2019 New York State Department of Health's Bureau of Women, Infant and Adolescent Health Provider Meeting

Workshop Descriptions

Workshop Block 1

Alarming Trends in STIs and What We Can Do NYSDOH Bureau of Sexual Health & Epidemiology. This session will cover the latest sexually transmitted infection (STI) epidemiologic data for New York State, with a focus on populations who are disproportionately impacted as well as new directions in STI prevention and control.  You will learn about resources and programs that you can partner with to ensure your clients are getting the services they need.

Fostering an Organizational Culture that Acknowledges and Mitigates Bias Molly Findley, DO, MPH, MS, Attending Physician, Site Director of the Fellowship in Family Planning, and Medical Director of the Title X Family Planning Clinic, Jacobi Hospital. Unconscious biases are common; however, the important question is what can we do about this? In this session geared towards administrative and community-based staff, we will explore implicit biases through a public health and social determinants of health lens. We will discuss what unconscious biases are and explore the research that shows how unconscious bias has resulted in less-than-optimal reproductive health outcomes and reproductive coercion. Strategies to mitigate bias at an organization level will be discussed, including how to foster an environment that acknowledges biases and responds positively.

Intimate Partner Violence in Student Relationships: Context and Consequences Lorien Castelle, Director of Prevention, New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. In this workshop we will discuss the latest research on intimate partner violence (IPV) and its implications for appropriate, effective intervention as well as what we can do to promote protective factors across the social ecology that may prevent IPV before it starts. Through interactive presentation, facilitated dialogue, and group exercises, participants will explore the nature and dynamics of IPV. Given the prevalence and magnitude of abuse occurring for young people and students, this discussion will include addressing the unique barriers facing young people when seeking help and safety, particularly for college students navigating multiple service providers and intersecting jurisdictions.

Rethinking Health Care through a Reproductive Justice Lens Loretta Ross, Visiting Professor of Practice in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University, co-founder of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Health care is a human right and the basis of reproductive justice. This workshop will discuss the full range of human rights protections everyone deserves, and why demands for considering health care as a vital human rights issue can strengthen our movement to provide the best quality services for everyone.

What’s Going on in the Adolescent Brain? Jutta Dotterweich, Director of Training and Technical Assistance, ACT for Youth Center for Community Action, Cornell University. Adolescence is a developmental stage of life that is shaped by the environment and by rapid changes in the body and mind. Recent research in adolescent brain development has really altered how we view adolescence: In the past we saw turmoil; now we see opportunity. It’s a time of tremendous growth and potential. Jutta Dotterweich will explore how this new understanding of the adolescent brain impacts adult—in particular service provider—communication, social interaction, and service delivery with adolescents and young adults.

 

Workshop Block 2

New Findings from the Adolescent Sexual Health Research Study Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation and Research, ACT for Youth Center for Community Action, Cornell University. Where are New York State’s adolescents and young adults getting their sexual and reproductive health care? If they are not getting care, why not? How do they perceive their risk for STDs? At the request of the NYS Department of Health, ACT for Youth—working with CAPP, PREP, Enough is Enough, and Pathways to Success providers—asked adolescents, young adults, and health care professionals these questions and more. In this presentation, lead researcher Amanda Purington will present findings from this study, which included surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews.

Reframing Preconception Health and Reproductive Life Planning Dr. Rachel Flink-Bochacki, MD, MPH, a practicing Obstetrician & Gynecologist at Albany Medical Center. Her research focuses on contraceptive and reproductive decision-making. In this session, Dr. Flink-Bochacki will help us re-examine our understanding of preconception wellness and reframe preconception health as something to consider for all women of reproductive age, regardless of their stated intention for pregnancy. Participants will consider new research that questions the relevance of the concept of planning for pregnancy, explore ambivalence about pregnancy and the impact of reproductive coercion. Dr. Flink-Bochacki will introduce approaches to reproductive life planning that incorporate individual patients’ feelings and perceptions around pregnancy and contraception, enabling a more nuanced discussion and mitigating potential implicit biases. Finally, she will briefly discuss how program staff, through patient-centered counseling, utilization of extensive referral networks and provision of community supports, can play a critical role in advancing equitable health outcomes. Staff who work with adolescents and women across the life-course will find this session valuable.

Restorative Justice (Part 1) Nastia Gorodilova, Senior Coordinator of Systems & Training, New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault. The term “restorative justice” has become something of a buzzword as conversations about the need for options beyond the criminal legal system increase. This two-part workshop will unpack these nuanced concepts and explore what restorative practices are, as well as outlining the set of values and processes that can lead to restorative outcomes. Some focus will be devoted to the principles of restorative justice, and the continuum of restorative practices will be explained using concepts such as the social discipline window. This workshop aims to ensure that participants leave with a strong grasp of the philosophies and processes behind restorative practices, in order to explore further training and next steps if there is continued interest. Additionally, concrete examples where restorative approaches are currently being applied across the world and in the United States will be introduced.

