2018 National Tribal Public Health Summit

SEE YOU ONSITE STARTING MONDAY, MAY 21st!

Agenda

  Go
  • Closed  Closed
  • Optional  Optional
  • Fee  Fee
  • Monday, May 21, 2018
  •  
    8:00 AM  -  8:45 AM
    Tribal Caucus
    Isanti Ballroom
    Tribal leaders are invited to participate in a Tribal caucus prior to the Opioid Consultation and Listening Session. Tribal caucus is a time for Tribal leaders, their advisors, and Tribal organizations to come together to clarify issues and define recommendations that they may want to put forth to leadership of federal government agencies.
     

    Free Pre-Summit Sessions

    8:45 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Opioid Consultation and Listening Session (Free)
    Isanti Ballroom

    The rising number of opioid overdose deaths is a serious public health crisis that affects individuals, families and communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives have been disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis. For example, they had the highest drug overdose death rates in 2015 and the largest percent increase in the number of deaths from 1995 to 2015 relative to other racial/ethnic groups. This Tribal Consultation, Addressing the Opioid Epidemic in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities, will bring together the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Indian Health Service (IHS), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and tribal leaders and their representatives, offering a unique and comprehensive opportunity to address issues around this crisis with all three agencies in one locale. The consultation will facilitate the provision of information and afford the opportunity for Tribal nations to have meaningful input as these agencies and Institute develop priorities, strategies, and programs to address the opioid crisis. This consultation reflects the commitment of these agencies to engage with tribal nations and the critical importance of ensuring that programs are responsive to the needs of tribal nations.

     

    This event is free and no prior registration is needed. 

     

    For more information and to view the agenda, click HERE.

     
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch (on your own)
    2:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Summit Registration Open
    Waconia Foyer
  • Tuesday, May 22, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  6:00 PM
    Summit Registration Open
    Waconia Foyer
    8:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Exhibitor Set Up
    Waconia 1&2
    9:00 AM  -  4:00 PM
    Pre-Summit Institutes (Optional)

    Morning Sessions (9:00 AM - 12:00 PM)

    • (Morning Session A, Waconia 5) Tips for Successful Grant Writing
    • (Morning Session B, Waconia 6) Planning for and Conducting Tribal Community Health Assessments

    Afternoon Sessions (1:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

    • (Afternoon Session A, Waconia 5) Fundamentals of Evaluation for Public Health Programming 
    • (Afternoon Session B, Waconia 6) Making your Strategic Plan an Action and Results Driven Process

    For more information including institute descriptions, click HERE

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Free Pre-Summit Sessions

    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Cancer Prevention Seminar (Free)
    Anoka 1 & 2

    The Cancer Prevention Seminar is offered as part of the Tribal Public Health Summit's pre-conference activities. Run in partnership with the American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF), this interactive Seminar will focus on skills building as it relates to cancer prevention strategies through two primary sessions: 1) using motivational interviewing to address tobacco cessation and HPV vaccination in clinics and community health programs and 2) quality improvement strategies and success stories for cancer prevention programs. 

     

    Learning objectives:

    • Describe how motivational interviewing strategies can be used effectively in cancer prevention activities within Tribal communities
    • Explain the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle to implement quality improvement strategies for a cancer prevention and/or screening program within an AI/AN health system
    • Identify effective culturally-tailored interventions within a cancer screening program


    This Seminar is free to attend and no prior registration is required.

    9:00 AM  -  3:00 PM
    Opioid Consultation and Listening Session (Free)
    Isanti Ballroom

    The rising number of opioid overdose deaths is a serious public health crisis that affects individuals, families and communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives have been disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis. For example, they had the highest drug overdose death rates in 2015 and the largest percent increase in the number of deaths from 1995 to 2015 relative to other racial/ethnic groups. This Tribal Consultation, Addressing the Opioid Epidemic in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities, will bring together the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Indian Health Service (IHS), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and tribal leaders and their representatives, offering a unique and comprehensive opportunity to address issues around this crisis with all three agencies in one locale. The consultation will facilitate the provision of information and afford the opportunity for Tribal nations to have meaningful input as these agencies and Institute develop priorities, strategies, and programs to address the opioid crisis. This consultation reflects the commitment of these agencies to engage with tribal nations and the critical importance of ensuring that programs are responsive to the needs of tribal nations.

     

    This even is free and no prior registration is needed.

     

    For more information and to view the agenda, click HERE.

    This event is free and no prior registration is needed. 
    This event is free and no prior registration is needed. 
     
