Agenda

  • Sunday, September 16, 2018
  •  
    2:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Registration & Information Opens
    Pre-Function Space
    3:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Exhibit Hall Setup
  • Monday, September 17, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Area Caucus
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Marketplace & Exhibit Hall Open
    Pre-Function Space
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Registration & Information Open
    Pre-Function Space
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Indian Health Service Listening Session
    Ballroom D & E
    9:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    OMHRC SMAIF Clinical HIV/AIDS Regional Training
    Meeting Room 18
    With support from the Secretary's Minority AIDS Initiative Funding (SMAIF), the Office of Minority Health Resource Center (OMHRC) in collaboration with the Urban Indian Health Institute and the National Indian Health Board, is implementing the pre-conference training. This one-day regional clinical training is intended for doctors, nurses, case managers, community health workers, and other health care professionals working in Tribal agencies and clinics delivering HIV prevention services. The workshop will increase providers’ knowledge in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment with presentation topics on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), HIV/HCV integration, and HIV and opioids.
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Opioid Toolkit Institute
    Meeting Room 16
    Responding to the growing prevalence of prescription opioid misuse and addiction rates, in 2016 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. As the first guideline of its kind, the CDC Guideline outlines recommendations for primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and internists, to engage in more safe and effective opioid prescribing practices. Under a funding agreement with the CDC, the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) adapted the CDC Guideline for providers in Tribal and Indian Health Service hospitals and clinics. NIHB’s adaptation of the CDC Guideline contextualizes the recommendations by providing additional considerations specific to American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Further, the NIHB Provider Guide provides Tribally-specific and culturally appropriate tools to assist Tribal providers in recognizing and responding to signs of opioid misuse and addiction, engage in safer prescribing, and deliver more quality pain management care. This institute will provide an overview of the CDC Guideline and an in-depth analysis of the NIHB Provider Guide, with particular emphasis on strategies Tribal clinics can use to operationalize the recommendations.
    10:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Seminar: Gathering Our Data Resources, Processing Them, and Putting Them to Use for Indian Health
    Meeting Room 19
    The goal is to give attendees the ability to gather data relevant to Indian health, and to process the data in easy to understand formats for grant writing, planning, and reporting. The NIHB Tribal Data Project Director will present a state of the art data-driven ‘Introduction to Indian Health’ to demonstrate how vivid graphic presentations of data can inform and inspire further analysis. Using tableau software, maps of the American Indian and Alaska Native population, income, education, health status and insurance coverage at the national, state and county levels will be presented. Following the presentation, there will be a description of the main sources of data used in the presentation and the tools used to gather and present the information. Your questions will then serve as the start of the balance of the seminar as you learn where to gather the data, tools needed and ‘tips’ to ease this process, how to compile the data into graphics including charts, tables and maps, and suggestions on how to effectively include data into grants, reports and planning documents. You will learn how to ask, respond to and refine research questions that you are often asked, but not sure you can easily answer. The seminar will help you in your work preparing grant applications, planning documents, and community assessments that include data.
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch (On Your Own)
    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Area Caucus 101
    Meeting Room 17
    Area Tribal Caucuses are an important and vital part of the NIHB policy making process. There are several purposes of the caucuses – the most significant of which is to provide the space and opportunity for all Tribal Leaders, Tribal Health Directors, Tribal health consumers and stakeholders to come together to discuss and identify legislative, policy and public health needs that impact American Indian and Alaska Native health, health systems, public health infrastructure, programming, capacity and Tribal health sovereignty. The area caucuses also provide an important opportunity for participants to engage with the Tribal representative that each Area elects or appoints to serve on the NIHB Board of Directors. Join NIHB for a briefing session on the area caucus process.
    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) 101
    Meeting Room 19
    The Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) has been operating in Alaska since 1968. To serve Alaska Natives living in remote villages, community-based CHAPs, Behavioral Health Aides (BHA), and Dental Health Aides (DHA) provide services previously only available in Alaska’s largest towns. Currently, 550 CHAPs and 160 BHAs serve 170 Alaska Native villages. The Indian Health Service is currently implementing a national expansion of CHAP/BHA/ DHA to bring the program’s successes to Tribes in the Lower 48. This session will give a background on the program, explore potential benefits of national expansion, and discuss why it’s important to have a local advocacy and involvement.
    1:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
    NIH Discussion Session: Safe Infant Sleep in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities
    Meeting Room 11
    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development will host a discussion session to gather real-time information about safe infant sleep practices, protective and risk factors, as well as education and outreach priorities, opportunities, and challenges in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. Participant feedback will help inform future goals and activities of the Healthy Native Babies Project, an ongoing effort to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and other sleep-related causes of infant death among AI/AN communities. Participation is encouraged from a wide variety of audiences including elders, Tribal leaders, health directors, health educators, CHRs, home visitors, nurses, service providers, etc.
    2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Opioid Update and Naloxone Training
    Meeting Room 16
    This presentation will provide national statistics on the opioid crisis in the American Indian/Alaska population. Details will be given on how to start a new naloxone program in order to reduce the opioid overdose death rate in your community. Training will be provided on how to identify an opioid overdose and how to use the life-saving medication, naloxone.
    2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Tribal Dental Therapy Advocates Meeting
    Meeting Room 12
    The past year has been a momentous one for Tribes seeking to use dental therapy as a solution to their oral health challenges. This gathering will provide a place for Tribal advocates of dental therapy to come together and discuss the latest challenges and opportunities within the movement to expand Tribal familiarity and utilization of the innovative workforce model.
    3:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Listening Session
    Ballroom D & E
    6:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Opening Reception
    Pre-Function Space
  • Tuesday, September 18, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
    Area Caucus
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Marketplace & Exhibit Hall Open
    Pre-Function Space
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Registration & Information Open
    Pre-Function Space
    8:30 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Opening Plenary Session
    Ballroom ABC

