2015. Print.

Dayton, Tian. "Relational Trauma Repair (RTR): An Experiential Model for Working with PTSD Psychosocial Metrics."  Creative Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.

Davis, B. J. (2015). The Mindful Art Therapy. (pp. 54). London, UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Rubin, A. R. (2001). Approaches to Art Therapy: Theory & technique. PA: Brunner-Routledge.

Linehan, M. M. (1993). Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. New York, NY: Guilford Press.


 
 




MORNING WORKSHOPS

HAIBUN: ANCIENT JAPANESE WRITING FORM FOR ENHANCING REFLECTION & CLOSURE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Sherry Reiter, Phd, LCSW


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 functions of the haibun Japanese form: observation, reflection, integration.
2. Facilitate the haiku poem for a minimum of 4 diverse clinical populations that will benefit from brief, highly focused reflection.
3. Facilitate poetic prose and identify at least 3 clinical populations which could benefit from the expressive writing application.

Thompson, K. and K. Adams, Eds. 2015. Expressive writing: counseling and healthcare. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Mazza. N. (2016). Poetry therapy; theory and practice. Oxford, U.K.: Routledge.

Padgett, R. (2000). The teachers and writers handbook of  poetic forms. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative.
 

THE FINGER LABYRINTH: AN ANCIENT TOOL FOR TODAY’S HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Alix Amar, MED, MSS, LCSW, CRS
Mindy Jacobson-Levy, MCAT, ATR-BC, LPC, DVATA HLM

Objectives:
1. Define the term finger labyrinth and describe how to introduce it to clients.
2. Describe 3 ways that finger labyrinths can be incorporated into clinical work with clients.
3. Identify 2 aesthetic and/or content shifts within art renderings that demonstrate the positive effects of working with a finger labyrinth.

Artress, L (2006). The Sacred Path Companion: A Guide to Walking the Labyrinth to Heal and Transform. New York, NY: Berkley Publishing

Harris, N. (2002). "Effective, short-term therapy: Utilizing finger labyrinths to promote brain synchrony." Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, September/October 2002. 22-23.

Bigard, M. F. (2009). "Walking the Labyrinth: An Innovative Approach to Counseling Center Outreach." Journal of College Counseling, Vol.12, Fall , 137-148.


ETHICS AND THE MODERN ART THERAPY PRACTICE: A CRASH COURSE
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Rachel Brandoff, ATR-BC, ATCS, BCPC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Explain 3 key requirements for providing (engaging in the delivery of) online services.
2. Describe 1 tool to utilize in assessing relevant service delivery systems and how to vete online service delivery system.
3. Identify 3 parameters of their boundary around their professional online identity.

Art Therapy Credentials Board (ATCB), http://www.atcb.org/resource/pdf/2016-ATCB-Code-of-Ethics-Conduct-DisciplinaryProcedures.pdf

Orr, P. (2011). "Applying ethics to the age of social media: Electronic means." Art Therapy Credentials Board Review, 18(3), 5–6, 13. Available at www.atcb.org/pdf/Newsletter/Fall2011.pdf, accessed on 10 July 2016. 

Brandoff, R. & Lombardi, R. (2016). "Technology-facilitated art therapy supervision."  In R.L. Garner (Ed.), Digital art therapy: Materials, methods and applications. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


SELF EXPLORATION THROUGH SOULCOLLAGE®
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Sally Brucker, ATR-BC, CAGS, CLCC, LCSW

Objectives:
1. Identify a minimum of 5 clinical populations that would benefit from use of SoulCollage® in clinical treatment.
2. Identify and describe 2 Jungian principles present in SoulCollage®.
3. Describe how to facilitate clients in meaningful interpretation of their SoulCollage® cards.

Frost, S (2010) SoulCollage Evolving: An Intuitive Collage Process for Self-Discovery and Community- Hanford-Mead Publishers

Citations Forthcoming


SAY YES TO SPONTANEITY: THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS OF APPLIED IMPROVISATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Bess Eiermann, MA, R-DMT, CAGS, PhD Candidate
Maude Davis, MA

Objectives:
1. Identify 4 rules of improv and describe how they can apply to your therapeutic practice.
2. Identify 3 techniques on how to trust your instincts and describe one clinical application of stepping into the unknown.
3. Describe 3 ways improv listening skills can allow something unexpected to emerge and may be applied to serve clinical goals.

