2019 BC Land Summit: Collaborations & Connections

PROGRAM & SCHEDULE: 

The entire conference preliminary program and schedule is now available and outlined below. Click on the day-by-day tabs below to view the program details for each day of the conference.

In the interests of improving and delivering the best possible conference program, the organizers reserve the right to amend the conference program and schedule.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION:   Many sessions and activities are included in registration, while others may be optional, require pre-registration, and / or be subject to additional costs. For full details on what is (or is not) included in various conference registration options, please be sure to click on the 'Fees & Registration' link in the menu on the left.

Please Note:   During the 'Extra Early' registration period (prior to the release of the full preliminary program), only basic Summit registration was available, including the ability to sign-up for the Summit Welcome Reception & Networking event and the Summit Gala Evening Reception & Dinner. With the release of the preliminary program, extra early registered attendees can now return and add other optional activities such as mobile workshops or tours to their existing registration. Such attendees can simply click on the 'Already Registered?' link found on the top right corner above, and follow the instructions to modify their registration.

Conference Program

  Go
  • Optional  Optional
  • Fee  Fee
  • Wednesday, May 8, 2019
  •  

    Registration

    9:30 AM  -  6:30 PM
    Registration Desk
    Registration desk for attendee check-­in and general information.
     

    Pre-Conference Events

    2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    BC Institute of Agrologists Annual General Meeting (AGM)
    Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the British Columbia Institute of Agrologists (BCIA).
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Planning Institute of BC Annual General Meeting (AGM) & Awards Presentation
    Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the Planning Institute of British Columbia (PIBC) and presentation of the 2019 PIBC Awards for Excellence in Planning & Individual Achievement.
     

    Evening Activities

    5:30 PM  -  7:30 PM
    Summit Welcome Reception & Networking

    We’d like to welcome you to the 2019 BC Land Summit conference and help you start the collaborating and connecting early on with this reception and networking event at the Westin Bayshore hotel. Enjoy delicious light food and refreshments while mingling and connecting with old and new colleagues and friends alike.

    Cost & Registration:  There is no additional cost for this optional event for full Summit attendees, however to help us plan accordingly pre-registration is required to attend this event. Be sure to select this optional activity and sign up when registering online if you plan to attend.

     Optional 
  • Thursday, May 9, 2019
  •  

    Registration

    7:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Registration Desk
    Registration desk for attendee check­-in and general information.
     

    Breaks & Meals

    7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Light Continental Breakfast
    Get energized for the start of the Summit. Join fellow attendees for a light continental breakfast and networking to start the day.
     

    General Plenary Session

    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    General Session - Opening Ceremony & Keynote Speaker Presentation By: Sheila Watt-Cloutier
    Welcome to the 2019 BC Land Summit: Collaborations & Connections! Join fellow attendees, the organizing team, and special guests for the official opening ceremonies to formally launch the 2019 Summit. And join us for the kick off of the conference program with the opening keynote presentation from Sheila Watt-Cloutier.
     

    Breaks & Meals

    10:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Refreshment & Networking Break
    Re-­energize and reflect! Join fellow attendees for a light refreshment and networking break.
     

    Deep Dive Sessions

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 01 - Fire Ecology & Urban Interfaces: Living Within Fire Dependent Ecologies

    This in-depth session will explore the complexities of living within fire dependent ecological systems, and present different strategies and approaches to managing fire dependent ecologies, urban edges, and preparing for wild land fires. The panel discussion will provide background information and collaborative strategies for moving forward (a game plan), which can be applied at the local, regional, provincial, and national scale.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 02 - Changing Climate, Changing Coast: Building Resilience & Reducing Disaster Risk in BC

    Get ready to collaborate with your peers with this lively in-depth session to tackle the challenges of hazard lands, climate adaptation and risk management in coastal communities in BC. The current regulatory approach to managing hazard lands and disaster risk, including what is and can be managed at local scales, what requires regional and provincial oversight and support, will be introduced.Grounded in recent examples from the City of Surrey, we will work through coastal flood adaptation issues, key findings, and lessons learned to explore in the context of planning, landscape architecture, engineering, land appraisal and real estate, and community engagement. Dialogue will be framed around the challenges of coastal hazard land / risk management at local, regional and provincial scales. With an emphasis on what can be done from the bottom up, the session will include working in small groups to explore options co-developed by the public in City of Surrey’s Coastal Flood Adaptation Strategy. Participants will use their professional knowledge to further refine and evaluate the options developed and identify gaps and opportunities for making them happen. Come ready to play a side and pitch your solution to the group! Guided by a panel of interdisciplinary professionals, we will draw upon your professional backgrounds and new local knowledge to advance disaster risk reduction for coastal flood hazard lands in BC. The session will conclude by identifying actions and collaborative approaches for the various land professions to advance more effective coastal flood management and local, regional, and provincial disaster risk reduction.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 03 - Enforcement: The Pointy End of Regulation

    Effective land use regulation has an enforcement side that practitioners often ignore. Regulators at all levels of government occasionally need to take enforcement measures. This extended session provides an in-depth look at the enforcement aspect of regulation, including the legal basis of enforcement measures; special issues in overlapping jurisdiction; enforcement mechanisms including lawyer’s letters, tickets, prosecutions and court injunctions, and tips for drafting enforceable regulations. Additionally, this session will give special attention to coordination and cooperation between different levels of government in the enforcement of regulations in which they have a common interest. Presenters are experienced in obtaining compliance with a broad variety of regulations and familiar with the drafting errors that can be the Achilles’ heel of enforcement.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 04 - Working Together to Stop Invasive Species

