Agenda

  Go
  • Optional  Optional
  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018
  •  
    Early Conference Attendee Check-In 3PM - 7PM
    In Atrium
  • Thursday, October 25, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Bfast Buffet, Welcome & Announcements
    In Grand Ballroom
    Conference Attendee Check-In 7AM - 5PM
    In Atrium
    Exhibitor Hall Open 8AM - 5PM
    In Atrium
    8:45 AM  -  9:45 AM
    General Session with Jeff Hobbs
    In Grand Ballroom
    Jeff's presentation will address the climate and culture of individuals within a disability both in society and systems of care. Jeff will discuss evidence-based practices for working with students who have physical disabilities and help providers develop an action plan to implement disability awareness and build sensitivity skills.
    Speakers:
    9:45 AM  -  10:00 AM
    15 Minute Break & Visit Exhibitor Hall
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A1: How Able Accounts Build Financial Wellness for Transitioning Families  (Community Track)
    Room: Alton

    Audience: BEGINNER

    IL ABLE changes the way individuals with disabilities and their families participate in the community and build financial wellness by empowering them to save and invest for the essential, additional expenses that come with having a disability without losing, or losing access to federal means-tested benefits. Illinois ABLE accounts encourage employment, foster person-centered independence, improve self-reliance and improve quality of life for individuals with disabilities. But you need to understand how ABLE works. This session will teach transitioning self-advocates, parents, service providers, educators and other professionals everything you need to know about ABLE and how it can impact your family, your work and your life. Topics covered will include: What is an ABLE Account? Why ABLE? What can I use my ABLE account for? What will ABLE do to my SSI, SSDI and Medicaid Benefits? How do I open an IL ABLE account?

    Objectives:

    1) Improved transition youth's understanding of the importance of financial wellness.

    2) Improved family's and professional's understanding of the importance of financial wellness.

    3) New knowledge of tools to build financial wellness.

    4) Understanding of how to open and use and ABLE account.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A2: Journey Through Transition  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Barrington

    Discuss supporting adolescents with disabilities and their caregivers through the transition to adulthood. Speakers will summarize the process of a successful medical transition, including why it is important and how to choose an adult health care provider. They will explain expectations for partnership with health care providers and how to make the most of each visit with the adult health care provider.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify core elements of a successful transition.

    2) Recognize skills necessary for healthcare providers to prepare patients for transition.

    3) Outline resources for patients and families navigating the transition process.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A3: Meet Your Maintenance of Certification with Training on Transitioning Youth to Adult Care  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Carlyle

    This session will showcase a training curricula on transitioning youth to adult health care developed by the Illinois Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (ICAAP) in collaboration with UIC Specialized Care for Children-UIC. The audience will learn how to apply principles shared to successfully transition pediatric patients to adult care. The session will also assist adult providers to accept transitioning youth into their practices. Free provider and patient resources will be shared including examples of clinic transition policies.

    Objectives:

    1) Recognize the framework of ICAAP’s dual transition courses for pediatric and adult providers.

    2) Describe pediatric transition course modules (and MOC Part 4 track) and the adult provider course modules.

    3) Apply key clinical activities and implement in practice and workflow.

    4) Create and implement a transition policy for the practice.

    5) Apply billing and coding strategies for complex care services.

    6) Identify and access free provider and patient/family resources.

    7) Apply provider experience in implementing a transition policy across health system.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A4: The PAT Academy: Our Journey to an 18-22 year old Transition Program  (Education Track)
    Room: Edwardian
    We would like to take you on our journey from idea to reality with the starting of the PAT Academy in Peoria Public Schools. We will detail our learning, successes, and setbacks to encourage you to start a program in your own district.

    Objective:

    1) Attendees will learn about our process to set up a program in our district, including failures and successes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A5: Wearables for Transition  (Community Track)
    Room: Marborough

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Assistive Technology has been portable for years. Now, more and more devices can be worn instead of carried, making them even more portable. This session will look at some of the wearable devices that can help with transition at home, work, school and play.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify advantages and disadvantages of a variety of wearables to help determine the device that fits an individual's needs.

    2) Demonstrate at least three wearables that can help with transitioning at school or work.

    3) Identify at least three apps for smart watches that can help with transitioning at school or work.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A6: Have a Tween with Autism? Build an Action Plan to Get Them Off the Screen and Into Real Life  (Employment Track)
    Room: Prescott

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Teachability, LLC, an organization dedicated to transitioning young adults with autism and other invisible disabilities to employment, will present its new Inverse Internship Program (IIP) as part of the process to Customized Employment. A "do-it-yourself" approach is what makes Teachability, LLC, unique from other programs. The participant can determine how many hours they want the "job practice" experience to be. They work with a job tutor who accompanies them at all times in order to determine which skills they want to work on, and the job tutor coordinates everything with business owner.

    Objectives:

    1) Define transition goals.

    2) Understand the transition process.

    3) Prepare a personal plan.

    4) Analyze current transition opportunities.

    5) Create a step-by-step plan.

    6) Evaluate experiences.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A7: How to Increase Student Involvement in IEP Meetings  (Education Track)
    Room: Stanford

    Audience: Beginner (This session will repeat on Friday - Session G1)

    This session will explain why student involvement in IEP meetings is necessary, and will demonstrate ways in which students of all ages and ability levels can be involved.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will understand why student involvement in IEP meetings is necessary.