    12:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Exhibitor Hall Open
    Waconia 1&2
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch (on your own)
     

    Free Pre-Summit Sessions

    3:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Federal Agency Consultation and Listening Session - CDC
    Waconia 3 & 4
    State of Public Health in Indian Country Tribal Listening Session

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes that public health infrastructure is essential to carrying out core public health functions to detect, control, and prevent morbidity and mortality. CDC holds a mission critical charge to provide accurate, relevant, and timely data that will guide actions and policies to improve the health of the American people. The State of Public Health in Indian Country listening session will provide essential information from tribal leaders and tribal public health experts in developing the groundwork for development of tribal public health strategic initiatives for CDC. CDC would also like to brief attendees on The CDC Tribal Public Health Project (TPHP), and request feedback on the TPHP strategic model.

    No registration or fees required.

     
    6:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Opening Reception and SDPI Poster Session
    Waconia Foyer
    Please join us for an opening reception to kick off the Summit events and to learn more about the amazing work of the SDPI programs across Indian Country. The Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) has been changing the lives of American Indians and Alaska Natives for the past twenty years. Congress established SDPI in 1997 to address the growing epidemic of diabetes in Indian Country and it quickly grew into the nation’s most strategic, comprehensive, and effective effort to combat diabetes and its complications. Once a year, the National Indian Health Board is proud to host SDPI programs from around Indian Country, and this year, at the 8th Annual SDPI Poster Session, is no exception. We are thrilled to welcome the SDPI program participants to this event.
  • Wednesday, May 23, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Summit Registration Open
    Waconia Foyer
    7:30 AM  -  6:00 PM
    Exhibitor Hall Open
    Waconia 1&2
    8:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Opening Plenary
    Minnetonka 1-9

    8:30 am – 9:00 am

    Opening Prayer & Local Welcome:

    Joanna Bryant, Wellness Administrator, Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux

    Introductions and Review Agenda:

    Vinton Hawley, Chairman, National Indian Health Board

    9:00 am – 10:15 am

    Tribal Successes and Promising Practices in Addressing the Opioid Overdose Epidemic – Engaging Tribal Leadership

    Moderator: Dolores Subia Bigfoot, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 

    Karol Dixon, Health Director, Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe 

    Samuel Moose, Director of Human Services, Fond du Lac Tribe of Lake Superior Chippewa 

    Rosemary Cree Medicine, Health Director, Blackfeet Nation 

    Christina Arredondo, Medical Director, Pascua Yaqui Tribe 

    10:15 am – 10:35 am

    IHS Update on Tribal Public Health Issues

    RADM Chris Buchanan, Deputy Director, Indian Health Service 

    10:25 am – 11:50am

    Returning to Our Roots to Promote Our Health – Food Sovereignty and the 2018 Farm Bill

    Moderator: Abaki Beck, NIHB Native Youth Policy Fellow

    Colby Duren, Policy Director, Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative 

    A-dae Romero-Briones, Director of Native Agriculture and Food Systems, First Nations Development Institute 

    Erin Parker, Research Director and Staff Attorney, Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative 

    11:50 am -12:00 pm

    Summit logistics, Tribal Public Health Week Photo Winner

    12:00 PM  -  1:30 PM
    Lunch (on your own)
    1:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Breakout and Roundtable Sessions
     

    Roundtable Session

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Roundtable Session 1
    Minnetonka 2 & 3

    How do Roundtables work? Start at any table you would like and you will have to opportunity to visit the other tables every 15 minutes and in any order that suits you.

    For complete descriptions of roundtables in this session, download the pdf: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention RT 1

    1 - Improving AI/AN Cancer Incidence Data in the US

    Melissa Jim, CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

    Cheyenne Jim, IHS Immunization Program Analyst

    2 - Maximizing Collaboration to Achieve Collective Impact on Improving Cancer Outcomes Across American Indian Communities

    Anne Walaszek and Amber Ruffin, American Indian Cancer Foundation

    3 - Dine (Navajo) Goes Lasagna

    Lishua Gishie, Annette Gonnie, and Kimberly Yazzie, Winslow Indian Health Care Center

    4 - Stories from the Field: Native STAND and other Culturally Relevant Sexual Health Resources for AI/AN Teens

    Michelle Singer, The Center for Healthy Communities, OHSU PSU School of Public Health

    5 - NIEJI Elder Mistreatment Survey

    Melissa Wheeler and Jacqueline Gray, National Indigenous Elder Justice Initiative

     Optional 
     

    Track: Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Promoting Health Equity in Tribal Communities: Tools of Implementation
    Waconia 4
    Cancer disproportionately affects American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) communities. While nearly every other population is experiencing decreases in cancer diagnoses and death rates over the last twenty years, these incidences are still increasing for AI/AN populations. The American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) is committed to changing the cancer story by working in partnership with tribes and other organizations to address pervasive health inequities. AICAF partners with AI/AN tribes and communities to implement Policy, Systems and Environmental (PSE) Change strategies to promote health equity, cancer prevention and increasing healthy norms across Indian Country. During this workshop AICAFs newest culturally tailored chronic disease prevention resources will be reviewed. Time will be dedicated for participants to work in groups to strategize how the resources can be taken back and utilized in their own communities and organizations.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Building Communities of Hope Suicide Prevention Initiative: One Voice, One Nation – Protect Life
    Waconia 6