    Invasive species know no boundaries and are the second biggest threat to nature after development. They threaten many of BC’s green spaces, communities and even our citizens. Whether it is the Japanese beetle with its voracious appetite that kills lawns, trees and fruit; Knotweed, a tenacious bully on the landscape capable of cutting through concrete; or aquarium escapee Parrots feather threatening dykes and reservoirs - each of these species has been introduced to BC with devastating consequences. Join the Invasive Species Council of BC for this in-depth session to discuss invasive species, their impacts, some of the projects and programs underway to combat them and the ways the Council is collaborating with the public, decision makers and more to prevent increased economic and environmental damage to our landscapes and communities. Key learning outcomes include the ability to recognize high-priority invasive species and their impacts, key resources available to support good practices and decision-making, and valuable knowledge on how the Council is working together with agencies and organizations to manage invasive species in BC.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 01 - Due Diligence Ain’t What It Used To Be
    An up-to-date title search is often the starting point for due diligence in regard to B.C. real estate. This session will take a deep dive into the structure and content of title searches. We’ll look at the normal information as well as the weird, wacky, rare, obsolete and confusing. What are the red (and not so red) flags that should not be ignored if your purchase, loan or project is to proceed as planned? “You didn’t know about the pipeline right of way…?”
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 02 - Archeology & Development in BC: Understanding Regulations & Implementing Best Practices
    This educational session introduces archaeological practice in BC in the context of development and provides an overview of both the legal framework that regulates archaeology and protects archaeological sites, and best practices for managing archaeology on development projects. Participants will come out better equipped to deal with archaeology as a potential component of their projects, and better equipped to work with archaeological professionals on their project teams.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 03 - Living on the Edge: Exploring Planning & Design of the Farming-Urban Interface
    As land use intensifies across the province, the BC Ministry of Agriculture is fielding more complaints regarding farm practices, particularly along the farming/urban interface. Research has shown that large setbacks and vegetative buffers are effective at mitigating the conflict between farming and urban uses; however, as land become scarce and ever more expensive, people on both sides of the edge are reluctant to give up land to accommodate these setbacks and buffers. The BC Land Summit is a unique opportunity to gather professionals from multiple areas to address and discuss this complex topic. The session will be of interest to agrologists, particularly those engaged in conducting agricultural impact assessments, planners who are evaluating development applications along the farming/urban interface and any accompanying agriculture impact assessments, as well as engaging in community, neighbourhood or urban planning, landscape architects who could be engaged in vegetative buffer design and community planning exercises, and realtors and appraisers who may learn valuable information about farming practices for disclosure purposes and may be interested in buffer design as a means of increasing value of properties along the edge.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 04 - Contribution of Forest Resources to Rural Land Value
    In this session participants will learn basic concepts of forest valuation including estimating timber volume, the timber appraisal process, and reconciling timber values with land values. This is important in most rural parts of BC where AIC members practice. Few appraisers have a forestry background. Most appraisers, and buyers and sellers of forest land struggle with identifying the contribution to land value of forest resources. This session will deal with subjects such as: Methods for measuring tree volume and determining net downs for decay, breakage, low productivity sites, etc.; Determining when the standing trees add material value to the land (I.e., volume thresholds) and the importance of domestic and export log markets, stump to dump costs, and other costs; Avoiding double counting of land and forest resource values; identifying the amount of tree retention likely required to maintain natural values and aesthetic appeal of rural property including viewscapes, stream protection, steep slopes and sensitive soils, and values. We will focus on one or two examples to explain the interface between forest valuation and land valuation.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 05 - Risk & Return on Investment in Social Purpose Real Estate: Industry Panel
    Beyond the increasing demand by investors, government and communities for social impact in land use projects, social purpose real estate (space for community) also delivers real returns on investment. Whether that is accessing otherwise unavailable sources of capital or delivering animated neighbourhoods and establishing market profiles for building sales—the benefits are real and substantive. Blending economic and social returns delivers better spaces and opportunities for residents, neighbourhoods and communities—and is increasingly expected for project approval. As with any return, there are risks. Projects can be more complicated due to the partnerships required, and government can affect social purpose projects through their policy requirements. Join this pinnacle team of industry professionals to learn about risk and return in social purpose real estate. Key Learning Outcomes will include: building awareness; delivering learning opportunities; establishing connections and expanding relationships; enabling interdisciplinary discussion/analysis; and informing policy decision makers.
     

    Optional Mobile Workshops & Tours

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Mobile Workshop 01 - Planning Great Transit Cities: Designing for Growth in Oakridge Town Centre

    The Oakridge Municipal Town Centre (MTC) sits at the intersection of two high-capacity, high-frequency transit services, making it an attractive location to live, work, and shop. These include Canada Line rail (developed in advance of the 2010 Olympics) and the new 41st Avenue B-Line Rapid Bus service, launching officially in September 2019. The Cambie Corridor plan, recently adopted by Council, takes advantage of these investments by targeting significant amounts of new growth and activity in the MTC area, reimagining the largely single-family neighbourhood as a walkable mixed-use urban centre with a diverse mix of job space, housing types and tenures. This major city-building initiative will see about 50,000 more people living in a vibrant, complete community close to the rapid transit corridor over the next 30 years. This session will help participants to connect ideas about how to build great transit-oriented development (TOD) with the tools transit planners use to make decisions about transit design and delivery. The session will begin with a ~1-hour “in-class” presentation and discussion on building great TOD and the land use and urban design ingredients for supporting high-quality transit service. Then, participants will be bussed to 41st & Cambie and participate in a 2-3 hour “walk-shop” in the Oakridge MTC area. Participants will see firsthand how planners are guiding TOD that capitalizes on transportation investment and take back ideas about what communities can do to attract and support fast, frequent, reliable transit service.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop involves travel by bus and public transit, and may also include extensive walking at various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions. Lunch is included on this mobile workshop.

    Cost: $79

    Fee  Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Mobile Workshop 02 - Tsawwassen Farm School: A Model for Farming & Community Development

    The mobile workshop introduces an innovative and unique model of a farm school and incubator farm program that incorporates land-based sustainable agricultural practices with food security, Indigenous relationships, and community and economic development issues. The long table lunch allows participants to meet and make new connections with professionals from diverse areas of practice. The workshop will encourage future collaboration that advances sustainable land use in BC. The mobile workshop session starts at the Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver. Participants take a 50-minute bus ride to the Tsawwassen Farm School. Once there, participants will have a one-hour walking tour of the farm. During the tour, participants will learn about the farm school curriculum, the integration of hog, chicken and vegetable production, experimental apple and cherry orchards, and the incubator farm program. Participants will meet some of our incubator farmers and farm school alumni to discuss their experience and farming journey. Additionally, participants will also learn from an Indigenous knowledge holder regarding sustainability and relationship with the land at the traditional medicine garden and smokehouse on the farm. After the walking tour, participants are invited to share a long table lunch – a light meal featuring food available locally. At this time, participants will have an opportunity to network and connect with their peers as well as discussing the role of the Tsawwassen Farm School as a pioneer in relationship building between First Nation and non-First nation communities. The farm school manager will also discuss the lessons learned and answer questions. Participants are invited to share perspective on different ways that the program can be improved.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop involves travel by bus and may also include extensive walking at various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions. Lunch is included on this mobile workshop.