    2) They will learn ways to involve students of all ability levels in their IEP meetings.

    3) Participants will have time to plan ways to involve a target student of their choosing in his or her IEP meeting and collaborate with each other to further develop their planning and understanding of the student led IEP process.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A8: Are Your Students Ready for Employment?  (Employment Track)
    Room: Trafalgar
    (This session will be repeated Friday - Session G2)

    More students with disabilities than ever before are graduating from high school and entering post-secondary programs. This is a cause for genuine celebration. But as we celebrate, I challenge us to consider the work yet to do in truly preparing our students for the next step. This session will discuss learning experiences and skills to address in the transition process; including understanding legal rights and transfer of responsibilities and assistive technology as an accommodation.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn three specific transition skills to address that are needed for student success in post-secondary programs and employment.

    2) Learn about the QIAT-PS Student Self-Evaluation Matrix, a free tool created by the Great Lakes ADA Center to measure Assistive Technology skills.

    3) Learn about the free Punch-In employment skills course, creatied by the Great Lakes ADA Center and available for free to teachers in Illinois.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A9: The SEAT Project: Identifying & Addressing Systems Barriers to Supported Employment  (Employment Track)
    Room: Windsor

    Audience: BEGINNER (This session will repeated on Friday - Session E6). 

    The Supported Employment Action Team (SEAT) project, a partnership between four organizations, will present on our findings around barriers seen by individuals and families to supported employment. We will talk about opportunities to access supported employment services through WIOA and Employment First as well as the SEAT advocacy effort to engage families to improve the system.

    Objectives: 

    1) Learn about the SEAT project and opportunities to join in advocacy.

    2) Understand barriers to supported employment in Illinois as gathered from families and individuals with disabilities.

    3) Learn about changes to supported employment through the workforce investment opportunities act and Employment First.

    4) Utilize strategies for navigating the components of the supported employment system.

    5) Be able to advocate for self and family and for the community to continue to improve employment options.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A10: Strengthening Social Determinants for Health and Success  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Leighton

    Provide current and state-specific information on social determinants of health based research from Healthy People 2020 and Illinois Health 2021. Discuss research that indicates the brain has neuroplasticity-the ability to constantly change and try to adapt.

    Objectives:

    1) Apply information on social determinants of health to everyday practice.

    2) Explain brain research illustrating neuroplasticity and capacity of lifelong learning in context of environment.

    3) Identify mental health is essential to overall health and wellbeing.

    4) Recognize specific social and health determinants shaped by environment and social context.

    5) Apply methods of empowering youth and young adults to increase self-efficacy and resiliency.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
    15 Minute Break & Visit Exhibitor Hall
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B1: Growing Above Simple Compliance….Developing and Implementing Transition Services & Programming  (Education Track)
    Room: Alton

    Many districts provide transition programming for employment and independent living skills. We will share our programming, processes, and what we have learned from developing and implementing transition programming that goes above compliance to include dual enrollment for college success.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will gather information on what programming we developed and how it works, the data and information from how we got there, how we as a district made it happen, and what we have identified and learned from its implementation, and how we are using that to move forward.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B2: Using Podcasting & New Media to Educate Students  (Education Track)
    Room: Barrington
    In this session participants will learn how educating students through podcasting and new media can solve a variety of issues and barriers that teachers, transition specialists, and vocational rehabilitation counselors experience with transition-age youth.

    Objectives:

    1) How new media techniques have been implemented to increase interest, engagement, and ultimately outcomes with transition-age students.

    2) A variety of techniques will be shared so that attendees can choose strategies to develop and implement with their students.

    3) Existing platforms will be demonstrated and explained to illustrate these examples.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B3: Group Care Model for Transitioning Adolescents with Chronic Disease to Adult Care  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Carlyle
    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will demonstrate a group health care model addressing the unique transition needs of those patients with chronic disease. Our group care model addresses the unique needs of adolescent patients as they begin the transition from pediatric to adult care. For our 10-session group care program, we schedule the same group of patients for a group visit that includes a health assessment with their hematologist and group education that builds self-efficacy, ownership of health, and community. We use fun, interactive, and participatory activities to generate health promotion discussions. We will describe how we implemented this program in our Sickle Cell Disease Pediatric Clinic and will demonstrate one of the sessions.

    Objective:

    1) Demonstrate teaching transition skills in a group care setting.

    2) Express benefits of using a group centered model of delivery to guide a transitional care group.

    3) Identify what areas to address during the transition process to help youth and their family have a successful transition.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B4: Community Participation in Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN)  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Edwardian

    This session is an interactive discussion on anticipatory guidance health care providers should provide to all CYSHCN in early adolescence, including access to resources that will provide community participation opportunities and accessibility needs, as part of the medical encounter. To understand this we will use the findings of a study of 304 CYSHCN across multiple clinics looking at transition outcomes and community participation.

    Objectives:

    1) Express community participation and sense of independence and behaviors among children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN), and to identify correlates between these factors.

    2) Identify differences in these factors among CYSHCN with spina bifida (SB) versus other chronic conditions (CYSHCN non- SB).

    3) Explain a study of 304 CYSHCN concluding a positive correlation between community participation and peer friendships, independence level compared to peers, intimate relationships and chores.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B5: Special Needs Legal Planning with Special Needs Trusts and ABLE Accounts  (Community Track)
    Room: Marborough

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will cover the many legal tools families can use to maintain assets and reserve funds for individuals who receive SSI and/or Medicaid, such as third party special needs trusts, first party or OBRA special needs trusts, Pooled special needs trusts, ABLE Accounts, including "how much is needed to leave, how divorce impacts benefits, among other related topics".