    8:30 AM – 8:40 AM

    PRESENTATION OF THE COLORS

     

    8:40 AM – 8:50 AM

    OPENING BLESSING

     

    8:50 AM – 9:05 AM

    WELCOME TO THESE LANDS

     

    9:05 AM – 9:10 AM

    WELCOME TO THE NATIONAL TRIBAL HEALTH CONFERENCE AND CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

    Vinton Hawley, Chairman and Phoenix Area Representative, National Indian Health Board

     

    9:10 AM - 9:20 AM

    THE STATE OF TRIBAL AFFAIRS IN OKLAHOMA

    Chris Benge, Secretary of Native American Affairs, State of Oklahoma

     

    9:20 AM – 10:00 AM

    TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY UNDER ATTACK: STRENGTHENING TRIBAL UNITY IN DEFENSE

    Greg Smith, Partner, Hobbs Straus Dean and Walker

    Devin Delrow, Director of Policy, National Indian Health Board

    Vinton Hawley, Chairman and Phoenix Area Representative, National Indian Health Board

    Bruce Pratt, President, Pawnee Nation

    Daniel Preston, Councilman, Tohono O’odham Nation

    Stacy A. Bohlen, Chief Executive Officer, National Indian Health Board

    Kitcki Carroll, Executive Director, United South and Eastern Tribes

     

    10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

    INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE UPDATE AND OVERVIEW

    RADM Michael Weahkee, Principal Deputy Director, Indian Health Service

     

    10:30 AM – 10:50 AM

    CONGRESSIONAL UPDATE AND OVERVIEW

    The Honorable Markwayne Mullin, U.S. House of Representatives, Chairman of the House IHS Task Force; Citizen of the Cherokee Nation

     

    10:50 AM – 11:20 AM

    THE FUTURE OF HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS IN INDIAN COUNTRY

    Camilo Sandoval, Executive-in-Charge, Office of Information Technology, Department of Veterans Affairs

    Mitch Thornbrugh, Acting Chief Information Officer, Indian Health Service

     

    11:20 AM – 11:35 AM

    NATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICAN INDIANS UPDATE

    Jefferson Keel, Lt. Governor, Chickasaw Nation; President, National Congress of American Indians

     

    11:35 AM – 11:55 AM

    RECLAIMING NATIVE TRUTH

    Abigail Echo Hawk, President and Chief Executive Officer of Echo Hawk Consulting

     