    Cost: $69

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Breaks & Meals

    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Light Lunch & Networking
    Recharge and reconnect! Join fellow attendees for a light lunch and mid-­day networking break.
     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 06 - Triple Net Leases: Can Vibrant Neighbourhoods Survive Them?
    Local small businesses are not only key to the Canadian economy, but they are the backbone to neighbourhood vibrancy and social connectedness in MetroVancouver. With the overheated market, many local small businesses are struggling to survive the triple net leases and need help. This session brings together tax specialists/appraisers, urban designers/land use planners, BIA directors who will provide analysis and some transferable solutions to help municipalities and local small businesses plan for a viable future. Participants will have an understanding of the role of small, local businesses in neighbourhood vibrancy & public realm-impact of taxation; market conditions on viability of small businesses-taxation and; alternative development model options that support local businesses.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 07 - Okanagan Rail Trail: Acquisition & Development of a Regional Transportation Corridor
    This session will provide attendees with an understanding of what the Okanagan Rail Trail is – the connection; and how an inter-jurisdictional approach and multidisciplinary support made the rail trail possible – the collaboration. The rail trail is an actual physical connection. A 50km length of regional infrastructure that provides a trail linking four distinct communities, and secures the route for future regional transportation (e.g. rapid bus, light rail). Collaboration was required. Three local governments, one First Nation, volunteer fundraisers and the involvement of diverse land-use professionals, was what made the project possible.
    Speakers:
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 08 - The Garden City Lands: Arriving at Convergence
    To develop the Legacy Landscape Plan, the City of Richmond embarked upon the largest public stakeholder process to date to develop the vision of the Garden City Lands. A collaboration with the community, involving also a host of city staff, professionals and academics, resulted in the vision for the Lands the City is now implementing. This spirit of collaboration continues with the involvement of Kwantlen Polytechnic University's Sustainable Agriculture Program which operates a 20-acre teaching and research farm on the Lands.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 09 - Hidden Housing Solutions: Practical Action on Affordability & Climate
    This session will provide insight into innovations that could dramatically advance affordability, GHG reductions, and social inclusion across BC. Provocative presentations will be followed by animated discussion: Michael Epp (CNV) will share its engagement and policy process to consolidate community support to allow three residential units across all single-family parcels, “duplex” zoning of some single-family neighbourhoods, and livability policies for secondary suites and coach houses. Joy Hayden (Hollyburn) will share its journey to develop an online room-mate registry to address rising affordability and social isolation with seniors through co-housing in single family homes. It will profile precedents matching seniors with seniors, seniors with young people, and social enterprises leasing ground floors to put into the rental market. Alex Boston (Renewable Cities) will illustrate the opportunity for affordable, low cost housing through invisible densification of single-family neighbourhoods as a function of plummeting household occupancy and our dominant single-family fabric. Modest local and provincial policy innovations could rapidly, and cost effectively create 100,000 new affordable housing units, reduce GHGs by a quarter million tonnes annually.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 10 - From the Ground Up: Best Practices for Professionals Working with the ALC
    The Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) covers 4.7 million ha of agricultural land in BC. Professional Agrologists frequently interact with the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) on matters related to agricultural capability and suitability of land within the ALR as well as reclamation of agricultural land. This session will explain the role, ethics, and required credentials of Agrologists who submit reports to the ALC, requirements for content of professional reports (agricultural assessments, progress reports and closure reports), what the ALC Commissioners consider when reviewing applications, and how professional reports are used in the decision making, the ALC’s requirements for content of professional reports (agricultural assessments, progress reports and closure reports).
    Speakers:
     

    Optional Mobile Workshops & Tours

    1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Mobile Workshop 03 - Innovative Models of Social Purpose Real Estate

    This mobile workshop will take participants on a tour of three affordable housing and social purpose real estate projects in Vancouver that were developed by not-for-profit real estate developers using entrepreneurial approaches, community partnerships and innovative financial models. All three non-profit organizations are community partners of VanCity, a values-based financial institution that uses the tools of finance to create social change. The first stop will be the River District to visit the Community Land Trust of BC’s new Fraserview Housing Co-operative, with 278 homes for families and individuals. Learn how the CLT BC model is accelerating the development of new housing co-ops such as Fraserview, and the redevelopment of older co-ops in the region through partnerships with municipalities, non-profit partners and the community land trust model. Next, visit Hannelore, a mixed-used affordable housing developed by Catalyst Community Developments Society and the Oakridge Lutheran Church. Learn how the partnership between Catalyst and the Church created 46 affordable homes and church and community space through social impact investing and innovative partnerships. For the last stop, visit BC Artscape’s Sun Wah community cultural hub in Vancouver’s Chinatown that provides affordable and secure rental space to cultural organizations and artists that share a commitment to being engaged and responsible to the area’s communities. Learn how BC Artscape is developing cultural spaces through in-depth community engagement to build dynamic, inclusive and affordable spaces for artists and not-for-profit organizations.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop involves travel by bus and may also include extensive walking at various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions.

    Cost: $49

    Fee  Optional 
    1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Mobile Workshop 04 - Walking Spirit Trail: Connecting Indigenous & Non-Indigenous Communities

    The Spirit Trail is collaboration between various levels of government, which transcend jurisdictional, community and cultural boundaries, and its success is measured not in the physical building of the trail but in the relationships built between indigenous and non-indigenous communities. Attendees will walk a portion of the Spirit Trail, from the foot of Lonsdale, within the City of North Vancouver to Squamish Nation land at the Mosquito Creek Marina, and tell a story that embraces: public art, creek connections, unique views of an active marina, and a trail connecting communities. The Spirit Trail is a visionary project which began as an idea in the lead up to the Vancouver/Whistler 2010 Winter Olympics to connect Vancouver’s North Shore communities with a common, waterfront oriented alternative transportation route. Since then, much of the Spirit Trail has been realized as a multi-use and fully accessible greenway. However, Spirit Trail is not just another greenway. It connects communities and cultures that were previously isolated, links major destinations, parks and open spaces, contributes to a reduction in green house gas emission, provides opportunities for an ecological corridor, provides health recreation and transportation options, provides opportunities for economic initiatives, and has raised the North Shores ownership and pride of our combined heritage and values. The June 2018 connection at Mosquito Creek Marina on Squamish land in partnership with the City of North Vancouver represents one of the last and most critical links in the Spirit Trail with a trail segment that traverses the community of Eslahan (Mission reserve) through an active Nation-owned and working marina, bridging Mosquito Creek, and slipping beneath sea level and a 50-tonne gantry crane boat lift. Welcoming people are two new pieces of inspirational public art by Squamish Nation artists.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop involves travel by public transit and may also include extensive walking at various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions.