    Objectives:

    1) What are, why do I/we need special needs trusts?

    2) What is an ABLE Account, when is it appropriate and when is it not?

    3) What is the difference between the Illinois ABLE Account and other State ABLE Accounts that I/we can use in the alternative.

    4) How does court order child support impact SSI and Medicaid and what can we do to avoid losing benefits when there is a divorce.

    5) How to educate and inform the extended family on appropriate ways to leave gifts and inheritances.

    6) Common attorney drafting mistakes made in special needs trusts that will be an issue for Social Security and the State (HFS).

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B6: Career Pathways: Transitioning to Success for All  (Employment Track)
    Room: Prescott
    The Disability Employment initiative focuses on improving education, training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities. Lessons and successes will be shared on the partnership of the development and implementation of instruction and supports and information technology pathways. Topics include the use of Integrated Resource Teams, career advisors, work-based learning expansion strategies, career pathway development and implementing the use of an Individual Career Development Plan that meets all legal requirements of the transition plan required for individuals with disabilities.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will learn Integrated Resource Team implementation strategies and partnership development.

    2) Strategies for expanding work-based learning opportunities for youth with disabilities.

    3) The content of an Individual Career Development plan and it's value for all students. 

    4) The value of the career advisor in the success of students.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B7: Providing Transition Support for Youth with Intellectual / Physical Disabilities  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Trafalgar

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Objectives:

    1) Review the six Got Transition core elements of transition as they apply to youth with intellectual/physical disabilities.

    2) Provide tools and resources to meet specific transition needs of youth with ID/PD such as decision making supports, health habit skill development, caregiver supports.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B8: Your Rights Under the ADA In Employment and Higher Education  (Employment Track)
    Room: Stanford

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Ensure that you know your rights, as you plan your transition to employment or higher education. What are your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? How can you advocate for yourself by making sure you have reasonable accommodations that will help you be successful? If you receive social security, what are some additional options you may have available to you? An Equip for Equality attorney will explain your legal rights and resources available.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn about the ADA, and help prepare students on increasing awareness of their rights.

    2) Learn about specific strategies to use to ensure a successful transition to higher education and/or employment.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B9: Transition Resources for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing  (Employment Track)
    Room: Windsor

    This session will provide participants with information on Illinois Post High School Access to Transition Help (IPATH) for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. IPATH is the result of collaboration among several entities in Illinois that support this population. Resources, reading lists, and training opportunities for students, graduates, parents, and educators are available.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will be able to identify multiple resources available for educators who provide transition support for students who are deaf and hard of hearing.

    2) Participants will be able to identify multiple transition resources available for parents of students who are deaf and hard of hearing.

    3) Participants will be familiar with training opportunities available for educators and parents of students who are deaf and hard of hearing who will be transitioning to post-secondary education and/or employment.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B10: Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and Pre-Employment Transition Services  (Employment Track)
    Room: Leighton

    This session will provide an overview of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and its impact on school transition for youth with disabilities in school. One focus of WIOA is Pre-Employment Transition Services with the five required activities for students with disabilities. WIOA legislation strengthens requirements for collaboration between vocational rehabilitation and school transition services leading to competitive, integrated employment for students. Highly valued strategies and materials used for Pre-Employment skills will be shared.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will identify components of WIOA and its application to students with disabilities.

    2) Participants will identify the five Pre-Employment Transition Services that are being implemented in schools as part of their transition planning.

    3) Participants will Identify key partners for state collaboration to implement WIOA that support employment outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Lunch Provided & Visit Exhibitor Hall
    In Grand Ballroom
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C1: Dual Enrollment Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities  (Education Track)
    Room: Alton

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will discuss the idea of developing dual enrollment options for students with intellectual disabilities between high schools and colleges.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn about current programs.

    2) Inspire ideas for new options at local schools.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C2: Transition: Take Action Now!  (Education Track)
    Room: Barrington

    Our team will walk families and professionals through strategies, person-centered planning techniques, and timelines to support post-secondary outcomes for students. There are important steps that can be taken by IEP team members throughout the student’s experience in high school and transition. Freshman year is NOT too soon to begin transition planning! Working together with your IEP team can help build supports in the areas of education, employment and independent living for future success.

    Objectives:

    1) Enhance knowledge of actions that school-based teams should take to improve students’ post-secondary outcomes in the areas of employment, education, and independent living.

    2) Identify specific tasks that students should complete for each year of their high school career in order to be well-prepared for post-secondary planning and transition.

    3) Understand the roles of members of a transition planning team including students, parents, transition specialists, case managers, and job coaches.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C3: You Can't Take Case Managers with You, Integrated Assistive Technology for Postsecondary Success  (Education Track)
    Room: Carlyle

    Do you have students with multiple accommodations and plans to attend college? Are these students ready to navigate collegiate services? Join us as we discuss differences between high school and college, how assistive technology can build independence, and three powerful tools to help prepare students for postsecondary success.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify levels of post-collegiate services (3 levels from K&P Guide).

    2) Understand the differences between IDEA and ADA. 3) How that shapes high school service delivery.

