Dress Code:  Business Casual

Agenda

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    • Optional  Optional
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      Monday, June 4, 2018
      10:00 AM  -  7:00 PM
      Conference Registration Opens
      Versailles Foyer
      12:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Exhibitor Move-In and Setup
      Versailles Foyer
      12:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
      Poster Setup
      Versailles Foyer
      5:30 PM  -  6:30 PM
      Welcome and Keynote Address
      Versailles I
      6:30 PM  -  9:30 PM
      Exhibit Hall Grand Opening and Reception

      Enjoy food and drinks while viewing cutting edge technology from exhibitors, socializing with peers and improving your network.

       Optional  Closed 
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      Tuesday, June 5, 2018
      7:00 AM  -  6:00 PM
      Conference Registration
      Versailles Foyer
      7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
      Poster Session with Continental Breakfast
      ​​Please join us for breakfast and as you prepare for an interesting day of presentations and exhibits.
       Optional  Closed 
       

      Concurrent Technical Sessions - Tuesday, June 5

      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Advanced Biorefineries
      Versailles I

      Session Description: The advanced biorefinery session will provide three talks that focus on how functional materials and bioproducts can be obtained from a corn biorefinery; the processing of corn stover to biofuels and chemicals using an acetosolv process; and the role of the center of biocatalysis and  bioprocessing at the University of Iowa in enabling greater diversification of the bioeconomy. The topics covered will provide a broad perspective of how research can be used to enhance and expand the profitability of the corn industry by deployment of new tools while expanding the range of materials that can be processed to high value-added products at biorefineries.  


      "Modified Acetosolv Processing of Corn Stover Fractions" - Tom Binder, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Retired


      "The Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing:  Its Role in Supporting the Development of the Bioeconomy" - Mark A. Arnold, Ph.D., University of Iowa

       

      "Functional Materials and Bioproducts from Corn" - ​​Nathan Mosier, Ph.D., Purdue University

      Co-Chair:
      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Using Digital Agriculture to Enable a Reliable Supply Chain
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description: "Digital Agriculture tools improve farmer efficiencies to help with profitability.” A true statement used in the beginning of the digital ag era, but now rapid population growth, climate shifts driving extreme weather events, and the decline of erodible land are also making the technology critical for long-term grower profitability as well as supply chain consistency.  In addition, consumers want to know more about their food and the ingredients they are consuming. As consumers become more informed they are also interested in the sources of their food, how their food is produced, where it is produced, what techniques are utilized, etc.  Digital ag can provide the ability to meet this consumer demand while mitigating risk and enhancing grower productivity, delivering consumers transparency from their food suppliers.  


      "Digital Ag at Ingredion" -  Wendell Rich, Ingredion

       

      “Bridging the Gap between Farm and Food” - Gabe Conaghan, Bunge, North America Milling



      Chairman:
      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Applications of RNAi for Mycotoxin Management
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description:  RNA interference has become a new and powerful tool in managing plant diseases in recent years. This session focuses on latest progresses in applying this tool to reduce aflatoxin contamination in susceptible crops, such as corn, by suppressing various genes that are important for Aspergillus flavus to infect the host plant or to synthesize aflatoxin after infection.

       

      "Host Induced Gene Silencing as an Effective Engineering Tool to Suppress Aflatoxin in Maize” -  ​​Monica Schmidt, Ph.D., University of Arizona

       

      "Mitigation of Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination in maize utilizing RNAi-mediated HIGS" - Rajtilak  Majumdar, Ph.D., USDA-ARS

       

      "Transgenic Control of Aflatoxin Contamination in Corn Through Host-induced Gene Silencing." - Zhi-Yuan Chen, Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

       

      “RNAi-Mediated Control of Aflatoxins in Peanut” - Renee Arias, USDA-ARS

      Chairman:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Biorefineries
      Versailles I

      Session Description: In order to further expand corn use as an industrial raw material, the corn biorefinery must continue to expand the scope of its product portfolio.  This session presents the development of several new processes to produce commodity-scale chemicals from plant carbohydrates.