    11:55 AM – 12:15 PM

    LEGISLATIVE UPDATE / NIHB LEGISLATIVE AND POLICY AGENDA OVERVIEW

    Stacy A. Bohlen, Chief Executive Officer, National Indian Health Board

    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch (On Your Own)
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Developing Tribal and State Partnerships to Meet the Public Health Needs
    Meeting Room 18
    The Chickasaw Nation’s Division of Research and Public Health has developed a unique partnership with regional public health departments located within the Chickasaw Nation service area. The partnership began in 2016 to maximize influenza outreach efforts across the Chickasaw Nation. The Chickasaw Nation purchased influenza vaccine and partnered with local health departments to dispense the vaccine throughout specific counties in the Chickasaw Nation. To date more than 28,000 residents of the area were reached through the program. In addition to the influenza outreach efforts, the two entities partnered again to participate in a Mass Immunization Prophylaxis Strategy Drill in Ardmore Oklahoma. This drill evaluated the ability of local and Tribal agencies to collaborate, identify, investigate, distribute, and medicate local citizens in the event of a mass outbreak of a deadly disease. Both efforts have been extremely beneficial for the development of the effective and sustainable partnership between the two entities.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    DHAT Issues in Indian Country
    Meeting Room 17
    Tribes have begun to use their inherent tribal sovereign authority to expand the health care services they provide to Indian people beyond the services that might otherwise be available under state or federal law. Dental Health Aide Therapists (DHATs) have been employed in IHS and tribal health programs in Alaska for over a decade under a federally authorized program. In 2016, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community became the first tribal community outside of Alaska to employ a DHAT to provide basic oral health services to community members under its own licensing law and regulatory system. This example of Tribal self-regulation drives the evolution of state and federal law and provides innovative and elevated levels of care to the community. The panel will also discuss a pending appeal by the state of Washington from a denial by CMS to allow tribes in the state to recover Medicaid reimbursements for DHAT services.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Eliminating Hepatitis C in Indian Country using the ECHO Model
    Meeting Room 19
    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have the highest mortality rate from hepatitis C virus (HCV) of any race or ethnicity. Hepatitis C can be cured and the Indian Health Service, Tribal and Urban Indian primary care clinics are developing their capacity to provide this cure. By treating at the primary care level, we can begin to eliminate HCV. The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, Northern Tier Initiative for Hepatitis C Elimination, and University of New Mexico host multiple regional teleECHO clinics designed for AI/AN-serving clinicians to treat and cure HCV. The ECHO model is a collaborative model of medical education utilizing case-based learning and care management to democratize knowledge and empowers clinicians to provide better care to more people. Unlike other traditional telemedicine, local clinicians gain the expertise to treat patient within their own communities, an especially important attribute in Indian Country. ECHO increases access to specialty treatment by providing clinicians with the knowledge and support needed to manage patients with hepatitis C. To date, 70 tribal sites, comprised of 125 providers from 7 IHS regions have joined the collaborative learning network. Over 250 HCV patient cases have been discussed. Currently there are 5 Indian Country HCV teleECHO clinics with expansion to 2 additional IHS regions in 2018.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Empowering a Culture of Health for Lasting Change in Indian Country: Tribal Food & Policy
    Meeting Room 11
    As sovereign nations, Tribal governments have the inherent authority to develop laws and policies that protect, support, and maintain the health of their people, lands, and communities. By controlling the policy environment surrounding food and agriculture, Tribal governments can promote better health through improved food access and food-based prosperity. The Tribal Model Food and Agriculture Code Project is a multi-year project designed to assist Tribal governments in the creation of food and agricultural policy that promotes true Tribal food sovereignty and supports improvements in native health and well-being. This presentation will explore the model code as a resource and toolkit designed to assist Tribal governments in promoting long-term health and wellness in Indian Country. Panelists will focus not only on public health provisions in the model code but will also address the critical linkage between Tribal agricultural codes and community health.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Healthy Earth Summit: Inspirations from youth-led public health initiative
    Meeting Room 16
    In 2018, youth leaders with the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program, Inc had a vision to bridge the gap between tribal public health, environmental protection and nutrition. Youth Leaders who were growing gardens and providing nutrition awareness to their communities realized the need to bring together Indigenous Food Producers, Organic Food Growers, Nutrition Programs, Public Health Advocates, Environmental Protection Programs, Social Entrepreneurs, Native Youth, Water & Earth Protectors, Native Chefs, and Native American Market vendors. In partnership with an international organization, the youth created the “Healthy Earth Summit” to highlight the idea among local action-takers that nutrient-nutrition-nourishment cycles (between people and earth) provide immediate and practical economic, physical, and cultural opportunities. Special guest included Sylvia Banda from Zambia. The “Healthy Earth Summit” stimulated practical insights and systemic actions, both immediate and long term, by participants on opportunities linking land, water, food, and wellness systems. Learn about the first ever “Healthy Earth Summit” held in Window Rock, Arizona.
    Speakers:
    Speaker:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    State-by-State Behavioral Health Services Guide
    Meeting Room 20
    This workshop will provide an overview of an initiative that the National Indian Health Board, in partnership with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is conducting to document state Medicaid programs across the country and determine what behavioral health, substance abuse and addiction services are reimbursable and identifies which practitioners have been authorized to directly bill for those services. The objective is to provide an administrative tool to aid both in making informed staffing decisions and in achieving full reimbursement for Medicaid services delivered. Ideally, this effort will help IHS and Tribes in their effort to achieve full implementation of the behavioral health related provisions of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act. Workshop attendees are invited to provide feedback on this tool to ensure that it meets the needs of Tribes.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Traditional Wild Rice Used in Contemporary Dishes
    Meeting Room 12
    In this interactive engaging session, Native Chef Jason Champagne MPH demonstrates how to use authentic Native American wild rice in different contemporary dishes. Small tastings will be available at the end of the session.
     