    3) Learn three tools to utilize to promote successful collegiate transition: (QIAT PS, Hierarchy of replacing accommodations with AT, Transition and Technology Form.)

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C4: Patient, Family, and Provider Views on the Ideal Healthcare Transition Program  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Edwardian

    Most youth with special needs are now surviving into adulthood, where they must navigate a different system of healthcare and adult life. The American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations have established a formal definition of healthcare transition, along with general guidelines for provider best practices. We will review these guidelines and discuss specific patient and family concerns regarding transition while we show the results of a brainstorming exercise conducted with providers and patients to develop an ideal healthcare transition program.

    Objectives:

    1) Define Healthcare Transition.

    2) Identify questions that families can ask their providers regarding transition and describe measures families can take to improve their child’s readiness.

    3) Explain the outcome of a provider/patient workgroup on the ideal transition program.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C5: Guardianship and the Alternatives to Guardianship  (Health / Community Track)
    Room: Marborough

    Audience: BEGINNER

    No two individuals with special needs are the same. This session will cover forms of guardianship as well as the many options to guardianship such as "Supported Decision Making", Powers of Attorney, as well as Limited and Plenary Guardianship, the new E-File Guardian Report requirement, the new Guardian Training Law, the use of Short Term Guardian Declarations, the Illinois Health Care Surrogate Act, and many related topics.  

    Objectives: 

    1) Identify when guardianship is appropriate and when alternatives to guardianship are more appropriate.

    2) Explain what is Supported Decision Making.

    3) Distinguish the difference between Limited Guardianship and Plenary Guardianship.

    4) Recognize how to comply with the new E-File Annual Report requirement.

    5) Express what the new required Guardian training all about.

    6) Explain what is and how do I/we use the Short Term Guardian Declaration.

    7) Define how best to select future guardians.

    8) Identify the procedure to "get" guardianship.

    9) State when do Guardians have to go back to court.

     

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C6: Ready to Work? What you Need to Know about How Earnings will Affect Benefits  (Employment Track)
    Room: Prescott

    Audience: BEGINNER

    In this session we will be helping customers understand how earnings from work will affect their Federal and State benefits. In addition, we will also be discussing Social Security work incentives, health care options for people with disabilities who are working, as well as the Ticket to Work program.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will have the valuable information to be able to make an informed choice about future employment.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C7: Tailoring Services for Transition Age Youth with Mental Health Needs  (Employment Track)
    Room: Stanford

    Transition Age Youth (TAY) have the highest prevalence rate of onset of mental health needs, yet they are the least likely population to engage in services. Without the right supports when needed most, TAY often fall off the transition cliff. This session will discuss Thresholds’ Emerge and Mind Strong programs dedicated specifically to this need, along with outcomes data and youths’ perspectives. By combining multiple best practices, including Individual Placement and Support, TAY can build more successful transitions.

    Objectives:

    1) Understand effective program designs for TAY with Serious Mental Health Challenges (SMHC).

    2) Learn about both resources and strategies for engaging TAY with SMHC.

    3) Describe the differences between Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and other employment models and list the 8 principles of IPS.

    4) Identify the different components of Adapted IPS.

    5) Understanding key elements & practices for tailoring services for TAY.

    6) Learn about our excellent vocational outcomes.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C8: Technology Supports for Individuals with Disabilities in Employment Settings  (Employment Track)
    Room: Trafalgar

    This session will provide strategies for identifying appropriate technology supports for individuals with disabilities in employment settings. Participants will learn strategies for determining appropriate technology based on the needs of the employee, employment setting, and requirements of the job and will be given an overview of various technology supports. The focus will be on supporting the needs of individuals with ASD and/or ID using technology to encourage communication, independence, and well-being while on the job.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will learn to use the SETT framework to identify appropriate technology supports in employment settings.

    2) Participants will be given an overview of different technology supports that can be used to promote independence, communication, and emotional well-being on the job.

    3) Participants will be given strategies for evaluating the effectiveness of technology supports and in fading these supports across time.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C9: Creating Social, Professional, and Community Partnerships Across Neighboring Transition Programs  (Community Track)
    Room: Windsor

    Stevenson District 125, Barrington District 220, and Lake Zurich District 95 have created a partnership that has utilized multiple service providers, community resources, and experience to provide students with an integrated socialization education. Presenters will provide information on the planning, costs, and implementation of creating various community based socialization opportunities.

    Objectives:

    1) An attendee will leave this session with ideas of how to create a partnership with another district for the purpose of enhancing student socialization opportunities.

    2.) An attendee will leave this session with a variety of real-life socialization ideas and steps for how to plan, fund, and implement (for districts with various socioeconomical levels).

    3) An attendee will leave this session with an understanding of how to assess students’ socialization and apply the data collected to their respective (socialization) IEP goals.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C10: Med-Peds PATHways & Adult Developmental Disabilities Clinic: Program Models, Cases and Toolkit  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Leighton

    Med-Peds PATHways is transition care consultative service that aims to improve health for adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. The Adult Developmental Disabilities Clinic is a medical home providing comprehensive primary care and preventive services to adults with developmental disabilities. We will describe these programs and case examples. A toolkit will be provided for participants to use in their own settings caring for adolescents and adults with special health care needs.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify where to find information to help patients and families prevent gaps in health insurance.

    2) Identify where to find information to help families obtain adult guardianship.

    3) Recognize standards of care for preventive health services for adults with developmental disabilities.