      "
      Monoethylene Glycol from Corn: A Single-Step, Thermocatalytic, Continuous Process" - Alex Buck, Ph.D., Iowa Corn Growers Association

       

      “Carbon Fiber from Corn Stover”  - Eric Karp, National Renewable Energy Laboratory


      "Toward Biomass-Derived Renewable Plastics: Production of 2,5-Furandicarboxylic Acid from Fructose" - Ali Hussain Motagamwala, University of Wisconsin



      Chairman:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Editing the Future
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description: This session we’ll hear from major seed producers and companies in the innovation community who are making big investments in the next generation of breeding. Gene editing has taken over as the next tool that will allow production of corn and other food items more efficiently, but with possible downstream implications as well. 

       

      Representing the Granular platform that includes a suite of farm management software (Granular Business and Granular Agronomy by Encirca), the leading farmland real estate analysis tool (AcreValue), and precision agronomy software for ag retailers (AgStudio)"– David Songstad, Cibus US, LLC 

       

      “Application of CRISPR-Cas Enabled Advanced Breeding Technology for Maize Traits Development – Todd Jones, Ph.D., Corteva Agriscience™, Agricultural Division of Dow DuPont ​​

       

      Caution: Value Chain Disruption Ahead - ​​Michael Thompson, Ph.D., Benson Hill Biosystem  

      Co-Chair:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Breeding to Reduce Mycotoxin Contamination
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description:  Pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of corn is an endemic problem throughout southern U.S. and the warmer regions of the world, where it is a known causal agent of liver cancer. Utilizing basic research findings in breeding resistance corn to reduce mycotoxin contamination, four prominent speakers will share their frontier research and innovative and interdisciplinary approaches in preventing mycotoxin contamination in order to ensure the U.S. corn industries remain competitive in the global marketplace.


      "Filling Information Gaps between Host Plant Resistance and Ecology to Reduce Aflatoxin Contamination and Insect Damage in Corn Production" - Xinzhi Ni, Ph.D., USDA-ARS

       

      "Elucidation of Broad-spectrum Antifungal Maize Defense Pathways and Metabolites Underlying Pathogen Resistance." - Eric A. Schmelz, Ph.D., University of California

       

      "Discovering New Frontiers in Aflatoxin Prevention Using "Omics" and Genetic Engineering" - Jake C. Fountain, Ph.D., University of Georgia

       

      "Aspergillus flavus Requires Oxylipins from both Kernel and Self for Pathogenesis" - Eli J. Borrego, Texas A&M University


      Chairman:
       

      Lunch

      12:00 PM  -  1:30 PM
      Buffet Lunch
      Versailles II
      Leisurely lunch with your fellow attendees with plenty of time to browse the Exhibit Hall and posters.  
       Optional  Closed 
       

      Concurrent Technical Sessions - Tuesday, June 5

      1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Future of Corn Processing
      Versailles I

      Session DescriptionProtection of climate and anticipative shift from fossil based to renewable feedstock are driving bioeconomy in the US and around the world.  It is estimated that 20% of today’s petrochemical production will be replaced with biobased chemicals in the next decade.  Large amounts of renewable carbon in form of fermentable sugars are needed to enable production of next generation biochemicals and biofuels.  Corn production is also expected to grow with more bushels of corn produced per acre of land.  For next few years, sugars from corn will be the most abundant carbon source available in the US to drive this industrial biotech engine.  In this session future of the corn processing industry and growth in industrial biotech based on corn sugars will be discussed.

      "Availability of Abundant Carbon to Drive Industrial Biotech" - ​​Vijay Singh, Ph.D., University of Illinois 


      "Industrial Glucose:  Bridging the Biochemical Gap"Jeff Roberts, Fluid Quip Process Technologies


      "Industrial Biotechnology Shaping the Biorefineries of the Future" - Joel Stone, ConVergince Advisors


      "Commercializing Biobased Products:  Opportunities and Challenges" - ​Sundeep Vani, Consultant

       


      Chairman:
      1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Developing Novel Carbohydrate-Derived Chemicals
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description - With low fossil carbon prices, the economics of replacing known petrochemicals with biobased sourcing is quite challenging.  Therefore, the best opportunities for starch-derived chemicals are when they are novel molecules that impart advantaged properties in end-use applications.  Examples of this attribute can be seen in 1,3-propanediol, 2,5-furandicarboxlyic acid, etc.  This session focuses on the challenges associated with the introduction of novel biobased chemicals and the strategies to overcome those challenges.