    The Building Communities of Hope (BCOH) Initiative began in the latter months of 2015. This initiative was created through Executive Order No. E0-03-2015 by Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye and Vice President Jonathan Nez to increase suicide prevention and awareness. This presentation is aimed toward youth, elders, families, and communities by providing education on signs and symptoms of suicide, strengthening resiliency, and positive self-awareness in order to reduce suicide and substance misuse. The BCOH Interdisciplinary team is comprised of behavioral health clinicians, partners, and motivational speakers. Since 2015, BCOH has presented at 71 locations and to approximately 10,000 individuals on and off the Navajo Nation. BCOH has progressed to include Being Resilient and Coping with Stress presentations and Crisis Response Teams.

     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and Other Approaches to Address Opioid Use Disorders
    Waconia 5
    The purpose of this session is to consider treatment strategies and other approaches to reduce Opioid Use Disorders (OUD) in AI/AN communities. Presentations will range from sharing scientific evidence on treatment approaches to exploring lessons learned when addressing OUD in a community. Medication assisted treatment (MAT) will be discussed, which is the most efficacious strategy demonstrated thus far to address this disorder. Considerations for appropriate cultural adaptations to MAT will be considered, including examples. Presenters will additionally consider strength-based solutions to this epidemic, drawing from lessons learned from AI/AN communities and people. Finally, an example of how one community has worked to address OUD will be presented.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Climate Change and Environmental Health

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    ITEP: Working with Tribes Across Climate, Human and Environmental Health
    Waconia 3
    Since 2009, the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) Tribal Climate Change Program has served tribal environmental professionals and communities on climate change adaptation and resilience planning. ITEP staff travel to different regions of the country to offer tribal natural resource managers and citizens the latest tools and resources, climate data, potential partnership and funding opportunities. ITEP offers these vital tools and a support system to tribes who are looking to address the impacts of climate change on their respective communities and natural and cultural resources. ITEP will speak on their work with tribes to ensure tribes have the resources and support they need to address climate and non-climatic impacts on the health of their people and their mother, the Earth, and all while maintaining the commitment to preserve and protect their indigenous/traditional knowledge systems central to their culture. ITEP has been and still is committed to providing services and support that will assist tribes to build the capacity to support their people in educating and healing themselves to take care of their environment. Examples of what tribes are doing across the country will be provided and staff will lead a discussion of what is happening and what needs to happen in tribal/Indigenous communities.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Infrastructure & Capacity

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Community Health Assessments: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's Community Based Collaboration
    Anoka 1 & 2
    Community Health Assessments (CHA) are a primary tool in the reduction of health disparities in tribal communities. CHA offer a view of what community members' top health concerns are, what is currently being done to try to reduce the disparities, what has been effective, and where there are service gaps. Key to the success of a CHA is the collaboration between the community members, tribal health services, Indian Health Services, other providers and tribal leadership. This session will tell the story of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North and South Dakota as they embark on a CHA, their utilization of technical assistance, and how Indian Health Services and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Health Services CHA will work in tandem to improve the health of the people of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Preventing and Managing Chronic Disease Using Culturally Relevant Practices and Evid-based Medicine
    Owatonna 1 & 2
    Diabetes is prevalent in the AI/AN population and is commonly associated with other health problems, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and heart failure. Environmental and social factors increase the risk of disease development and have a direct impact on prevention and treatment. Approach: Guideline directed, evidence-based practices will be presented. Psychosocial risk factors, social health determinates, and cultural beliefs will be introduced through personal stories and self-reflection. Participants will be given the opportunity to role play using real life cases that combine evidence-based medicine, psychosocial factors and cultural beliefs. Result: Participants will be able to practice multidisciplinary, culturally relevant approaches to use in chronic disease management, specifically aimed at identifying factors that influence patient outcomes and disease prevention. Conclusion:Identifying and understanding factors that contribute to the development and treatment of chronic diseases will improve relationships between providers and their patients, translating to disease prevention and improved health outcomes.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Roundtable Session

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health Roundtable Session
    Minnetonka 2 & 3

    How do Roundtables work? Start at any table you would like and you will have to opportunity to visit the other tables every 15 minutes and in any order that suits you.

    For complete descriptions of the roundtables in this session, download this pdf: Substance Abuse and BH Roundtable

    1 - Integrated Care 1: Weaving Primary and Behavioral Health Services Together

    Kate Grismala, United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc.