    3:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Wellness Break
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Creating Realistic Policy using Community Voices
    Meeting Room 17
    Papa Ola Lōkahi is a community-based entity tasked with the kuleana (responsibility, accountability) to implement the mandates of the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act) to “raise the health status of Native Hawaiians to the highest possible level.” Papa Ola Lōkahi launched our Community Voices Project, in our attempt to listen to and understand the stories from our community members regarding their health and health behaviors and applying to overall creation and impact of policy on our communities. The Community Voices Project survey offers an opportunity for the Native Hawaiian communities, state-wide and on the continent, to provide valuable knowledge on their healthy behaviors. This project entails a designed survey to understand the health practices of our communities. The survey was submitted to individuals as well as communities throughout the state and continent by means of focus groups, established meetings, and community gatherings. The Community Voices project was a response to Papa Ola Lōkahi’s Pulse Survey that surveyed the health needs of our Native Hawaiian communities. •Validate community needs regarding Native Hawaiian health practices•Measure level of confidence in practices and assess areas to educate•Design a survey to capture the knowledge capacity of Native Hawaiian practices to ensure health and wellbeing
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Federal and State Indian Health Policy Guide
    Meeting Room 20
    The landscape of Indian health policy is evolving at a rapid pace, driven by changes of the Affordable Care Act, new state and federal approaches in value and access to care through Medicaid, and a focus to keep Medicare financially solvent while maintaining access for the growing senior population. These challenges call attention to the need for individuals working in the Indian health system to become more aware and involved in the development of health policy from the beginning. Individuals working in the Indian health system can be a powerful voice and have opportunities to represent their Indian communities in the development of health policy. This workshop will be a working session that focuses on how to get individuals from tribal health programs, as well as others from Indian Country, involved in Indian health policy and what types of tools and resources are needed to make this happen. The session will draw on the experiences and needs of participants.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    National VA Update Panel Presentation
    Meeting Room 16
    This workshop is an overview of the current status, along with program initiatives on the horizon, such as Caregivers Program expansion and the medical residency pilot program.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Protecting Human Rights and Tribal Soverginty in Research Policies
    Meeting Room 18
    Chickasaw Nation’s Department of Health houses the tribal research protections program, which includes a federally registered IRB responsible for reviewing all research that takes place within the Chickasaw Nation. Notably, the Chickasaw Nation’s Department of Health IRB extends the protections afforded to individuals by the Belmont principles to the entire Chickasaw community in order to protect the community and the heritage of the tribe in addition to individual research participants. The research protections program is working to answer several ethical questions, including how tribal sovereignty relates to the NIH’s single IRB policy, the management and ownership of genomic data, bio-specimen storage and use, and new nation-wide studies such as All of Us. These issues directly impact all tribes and could potentially limit tribal participation in important health studies. Historically, Native American and Alaska Native data are lacking from large studies that impact health decisions in the United States.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Stories From the Field: Native STAND and other Culturally Relevant Sexual Health Resources for AI/AN
    Meeting Room 19
    Youth sexual health messaging can be challenging in Indian Country, where sexual and reproductive decisions are shaped by both traditional and contemporary social norms. Culturally relevant health education curricula are needed to deliver effective, age-appropriate health promotion programs. The Native STAND curriculum – Students Together Against Negative Decisions – incorporates tradition and culture to address STDs, HIV, healthy relationships, and teen pregnancy, while teaching healthy decision-making skills and positive youth development. In this presentation, we will describe lessons learned from our ongoing nationwide implementation at 48 sites, including best practices in delivery approaches to reservation and urban settings, in schools and other community settings, and the incorporation of web-based and social media enhancements. Data on shifts in knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of participating youth will be presented. The Native STAND Project is funded by the CDC Prevention Research Centers (Grant No. U48DP005006).
    Speakers:
     
    6:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Culture Night
    Hosted By Southern Plain Tribal Health Board
  • Wednesday, September 19, 2018
  •  
    6:30 AM  -  7:30 AM
    Fitness Event: Yoga and Mindfulness
    Room 9
    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Area Caucus
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Marketplace & Exhibit Hall Open
    Pre-Function Space
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Registration & Information Open
    Pre-Function Space
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Plenary Session
    Ballroom ABC

    9:00 AM – 9:20 AM

    UPDATE AND OVERVIEW FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (HHS) SECRETARY’S TRIBAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE (STAC)

    Chester Antone, Councilman, Tohono O’odham Nation; Chair and Tucson Area Representative, Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee

    Bruce Pratt, President, Pawnee Nation; Oklahoma Area Representative, Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee

    Vinton Hawley, Chairman, Pyramid Lake Paiute; Phoenix Area Representative, Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee

    Victoria Kitcheyan, Council Member, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska; At-Large-Delegate, Secretary’s Tribal Advisory Committee

     

    9:20 AM – 9:40 AM

    INDIAN HEALTHCARE IMPROVEMENT FUND UPDATE

    Jim Roberts, Senior Executive Liaison, Intergovernmental Affairs, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Co-Chair, Indian Health Care Improvement Fund Workgroup

    RADM Kevin Meeks, Deputy Director of Field Operations, Indian Health Service, Alternate Co-Chair, Indian Health Care Improvement Fund Workgroup

     

    9:40 AM – 10:00 AM

    TRIBAL PHARMACEUTICAL LAWSUITS OVER OPIOIDS: OVERVIEW AND UPDATES

    Timothy Q. Purdon, Partner, Robins Kaplan, LLP

    Lloyd Miller, Partner, Sonosky Chambers Sachse Miller & Monkman, LLP

     

    10:00 AM – 10:20 AM

    HOW IS CONGRESS FIGHTING THE OPIOID CRISES?