      "Bioprivileged Molecules: a New Biobased Chemicals Opportunity" - ​Peter Keeling, Ph.D., CBIRC


      "Engineering a Metabolic Platform to support a Renewable Chemical Product Pipeline" - Angelica Bautista, REG Life Sciences


      "Unsaturated Diacids for the Production of Bio-Advantaged Nylon" - ​Jean-Philippe Tessonnier, Sumatra Biorenewables, LLC


      Chairman:
      1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Climate Change Research that Addresses Mycotoxin
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description:  Mycotoxin contamination of grain raises important agricultural, economic, food safety and public health concerns. The severity of fungal disease epidemics and accumulation of associated mycotoxins are strongly driven by climatic factors consistent with climate change. In this session, leading experts, Dr. Naresh Magan, Dr. Matthew Gilbert, and Dr. Pierce Paul will present their latest research and discuss challenges facing future corn production and mycotoxin contamination.


      "Climate Change Environmental Impacts on Mycotoxin Contamination of Maize" - Naresh Magan, Ph.D., Cranfield, University 


      "Environmental Factors Influencing Aspergillus flavus Development and Toxin Secretion in Maize Kernels"Matthew Gilbert, Ph.D, USDA


      "Increased Risk of Gibberella Ear Rot and Deoxynivalenol in Corn" - ​​Pierce Paul, Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

      Chairman:
      3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Health and Nutrition Benefits of Corn
      Versailles I

      Session Description:  Anthocyanin, an antioxidant present in colored corn, can prevent many chronic diseases and improve health. Corn fiber, a complex carbohydrate present in the seed coat of corn kernels, has a thickening function and also provides health benefits to improve gut health.  Resistant starch, present in high-amylose corn and modified starch, functions as a prebiotic to facilitate the growth of microbiota for physical and mental health.  In this session, leading experts, Dr. Richard Pratt, Dr. Kevin Hicks, and Dr. Gregory Phillips, will present their research on these topics.


      "Thing One and Thing Two Wish They Could Have Corn That is Blue -- Here's Why" - Richard Pratt, Ph.D., New Mexico State University


      "Corn Fiber Arabinoxylan: An Update on R & D and Commercialization Efforts" - Kevin Hicks, Ph.D., Venturesources, Inc.


      "Impact of Resistant Starch Diets on Animal Hosts: From the Microbiota to the Mind" - Greg Phillips, Ph.D., Iowa State University

      Chairman:
      3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Contamination Challenges in Industrial Fermentations
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description:  One of the challenges facing the fuel ethanol industry is the management of bacterial contamination during fermentation. Lactic acid bacteria are the predominant contaminants that decrease the profitability of biofuel production by reducing ethanol yields and causing “stuck” fermentations, which incur additional economic losses via expensive antibiotic treatments and disinfection costs. The current use of antibiotic treatments has led to the emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains, and antibiotic residues in distillers grains byproduct are a concern for the feed and food industries. This underscores the need for new, non-antibiotic, eco-friendly mitigation strategies for bacterial contamination.  This session will describe a variety of alternatives to antibiotics for controlling bacterial contamination in industrial fermentations.

       

      "Bacteriophage and Bacteriocin Applications for the Control of Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Commercial Corn Biofuel Ethanol Fermentation Process" - Elizabeth Summer, Ph.D., Ecolyse, Inc. 

       

      "Microbial Contamination of Fuel and Beverage Alcohol Production Facilities and Opportunities for Innovation" -  Pat Heist, Ferm Solutions, Inc.


      "Overcoming bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations -- alternatives to antibiotics" -​​ Joe Rich, Ph.D., USDA-ARS

      Speakers:
      Chairman:
      3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Biocontrol Strategies to Reduce Mycotoxins
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description: Biological control using non-aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus offers the greatest potential in mitigating aflatoxin contamination. Commercial biocontrol products are currently available and there is significant research interest in sustainable biocontrol of aflatoxin contamination. In this session, graduate students, Jane Marian Luis, Richard Gell and Megan Molo will present findings from their doctoral research to better understand the biology and genetics of A. flavus and how that information can provide a working platform for developing sustainable biocontrol of aflatoxin contamination in maize and other important field and tree crops.  