Madson, P. (2005). Improv Wisdom - Don't Prepare, Just Show Up. Bell Tower Publishing, New York.

Siddall, G. and Waterman, E., Ed. (2016). Negotiated Moments - Improvisation, Sound, and Subjectivity. Duke University Press, Durham and London.

Caines, R. and Heble, A., Ed. (2015). The Improvisation Studies Reader - Spontaneous Acts. Routledge, New York.


MAKING THERAPEUTIC STORY CLOTHS: USES & BENEFITS IN VARIED CLINICAL SETTINGS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Daniele Kaplan, MPS, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS, LCAT
Renee Folzenlogen, MA, LAC, NCC

Objectives:
1. Explain 3 or more benefits of using fabric and sewing in therapy.
2. Identify at least 4 therapeutic prompts that can be used for story cloths.
3. Describe at least 3 instances of how textiles have been used to influence social or political change within distinct cultures.

Garlock, L.R. (2016). "Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles."  Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 33(2), 58-66.

Futterman Collier, A.D., Wayment, H.A., & Birkett, M. (2016). "Impact of Making Textile Handcrafts on Mood Enhancement and Inflammatory Immune Changes." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 33(4), 178-185.

Hemmings, J. (2012). The Textile Reader. London: Bloomsbury Academic.


BEYOND DISGUISE: MASKS & MEANINGS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Jennie Kristel, MA, REAT, APTT, RMT

Objectives:
1. Use simple mask making with specific client populations.
2. Explore the history and uses of Masks in and out of clinical treatment.
3. Understand differing styles of mask making.

Chase, M. (2017) Mask: Making, using and performing Hawthorn Press, UK.

Walker, M. Kaimal, G . Gonzaga, A.D. Myers-Coffman, K. & DeGraba, T. (2017) "Active-duty military service members ’ visual representations of PTSD and TBI in masks," International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 12:1, 1267317, DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2016.1267317

Citation Forthcoming


AFFECTS AS CHAKRA ENERGIES: INTEGRATING METAPHYSICAL TRADITIONS WITH THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Briana MacWilliam, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 2 diagnostic indicators for affective response.
2. Compare and contrast the terms concordant versus complementary affect states.
3. Identify 3 or more mindfulness-based tips on treating root and sacral chakra imbalances.

Judith, A. (1996) Eastern body, western mind, psychology and the chakra system as a path to the self. New York, NY: Celestial Arts Berkeley

Judith, A. (1987) Wheels of life, the classic guide to the chakra system. Woodbury, Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications

McWilliams, N. (1994) Psychoanalytic Diagnosis. New York, NY: Guilford Press


CREATING COMMUNITY: PLAY & INTERPLAY WITH GROUPS THROUGH THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Judith Rubin, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM
Hannelore Jiménez-Alonso, ATR, LSB

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 reasons for the importance of choice in some element of an art therapy activity.
2. Note at least 3 ways in which both drama and movement are relevant for work in art therapy.
3. Identify at least 3 aspects of art therapy’s usefulness for dealing with social issues.

Jiménez-Alonso, Hannelore (Ed.) (2016). In Honor of Edith Kramer.  Graz, Austria: Styria-Verlag

Irwin, E. C., Rubin, J.A. & Shapiro, M. (1976). "Art and drama: Partners in therapy." American Journal of Psychotherapy, 24 107-116.

Rubin, J.A & Levy, P. (1975). "Art-awareness: A method for working with groups." Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama, 28:108-117.


ENGAGING PERSONS WITH DEMENTIA: A STRENGTH-BASED APPROACH

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Andrea Szucs, LMSW, RDT, SIFI
Jodie Berman, BFA, QDCP

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 symptoms of dementia and describe how they affect a person's cognitive and social ability to engage in meaningful activities.
2. Explain 5 communication approaches, informed by Positive Psychology, that can enhance client engagement and participation.
3. Facilitate 3 action methods modified for persons with dementia that facilitate positive interaction and enhance cognitive functioning, autonomy, and relatedness.