     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    15 Minute Break & Visit Exhibitor Hall
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    D1: Building Capacity and Supporting Transition to Adult Health Care  (Health Care Track)
    Abricot Ballroom

    This plenary discusses the importance of building clinician and practice capacity to assist with transition, expanding the capacity of health care providers to engage with transitioning patients, and building capacity for self-care by the youth/emerging adult to prioritize health care transition.  This will be an interactive session discussing the American College of Physicians’ Pediatric to Adult Care Transition Initiative.  We'll talk about the guide for the adult practices, “Approach to the Transitioning Patient” and recommended approach to transition planning for pediatric practices.  Information will be provided for both pediatric and adult practices and ways to use condition-specific transition resources available online.  The session will also focus on the challenges with implementation and differences between  academic-based urban practice vs a rural private practice setting.

    Objectives:

    1)  Summarize the move to patient-centered care and the medical neighborhood can only help improve the Pediatric to Adult transition.

    2) Illustrate how the transition process requires assessment, teaching, and acquisition of knowledge & skills. 

    3) Apply best practices to the process of transitioning from pediatric care to adult care/self-care and on accepting a transitioning patient.

    4) Express the value in using and embracing tools that help guide the process and fill the gaps.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    D2: Employment First in Illinois-Supporting Change and Building Resources  (Employment Track)
    In Grand Ballroom

    This session will explore National trends in Employment First, Illinois specific intergovernmental collaboration activities, resources and achievements in the Illinois Employment First Community of Practice. New tools supporting transitions age employment exploration and broad stakeholder engagement will be introduced.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn about National policy supporting Employment First.

    2) Learn how to connect with Employment First resources in the State of Illinois.

    3) Better understand how to utilize the Illinois Employment First Transitions Tool.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    4:30 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Visit Exhibitor Hall
  • Friday, October 26, 2018
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Bfast Buffet & Morning Announcements
    In Grand Ballroom
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E1: Don’t Call Us a Program: The Evolution of Transition Services  (Employment Track)
    Room: Alton

    This session will discuss how Glenbrook Transition Services adapted and adjusted over the last decade to better serve our students. Topics will include redesign of the mission and vision, flexible scheduling, FTE allocation, individualized community partnerships and formation of current collaborative team structure. Successful outcome data will also be shared.

    Objectives:

    1) Review Glenbrook Transition Services mission and vision and including a timeline of capacity growth.

    2) Examine past and present practices and how the flexible service delivery model increases student outcomes.

    3) Assist attendees in evaluating current staffing and programmatic structures to identify possible areas of development.

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E2: NEXT STEPS: The Transition Series Parent Training on Transition Planning  (Community Track)
    Room: Barrington

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Presenters will review the 8 workshops in the NEXT STEPS: the Transition Series and will share information on building a NEXT STEPS team or joining an existing team. Workshop curriculum is designed for parents and caregivers and includes topic content, resources and instructional guides.

    Objectives

    1) Learn about the NEXT STEPS curriculum and the NEXT STEPS network of volunteer teams who present the curriculum in workshop format.

    2) Learn about two workshops that focus on self-advocacy and independence for individuals with disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E3: A Case Management Approach to Transition and the Development of a Growth Mindset  (Education Track)
    Room: Trafalgar

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will define transition, the process, and opportunities. Systems theory, strengths based perspective, person-centered planning ground this session. First, we will identify challenges and setbacks individuals with disabilities face, then discuss strategies from a case management perspective to improve confidence, outcomes, and increase the drive to succeed. We will present research on the growth mindset. Vignettes will be presented to apply the strategies discussed to improve the outcome for now and in the future.

    Objectives:

    1) Define transition, including growth mindset in this process.

    2) Reframe student disabilities, classroom behaviors, and challenges.

    3) Identify and define the importance of a case management team among the student’s support systems for best outcomes.

    4) Identify how growth mindset strategies can be applied to student situations.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E4: A User Guide for the Youth Transition Process…..as told by a past user  (Community Track)
    Room: Carlyle

    Audience: BEGINNER

    In this session, participants will get a first hand account of a past youth's transition from high school to the community. ALL aspects of the transition, the good, the bad, the ugly will be discussed.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will learn what to expect, from a youth's perspective.

    2) What the transition process is like.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E5: Supportive Housing: Accessing and Obtaining Housing Supports  (Community Track)
    Room: Marborough

    What do you need to know about housing and supports? This session will help you understand what supportive housing is and what steps you should take to remain current on the procedures when you leave school. When and how should you apply for housing? What types of housing are available? What supports are available to get you into the housing you want and not just what is available?

    Objectives:

    1) An attendee will understand what supportive housing is and how to access it. 

    2) An attendee will learn how transition programs are sharing this information with students.

    3) An attendee will understand how to get ongoing information on support systems, Prioritization of Urgency of Needs for Services (PUNS), Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), Statewide Referral Network (SRN), and the Housing Authorities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E6: The SEAT Project: Identifying and Addressing Systems Barriers to Supported Employment  (Employment Track)
    Room: Prescott

    Audience: BEGINNER (this is a repeat of Session A9)

    The Supported Employment Action Team (SEAT) project, a partnership between four organizations, will present on our findings around barriers seen by individuals and families to supported employment. We will talk about opportunities to access supported employment services through Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and Employment First as well as the SEAT advocacy effort to engage families to improve the system.