    Cost: $39

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Breaks & Meals

    2:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Refreshment & Networking Break
    Re-­energize and reflect! Join fellow attendees for a light refreshment and networking break.
     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 11 - The High Cost of Low Industrial Land Supply
    Recent predictions are that the Greater Vancouver region will run out of industrial land suited for large-format warehousing and distribution by 2020. Rapidly increasing land prices, conversion to other uses and high competition among industrial users are just some of the factors that are already forcing many logistics users to locate in other markets such as Calgary. At the same time, industrial needs are changing with disrupting trends such as e-commerce. With responsibilities for the region’s industrial land spread across all levels of government, collaboration between all of these decision makers has never been more important.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 12 - Affordable NetZero Row Housing-Financed Without Government Grants
    Westcoast Outbuildings and the Yale First Nation have partnered to bring truly affordable NetZero row housing that does not require grant funding from either BC Housing, INAC or CHMC for communities. By working with the Bank of Montreal, any community in BC can 100% finance each home secured by receiving the monthly minimum Social Assistance shelter rate allowance from each tenant. We have developed two designs that feature either three studio units in one module or a 2-unit two-bedroom module layout. All the units also feature 13.3 kW of solar panels on the roof - providing more energy than the residence will consume (i.e., NetZero housing that results in little to no electric utility bills). This partnership will support the good work of the Yale First Nation in leading the charge to bring the most energy efficient and affordable housing to our community and now other communities throughout BC. The team leads from both Westcoast and the Yale First Nation will show you how to develop similar projects in your community. The row housing model developed uses 100% secured financing to eliminate the need for lengthy proposals, wait times (often exceeding 6 months) and government funds, and allows communities to build housing and offers an immediate and sustainable funding solution for the construction of new homes for Indigenous communities, whose members receive social assistance and are in need an temporary housing option before a long-term placement is secured.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 13 - Creating Harmony in Rural Planning Policy
    As communities grow and knowledge of impacts of development increases, developing land is becoming more complex. A 60-year evolution of land use regulation in unincorporated areas has left us with a patchwork that can be confusing and contribute to lack of public trust. An official community plan (OCP) that is unique to an electoral area is often upheld by the local elected official and community members as a document that enshrines unique character and needs of that community and not to be combined with any other lest the entire region become homogenous. This perception needs to be challenged. The unnecessary differences in planning bylaws between unincorporated areas can be harmonized while respecting the character and aspirations of each community. In the Regional District of Nanaimo electoral areas, 25 development permit areas throughout 7 OCPs were standardized to 7 that apply across the region. The development sector and planning staff alike appreciate the consistency and agree that the changes will result in less time spent achieving better results for protecting what the development permit area is mean to protect. In the Cowichan Valley Regional District, harmonizing OCPs to create a single set of common policies and objectives will provide consistency in how land use objectives and policies are defined and assist developers in applying the policies and objectives across the region. Current OCP reviews can take 2-3 years to complete, and the logistics of updating all 9 OCPs on the required 5-year cycle is impossible with traditional staffing levels. This session challenges the tradition of numerous unique official community plans in unincorporated areas of a region and presents the cost savings of harmonizing policy and regulation for common land use objectives. It also considers the value of more regionally-consistent policy for better land use planning decisions.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 14 - The Appraiser-Lawyer Relationship: Establishing & Meeting Reasonable Expectation
    This session will consider the appraiser-lawyer relationship in a litigation context and the reasonable expectations the appraiser and the lawyer should have of each other in light of the law governing expert opinion evidence and the appraiser’s professional requirements under the Canadian Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 15 - Re-formed and Re-farmed: Revitalization of the ALR
    There are over 4.7 million hectares of Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) in British Columbia, and over 150 BC local governments have ALR land within their boundaries. These local governments, along with their real estate, agrology, and planning professionals, have an important, collaborative role to play with the Provincial Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) to preserve agricultural land and encourage farming in BC. In January 2018, BC’s Minister of Agriculture tasked an independent committee to lead a public engagement process and provide recommendations to the provincial government to "Revitalize the Agricultural Land Reserve and the Agricultural Land Commission". Join ALC staff to learn about the outcomes of this revitalization initiative and how changes to provincial legislation governing the ALR affect your area of the province, and your professional practices.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 16 - Energy & Land: National Insights & Updates from the National Energy Board
    The National Energy Board (NEB) is Canada’s energy and safety regulator of international and interprovincial pipelines. The NEB oversees safety for the full life cycle of a project and promote safe work practices around pipelines. Preventing damage to pipelines is a shared responsibility. The NEB promotes safe work practices around pipelines and raises public awareness about safety by providing information and encouraging co-operation, safety education, and compliance with regulatory requirements. Join representatives from the National Energy Board (NEB) to receive valuable information, insights, and updates relevant to land and energy, including: federal regulatory updates; educational information relevant to land and land-use professionals; and more. Most practitioners work on or near lands, or plan developments on or near federally-regulated pipeline rights-of-way and will benefit from a deeper knowledge and understanding of the applicable federal regulations. These insights will be of benefit to improve land-use planning and land management for land and land-use professionals.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 17 - Collaborating to Improve Land Registry & Land Information Services in BC
    The Land Title and Survey Authority of British Columbia (LTSA) is a publicly accountable, statutory corporation formed in 2005 responsible for operating the land title and survey systems of BC. Our vision is to provide exceptional service and innovative solutions as the trusted source of land registry and land information services in British Columbia. Our mission is to deliver responsive and trusted expertise and reliable land title and survey systems, which are an essential foundation to economic and social prosperity. In 2018, we undertook a number of initiatives that enabled us to innovate with our customers and stakeholders to improve land title administration and information access. As a trusted source of property information and a leader in the development of efficient and secure registry solutions, the LTSA is uniquely positioned to help the Province serve the public interest, support collaboration among land professionals in BC, and provide a secure and robust platform for land register transactions. This session will provide attendees with insight into the LTSA’s efforts to modernize how land title transactions are administered, the change experience with our customers and stakeholders, and the important balance between transparency and privacy when servicing the public interest.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 18 - Staying Within the Lines: Ethics & Professionalism for Planners & Other Professionals
    Ethics and professionalism are core principles for any professional practitioner. Join members of the Planning Institute of BC’s (PIBC's) Professional Conduct Review Committee to discuss key concepts and issues when it comes to professional ethics – including: references to PIBC's Code of Ethics & Professional Conduct, key ethical circumstances in planning and other fields, and ethical considerations for planners and land-use professionals. The session will also provide a forum for facilitated discussion, dialogue, questions, and general advice, with practicing professionals and members of the Committee.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 19 - Rain City Strategy: Moving Towards a Water Sensitive City
    Recognizing that Vancouver’s utility infrastructure is aging, major upgrades are necessary to support future development. Instead of only looking at the conventional approach of upgrading pipes, the concept of a water sensitive city emerged as an integrated water management approach (IWM) that not only meets the city’s water needs, but also offers opportunities to deliver a multitude of benefits associated with water quality, livability and resilience. The City of Vancouver is taking the lead in urban water management and is pushing beyond the regulatory requirements of improving water quality. Presenting an encompassing strategy and approach that takes into consideration all water systems and land-use planning is unique in the North American context. Envisioning a water sensitive city is a transition process that is all about collaborating, connecting and learning together (internally and externally with academia, industry and community).
     