    Caitrin Shuy, Director of Congressional Relations, National Indian Health Board

     

    10:20 AM – 10:50 AM

    CENTERS FOR MEDICARE AND MEDICAID SERVICES (CMS) UPDATE AND OVERVIEW

    Tim Hill, Acting Director, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services, CMS

     

    10:50 AM – 11:20 AM

    HOW CAN MEDICAID AND CMS HELP FIGHT THE OPIOID CRISIS IN INDIAN COUNTRY?

    Kirsten Beronio, Senior Behavioral Health Policy Advisor, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services

     

    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    STRENGTHENING AND SUSTAINING STATE – TRIBAL RELATIONS IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    Reuben Howard, Executive Director, Health Services Division, Pascua Yaqui Tribe

    Debra Danforth, Debra J. Danforth, BSN, RN,  Division Director-Operations, Oneida Comprehensive Health Division

    John Stephens, Programs Administrator, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

     

    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch (On Your Own)
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Public Health in Indian Country Capacity Scan (PHICCS) Meeting
    Ballroom D
    The NIHB Public Health in Indian Country Capacity Scan (PHICCS) project aims to create and disseminate a comprehensive profile of the public health system and infrastructure in Indian Country. This information will be gathered through a scan instrument /survey. The scan instrument /survey will ask questions about the respondent Tribal health department’s public health systems, functions, workforce, priorities, needs, strengths, and leadership. The information collected will be used to develop a report that can support and guide essential public health work in Indian Country, especially in the areas of Tribal public health practice, technical support, and assessing priority areas related to improving Indian health. The scan instrument / survey will be shared with Tribes this fall. NIHB encourages all Tribes to participate in the PHICCS project, and to designate a health or public health director to answer the scan questions. Please join us for this session to discuss the project and ask questions.
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    1:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Bridging the Gap Between State and Tribal Health Departments
    Meeting Room 16
    The relationship between states and Tribal Nations can vary by region, state, and Tribal Nation. The United South and Eastern Tribes Tribal Epidemiology Center (USET TEC) has a long history of working with states to access vital statistics data to provide USET Tribal Nations with mortality reports. Currently, the USET TEC has been working to strengthen the relationships between the 27 USET Tribal Nations and the 13 state health departments within the USET region. The USET TEC has coordinated with Southern states to assist in Zika virus outbreak preparedness and response. In 2017, USET was able to work with the Florida health department to provide Zika prevention kits to two Tribal Nations within Florida. USET held an Outbreak Response Workshop in August 2017 for state health departments and USET Tribal Nations. In March 2018, USET collaborated with NIHB to host a vector borne disease workshop for the four Tribal Nations in Louisiana and the Louisiana health department. This workshop focused on services provided by each entity and how these entities can work together in the future. USET has prepared educational materials for the Louisiana health department on cultural sensitivity to Tribal Nations, and educational materials for the Tribal Nations within Louisiana on the collection protocols of the Louisiana health department. The strengthening of state and Tribal relationships can provide additional funding opportunities, more services and accurate data to Tribal Nations.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Careers in Biomedical Engineering: Development and Exploration Opportunities for Native Youth
    Meeting Room 17
    Biomedical engineering has served as an effective vehicle for engineering education and outreach for K-12 students by providing a unique perspective on current healthcare challenges while engaging students to provide a solution. The Stephenson School of Biomedical Engineering at OU has developed a variety of hands-on activities (e.g., 3D-printing hands) tailored to different grade levels designed to generate enthusiasm for the technology side of healthcare and showcase the career opportunities that are available. It is our hope that the multidisciplinary nature of healthcare technology inspires students to approach biomedical engineering as a viable career path. Our team is excited to work with individual tribes on activities suited to their needs at the location of their preference, including students and teachers from K-12 and tribal college alike. The workshop presenters will provide an overview of opportunities, examples of existing tribal outreach, and time permitting, an example demonstration.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Innovative Tribal Response to the Opioid Crisis and Behavioral Health Priorities
    Meeting Room 18
    The Didgwalic Wellness Center is a completely tribally owned, financed and managed by the Swinomish tribe. The Center offers a wrap around approach on many different levels and offers care that is focused on the individual needs of each patient. It is an innovative tribal model that has led to 50 percent capacity since its opening in January 2018. The Center's services include outpatient treatment services: Primary medical care, mental health counseling, medication assisted therapies (suboxone, vivitrol, methadone), case management and referrals, DUI/deferred prosecution, shuttle transportation and onsite child care. It should have taken three years to construct and open the wellness center, but it was completed in about 15 months. The urgency was driven by the opioid epidemic.The biggest barrier to getting treatment is the lack of available facilities, she said. This center is the largest medication-assisted treatment facility north of Snohomish County and is open to both natives and non-natives.John will discuss the process in building the clinic and the key factors Washington SPA and Medicaid expansion pool.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Medicaid Work Requirements: An Update and Path Forward
    Meeting Room 11
    This panel will present an update and overview of State efforts to impose work requirements as a condition of participation in Medicaid through Section 1115 Demonstrations. Panelists will provide both national and state specific updates on this issue. Topics to be covered include CMS's position that an Indian exemption would raise civil right concerns, and the tribal response to that position, including the legal response from the CMS TTAG and the political response led by NIHB and NCAI. Panelists will provide an update on the lawsuit in Kentucky to block CMS's approval of work requirements. Panelists will also provide state-specific examples of how tribes can work with States to address these issues, using Arizona as a case-study.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Medicaid: Update on National Policy and Protections for Indians under Medicaid
    Meeting Room 20
    This session will provide an update on Medicaid policy from a national perspective and highlight some recent State-based developments in terms of proposed changes that have an impact on American Indian/Alaska Native health care. We will cover topics such as the impact of Medicaid expansion, cost sharing protections and exclusion of trust income for Indians under Medicaid, Indian specific provisions under Medicaid Managed Care, the 100 percent FMAP and 4 walls policy, and section 1115 demonstrations.
    Speakers:
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Retaining Health Care Providers through Culture and Connection
    Meeting Room 19
    Retaining health care providers is essential to providing quality health care to American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Understanding the cultural customs of the community allows providers to better serve their patients. This workshop will focus on current approaches taking place throughout Indian Country that have been used to help strengthen patient-provider relationships. Additionally, through facilitated discussion, participants will share their perspectives and insight in building successful relationships between patients, providers, communities, and Tribes using a cultural lens.
    Speakers:
     