Bermant, G. 2013. “Working with (Out) a Net: Improvisational Theater and Enhanced Well- Being.” Frontiers in Psychology 4. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00929.

Peterson, C., and M. E. P. Seligman. 2004. Character Strengths and Virtues: A Handbook of Classification. New York: Oxford University Press.

Tomasulo, D., & Szucs, A. (2015). "The ACTing cure: evidence-based group treatment for people with intellectual disabilities." Dramatherapy, 37(2-3), 100-115.


CREATIVE PLAY THERAPY WITH (EVEN THE MOST RESISTANT) TWEENS & TEENS
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Lyla Tyler, LMFT, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Explain the 4 benefits and challenges of adolescence as described by Daniel Siegel in Brainstorm.
2. Facilitate at least 5 play therapy interventions to use as assessment tools with teen clients.
3. Describe at least 3 play therapy techniques that can be used in clinical practice to teach coping skills and self-discovery to teen clients.

Seigel, Daniel J. (2014). Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain. Tarcher. USA

Chapman, Linda. (2014) Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy with Children and Adolescents.  W.W. Norton and Co.  NY, NY.

Gil, Eliana. (1996). Treating Abused Adolescents.  Guilford Press, NY, NY.


GRIEF AND THE MEMORY BOX: A CREATIVE APPROACH FOR CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Sarah Vollmann, MPS, ATR-BC, LICSW

Objectives:
1. Identify and describe at least 5 developmental stages of grief for children and adolescents.
2. Identify at least 5 potential art therapy directives which might be utilized to further treatment when working with a bereaved child, adolescent or family.
3. Describe 3 or more potential therapeutic benefits of the creation of memory box as a part of grief therapy and treatment.

MacWilliam, B. (2017). Complicated Grief, Attachment, and Art Therapy: Theory, Treatment, and 14 Ready-to-Use Protocols. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London & Philadelphia.

Davies, B. (1999). Shadows in the Sun: The Experiences of Sibling Bereavement in Childhood. Taylor & Francis, USA.

Gibbons, M. B. (1992.) "A Child Dies, A Child Survives: The Impact of Sibling Loss." Journal of Pediatric Healthcare, 6(2): 65-72.


INTRODUCTION TO THE THERAPEUTIC USES OF PHOTOGRAPHY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Robert Wolf, MPS, ATR-BC, NCPsya, LP, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Describe 2 or more types of approaches to working with photographs that can promote personal growth in clinical and educational settings.
2. Identify 2 therapeutic techniques involving photography that can be used with a wide variety of populations.
3. Explain 1 or more benefits of using therapeutic photography as compared to other forms of visual arts in treatment.

Weiser, J. (1993). Phototherapy techniques. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wolf, R (2017). "The Therapeutic Uses of Photography In Play Therapy,” Integrating Expressive Arts and Play Therapy: A Guidebook for Mental Health Practitioners and Educators, Green & Drewes, Eds
Walker, J. L. "The photograph as a catalyst in psychotherapy," Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, October, 1982.
 








LUNCH & LEARNS

EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPISTS FROM SAMSHA'S REGISTRY OF PROGRAMS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Lisa Miller, LMFT
Denise Anima, LMFT

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more evidence-based practices utilizing SAMSHA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices.
2. List 3 expressive arts therapy interventions using a specific evidence-based practice.
3. Define the term evidence-based practice.

Citations Forthcoming


PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY FOR COUNSELORS, THERAPISTS, AND THEIR COLLEAGUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Scott Palyo, MD

Objectives:
1. List 3 or more commonly prescribed medication families and examples to each.
2. Define 3 or more terms in psychopharmacology.
3. Apply at least 2 strategies to improving collaboration with physicians.

Schachter, M.D., Meri (Ed.). (1993). Psychotherapy and Medication-A Dynamic Integration. Northvale: Jason Aronson Inc.

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock's synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (Eleventh edition.). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer.