    Mike Cook, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe

    2 - Integrated Care 2: Weaving Primary and Behavioral Health Services Together

    Cynthia Guzman, and Dave Panana, Santo Domingo Health Center

    3 - The Use of Peer Recovery Advocates to Assist in Treatment/Recovery

    Justin Peglowski, and Peter Wilson, Seneca Nation Health System

    4 - Ninde (My Heart): A Community-Based Collaborative to Support Healthy Birth Outcomes

    Meghan Porter, Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Epidemiology Center

    Lisa Skjefte

    Stephanie Graves, Minneapolis Health Department

    5 - Building Capacity to Prevent Suicide in Tribal Communities

    Luther Talks, Minnesota Department of Health

    Sherri Newago, Cass Lake Indian Service Hospital

     

     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Policy

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Breaking Barriers in HIV Prevention – the Need to Expand PrEP in Tribal Communities
    Waconia 5
    The HIV/AIDS prevention landscape has experienced seismic changes over the past several years, largely resulting from new medicines such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), under the brand name TRUVADA®. Unlike previous medicines that worked to reduce the risk of HIV infection after exposure, PrEP strengthens an individual’s protection against HIV by working to prevent infection before exposure. Unfortunately, access to this powerful drug has not been at the level of need for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). In addition to its high cost, TRUVADA® is currently only categorized as post-exposure prophylaxis as opposed to PrEP within the Indian Health Service (IHS) National Core Formulary (NCM) – limiting its potential as a tool for HIV prevention. This workshop will provide an analysis of current challenges in PrEP access in Tribal communities, and provide examples of Tribal best practices towards improving the availability of this drug within IHS and Tribal health facilities.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Working in Harmony with State Cancer Programs for Native Health & Wellness
    Waconia 4
    Comprehensive cancer control is a strategic approach to preventing or minimizing the impact of cancer in communities. It involves many agencies, groups, and people all coming together to find and agree upon ways to combat cancer in their communities. Since 1998, states have been federally-funded to create and implement comprehensive cancer control plans which should pay special attention to the needs and concerns of people with poor cancer health outcomes. In 2017, National Native Network (NNN) reviewed and analyzed State Cancer Plans to assess how well they were inclusive of AI/AN-specific data, strategies, and engagement activities to impact cancer disparities. Presenters will share those results, as well as themes from interviews with state program managers whose plans demonstrated inclusion. Participants will contribute throughout the presentation using interactive technology, and in a solutions-focused dialogue about approaches to encouraging effective state and tribal collaboration, starting with examples from NNN partner agencies.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Behavioral and Social Aspects of the Opioid Crisis
    Owatonna 1 & 2
    The population of adults with mental disorders receive more than half of the total opioid prescriptions in the United States. It seems likely that there are common factors underlying mental disorders, suicide, and substance abuse and their increasing burden to society. Among the nearly 40 million Americans who have a mental health condition, approximately 19% use prescription opioids. Higher opioid use among those with mental disorders persists across key characteristics, including cancer status and various levels of self-reported pain. Hence, there is a need for understanding the behavioral and social aspects of opioid abuse. This Roundtable aims to convene researchers to discuss a number of topics that may include understanding what other conditions (e.g., alcoholism, anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation) are associated with opioid addiction; destigmatizing mental illness and opioid addiction; promoting resilience- and strengths-based approaches utilizing community capacity, Indigenous culture, and social networks; identifying key settings in rural and urban contexts for collaborative care around detection, referral, and treatment; and working with service providers to promote responsible opioid use, improved prescription monitoring, and alternate forms of pain management.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track: Climate Change and Environmental Health

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Making the Connection Between Housing, Hazards and Health in Tribal Housing
    Waconia 3
    Although lead poisoning prevention, asthma and other housing related health hazards have been addressed, focus has not been spent or provided for tribal housing. Older housing, lower household income and poor maintenance of properties increases the incidence of exposure to lead based paint hazards which adversely affects health of children under the age of 6. In addition to lead poisoning risks, occupants of older housing with poor maintenance often have increased indoor air quality issues and mold/moisture which contribute to lower respiratory tract infections including asthma in children and adults. By identifying and addresses housing hazards, programs can be developed and implemented to protect families from increased exposure as well as reduce illness, reduce stress, decrease missed school days for children and loss of work days for parents. Funding is often minimal to address housing hazards such as lead based paint hazards, mold/moisture, pests, radon, and safety for tribal housing. The presentation will provide data, best practices and plan development to focus on tribal housing. In addition to sharing best practices, I want to present intervention strategies aimed at identifying and addressing housing related health hazards and creating sustainable, community-driven solutions to ensure all families are living in an environment that is healthy and safe.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Infrastructure & Capacity