    Evening Activities

    6:00 PM  -  9:30 PM
    Summit Gala Evening Reception & Dinner Featuring: Mark Critch
    Join fellow attendees for food, drink and fun at the Summit Gala Evening. Start off with pre-dinner mingling and networking at the cocktail reception, followed by the formal dinner, and the featured entertainment provided by Canadian comedian Mark Critch, of CBC's This Hour Has 22 Minutes. And celebrate the collaborations & connections being made at the 2019 BC Land Summit!

    Cost & Registration:  There is no additional cost for this optional event for full Summit attendees, however to help us plan accordingly pre-registration is required to attend this event. Be sure to select this optional activity and sign up when registering online if you plan to attend.

     Optional 
  • Friday, May 10, 2019
  •  

    Registration

    7:30 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Registration Desk
    Registration desk for attendee check­-in and general information.
     

    Breaks & Meals

    8:00 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Light Continental Breakfast
    Get energized for the final day of the Summit. Join fellow attendees for a light continental breakfast and networking to start the day.
     

    General Plenary Session

    9:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
    General Session - Keynote Speaker Presentation By: Edward Glaeser
    Join fellow attendees for the start of the final day of the Summit program with the morning keynote presentation from Edward Glaeser.
     

    Breaks & Meals

    10:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Refreshment & Networking Break
    Re-­energize and reflect! Join fellow attendees for a light refreshment and networking break.
     

    Deep Dive Sessions

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 05 - Planning to Eat: The Development & Application of Bioregional Food System Planning
    Our globalized food system has severe impacts to our lands and communities, ranging from ecological to economic, to an inability to feed ourselves when faced with external stressors like market forces, or a dwindling agricultural land base. The Institute for Sustainable Food Systems has developed an unprecedented, replicable methodology to assess the economic, environmental, social, food production, and food self-reliance potentials of bioregional food systems. Utilizing the best data available, our model uses contemporary land use and food production as a baseline, to compare future food system scenarios. These explore the trade-offs and relationships between the economic, ecological and food self-reliance dimensions of land use decisions. The model facilitates “what if” analysis and provides new information for land use professionals, economic development officers, policy analysts, and elected officials. The in-depth session includes: An overview of bioregion food system modeling – what it is, why it’s important, how it works, and how a bioregion lens can help advance food system planning. Includes an interactive workshop on BC bioregion delineation and important food system challenges in each; An overview of bioregion food system modeling research completed or currently underway, including findings relating to land use decisions; A panel discussion about the practical applications of the research, based on the experience of local government and community stakeholders in the Southwest BC and Okanagan bioregions. This will include a facilitated discussion of what is missing, what could improve future projects, and how to establish these in other regions.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 06 - The Numbers Behind Affordability
    Join us for this deep dive into the key factors that determine affordability in the Lower Mainland and British Columbia. Our experts representing the appraisal profession, private development, and BC Housing will present three different perspectives on the elusive word “affordability.” Three presentations will be followed by a facilitated discussion on the opportunities and constraints affecting housing including answering some key questions, including: What are the fundamentals determining affordability? What are the factors limiting the delivery of more affordable housing by the private sector? What are the progressive government programs addressing affordability?

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 07 - Collaborations + Connections = Development
    Have you ever wondered exactly how all the professions work collaboratively to create a development? In this session we will examine in depth the relationship between each profession and how they come together to complete a development, whether that be residential or commercial. You will hear from industry experts starting with the pro forma to the sales or leasing.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Deep Dive 08 - The Professional Governance Act: Complying with New Legislative Obligations
    Arising from the Professional Reliance Review of 2018 the new Professional Governance Act outlines the governmental strategy to significantly redefine the relationship between self regulating professions within the province of British Columbia and the citizens of the province. With a potential implementation period in excess of 5 years this legislation has the potential to significantly modulate the manner of practice within the professions that are, or will be subject to this legislation. This session will outline the history and development of the Act, update participants as to the current status of implementation and discuss the potential changes to the practice methods of the individual professionals subject to the legislation.

    Please Note: This extended Deep Dive session runs from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm with a break for lunch.