    3:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Wellness Break
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Approaches to Address Food Insecurity in Indian Country
    Meeting Room 17
    This workshop will outline the current state of food insecurity among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people, the programs that influence food access in urban and rural Native communities, and the impact on chronic disease. Examples of culturally appropriate approaches and best practices to promote food security at the individual, family, community, and state level when serving AI/AN populations will be shared. The importance of including indigenous perspectives into evidence-based health promotion and chronic disease prevention initiatives will also be discussed.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Harnessing Youth Innovation to Solve Pressing Health Problems in Indian Country
    Meeting Room 19
    Native youth are strong, resilient, engaged, and acutely aware of the political and social tides shaping our world. Some are choosing to take on leadership roles in their communities and committing themselves to making positive change. This workshop is led by 4 National Indian Health Board Health (NIHB) Policy Fellows who are doing just that. Please join us as they share stories about their journeys working with Tribal leadership to understand some of the most pressing health issues facing our communities today. Information will be provided about the Health Policy Fellowship, NIHB’s mini-grant opportunities for youth, and how you can be an advocate for change in your community.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services at an Ambulatory Healthcare System
    Meeting Room 11
    Purpose: Describe the implementation of clinical pharmacy services at an ambulatory healthcare system.Abstract: Pharmacists play a vital role in the healthcare system. Pharmacists can conduct patient assessments, review medication histories, identify optimal medication choices, and deliver patient education, and provide preventative services. Furthermore, healthcare facilities that have incorporated pharmacists’ clinical skills have reported positive outcomes. The expansion of pharmacy services at the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC) was successful in pharmacist managed and collaborative interprofessional clinics. These clinics have also served as training sites for healthcare professionals. OKCIC has benefited from decreased provider workload and increased patient access to care. The number of pharmacy clinic visits has grown from about 75 patients per month (2015) to 250 patients per month (2017). This has also improved insurance reimbursements and positively impacted the clinic budget. The pharmacists have an enhanced role in reducing disease burden on the Native American population.
    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Legislative Priorities on Medicaid
    Meeting Room 20
    Discuss federal legislative proposal by the Tribal Self-Governance Advisory Committee to address gaps in access to health care services under Medicaid for low- and moderate-income American Indians and Alaska Natives.
    Speakers:
  • Thursday, September 20, 2018
  •  
    6:30 AM  -  7:30 AM
    Fitness Event: Run/Walk
    Room 9
    7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
    Area Caucus
    7:00 AM  -  1:00 PM
    Marketplace & Exhibit Hall Open
    Pre-Function Space
    7:00 AM  -  1:00 PM
    Registration & Information Open
    Pre-Function Space
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    8:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Breaking Through: Taking Action on State-Level Legislative and Advocacy Priorities
    Ballroom D
    Just like tribes, every state in the U.S. has unique styles and processes – especially when it comes to moving legislative and advocacy priorities from starting blocks to the finish line. In order to gain traction for your initiatives, it’s important to understand the annual legislative session “great cycle of life.” In this session you will learn the stages of a typical State of Oklahoma legislative calendar year, key legislative positions employed by the state to help you through the process, what interim studies are and how to use them for educational advocacy, and review a case study that contains key lessons learned through the full developmental stages of bill drafting to law passage. Your presenters have a combined experience of more than 40 years in state-level advocacy leadership, and are looking forward to providing you “coaching” to run your own initiative priority race successfully.
    Speakers:
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Culturally Rooted Healing on Yurok Tribal Lands: A Collaborative Approach to Restoring Health to the
    Meeting Room 20