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Healthy, Active Native Communities
    Anoka 1 & 2
    The purpose of this program is to provide capacity building assistance for Tribal Health Departments and American Indian/Alaska Native non-governmental stakeholders in the public health workforce to improve the quality and performance of public health systems. Utilizing the recommended strategies for obesity prevention from the centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Winnable Battles and Community Guide, this program has been able to increase the awareness of how effective evidence-based interventions can be within AI/AN communities when adapted to include cultural relevance. There are many AI/AN communities using evidence-based strategies resulting in pro-health policy, systems, and/or environmental change, however, there is little information specifically for AI/AN communities describing the work, challenges, cultural significance, and impact of the work being accomplished. The Healthy, Active Native Communities (HANC) Online Resource Guide allows AI/AN communities to have a peer learning experience in order to gain valuable insight and knowledge concerning obesity prevention strategies. The Promising Practices brief details the work of eight AI/AN communities making the cultural adjustments necessary for the selected strategies to have sustainable impact.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    3:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Our Cansasa Story: Culturally Focused Health and Healing
    Waconia 6
    From exploitation of our traditional medicine, to banning our ceremonial ways, colonization created a sordid history around traditional tobacco. This presentation tells the story of this sacred medicine through the eyes of the Indigenous people of Minnesota. The education of Native and non-Native people is integral to ensuring that we are not misunderstood in today’s mainstream tobacco prevention movement. We will begin by showing “Reclaiming Sacred Tobacco,” a film developed in partnership with Twin Cities Public Television and Clearway Minnesota, which highlights work to educate and preserve cansasa -sacred tobacco. We will follow up with a short presentation on the history of cansasa and how it is harvested, and end by explaining the efforts we are making in Lower Sioux Community to integrate Dakota cultural teachings into our commercial tobacco prevention work with youth to preserver the future of our cultural heritage surrounding cansasa.
     Optional 
     
    5:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    IHS Listening Session
    Minnetonka 2 & 3
    Please join IHS leadership and staff for a listening session to seek out input in improvements for IHS in meeting its mission to raise the physical, mental, social and spiritual health of American Indians and Alaska Natives to the highest level. The purpose of the listening session is to provide Tribes, Tribal Organizations and Urban Indian Organizations with a forum to review IHS’s progress on achieving the Agency’s mission and priorities.
  • Thursday, May 24, 2018
  •  
    6:30 AM  -  7:30 AM
    Fitness Event: Fitness Run/Walk
    Minnetonka 1-9
    Join NIHB for a Fitness Run/Walk before Summit Sessions begin! The event will be appropriate for people of all fitness levels, so please join us Thursday Morning in front of Minnetonka 1-9.
    7:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Summit Registration Open
    Waconia Foyer
    7:30 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Exhibitor Hall Open
    Waconia 1&2
    8:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Breakout and Roundtable Sessions
     

    Roundtable Session

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Policy, Infrastructure, and Capacity Roundtable Session
    Minnetonka 2 & 3

    How do Roundtables work? Start at any table you would like and you will have to opportunity to visit the other tables every 15 minutes and in any order that suits you.   For a complete description of the roundtables in this session:  Public Health Policy Roundtable 

    1 - Promoting Public Health through Home Visits to Parents and Children

    Jennifer Boulley, Red Cliff Zaagichigaazowin Home Visiting Program

    Catriona MacDonald, Association of State and Tribal Home Visiting Initiatives

    2 - Policies to Address Commercial Tobacco Use

    Mike Freiberg, Public Health Law Center

    Patricia Nez Henderson, Black Hills Center for American Indian Health

    3 - Decolonizing Health Care for American Indian Transgender

    Trudie Jackson, University of New Mexico

    4 - Improving Oral Health in Indian Country: Examining Tribes' Compatibility with Dental Therapists

    Brett Weber, National Indian Health Board

    5 - Creating an Elevator Speech

    Sarah Price, National Indian Health Board

    6 - Enhancing Your Understanding of the PHAB Standards and Measures: A new Tribal Documentation Supplement

    David Stone, Public Health Accreditation Board

     Optional 
     

    Track: Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Two Programs, One Goal: Evaluating Two Interconnected Prevention Programs (Cancer Screening)
    Waconia 4
    Two cancer prevention programs, sharing one goal of increasing cancer screening rates in Indian Country, and their evaluator describe their journey culturally tailoring evidence-based interventions and the evaluation for use with tribal communities. We will first walk workshop attendees through the process used in setting-up the colorectal cancer screening program, the breast and cervical cancer screening program, and the overall evaluation design. Key emphasis will be placed on collaboration efforts, feedback received from tribal communities, and application of the Indigenous Evaluation Framework principles. We will also explore the different ways evaluation tools were used to measure selected evidence-based interventions, including provider assessments and feedback. Successes and challenges encountered will be shared, along with lessons learned. We hope attendees leave this workshop understanding ways interconnected programs can be set up and evaluated to best serve tribal communities.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Integrating Culture, Collaboration, and Evidence Based Opiate Treatment…
    Waconia 6
    The Pascua Yaqui Tribe New Beginnings Clinic. As the news of the opiate epidemic continues to dominate the US, more attention should be brought to how the crisis is developing in Native American communities that are already affected at higher rates than any racial demographic. As we work towards understanding the underlying factors and its effects it becomes imperative to also identify best medical practices. The Pascua Yaqui Tribe New Beginnings staff has been combating the opiate crisis with a multiaxial approach that focuses the crisis as a system wide issue rather than clinic based. This includes integrating behavioral health, introducing alternative and traditional healing, collaborating with primary care, working towards community engagement, and providing department wide public health protocols for prevention. This presentation will focus on the pitfalls and benefits of these processes, outcomes, and future goals of treatment.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Climate Change and Environmental Health