Martin, A., Volkmar, F. R., & Lewis, M. (2007). Lewis's child and adolescent psychiatry: A comprehensive textbook (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

FOCUSING & ART THERAPY: SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT BY DRAWING FROM THE INSIDE 
(
Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Elizabeth Baring, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT, NCPsyA, 


Objectives:
1. Describe the 4 key components of the Focusing Attitude and their relevance to self management of symptoms.
2. Identify 3 ways to use bodily "felt sense” in working with depressed or anxious clients.
3. List 2 or more ways that this Focusing & Art Therapy approach can be used with a group in the clinical setting.

Gendlin, E. T. (1996). Focusing-oriented psychotherapy: A manual of the experiential method. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Cornell, A.W. (2013).  Focusing in clinical practice. New York: W.W. Norton.

Rappaport, L. (2009). Focusing-Oriented art therapy accessing the body’s wisdom and creative intelligence.  London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 
COMEDY IMPROV THERAPY & CBT FOR WORKING WITH SOCIAL ANXIETY ISSUES


Norton, P. (2012).  Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Anxiety: A Transdiagnostic Treatment Manual.  The Guilford Press.

Wiener, D. (1994).  Rehearsals for Growth: Theater Improvisation for Psychotherapists.  W. W. Norton & Company.

Wiener, J. (2003).  Action Therapy with Families and Groups: Using Creative Arts Improvisation in Clinical Practice. American Psychological Association.
 

FIBER ARTS, FEMINISM & CRAFTIVISM IN ART THERAPY: CLINICAL AND SOCIAL THREADS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Bethany Altschwager, MPS, LCAT, ATR-B
Faith Bowen, MPS, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 basic principles of comedy improv techniques needed to facilitate a group specific to Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).
2. Describe how to incorporate the 4 necessary elements specific to comedy improv into group therapy.
3. Explain 1 or more ways—and when to—incorporate CBT into the group experience to address co-existing challenges such as low self-confidence, low self-image and fear of failure in group members.
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Neal King, LCSW

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 or more multi-cultural and historical traditions related to fiber arts.
2. Identify at least 3 fiber art directives for use in art therapy groups and their suitability with various populations.
3. Apply 1 or more fiber art techniques in the creation of a group yarn bombing project, and state at least one clinical application of the project.

Hogan, S. (2012). Revisiting feminist approaches to art therapy. New York: Berghahn Books.

Lynn Kapitan (2011) "Close to the Heart: Art Therapy's Link to Craft and Art Production," Art Therapy, 28:3, 94-95, DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2011.601728

Collier, A. F. (2013). Using textile arts and handcrafts in therapy with women weaving lives back together. London: Jessica Kingsley Publ.
 

CONNECTING TO OUR CLIENTS THROUGH SONG LISTENING

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Maya Benattar, MA, MT-BC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 or more roles of songs in their lives or clients lives.
2. Facilitate 1 or more simple song listening experiences during session using client-preferred music.
3. Apply 2 approaches for use of songs into professional work (either during session or during reflection/processing of session).

Levitin, D. (2009). The world in six songs: how the musical brain created human nature. New York: Penguin.

Rappaport, L. (Ed.). (2014). Mindfulness and the arts therapies. Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley.

Grocke, D., & Wigram, T. (2007). Receptive methods in music therapy. Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley.
 

EXPRESSIVE KAVANNAH© AT SUKKOT: A KABBALAH-INSPIRED MIND/BODY APPROACH TO THE ARTS THERAPIES

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Sally Brucker, ATR-BC, CAGS, CLCC, LCSW
Edna Miron-Wapner, MA, CAGS

Objectives:
1. Facilitate intermodal transfer from movement to writing to meditation to artmaking to processing.
2. Apply the collective ritual to create a personal one for themselves.
3. Learn meditation as a tool for focusing and relaxation.

"Expressive Kavannah: Inspiration from an Ancient Tradition." The International Expressive Arts Therapy Association Journal Winter 2011.

Minstrels of the Soul: Intermodal Expressive Therapy
. Paolo Knill, Palmerston Press, 1995

Art as Medicine
: Shaun McNiff. Shambala Publishers, 1992.
 

ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING INTIMACY IN THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIPS

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Natalie Carlton, PhD, ATR-BC, LPCC
John Lutz, MCAT, ATR-BC, LPC

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 biases or assumptions about relational intimacy drives in their clients or themselves.
2. Name 3 therapeutic techniques that can foster trust with clients.
3. Learn 3 areas of heightened awareness that could shape their perceptions and experiences of trust with clients.

Buchele, B., & Rutan, J. S. (2017). "Theory and practice of group therapy: An object relations perspective."  International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67(1), s37-s43.

Eaton, J. & Tieber, C. (2017). "The effects of coloring on anxiety, mood, and perseverance." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 34(1), pp. 42-46.
 
Kossak, M. (2015). Attunement in expressive arts therapy: Towards an understanding of embodied empathy. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.



BUILDING RAPPORT WITH CHILDREN & THEIR FAMILIES USING A PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Shirley Disu, MPsa, MA, CCLS, NC-PsyA, LP

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 5 main psychoanalytical theories and treatment concepts.
2. State at least 5 common childhood mental health/intellectual disabilities diagnosis that impact emotional and cognitive development.
3. Apply 3 or more clinical therapeutic strategies to promote positive socio-emotional development for children and build rapport with families.

Mitchell, S. A. & Black, M. J. (1995). Freud and Beyond: A History of Modern Psychoanalytic Thought. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Winburn, A., Gilstrap, D. & Perryman, M. (2017). "Treating the Tiers: Play Therapy Responds to Interventions in the Schools." International Journal of Play Therapy, 26(1), 1-11.

Axline, V. (1981). Play Therapy. New York, NY: Random House.
 

SOULCOLLAGE® FOR PARTS WORK: HARNESSING THE POWER OF ARCHETYPAL IMAGERY & COLLAGE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Katerina Evans, ATR, LCPC

Objectives:
1. Learn 1 or more ways to incorporate SoulCollage® in therapeutic and educational settings with people of various ages and issues. 
2. Learn 3 or more principles of SoulCollage® as it pertains to human development and personality.
3. List 3 strategies for facilitating psychological containment and safety while using the SoulCollage® process.

Holmes, T., Holmes, L., & Eckstein, S. (2007). Parts work: an illustrated guide to your inner life. Kalamazoo, MI: Winged Heart Press.

Parisian, K. (2015). "Identity Formation: Art Therapy and an Adolescent's Search for Self and Belonging," Art Therapy Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 32:3, 130-135, DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2015.1061257

Weiss, N., & Raphael, J. (2013). How to make MeCards4Kids: creative expression for children and the grown-ups in their lives. Santa Cruz, California USA: Hanford Mead , Inc.
 

EMPATHIC MIRRORING FOR COUPLES THROUGH IMAGO AND CREATIVE ARTS THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Bonnie Hirschhorn, NCPsyA, ATR-BC, LCSW, LCAT, LP

Objectives:
1. Define the mirroring process.
2. Explain 1 or more benefits of mirroring.
3. Identify 3 ways to use creative arts therapy to help their couples empathically connect.

Hendrix, H. (1988). Getting The Love You Want, A Guide For Couples. New York, NY:Harper & Row.

Wright, K. (2009). Mirroring and Attunement: Self-Realization in Psychoanalysis and Art, New York: Routledge

Hirschhorn, B. (2013). The Creative Mirror: Imago Relationship Therapy, Creative Arts Therapy and Psychoanalysis, New York
 

INTEGRATING ECOPSYCHOLOGY, ART THERAPY & ARCHETYPAL PSYCHOLOGY THROUGH THE EAAC© METHOD
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Alexander Kopytin, PhD

Objectives:
1. Describe the expressive and projective art therapy tool, Ecological Archetypal Art Constructor (EAAC), based on the ideas of archetypal psychology, eco-psychology and creative/expressive media.
2. Discuss at least 1 therapeutic potential of working with visualized and real environments in expressive therapies through artistic/expressive means.
3. State at least 1 method used to support and develop eco-identity of clients related to their ability to follow healthy and sustainable lifestyle.