    The Yurok Tribe, California’s most populous Native American Tribe, is located in the Northwestern corner of the state. Del Norte County and the Yurok Tribal Lands were one of 14 California sites chosen by a health foundation for a 10 year initiative focused on improving health outcomes. One powerful tool for creating sustainable change was building capacity of residents to change systems and policies through community organizing. Residents sought to find the most pressing health needs.On the most remote part of the Yurok reservation, the root of many issues was a common need for a return to a more traditional land management system to improve the health of both the land and the people. After 100 years of fire suppression efforts the land was overgrown, traditional gathered food sources were scarce and large game was almost non-existent. The physical and mental health of Tribal members was also at a critical point; diabetes and obesity were above predicted levels and the suicide rate was rising drastically. It was discovered that the root of many of the health issues was a need for a return to a more traditional land management system. Together with the Yurok Tribal government, local land owners and state and federal agencies, residents successfully led a return to a more traditional and culturally appropriate lands management system. This community win has resulted in additional resident-led actions to create policy and systems change to address health and social inequities.
    Speakers:
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Medicaid: Update on National Policy and Protections for Indians under Medicaid
    Meeting Room 19
    This session will provide an update on Medicaid policy from a national perspective and highlight some recent State-based developments in terms of proposed changes that have an impact on American Indian/Alaska Native health care. We will cover topics such as the impact of Medicaid expansion, cost sharing protections and exclusion of trust income for Indians under Medicaid, Indian specific provisions under Medicaid Managed Care, the 100 percent FMAP and 4 walls policy, and section 1115 demonstrations.
    Speakers:
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Public and Private Partnerships to Maximize Health Care Coverage for AI/ANs
    Meeting Room 18
    The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma (BCBSOK) have a shared commitment for healthy tribal communities through collaboration and meaningful communication with tribal stakeholders. The disproportionately high number of uninsured American Indians and other barriers to access health services, present unique challenges to bringing resources to the ITU health systems. Collectively, OHCA & BCBSOK provide health coverage to the majority of Oklahomans and are in position to have a positive impact in tribal communities. Both organizations have established best practices in collaborative efforts with ITU health systems. Workshop will highlight examples of successful collaborations and best practices that can be implemented in other states.
    Speakers:
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Tribal Opioid Litigation: Overview and Update
    Meeting Room 17
    Over 60 Indian Tribes have joined 1,000 state and local government lawsuits filed across the country against the manufacturers, distributors and retailers of prescription opioid drugs. Most of these cases have been consolidated before Ohio Federal Judge Dan Polster. In June 2018 Judge Polster established a Tribal Track in the litigation, and selected the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and the Blackfeet Tribe to be "bellwether" (or test) cases. The pharmaceutical defendants have now filed motions to dismiss those two cases and Judge Polster has given advance approval for other tribes to join together in an "amicus" brief in support of the Muscogee and Blackfeet tribes. This workshop will educate attendees on the history and status of the opioid litigation, and on the opportunities tribes now have to participate in that litigation in an "amicus" capacity.
    Speakers:
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Virtual Training Simulations to Support at Risk Youth
    Meeting Room 16
    An overview of Virtual Training Simulations in Indian Country. This presentation offers 3 evidence based simulations with exclusive use for all federally recognized tribes, bureau of Indian education schools and their partners. The simulations cover topics such as: thoughts of suicide, anxiety, becoming trauma-informed, empowering positive decisions, effective and ineffective ways to approach friends, mental health, cyberbullying, cutting, and disruptive behavior in youth. Participants will become familiar with the simulations, the process of accessing them, and a discussion on resources and ways to implement in their own community. A tribal youth advocate will share her personal story about the importance of training youth on mental health and suicide prevention.
    Speakers:
     