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Subsistence and Safety in a Changing Arctic
    Waconia 3
    Wainwright community members have expressed a strong desire to continue their subsistence hunting practices despite the significant dangers associated with these activities due to increasingly unpredictable environmental conditions within the Alaskan Arctic. Hunter safety has therefore been identified as a key issue that the Village of Wainwright is attempting to address through a geolocation technology program that now offers inReach devices free of charge to all Wainwright hunters and travelers. This particular presentation therefore explores these efforts and the ways they are working to support the fundamental goal of maintaining a subsistence way of life in Wainwright in the context of a changing Arctic environment.
    Presenters:
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Evaluation of Traditional Foods Programs in Southeast Alaska
    Owatonna 1 & 2
    The SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium conducted an evaluation of its programs supporting traditional knowledge and traditional foods. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis were done, using focus groups, key informant interviews, and RPMS data analysis of health measures. The qualitative evaluation showed that the image of a healthy community was where people took care of each other, collaborated together, and where everyone had an important role, based on living life in the traditional way, including hunting, fishing, gathering, engagement in the arts (weaving, story-telling, carving) and taking care of elders and children and those in need. Working towards a healthier community included returning to these concepts as norms. The RPMS data analysis from all six communities suggests that improvements in health behaviors since 2001 include: use of seatbelts, consumption of fruits and vegetables, and interventions by primary care providers on tobacco control. Additionally, receiving a diagnosis of diabetes had not changed between 2011 and 2014, clinically confirmed by the Diabetes Registry.Based on RPMS clinical data examined, communities supported by Traditional Foods Grants showed few clinically measured improvements over communities not receiving grants. However, residents in the Traditional Food Grant communities reported many improvements in their perceived health as a result of the grants, calling into question the standard definition of 'good' health.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Gathering for Health: The Impact of Stress on Diabetes Outcomes and Identifying Cultural Solutions
    Anoka 1 & 2
    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a significant health inequity and leading cause of death for many American Indian (AI) communities. There is substantial research on the T2D “epidemic” among AI people, yet little work on the linkages between stress and T2D for AIs. Maawaji’ idi-oog Mino-ayaawin (Gathering for Health) is a community-based participatory research collaboration between five Anishinaabe communities and researchers at the University of Minnesota. The study involved qualitative data collection and a quantitative design involving computer-assisted personal interviews, salivary cortisol samples, and medical chart reviews. A total of 194 participants enrolled in the study at baseline and reassessed at 6-month intervals for 4 total waves of data. We will share key study findings, including how social support and cultural involvement can buffer the impact of stress on health. Attendees will be asked to participate in activities to identify possibilities for transforming research findings into actions for health promotion.
     Optional 
     

    Roundtable Session

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Roundtable Session 2
    Minnetonka 2 & 3

    How do Roundtables work? Start at any table you would like and you will have to opportunity to visit the other tables every 15 minutes and in any order that suits you.

    For a complete description of the roundtables in this session: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention RT 2

     

    1 - Strategies for Ending Cervical Cancer in Indian Country

    Laura Sioux Roberts, American Indian Cancer Foundation

    2 - Manoomin / Psi: A Flagship for Environmental Preservation and Indigenous Resource Sovereignty

    Meghan Porter, Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Epidemiology Center

    Crystal Ng, University of Minnesota, Department of Earth Sciences

    3 - Dine (Navajo) Goes Lasagna

    Lishua Gishie, Annette Gonnie, and, Kimberly Yazzie, Winslow Indian Health Care Center

    4 - Balancing Culture, Health, and Data

    Collette Adamsen, National Resource Center on Native American Aging

    5- Climate Change Impacts Our People and Our Environment: Innovative Techniques for Communicating Impacts and Adaptation Opportunities

    Gerald Wagner, Blackfeet Environmental Office

    6 - Working with Tribal Partners to Protect Tribal Health and Wellbeing: Perspectives from EPA’s Office of Research and Development

    Fred Hauchman, Kacee Deener, and Cynthia McOliver, U.S Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Science Policy