     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 20 - Ownership & Interests: The Story of BC.’s Torrens Land Title System
    How did British Columbia come to use the Torrens system, why, and what does it look like today? Named after Sir Robert Torrens, parliamentarian and land title reformist, this 19th century system developed in South Australia gradually replaced the common law system of title to land. BC was the second jurisdiction in the world to implement the Torrens system. This session will explore the origins of the Torrens System, trace its development to the system of today, and imagine the future of land title registration in BC.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 21 - Cemeteries: Forgotten Landscapes
    As sacred spaces, not just places; cemeteries are where community memory, narrative, meaning, comfort and respect happen. These landscapes are woven into family and community history and experience, housing ancestral lines back centuries. People travel the world to visit cemeteries and experience the unique ways humankind has handled the mortal coil after death, and yet we have managed, especially in North America but across the western world, to mostly sanitize and isolate our places of burial. Why have cemeteries been lost in the urban planning discussion? Why do fewer and fewer people tend to visit? And what role will they play in the future? This conference session will look into the some of the first intentionally designed cemeteries which played a fundamental role in the mosaic of parks and open space in city planning and investigate why cemeteries today have largely been forgotten. We will examine the growing pressure of land use and the emerging trends to tackle space demands through new burial techniques. Discussions will focus on the reinvention of cemeteries and why they must be an integral part day to day lives, and why the social, healing and environmental benefits must be promoted. This proposal will highlight a key but forgotten landscape within the urban sphere. Cemeteries hold a unique place within our communities but are currently facing the growing pressures of space demands and land use. This conference session will highlight the needed interdisciplinary insight in addressing the land use challenges we face today.
    Speakers:
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 22 - Embracing the BC Climate Action Charter: Creating Complete, Compact Communities
    Today, virtually every BC local government – 187 of 190 municipalities, regional districts and the Islands Trust – has signed the BC Climate Action Charter. This unique and innovative partnership has mobilized local governments to push the boundaries on climate action and garnered international recognition for British Columbia as a leader on climate change. Housing affordability has emerged as one of the most pressing priorities of the province. Affordability, climate and land use are closely linked. The third commitment under the Charter – creating complete, compact and energy efficient communities is a powerful objective that supports the achievement of multiple linked benefits, including low carbon land-use patterns and reduced GHGs, household affordability, infrastructure cost efficiencies and positive health and social outcomes. This highly participatory 90-minute session will engage land use planners, urban designers, real estate economists and developers, agrologists and engineers in discussing existing tools and future solutions in support of creating complete, compact, energy efficient and affordable communities. Participation in this session will also inform discussion on the government of BC Clean Growth Strategy.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 23 - Innovative Partnerships in Affordable Housing
    The Housing Research Collaborative (HRC), an initiative of the UBC School of Community and Regional Planning, is an innovative community of housing researchers, providers and policy makers focused on understanding systemic impediments in the housing system and the development of models to address housing un-affordability. The goal of the HRC is to further our understanding and contribute to policy development on comprehensive affordable housing strategies to meet the need for affordable housing along the spectrum from the homeless to middle-income households. Consensus has been building in North America, and elsewhere, that an effective response to the need for affordable housing requires a multi-sectoral approach, including all levels of government, the private for-profit and nonprofit sectors, as well as community involvement. This is perceived as the most effective means of producing affordable housing within limited resources and capacity, and to meet local needs. We are seeing many new approaches in multi-sectoral collaboration, locally and internationally, and many of these involve innovations in the governance and purposing of public land for housing.The structure of our program elements is divided into two sections focused on innovative partnerships in affordable housing. In the first section our panel of experts and researchers will review four case studies of affordable housing partnerships. Participants attending this session will learn of innovative outcomes arising from collaborations in affordable housing provision and research. In the second half of the session we will engage with audience participants through facilitated conversation.
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Session 24 - Living the LNG Dream: The View from Ground Zero
    This session highlights a region of BC that is crucial to the success of the LNG dream. It will provide insight into what meaningful collaboration between all stakeholders in the LNG industry could look like and connect in real time what is happening with a historical perspective. Informing dialogue between relevant professionals and connecting end users of the resource with the source highlights the connection between the people, the land and the resource to improve the way forward. This session will outline the unique history of development in the Peace Region of British Columbia, discuss current energy development and trends in North East British Columbia, and distinguish development practices on private vs. Crown land. The presentation will focus on surface and under-surface rights and the anomaly of privately held under-surface rights. Agricultural impacts both locally and provincially, including Agricultural Land Reserve conflicts will be discussed in the context of consultation and notification with respect to indigenous interests and private landholdings.
     

    Optional Mobile Workshops & Tours

    10:30 AM  -  2:30 PM
    Mobile Workshop 05 - Developments Impacting or Impacted by Overhead High Voltage Transmission Lines

    BC Hydro works together with communities, individuals, decision-makers, to ensure uses within and adjacent to its transmission corridors are safe and ensure continued security for the reliable supply of electricity to residents throughout the province. This mobile workshop will take participants through several developments which required modifications to address electrical safety and right of way management concerns. Tour sites to include where transmission works were constructed on agricultural lands and subsequent development has resulted in changes to land use both within and along the edges of transmission rights of way. Learn about property rights and electric transmission works; how electric field induction, ground faults and required overhead clearances impact developability of lands; how BC Hydro is working with local and regional governments to best manage these issues.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop involves travel by bus and may also include extensive walking at various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions. Lunch is included on this mobile workshop.

    Cost: $79

    Fee  Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Mobile Workshop 06 - Touring the Vancouver Convention Centre Living Roof

    The 6.5 - acre award winning living roof at the Vancouver Convention Centre has become a model in sustainability and collaboration. Completed in 2009, the roof is celebrating its 10th anniversary. Conceived as an urban ecological habitat inspired by regional coastal grasslands, the living roof’s success has drawn interest from around the world. The many species of native plants have thrived, creating habitat for rare species of insects and birds. This is a rare opportunity to experience the roof with the landscape architect responsible for its design.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 1.5-hour mobile workshop is a walking tour that includes extensive walking to and from various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions.