    Objectives: 

    1) Learn about the SEAT project and opportunities to join in advocacy.

    2) Understand barriers to supported employment in Illinois as gathered from families and individuals with disabilities.

    3) Learn about changes to supported employment through the workforce investment opportunities act and Employment First.

    4) Utilize strategies for navigating the components of the supported employment system.

    5) Be able to advocate for self and family and for the community to continue to improve employment options.

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E7: SSI, SSDI, DHS: Understanding the Alphabet Soup of Government Benefits  (Community Track)
    Room: Stanford

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This interactive and informative session will explain the: who, what, when, where of the four major government benefit programs, how they change over a lifetime and how to protect them. The main emphasis will be on Medicaid and waiver programs. Ending in a game of Benefit BINGO, you will not believe how much you have learned.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn the difference between SSI SSDI Learn the difference between Medicare and Medicaid.

    2) Learn how to protect benefits and learn how benefits change over a lifetime.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E8: Sex Education: A Critical Part of the Health Plan for Transition Age Youth  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Windsor

    This session will look at the importance of sex education in the health plan. This will be an interactive session where we will learn about the statistics on sexual assault for people with disabilities, the kind of education both parents and staff and students need to be aware of this and curricula that will best meet the needs of all students with a variety of disabilities. It will also look at how to write strong goals in the transition plan to address this.

    Objectives:

    1) Recognize why sex education is an important issue and what the statistics tell us about this.

    2) Express what sexual assault is and how to be aware if this is happening even to nonverbal children.

    3) Identify the importance of sex education for all students and all disabilities.

    4) Distinguish the strong curricula available for different disabilities and how to write strong goals in the IEP/transition plan to address this.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E9: Our Lives Outside the Doctor's Office  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Edwardian

    Audience: BEGINNER

    A young woman with a disability will share intimate details of living independently. She will provide advice for health professionals on establishing effective patient professional partnership with patients with special needs. 

    Objective:

    1) Identify the challenges and triumphs of living independently with a disability.

    2) Recognize empathize not sympathy and ways to interact respectfully with people with disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E10: Preparing for College for Students with Disabilities  (Education Track)
    Room: Leighton

    This session will focus on the differences between high school and college and what to expect from disability services offices in college. Attendees will learn how to support and prepare high school students for the transition to college as well as self advocacy strategies to use now and in college.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will learn the differences between IDEA and ADA and how they support students with disabilities.

    2) Attendees will learn strategies to prepare high school students for college and beyond.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  2:00 PM
    Conference Attendee Check-In
    In Atrium
    9:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
    15 Minute Break
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F1: All the World's Stage: Be Director of Your Own Life!  (Education Track)
    Room: Alton

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Self-advocates, do you want to be the writer and director of your own life? Learn how to take charge of your future and build a team of supporters to help reach your goals. After this fun and interactive session, you will be ready to take charge! Educators, join us to find out how you can lead students to direct their own lives! Use our strategies in your classroom tomorrow.

    Objectives:

    1) Practice self-determination.

    2) Know your own strengths and needs.

    3) Know your vision for your own life. Build a team of supporters to help achieve your goals.

    4) Other attendees will learn specific strategies to support self advocates toward self-determination.

     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F2: Gone Fishing Lately?  (Community Track)
    Room: Barrington

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will focus on the ongoing epidemic of online bullying, specifically cat fishing. Participants will learn exactly what cat fishing is and strategies for teaching youth on how not to fall victim to it. Supporting someone who has been cat fished will also be discussed.

    Objectives:

    1) A net of information on how to recognize cat fishing.

    2) Questions they should avoid answering online.

    3) Ways to overcome self-esteem concerns that may increase their risk of falling victim.

    4) Ways professionals can support their youth with disabilities if they are cat fished.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F3: Strategies to Develop a Successful Continuum of Services  (Education Track)
    Room: Stanford

    This session will provide families with information, strategies and resources that support meaningful transition goals.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will be able to identify strategies that lead to the ideas that Learning, Training, Instruction, Practice equals a successful continuum of services.

    2) Attendees will be provided opportunities to explore aspects of successful transition programs that could be replicated in other school districts.

     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F4: Every Journey Begins with a First Step  (Employment Track)
    Room: Leighton
    This session will explain the current unemployment rate of adults with disabilities and how we can bridge the gap by offering supported employment and educating employers. Encourage Transition Teachers to keep a portfolio of all vocational and volunteer work of their students to be used on resumes.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will learn to empower students with job seeking skills, stress-management and resume building.

    2) How to use mock interviews before going to actual interviews.

    3) How to encourage  students to advocate for their needs by building a rapport with management and co-workers.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F5: How the Human Rights Authority can Help your Family Through Life's Transition  (Community Track)
    Room: Marborough

    Audience: BEGINNER

    The session will be an introduction of the advocacy work that is done by the agency and how the agency achieves it's goals. The session will be tailored towards the disability services that we cover that may span the life of a child with disabilities, such as special education, CILA homes and psychiatric services.

    Objective:

    1) Attendees will learn a resource to turn to should they need advocacy services as the youth enters their different milestones.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F6: Is There an Echo in Here? Smart Speakers for Transition  (Employment Track)
    Room: Prescott

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Smart speakers, like the Echo, Google Home Assistant and Apple's HomePod, are already in many homes. Did you know these smart speakers can be Assistive Technology? We'll look at several "skills" and "actions" to help with school and work. We'll also look at some of the accessories for these devices that help with daily living. If you have a smart speaker come prepared to share your favorite skills and actions.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify at least five skills and actions to help with school work.