     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Policy

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Drafting Tribal Laws and Policies to Promote Public Health
    Waconia 5
    This workshop will provide opportunities for Tribal leaders, health directors, attorneys, and community stakeholders to discuss and practice how to develop and write public health laws and policies, with a focus on policies supporting healthy Tribal food systems and reducing use of harmful tobacco. Presenters will share about the crucial role of community and stakeholder engagement in developing policies, and provide examples of how this process can work. We will provide tips on writing public health laws and policies, and share resource materials available to help with policy development. Lessons learned from experiences working on laws and policies will be shared, highlighting the innovative work of the Lower Sioux Indian Community in developing a healthy and indigenous food policy and implementation plan. Participants will have the opportunity to practice drafting and spotting issues with draft policy language, and are encouraged to bring policy language or ideas to work on.
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Preparing for a Public Health Emergency: The Tribal Legal Preparedness Project
    Waconia 4
    Recent events have demonstrated that threats from infectious disease and natural disasters continue to be issues of great importance. To address these threats, it is critical for all jurisdictions, including Tribal Nations, to be legally prepared. Navigating public health and emergency response in Indian Country can be challenging, as jurisdictional issues often arise between federal, state, local, and Tribal governments due to the complex history surrounding delivery of public health services to Tribal communities. Thus, legal preparedness is vital to effective emergency response in Indian Country. Tribal Nations, which maintain a government-to-government relationship with the United States government, must also work with state governments to coordinate emergency response, as Tribal lands share borders with states. For a successful collaborative relationship, Tribes and states must commit to developing a relationship built on mutual respect and understanding, open communication, cooperation, and acceptance. In this session, participants will learn about the importance of legal preparedness for Tribal Nations and how to use the law to enhance cross-jurisdictional collaboration. This session will demonstrate the Tribal Legal Preparedness Project (TLPP) resources available to assist Tribal Nations in strengthening relationships and enhancing capacity. After an overview of the best practices shared with TLPP via listening sessions, participants will work through case studies in which a Tribal Nation and neighboring jurisdictions must work together to address issues arising during public health emergencies.
    Presenter:
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track: Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Diabetes and Behavioral Health Comorbidities: Opportunities for Research and Policy
    Waconia 6
    Diabetes and behavioral health conditions are common in American Indians and Alaska Natives and often occur together. Research is emerging on the comorbidity of these two conditions in the same individual. The NCAI Policy Research Center recently reviewed the literature for research on diabetes and behavioral health comorbidities in American Indians and Alaska Natives and developed a report with policy recommendations. This session will begin with a review of this work and then engage the audience in an interactive discussion on opportunities for future research, best practices, and program/policy recommendations on how to address diabetes and behavioral health comorbidity.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Climate Change and Environmental Health

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Resiliency in the Face of Climate Change: Indigenous Health and Resources
    Waconia 3
    Recent publicity has illuminated that Indigenous people are some of the most impacted by climate change. What is less broadcasted is that many Indigenous communities are also at the forefront of assessing impacts and developing adaptation plans. The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, a Coast Salish people (Washington State), signed a proclamation to address climate change in 2007, then published an impact assessment in 2009 and an action plan in 2010. As part of on-going efforts, tribal staff have worked with community members to evaluate community health impacts based on projected sea level rise and storm surge effects on habitat of important Indigenous resources. This project is an example of how to indigenize public health impact assessments for climate change by developing and using community-specific health definitions and priorities. The presentation will summarize the Swinomish work and results, with a focus on the work as a template that can be modified for use by other Indigenous communities with their own health definitions and priorities.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Infrastructure & Capacity

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Digital Stories for Quality Improvement
    Anoka 1 & 2
    The Osage Nation Health has worked on Standard 9.2 of the Public Health Accreditation Board Standard and Measures. To develop and implement our quality improvement processes, we provided expert training to selected departments to incorporate the art of traditional storytelling into a digital format as a creative way to report to Osage Nation and the community. Using training and guidance, the departments used the cultural tradition of storytelling utilizing digital technology to evoke emotions through stories of improvements. We used the quality improvement plan, surveys, and community health assessments to provide guidance and goals for each department to focus their story. The digital stories developed will be a tool to update leadership, legislative, health board, and the community about activities and goals met by departments within Osage Nation. The completed, narrated, videos will be broadcast on the WahZhaZhi Health Center televisions as well as placed on Osage Nation websites to showcase the stories of improvements in the departments and attaining buy-in from leadership and community. Osage Nation Health will use the training received and continue the digital storytelling as a method to communicate to our communities.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Collaborating to Close Gaps in Tribal Food Access
    Owatonna 1 & 2
    To address health disparities related to childhood obesity, Tribes are teaming up. Many Tribes are located in food deserts. Tribal communities in Michigan are working collaboratively with tribal and non-tribal organizations across professional fields to try to improve outcomes in healthy eating, physical activity, obesity and other weight related issues for children 2-11 years. Their work looks to;1) Build and strengthen tribal workforce capacity, 2) Improve coordination of care between the providers and nutrition education professionals, and 3) Utilization of community food access points and culturally adapted nutrition education resources.This interactive presentation will provide participants with information about Food Access work being done by Anishinaabe Tribes in Michigan. Additional resources shared by the National Native Network will enhance the conversation for people from other regions of the country.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     
    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Breakout and Roundtable Sessions
     