    Cost: $29

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Breaks & Meals

    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Light Lunch & Networking
    Recharge and reconnect! Join fellow attendees for a light lunch and mid-­day networking break.
     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 25 - Parks Will Save the World
    Since the beginning of the municipal parks movement in the late 1800’s & early 1900’s, parks have been seen as an antidote to the physical, mental and moral distress of urbanites, a key component in city beautification, and of great economic benefit to cities and towns. Today, these basic tenets have held true, but even more desired benefits have been added to the list such as homelessness, obesity, climate change, and improving quality of life with more diverse populations in mind. Municipal parks can indeed be a critical component in solving today’s “wicked problems” by contributing to social and environmental resilience, but a common thread with other disciplines is the need for renewal and investment to achieve those desired benefits. This conference session will begin with an overview of some of today’s current issues and their linkages to public parks – both in terms of impacts to parks and benefits provided by parks. Participants will then be engaged in round-table discussions around each of the main areas of expectations on our parks systems framed by, but not limited to, the three sustainability realms of society, environment, and economy. Discussions will be guided by specific questions aimed at identifying some of the most promising areas of focus to guide park improvements over the next 20 years.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 26 - A Beginner’s Guide to Indigenous Land Use Planning
    In BC, we are experiencing an exciting wave of increased Indigenous self-governance and strengthened intergovernmental relationships between Indigenous communities and different levels of government. This presentation seeks to provide an overview of the dynamic world of Indigenous community planning. As a beginner’s guide the presentation will: Provide an overview of Canada’s colonial history and implications for Indigenous community planning and engagement •Introduce key concepts for understanding the Indigenous planning context (Indigenous, First Nations, Metis, Inuit, Status Indian, Aboriginal rights, Consultation); Describe the vast diversity of land governance scenarios (traditional, Indian Act, FNLMA, Comprehensive Governance Agreements) and land tenures (treaty, reserve, traditional territory, land code, fee simple) in which Indigenous planning is taking place; and Introduce you to a vibrant community-based planning movement (Comprehensive Community Planning) and discuss opportunities to work as allies to these efforts. The presenters will cover this content while sharing stories from Indigenous community planning processes. Then, they will facilitate an interactive exercise in which session participants will work in groups to identify opportunities within their own work to support the Indigenous community-driven planning movement.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 27 - Co-Creating a Mixed Small Lot Neighbourhood
    The Highlands of East Hill is a newly approved 170 small lot residential subdivision in Vernon on previously owned public land. The presentation will focus on the benefits of the unique process of the municipality working closely with the developers throughout the development application process and the design and element outcomes. It will also highlight aspects of the development including fee simple row housing, secondary suites (including in semidetached units), a small commercial node, affordable housing units, ample park space, and an active laneway design (Woonerf). This presentation will focus on the collaboration between the Developer and Municipality on creating a modern neighbourhood development that achieves numerous policy objectives in Vernon's OCP. The process was unique, unusual, fast paced, innovative, uncomfortable and has resulted in a fantastic proposal that many in Vernon are proud of.
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 28 - Mainstreaming Systems-level Adaptation Responses in the Management of Land & Water
    Particularly in metropolitan areas, we have evolved a distance from our natural surroundings through creation of the built environment. The resulting impacts and new risks posed by climate change requires us to reframe our views on the relationship we have with our surroundings and the relationship between water management and land use. Solutions considered appropriate for the future have to meet multiple objectives (environmental protection, innovation, affordability, GHG reduction, community acceptance, resilience, etc.) and professionals and decision makers will have to do the balancing act of trying to meet these competing objectives. Strategies relevant to all professionals who support land-use decisions are needed. These strategies are often called green infrastructure implementation strategies, but they are also known by alternative names such as managing municipal natural assets, ecosystem-based services, and respecting natural features/ cultural forms. These strategies have multiple co-benefits and fit well within the various strategies for adapting to climate change. To implement these strategies at community level, it is becoming apparent that risks have to be managed at a systems level. As such, professionals are going beyond traditional risk management planning to encompass emergency management, human resources, finance, communications, and more to deal with high-level system threats to water supply and management. Come find out more and how these approaches could benefit your professional practice and the communities you serve. This multi-speaker session will provide an overview of Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategies, the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative, a Study of Regional-level Climate Impacts on Precipitation and Stormwater Management, and the Water System Risk Management Planning approach. The presentations include practical solutions afforded by these initiatives and efforts being made to create system-level changes in the management of water. The presentation and group discussions will be followed by 30-minute audience Q&A..
    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Session 29 - Integrating Land Uses: Transportation & Affordable Rental Housing
    Join a dialogue session moderated by BC Housing’s CEO, Shayne Ramsay, to explore the challenges and opportunities of creating more sustainable and inclusive communities. Panel members will share their perspectives on what they are doing to achieve greater connectivity and affordability while highlighting some of their successful examples and lessons they learned along the way, including: How are they achieving transit-oriented affordable rental housing? What are the available tools and innovative ways they used to reduce land costs? What is working? What advice do they have for others?
    Speakers:
     

    Optional Mobile Workshops & Tours

    1:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Mobile Workshop 07 - Waterfront Parks on the Seawall by Bike (Cycling Tour)

    Vancouver's spectacular waterfront is home to some of the city's most unique and outstanding parks, many of them connected by the city's expansive seawall. Visit and learn about a number of these outstanding parks on this bicycle tour. The tour will start with your bike rental near the Westin Bayshore hotel, and will travel through Coal Harbour parks on the Seawall, then back along the seawall through Stanley Park (West End) to English Bay and False Creek extending to Hinge Park at Olympic Village. Stops along the way to show the various parks and development around them and the diversity of form and character of spaces and urban form.

    Please Note: This mobile workshop requires pre-registration and additional cost applies. Be sure to select this optional activity when registering online. This 4-hour mobile workshop is a bicycle tour to various locations; it will proceed ‘rain or shine’. Participants should come prepared and dress for conditions. Bicycle and helmet rental is included with this tour (or participants may optionally bring their own bicycle and helmet).

    Cost: $59

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Breaks & Meals

    2:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Refreshment & Networking Break
    Re-­energize and reflect! Join fellow attendees for a light refreshment and networking break.
     