    10:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Wellness Break
     

    NTHC 2018 Workshop

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Building a Culture of Safety
    Meeting Room 16
    Building a culture of safety Title: You can’t fix what you can’t seeIt’s easy to lose focus on patient safety when you’re working in a small, rural Indian Health Service hospital with constant staffing issues and a building that is on the National Historic Registry. But after Mescalero IHS Hospital scored below average on a survey of patient safety culture, hospital leadership formed a multidisciplinary team to focus on the issues. A root cause analysis revealed that staff did not routinely enter patient safety issues into the electronic incident reporting system (Webcident) and when they did, there was not consistent follow up. The right people were not at the table to address incidents and issues. The patient safety team now includes administration, clinical staff and IT. Through weekly meetings, daily huddles and development of surveys and tracking tools, the team has made many improvements in encouraging a culture of patient safety. Patient safety is now a hospital wide priority supported by hospital leadership and patient safety scores have nearly doubled.In addition to utilizing Webcident, Mescalero IHS is utilizing their data to drive improvement efforts that extend beyond their hospital walls. Effective partnerships with their tribal health programs and surrounding health systems were created to collaborate on community health issues. A community resource guide has been developed for IHS providers to refer patients to for self-management of their health
    Speakers:
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Culturally Appropriate Alternatives: Traditional Healing in Primary Care
    Meeting Room 17
    Southcentral Foundation, an Alaska Native customer-owned health care system, runs a system of integrated primary care, where patients (called “customer-owners” at SCF) have a wide range of services available that they can access as needed. One of these services is traditional healing, where tribal doctors offer culturally relevant counseling and physical healing that is based on the customer-owner’s needs and health goals. Referrals to traditional healing can come from primary care, behavioral health, OB-GYN, internal medicine, or pediatrics. Customer-owners go to traditional healing for a wide variety of reasons, including help with chronic pain, management of chronic conditions, emotional support, and more. 97 percent of customer-owners say they are satisfied with the care provided by SCF, and 96 percent say that their culture and traditions are respected. This session will cover the services offered by SCF’s Traditional Healing Clinic and how it functions within SCF’s integrated care system.
    Speakers:
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Enhancing Community Relationships to Implement Community Change
    Meeting Room 18
    This workshop will share how Gila River Indian Community has implemented a leadership driven approach to developing policies for establishing and enhancing suicide prevention awareness in the community. This will also include the creation of Gila River Indian Community’s Suicide Prevention Media Campaign.
    Speakers:
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Tribal-State Environmental Health Summits: A Foundation for Collaboration
    Meeting Room 19
    Cross-jurisdictional collaboration between Tribes and States is critical, especially during an environmental health crisis, which oftentimes forces different entities to work together towards a common goal. Having a positive existing relationship and effective communication channels is vital to a successful response. During this workshop, participants will hear from both Tribal and state health department representatives that are taking a proactive approach to collaboration by convening in-person Tribal environmental health summits. These summits have offered Tribal elders, members, and health department staff an opportunity to meet, exchange resources and build trust with counterparts at state health departments. Presenters will share how they came together to build communication bridges, identify environmental health challenges impacting Tribal communities, jointly host these summits, and ultimately identify culturally appropriate strategies to collaboratively mitigate those challenges.
    Speakers:
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Utilizing Modern Strategies to Implement Traditional Cultural Activities in Prevention Programming
    Meeting Room 20
    Define Your Direction is a youth/community-created and driven prevention program based on input gathered from youth residing throughout Chickasaw Nation. Define Your Direction utilizes a multi-pronged, community-based participatory approach to address underage drinking and prescription opioid misuse/abuse and overdose deaths in tribal communities. Since its creation and implementation in 2016, multiple risk factors for youth substance abuse have decreased and protective factors have increased. A key component to the success of the program has been its community-based participatory approach to program development. This process has been particularly important for ensuring youth engagement as the program began to implement culturally-based prosocial activities within our target communities. This presentation will discuss the process for involving youth in programmatic decisions and innovative strategies to close the generational divide by implementing traditional cultural activities and teachings with a modern twist.
    Speakers:
     
    12:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Closing Plenary Session
    Ballroom ABC

    12:30 PM – 12:45 PM

    CREATING A PICTURE OF PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY IN INDIAN COUNTRY

     Carolyn Hornbuckle, Deputy Director and Director of Public Health, National Indian Health Board 1

     

    2:45 PM – 1:05 PM

    CONGRESSIONAL UPDATE AND OVERVIEW

    The Honorable Tom Cole, U.S. House of Representatives, Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee, Citizen of the Chicksaw Nation

     

    1:05 PM – 2:00 PM

    AREA CAUCUS REPORTS

    Alaska Area

    Albuquerque Area

    Bemidji Area

    Billings Area

    California Area

    Great Plains Area

    Nashville Area

    Navajo Area

    Oklahoma City Area

    Phoenix Area

    Portland Area

    Tucson Area

     

    2:00 PM – 2:35 PM

    COMMUNITY HEALTH AIDE PROGRAM NATIONAL EXPANSION OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

     

    2:35 PM – 2:50 PM

    CONFERENCE WRAP-UP

    Exhibit Hall Passport Prizes 2019 Conference Announcements Closing Comments and Acknowledgements

     

    2:50 PM – 3:00 PM

    RETIRING OF THE COLORS

    Citizen Band of Potawatomi Veteran’s Organization

     

    3:00 PM

    ADJOURN NATIONAL TRIBAL HEALTH CONFERENCE

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