    2) Identify at least three skills to help with work.

    3) Recognize the potential impact of smart speakers on the lives of people with disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F7: Opportunities for Youth Involvement in Wellness and Recovery Activities  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Carlyle

    The IDHS/Division of Mental Health has numerous, ongoing, effective ways that individuals can become involved in their own recovery journey and support the recovery of their peers. In this session, participants will learn about several of these self-directed approaches, including Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), Certified Recovery Support Specialists (CRSS), and the Recovery & Empowerment Statewide Calls.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify four specific IDHS/Division of Mental Health programs for youth engagement in wellness and recovery activities.

    2) Recognize the value of youth engagement with wellness and recovery programs.

    3) Summarize who to contact for further information and engagement with these programs.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F8: Promoting Independence, Confidence and Employment  (Employment Track)
    Room: Trafalgar

    Audience: BEGINNER

    A series of unique & structured programs provide instruction to youth ages 15-24 who are visually impaired and intend to live independently. The Career Fair begins the process, followed by the First Jobs Program (training and support on the job), Summer in the City (one week living at UIC dorm and traveling throughout the city), and a variety of Saturday programs complete the year. Pre and post self-assessment has shown tremendous growth by all participants.

    Objectives:

    1) Increase the knowledge and skills of leaders who guide youth.

    2) Deepen the knowledge of programming for youth who are blind/vision impaired.

    3) Learn of ways to increase confidence and independence in youth.

    4) See how obtaining a job increases self-esteem.

    5) Pre and post self-assessment provide supporting data detailing improvement by each participant.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F9: Don't Burn your Bridges: How to Communicate with the Schools to Achieve the Best Transition Plan  (Education Track)
    Room: Windsor

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will focus on good communication skills and how to achieve those and use those to develop a viable transition plan. We will also focus on what makes good communication, mistakes we make when communicating and what to do when communication has broken down and there seems no going back.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will learn why communication is important for crafting and sustaining a good transition plan.

    2) Attendees will learn the difference between effective communication and ineffective communication and what pitfalls to avoid.

    3) Attendees will learn what to do when communication has completely broken down.

     

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F10: Finding what Matters to You: Putting Youth at the Center of the Plan for Healthier Outcomes  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Edwardian

    This session will discuss best practices in person-centered transition planning to help youth with disabilities achieve their needs, wants, dreams and desires as they enter adulthood. UIC's Division of Specialized Care for Children (DSCC) provides free care coordination, including person-centered planning, to help youth and their families navigate the transition to adulthood with a focus on what's important to the individual and their family. We will discuss person-centered planning in the areas of health care, school/work and independence. Valuable tools and resources will also be provided.

    Objectives:

    1) Express the significance of a person-centered plan for improved health outcomes.

    2) Recognize essential areas, including skill development, that are relevant to support independence from youth to adulthood.

    3) Identify best practices in promoting effective, person-centered transition planning.

    4) Explain the importance of care coordination in partnering with youth and their families to help connect to services and resources.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  11:15 AM
    30 Minute Break with Snacks
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G1: How to Increase Student Involvement in IEP Meetings  (Education Track)
    Room: Alton

    Audience: BEGINNER (this is a repeat of Session A7)

    This session will explain why student involvement in IEP meetings is necessary, and will demonstrate ways in which students of all ages and ability levels can be involved.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will understand why student involvement in IEP meetings is necessary.

    2) They will learn ways to involve students of all ability levels in their IEP meetings.

    3) Participants will have time to plan ways to involve a target student of their choosing in his or her IEP meeting and collaborate with each other to further develop their planning and understanding of the student led IEP process.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G2: Are Your Students Ready for Employment?  (Education Track)
    Room: Barrington
    (This is a repeat of Session A8) 

    More students with disabilities than ever before are graduating from high school and entering post-secondary programs. This is a cause for genuine celebration. But as we celebrate, I challenge us to consider the work yet to do in truly preparing our students for the next step. This session will discuss learning experiences and skills to address in the transition process; including understanding legal rights and transfer of responsibilities and assistive technology as an accommodation.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will learn three specific transition skills to address that are needed for student success in post-secondary programs and employment.

    2) Participants will learn about the QIAT-PS Student Self-Evaluation Matrix, a free tool created by the Great Lakes ADA Center to measure Assistive Technology skills.

    3) Participants will learn about the free Punch-In employment skills course, created by the Great Lakes ADA Center and available for free to teachers in Illinois.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G3: IHPs, IEPs and EAPs - Which Plan? How to? Evaluate?  (Health Care Track)
    Room: Carlyle

    Identity the differences between IHPs, IEPs, and EAPs, when to use which plan, how to determine the plan and write it. Includes the role of the school nurse as advocate for the health needs and safety of the student. Discuss partnering with physicians, care coordination team, other health professionals, therapists and others.

    Objectives:

    1) Define the types of health plans in use in schools.

    2) Create action goals and supporting objectives.

    3) Identify the student advocate role of the school nurse.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G4: Meet the Needs of All Students: Programming for High Incidence Disabilities  (Education Track)
    Room: Edwardian

    This interactive session is designed to widen the scope that is often used to determine who requires transition services. There will be an exploration of programmatic features that increase access and interest for students with high incidence disabilities. Implications for inadequate transition assessment and/or lack of post-secondary services will be explored in the session as well.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will increase their capacity to accurately assess the "eligibility" of students for services.