       

      "Morphological, Metabolic and Transcriptional Characterization of Fertilization within the Sclerotia of Aspergillus flavus" - Jane Marian Luis, North Carolina State University

       

      "Sequencing and Development of Genetic Maps for Three F1 Progeny populations of Aspergillus flavus" - Richard Gell, North Carolina State University

       

      "Understanding the Underlying Population Genetics of Biological Control in Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Production" - ​Megan Molo, North Carolina State University

      Chairman:
       

      Reception, Meals and Breaks

      5:00 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Exhibit Hall Open with Reception
      Versailles Foyer & Versailles II

      Enjoy food and drinks while viewing cutting edge technology from exhibitors, socializing with peers and improving your network.  Be sure to visit the poster session and see the latest in corn research.  

       

       Optional  Closed 
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      12:00 AM  -  3:00 PM
      Wednesday, June 6, 2017
      7:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Conference Registration
      Versailles Foyer
      7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
      Poster Session with Continental Breakfast
      Please join us for breakfast and as you prepare for an interesting day of presentations and exhibits.
       Optional  Closed 
      8:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Wednesday Concurrent Sessions
       

      Concurrent Technical Session - Wednesday, June 6

      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Microbial Strain Engineering for Industrial Applications
      Versailles I

      Session Description: Microbial platforms are increasingly relevant for both inputs into Agricultural production as well as outputs for novel products utilizing raw and refined feedstocks.  The session with cover cutting edge research on how microbial systems are being leveraged to support new crop protection/enhancement innovation as well as how the latest in microbial strain engineering techniques that are being leveraged to make more efficient use of feedstocks and push fermentation performance to new heights.


      "Discovery of New Herbicide leads Using Genome Mining of Fungal Natural Product Biosynthetic Pathways" - Yi Tang, Ph.D., UCLA


      "Development of Insect Resistance Traits from Microbial Sources" - William Beeson, Corteva AgriSciences, the Agricultural Division of DowDupont


      "Taking Any Molecule From Any Microbe From The Lab To Full-Scale Manufacturing" - Ute Galm, PhD;  Zymergen Inc. 

       

      Speakers:
      Chairman:
      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Finding Value with Identity Preservation
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description: Increasingly customers are looking for unique traits, absence of traits or increased sustainability in food and feed offerings.  From the seed producer, to the processor, to the final consumer-good manufactures, preserving the identity of the grain increases costs. But there are rewards to identity preserved grain too, and it can increase margins for the companies involved.  This session will discuss the challenges from seed production, to storage and delivery. Additionally, participants will delve into IP system complexities such as verification of purity to meet customer demands and the issues involved in maintaining a smooth pipe-line throughout the process. 


       
      "IP:  It's a Mindset " -  Chuck Hill, CCA, SSp, AgriGold Hybrids

       

      "Selecting Identity Preserved Grain For Food Products" Ken Dallmier, Ph.D., Clarkson Grain Company, Inc. 

       

      “Identity, Purity and Meaningful Data”  ​- Doug Miller, Illinois Crop Improvement

       

      "Managing the Risks and Complexities of an IP Supply Chain" - ​Jodi Pearson, Cargill


      "Identity Preservation in a Sea of Corn" - ​Christopher Cook, Syngenta Seeds, NA

      Chairman:
      8:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Advances in Mycotoxin Detection Technology
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description: Control of mycotoxins begins with the ability to measure them. Accurate measurements allow corn to be put to uses appropriate with the extent and level of contamination and facilitates efforts to prevent fungal contamination in the first place. The technologies used to measure mycotoxins, and the way that those technologies are applied in control systems, continue to evolve. This session presents a broad cross section of the efforts to control mycotoxins through the development and application of new and existing technologies. Presentations include those describing state-of-the art technologies for detecting mycotoxins using high-throughput sorting, and practical applications such as laboratory-based techniques including mass spectrometry and field-portable test kits. The real-world utility of such methods in solving problems in the ethanol industry will be described as will ongoing efforts of the USDA to facilitate corn export through the Mycotoxin Testing Program.