    Track: Public Health Policy

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Advancing Tribal Food and Agriculture Production to Build Healthy Tribal Economies and Communities i
    Waconia 5
    This session will discuss how potential opportunities based on the Regaining Our Future report for changes to U.S. Department of Agriculture programs and authorities in the 2018 Farm Bill reauthorization can empower Tribal governments, producers, and communities continue to build thriving and healthy economies and communities throughout Indian Country. This includes the ability to develop and expand Tribal infrastructure, utilities, telemedicine, broadband, water systems, and community buildings like hospitals and fire stations; improve federal food assistance programs; provide the means for Native agriculture businesses to thrive; and continue to address and improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives supporting the already great work happening in Natives communities surrounding food, agriculture, and nutrition. Finally, we will discuss how improving the Farm Bill programs for Indian Country will help bolster our work to achieve the truest form of sovereignty: feeding ourselves in our own foods systems with our own foods.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Clinic Team Strategies to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening across American Indian Communities
    Waconia 4
    The American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) piloted the Clinical Cancer Screening Network (CCSN) to lead evidence-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening strategies in partnership with clinic and community health systems in American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) across the Northern Plains. AICAF CCSN provided support to clinic teams in the network with diverse settings at varying levels of readiness to support quality improvement changes; on-site CME/CEU training on current CRC screening practices and clinic resources; facilitation to identify current screening processes; and determined a customized plan to support clinic goals at each clinic.
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Introducing the NDEWS HotSpot Study Opportunity for Assessing Opioid Overdose Inequities in Minnesot
    Waconia 6
    The National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) is a NIDA/NIH funded public health surveillance system that supports local experts and collaborators to generate critical information about drugs and their public health consequences in specific geographical areas. NDEWS approached the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth campus to consider a Phase I HotSpot study on opioid overdose disparities for Native Americans in Minnesota. We invite you to join us to learn about NDEWS and review initial Minnesota data about drug poisoning deaths, law enforcement seizures, and news scan/social media findings. We will also collaboratively discuss if and how a HotSpot study could be useful to address opioid overdose inequities in Minnesota. The method and data sources discussed may be useful for Tribal Nations beyond Minnesota.
     Optional 
     

    Track: Public Health Infrastructure & Capacity

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Tribal Elder Protection Team (TEPT)- Toolkit
    Anoka 1 & 2
    Very little information exists to address elder abuse, neglect and exploitation in Indian Country. Native American elderly are expected to triple in number by 2050, which make addressing the need for protecting elders an important planning and preparation process.This session familiarizes participants with the Tribal Elder Protection Team-Toolkit to assist tribal communities in the development of a TEPT. The TEPT is a collaboration of professionals and community members from various disciplines working with indigenous elderly. This toolkit is designed to identify vested partners or potential TEPT members, provide information for creating awareness, and addressing elder abuse reports in Indian Country. This session includes small group discussions on usefulness and strategies for development of EPTs in the participants communities. Providing feedback on ways in which the toolkit can benefit the partnership of elderly services in their tribal communities to diminish barriers or challenges (e.g., program development, infrastructure, capacity, sustainability).
    Presenter:
     Optional 
     

    Track: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

    1:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country, Challenges and Successes
    Owatonna 1 & 2
    The Southern Plains Tribal Health Board (SPTHB), representing the tribes of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas, provides an overview of implementing the Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country grant funded by the CDC. Within this presentation we will highlight the challenges and successes of many of the tribal partners of the grant within their respective communities and how the SPTHB formed lasting partnerships. We will end the workshop by highlighting the lasting success of the Oklahoma Native Youth Preventing Diabetes (NYPD) camp program and provide insight toward development of similar programs in other areas of the country. Throughout the discussion we will highlight the need and justification for targeting youth in prevention programming.
     Optional 
     
    3:15 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Closing Plenary

    3:15 pm – 3:25 pm

    Public Health Innovation Awards

    3:25 pm – 3:45 pm

    The Role of Community-Based Participatory Research in Tribal Communities

    Teshia G. Arambula Solomon, Director, Native American Research and Training Center, University of Arizona

    3:45 pm – 4:00 pm

    Acknowledging Leaders in Tribal Public Health Accreditation

    Karrie Joseph, Deputy Director of Public Health Policy and Programs, NIHB

    4:00 pm – 4:20 pm

    Cancer Prevention and Treatment in Indian Country

    Stacy A. Bohlen, Chief Executive Officer, NIHB

    Kris Rhodes, Executive Director, American Indian Cancer Foundation

    4:20 pm – 4:45pm

    Exhibitor Prize Drawing; Closing Remarks; Retiring of Colors; Closing Prayer; Adjourn

    Speaker:
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