    Concurrent Breakout Sessions

    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 30 - Beyond Protection: Farmland Use, Valuation & Policy for Productive Agricultural Land
    Only 5% of our land base is suitable for farming. In BC the Agricultural Land Reserve strives to protect this resource, however only 50% of the ALR is actively used for farming. Agricultural land is increasingly held in speculation and threatened by competing economic interests. What are the challenges and opportunities to productively use agricultural land? What policy can help drive this change? How can we draw on cross-disciplinary expertise to effectively steward agricultural land in the future? What policy priorities should be recognized in efforts to revitalize the ALR? In this session we will present key policy and land use trends impacting the productive use of agricultural land in BC. This will be complemented and supported by recent data outlining trends in ALR sale prices and assessment values, and, using this foundation, we will discuss the benefits and challenges of policy that has been implemented in other regions around the world to address farmland protection and use. We will then facilitate a discussion drawing on the cross-disciplinary expertise of land use professionals, to identify potential policy avenues to increase the productive use of BC’s farmland. Such a discussion, corresponding with ongoing efforts at the provincial level to revitalize the ALR.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 31 - Jumping the Queue: Integrating Land Use & Transit Planning to Shift Car Dependency
    The City of Abbotsford’s 2016 Official Community Plan set an ambitions mode share target of increasing walking, biking and transit from 7% to 25% by the time the city reaches 200,000 people (estimated at 145,000 in 2018). The OCP also focuses 75% of new growth in the urban core and existing neighbourhoods through redevelopment, aligned along a Primary Transit Corridor in the centre of the urban core. Collaboration: Work between BC Transit and the City’s Engineering and Planning departments following the 2016 OCP has focused on updating Master Plans and reviewing service approaches. This included assessing the shift from high coverage to high frequency, realigning routes to match growth, expanding transit facility space, adding service hours, and improving rider amenities. This more integrated planning and service delivery approach will result in higher ridership and a target of 50% more transit trips annually by 2025. This translates into a 10.5% sustainable work trip mode share – a significant jump towards the ultimate vision of 25%.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 32 - Invasive Species and Impacts to Property: What You Should Know
    Following consultation with land use industry professionals, an urgent need for regulations and guidelines to provide direction and clarity regarding invasive species management disclosure and liability issues was recognized. Thus, in partnership with the BC Society of Landscape Architects and financial support from the Real Estate Foundation of BC, the ISCBC developed invasive species training for landscape architects, real estate professionals, land appraisers, and land developers to empower and educate these sectors in the area of invasive species related to land values. As invasive species know no boundaries, sharing the program with professionals from diverse backgrounds and from a wide range of communities at the Summit is the perfect opportunity to network, learn, exchange knowledge, information, and ideas in the ultimate goal of limiting the impacts of invasive species in BC. While invasive species are not new problem in BC, it was acknowledged that some professional land use practitioners may have received little to no training. Therefore, this opportunity to present industry-relevant invasive species education to appraisers, agrologists, landscape architects, planners and real estate professionals is very valuable. This session will consist of best practices for land use professionals when assessing a property for invasive species issues and direction towards advising clientele, the identification of some key invasive species in BC with direct effects on land values and provide an understanding of their impacts and risks, and finally where to find further useful information and resources.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 33 - Leveraging ParcelMap BC to Supercharge Land Information Research
    ParcelMap BC improves the speed and efficiency of land-related research, planning and business decisions through a current, complete, and trusted visual representation of titled and Crown land parcels in British Columbia. It was developed in collaboration with the Province, Association of BC Land Surveyors, ICI Society, and BC Assessment—along with technology partners such as Esri Canada, MacDonald Dettwiler, and SAFE Software—to enable lawyers, notaries, land surveyors, developers, realtors, utility companies, local governments, and other stakeholders to quickly view a given parcel of land, its relationship to adjacent parcels, and access extensive information about the parcel. Land professionals in BC can collaborate using a common authoritative source of spatial data infrastructure to support land administration and development. The LTSA and ICI Society are currently working with local governments and utilities to support their ParcelMap BC adoption efforts. An Adoption Working Group has been established to provide a forum for analyzing challenges and identifying solutions. This session will provide attendees with insight into these collaborative relationships and initiatives, and how ParcelMap BC can help supercharge land information and services. Participants will hear from local government representatives who have adopted ParcelMap BC and how they successfully navigated the technology change in their organizations. Learn what’s next for ParcelMap BC and how you can benefit from its evolution.
    Speakers:
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 34 - New Normal: Building Collaborations & Partnerships for Social Impact Land Use Projects
    Social purpose real estate has been going on for a very long time. In Vancouver, projects date back well over 100 years. Now common across private, public and third sector development, collaborations and partnerships are key to the delivery of this high impact investment/service model. There are tremendous opportunities to be had in social purpose real estate—enhancing mission, delivering stronger proformas, meeting community needs. Establishing relevant, high value partnerships is fundamental to success. Join three leading professionals deeply involved in the work as they highlight the best in collaborative partnership thinking for social purpose real estate. Key Learning Outcomes: build awareness; deliver learning opportunity, establish connections and expand relationships, enable interdisciplinary discussion/analysis, inform policy decision makers.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 35 - Surveying the Past, Present and Future of BC
    Only a British Columbia Land Surveyor (BCLS) is allowed by law to determine cadastral boundaries and with great power comes great responsibility. The Association of BC Land Surveyors (ABCLS) has worked for more than 100 years ensuring that landowners of BC have well defined boundaries on the ground. A common adage in the profession is that to complete a land survey you must walk in the footsteps of the land surveyor before you. So, lace up your boots, grab a plumb bob and join the ABCLS in an interactive adventure across the province through time that will show the incredible challenges that faced the original land surveyors establishing the framework that is continued to be traced today. There will be explanations on how survey monuments that define boundaries were set and why they are lost, and exploration of how boundaries are recreated with rapidly changing technologies making land surveying a highly technical and mathematical art. Included in discussions will be the ambulatory nature of natural boundaries, the revolutionary map freezing of mineral boundaries and the relatively new boundaries of Strata Lots and Air Space Parcels. The mystery of boundaries will be shown to be exactly the opposite, and how land surveyors work in the public interest and self regulate to ensure the integrity of the parcel fabric for generations to come. As the first land surveyors used the star constellations to find where they were, land surveyors continue to use satellite constellations to show where they are. The discussion will conclude with a look to the future of land surveying in BC and the steps the ABCLS is undertaking to protect its monuments and, with them, the public.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 36 - Multidisciplinary Collaboration Visualization & Engagement: Sea Level Rise Adaptation
    Provincial policy now requires that all Local Governments consider Sea Level Rise (SLR) and related Coastal Flood Hazard Area Land Use Guidelines in their bylaws and approvals. In effect, this change brings consideration of SLR to the forefront in Official Community Plans, Development Permits, Zoning Bylaws, Subdivision and Engineering Bylaws, as well as Asset Management. SLR consideration will also feature in private sector development applications and related real estate and agriculture planning. Subdivision and development approval officers are likely to see SLR guidelines as important to their ‘due diligence’ as professionals to protect the public from hazard and related liability. This interactive panel session brings together a team of planners, landscape architects, visualization, community engagement and engineers that are working with communities to create adaptation strategies that integrate SLR considerations into long-term planning, infrastructure and regulations. It will explore some of the scientific, political and communications challenges faced by these various professionals in working towards developing a coherent response towards SLR. In a coordinated series, each panelist will provide a 10-15 minute presentation. An interactive audience discussion will focus on how this panel’s experience is reflected in other municipalities or private sector projects, what challenges and success stories can be shared, and how this issue affects all the disciplines at the Land Summit.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 37 - Thinking Big: Trends & Opportunities in Small & Mid-Size Cities
    Three quarters of British Columbia’s population lives in cities of less than 200,000, and more than 60% live in communities of less than 100,000. While mid-size and smaller cities surrounding Vancouver and Victoria, and a few elsewhere, are busy managing the growth spurred by the assets of those regions, many of BC’s smaller cities are struggling to attract investment. And not all growing metropolitan suburbs are achieving their visions for a distinct and increasingly vibrant “downtown”. This session will bring three different and complementary perspectives to the development challenges and opportunities facing BC’s small and mid-size cities. A real estate market advisor will share his stories of working with municipalities and developers to assess the true potential of lands targeted for development; he will highlight both financial and market considerations that should inform real estate actions by municipalities. A planning consultant will share his experience helping mid-size cities across Canada attract investment and revitalize their downtowns with a combination of fresh policies, financial incentives and place-making initiatives. And a planning manager with the City of Kelowna will describe how his fast-growing city is working to get the right types of development in the right places, including its five urban centres. Following the presentations, participants will be asked to share their strategies to attract growth and investment in their communities, with the panel offering advice to those still struggling.
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Session 38 - Appraising Conservation Covenants: Challenges & Solutions
    The appraisal of a conservation covenant can be a very rewarding assignment, but it is not without its trials and tribulations. This session will explore the most common challenges of appraising conservation covenants and offer possible solutions and practical advice.
     

    Evening Activities

    4:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Summit Closing Happy Hour & Networking
    Join fellow attendees one final time to collaborate, connect and celebrate the closing of the 2019 BC Land Summit conference.
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