      "Mycotoxins in DDGS - an Ethanol Industry Initiative to Improve the Integrity of Mycotoxin Results on DDGS" - Bart Plocher, Poet 


      "The USDA Mycotoxin Testing Program for Grain" - ​Timothy Norden, Ph.D., USDA-AMS-FGIS


      "Single-Kernel Detection of Mycotoxins in Corn: Foundations for High-Throughput Sorting" - ​​Matthew Stasiewicz, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


      "Suitability of 13C Isotope Labeled Internal Standards for the Determination of Fumonisin Fructosides From Maize by LC-MS/MS" - Mark Busman, Ph.D., USDA-ARS-NCAUR   

      Chairman:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      New Developments in Manufacturing of Starch, Sweeteners, Biofuels and Value Added Co-Products
      Versailles I

      Session Description:  The session will focus on the latest Innovative processes, equipment  and manufacturing technologies being used in commercial production.  With increased pressure on  green energy, reduction in energy use, increased yield and development of value added co-products, this session is ideal for plant and process engineer’s, Manufacturing and production managers, R&D .

       

      "Applexion SC Chromatography, Latest Developments of a Key Green Technology for Producing High Quality Special Sweeteners and Derivatives" - Damien Brichant, Novasep, LLC

       

      "Creating an Effective Dust Hazard Analysis for NFPA 652 Compliance" - M. T. Williamson, P.E., ADF Engineering Inc.

       

      "Modified Wet Mill" - ​John Kwik, Fluid Quip Process Technologies 

       

      "Biofuel and Coproduct Advances at POET" - Steve Lewis, POET

      Chairman:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Making Chemicals from Ethanol
      Zurich Ballroom

      Session Description: In the course of Ron’s career, he went from helping design a petro-ethylene to ethanol plant to helping market an ethanol to ethylene technology. Many of the world’s chemical industries were started by derivatizing bio-ethanol before crackers fed with petroleum naphtha or gas condensates were built, including in Australia, Brazil, India, and Russia. Some of the early chemicals made included ethylene for polyethylene, ethylene oxide, and ethylene glycol, and butadiene. Other options are discussed, including multiple optional routes to butadiene, acetic acid, and various esters. The presentations of the panelists are introduced in the context of the history.

       

      "Production of “Green” MEG" - David Bazzano, Scientific Design Company, Inc. 

       

      One-step High Yield Production of Fungible Gasoline, Diesel and Jet Fuel Blendstocks and High Value Chemical Coproduct (BTEX) from Ethanol without Added Hydrogen" - John Hannon, Ph.D., Vertimass LLC 

        

      “Catalyxx Guerbet Conversion of Ethanol to Higher Alcohols” - Joaquin Alarcon, Catalyxx Inc.

      Chairman:
      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Remediation for Mycotoxin-Contaminated Corn
      Alpine I & II

      Session Description: Mycotoxin contamination has become a global concern and considerable research has been directed at finding methods to prevent toxicity. There is excellent potential for non-biological means to help manage or remediate the aflatoxin problem.  Physical strategies such as the separation of aflatoxin from contaminated grains through sorting, the addition of adsorbents to contaminated diets and radiation of aflatoxin have been examined to reduce aflatoxin contamination post-harvest. This session will present current strategies for mycotoxin and fungal mitigation. 

       

      "Reducing Transfer of AFM1 into Milk of Dairy Cows through Feed Additives" - Stephanie Ward, Ph.D., North Carolina State University

       

      "NIR Spectroscopy Analysis of Corn Kernels Inoculated with Aspergillus flavus Fungi" -  Haibo Yao, Ph.​D., Mississippi State University

       

      "A review of Post-harvest Remediation Methods for Aflatoxin Contamination" - Erica Womack, Ph.D., USDA, ARS

      Co-Chair:
       

      Lunch

      12:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      General Session with Lunch

      Join us for the announcement of the student poster contest winners and an update on NCGA's efforts to increase corn utilization. 

       Optional  Closed 
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