    2) Participants will identify programmatic opportunities to enhance the benefit of transition services for individuals with high incidence disabilities.

    3) Participants will understand the impact on society when vulnerable youth exit service unprepared or under-prepared to enter the workforce.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G5: Transition Success Stories  (Education Track)
    Room: Stanford

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Students who are in transition now and who have successfully exited will share their stories, both successes and challenges. This includes stories of innovative transition planning, work skill development, job creation ideas, entrepreneurship and customized employment.

    Objectives:

    1) Students' successful transition work experiences.

    2) How young adults were supported in innovative ways to reach their goals.

    3) How important the dream of the student is in making this happen.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G6: Why Can't You Understand Me? A Personal Account of Living with Autism  (Community Track)
    Room: Prescott

    This session details Taylor's account of living with autism from both a professional and personal perspective. This session includes a PowerPoint slide show, demonstration videos and immersive experience of living with autism as well Taylor's personal experience with autism.

    Objective:

    1) Attendees will learn the basic and advanced facts of autism from the point of view of someone living with autism (the information we want people to know).

    2)  Attendees will be able to apply information learned in this presentation in assisting others on the spectrum based on an individual basis as I have learned through personal coping skills.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G7: Benefits 102: You Had Me at SGA  (Community Track)
    Room: Stanford

    This interactive informative session will cover more in depth issues surrounding government benefits: DAC, Pickle, 1619, QMB types, SGA, TWP, Spend-down, CDR, and more. Ending in case studies and a round of benefit BINGO, you will not believe how much you have learned.

    Objective:

    1) Learn the difference between SGA & TWP.

    2) Learn how to meet spend-down.

    3) Learn who should NEVER have a spend-down.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G8: Functional Transition Assessments 101  (Education Track)
    Room: Trafalgar

    Audience: BEGINNER

    This session will focus on the various ways to assess students in the domains of: independent living, employment, community participation, recreation/leisure, and self-determination. This session will differentiate between surveys, questionnaires, checklists, and formal assessments that measure functional ability versus those that measure interest. It will also inform participants of the background and validity of the assessments and provide resources that can be implemented with students and in programs.

    Objectives:

    1) Participants will increase their understanding of how to assess their students/young adults in the domains of: independent living, recreation/community, employment, and self-determination.

    2) Participants will learn how to identify the appropriate functional assessments to use for their individual students.

    3) Participants will gain insight on how to use assessments to guide their post-secondary outcomes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G9: Supporting Healthy Relationship and Sexuality: Knowledge is Power  (Community / Health Care Track)
    Room: Windsor

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Everyone is a sexual being, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD)! Yet information about healthy relationships and sexuality is often not available or accessible for people with ID/DD. This interactive and lively session will take you on a journey of discovery on how to support healthy sexuality by introducing you to best practice strategies, resources you can use, including from Illinois Imagines, and how to form your own action plan.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify barriers and challenges to the promotion of healthy relationships and sexuality for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    2) Identify best practice strategies for supporting healthy relationships and sexuality for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    3) Identify and have an opportunity to practice using resources on healthy relationships and sexuality for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    G10: Salir Adelante: A Transition Resource for Spanish Speaking Immigrant Families  (Community Track)
    Room: Leighton

    Audience: BEGINNER

    Lo Que Puede Venir through a grant from Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) is working on a web-based resource for Spanish speaking immigrant families. The resource will be available in Spanish and will provide families with information about the different types of adult service systems. The resource will also provide immigration information updates and links to other immigration assistance for individuals with disabilities. This session will highlight the status of the new resource in development and provide updates to current immigration laws affecting young immigrant adults with disabilities.

    Objective:

    1) Learn about a new resource available for immigrant Spanish speaking families involved in the Transition process.

    2) Learn about updates to immigration laws that impact youth with disabilities.

     Optional 
    12:15 PM  -  12:30 PM
    15 Minute Break with Snacks
    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    H1: Identifying System Gaps and Solutions in Multi Needs Transition Planning 5th through Graduation  (Education Track)
    Abricot Ballroom

    The LaGrange Area Department of Special Education (LADSE) presents a Focus Group and Conversations strategy used in identifying system gaps and solutions in transition planning, middle school through high school, for students with multiple needs. Presenters will share the process and what they learned across stakeholders focusing on student, parent and staff education and communication among all stakeholders. Panel of the Multi Needs Focus Group participants will share their thoughts and suggestions for strengthening systems of learning about and preparing for transition planning specific to multi needs students. Presenters will allow time for an interactive discussion surrounding solutions to system gaps in this targeted group.

    Objectives:

    1) Attendees will learn about a Focus Group/Coffee and Conversations strategy that can be used within their districts, programs or groups to identify gaps in their transition planning processes.

    2) Attendees will learn common gaps across programs of 5th grade through high school graduation that can impact the transition planning processes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    H2: Innovative Integrated Housing: Updates from the Field  (Community Track)
    In Grand Ballroom

    The Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities has been working to make innovative integrated housing options a reality. Come hear about the potential, updates and ways that you and your family can express the desire for and acquire innovative housing in your community of choice.

    Objectives:

    1) Learn about housing options outside of Community Integrated Living Arrangements (CILAs).

    Speakers:
     Optional 
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