Kopytin A., Rugh M. (Eds.) (2016). Green Studio: Nature and the arts in therapy. – NY, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Kopytin A., Rugh M. (Eds.). (2017). Environmental expressive therapies: Nature-based theory and practice. – NY, NY: Taylor & Francis.

Hillman J. The soul's code: in search of character and calling. – New York: Random House, 1996.
 

CONSULTATION & COLLABORATION WITH PSYCHIATRISTS: MANAGING YOUR CLIENTS' VARIED NEEDS
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Kristin Long, RDT, BCT, LCAT, LP
Scott Palyo, MD

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more reasons when it is necessary to recommend a medication consultation for therapy patients.
2. List 5 different classifications of psychiatric medications.
3. Define 3 core concepts to facilitate appropriate collaboration with a prescribing colleague.

Schachter, M.D., Meri (Ed.). (1993). Psychotherapy and Medication-A Dynamic Integration. Northvale: Jason Aronson Inc.

Wing Li, T.C. (2010). "Psychodynamic Aspects of Psychopharmacology." J. Am. Acad. Psychoanal. Dyn. Psychiatr., 38(4):655-674

Bodtker, J.S. (1990). Beyond Words: Interpretive Art Therapy. , 1-186. Clunie Press.
 

REFRAMING DEPRESSION & ANXIETY IN WOMEN: UNDERSTANDING AND HONORING THE HEROINE'S JOURNEY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Social and Cultural Foundations)
Briana MacWilliam, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 stages of The Heroine's Journey, as it applies to women's anxiety and depression.
2. Explain at least 2 ways in which The Heroine's Journey applies to women's anxiety and depression.
3. Facilitate 1 or more mindfulness-based experiential activities in exploring women's anxiety and depression, through the framework of The Heroine's Journey.

Chodorow, N. J. (2002) "Gender as Personal and Cultural Construction." In Dimen, M. & Goldner, V. (Eds.), Gender in Psychoanalytic Space: between clinic and culture (pp 237-361). New York, NY: Other Press

Murdock, M. (1990) The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness. Boulder, CO: Shambalah Publications, Inc.

Stover, S.A. (2015) The Book of She: Your Heroine’s Journey into the Heart of Feminine Power. Novato, CA: New World Library
 

ILLUMINATED MANDALAS AND THE CORNELL APPROACH: HEALING IMAGERY EMERGES FROM THE DARK
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Rosalie Skakum, ATR-BC, RYT-500

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more ways in which the practice of creating a mandala can enhance an overall sense of health and well being.
2. Facilitate 3 separate techniques to achieve bold and illuminated imagery and describe at least one clinical benefit of the creation of such imagery.
3. State instances in which this creative practice can be used therapeutically  with clients.

Jean Davis, B. (2015). Mindful Art Therapy: A Foundation For Practice. Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Cornell, J. (1994). Mandala: Luminous symbols for healing. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books.

Tucci, G. (2001) The Theory and Practice of the Mandala. Dover Publications.
 

CHRONIC PAIN & EARLY ATTACHMENT: A MOVEMENT PROCESS FOR AWARENESS AND HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Suzi Tortora, EdD, BC-DMT, LCAT, LMHC

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 ways that early childhood experiences influence the development of self.
2. Explain how your body-mind- emotions create a continuum that can be explored through the WOS process, supporting discovery and healing using 3 creative arts methods.
3. Identify at least 3 ways the WOS method is used with people with ADHD, chronic pain and trauma to support healing.

Gaensbauer, T (2011). "Embodied simulation, mirror neurons, and the reenactment of trauma in early childhood." Neuropsychoanalysis, 13(1) 91 – 108.

Tortora, S. (May, 2017) "Stories Our Bodies Tell." In Chavis. D. (Editor). The American Psychoanalyst. New York: APsaA.

Tortora, S. & Whitley, J. (in press). "Mother-Son Transgenerational Transmission Of Eating Issues Using A Co-Treatment Method". In H. Payne, S. Koch, J. Tantia & T. Fuchs (Editors). Routledge International Handbook of Embodied Perspectives in Psychotherapy: Approaches from Dance Movement, the Arts and Body Psychotherapies London: Routledge Publishers

 




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