Understanding and Addressing the Impact of Stalking on Young People Lorien Castelle, Director of Prevention, New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. This workshop will provide an overview of stalking and stalking behaviors, with a particular focus on the way stalking impacts teens and young adults. This overview includes defining stalking, identifying a pattern of behavior, and recognizing the prevalence and dynamics of this crime that, too often, goes unaddressed. The session will engage participants in an interactive dialogue about various stalking behaviors and how they are often used as tactics to further victimize a former dating partner. Studies show that stalking often escalates after a person has left the relationship and is a major predictor of lethality. Real- life examples of how communication software, social media, and location services can be used to stalk, harass, and terrorize victims will be discussed. This workshop will also explore various forms of harassment, threats, and harm that can be experienced by young people through their participation in dating sites, hook-up apps, and online gaming.

Web-based HIT Systems for Perinatal Risks Identification and Referral Vish Rao, Medicaid Redesign Team Health Information Technology Projects Manager, BWIAH, NYSDOH. The workshop will present preliminary results of a pilot project to use Health Information Technology (HIT) to coordinate care delivery for pregnant women among community-based programs and clinical providers. The workshop will explore a scalable online provider-to-provider risk identification, referral, and case management system piloted in three high-risk communities, and will examine the successes, challenges, and preliminary results of the project.

 

Workshop Block 3

How Do Unconscious Biases Influence Our Interactions with Clients? An Opportunity for Participant Self-Reflection Molly Findley, DO, MPH, MS, Attending Physician, Site Director of the Fellowship in Family Planning, and Medical Director of the Title X Family Planning Clinic, Jacobi Hospital. Research has documented that unintentional, unconscious biases are widespread and impact patient care, yet it can be difficult to consider this being the case in one’s own interactions with clients. In this session geared towards staff that work directly with clients, we will explore unconscious bias in a safe place. The goal of this session will be to empower staff to reflect on their own practices and identify strategies for mitigating unconscious biases that may exist. One strategy that will be discussed is using a shared decision-making approach to counseling, which can reduce bias by centering the discussion around client preferences and desires.

Opioid Overdose Prevention Training Catholic Charities Care Coordination Services. This training will prepare you to become part of the solution to solving the opioid issue in your community, to learn how to save a life during an overdose situation, and to receive education on crucial information related to opioids. The objectives are to increase understanding and awareness of fatal overdoses related to opioids and the impact within the community, identify risk factors for an overdose, recognize an overdose, identify the five essential steps for first responders in the event of an overdose, and correctly use naloxone to save lives.

Reducing Violence through Creating Protective Environments Elise Lopez, DrPH, MPH, Assistant Director of the Relationship Violence Program in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona. In order to reduce violence, we must make changes at the environmental level. Creating protective environments includes addressing risks through environmental interventions, such as targeting the physical environment. In this workshop, participants will learn specific strategies to evaluate the safety of the physical environments in their community; this can include a neighborhood, a school, or an organization. The workshop will also address how to use that information to enhance the safety of the environment through policy change, changes to the physical environment, and social norms change.

Restorative Justice (Part 2) Nastia Gorodilova, Senior Coordinator of Systems & Training, New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault. The term “restorative justice” has become something of a buzzword as conversations about the need for options beyond the criminal legal system increase. This two-part workshop will unpack these nuanced concepts and explore what restorative practices are, as well as outlining the set of values and processes that can lead to restorative outcomes. Some focus will be devoted to the principles of restorative justice, and the continuum of restorative practices will be explained using concepts such as the social discipline window. This workshop aims to ensure that participants leave with a strong grasp of the philosophies and processes behind restorative practices, in order to explore further training and next steps if there is continued interest. Additionally, concrete examples where restorative approaches are currently being applied across the world and in the United States will be introduced.

Strategies to Build Creative Awareness Projects: LGBTQ+ Art-Based Example Jeff Gurkin-Young, Geoff Peckman, and James Young, Co-founders of Queery. Prevention and awareness campaigns often struggle to reach LGBTQ+ and other underrepresented populations. Queery is an organization that uses creativity as a tool in their strategic plan to engage and provide awareness about LGBTQ+ issues. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to a primary prevention, art-based project created by the presenters called “Sticks and Stones: Reclaiming Names that Were Used to Hurt Us” a National Coming Out Day Project. The presenters will discuss how this project started, the various behind-the-scenes strategies used to make the project possible, as well as the linkages used and created from it. Participants will then break into small groups to create their own awareness project using some of the strategies discussed in the workshop, while the presenters assist them with brainstorming, connecting, and making the most of their project to maximize social impact.

“We're high-risk because we’re black” – Maternal Mortality & Racial Disparities: Lessons Learned from NYSDOH Community Listening Sessions Meaghan Carroll and Nevillene White, New York State Department of Health. This presentation will provide attendees with a summary of themes, findings, and first-hand accounts gathered through a series of Listening Sessions on Maternal Mortality convened in 7 high-risk communities across NYS over the summer of 2018.  The NYS Department of Health – Maternal and Infant Community Health Collaboratives partnered with community stakeholders to engage local black women in a free flowing conversation about their experiences being pregnant and giving birth, the barriers they faced and strategies to address disparities in outcomes.  Participants discussed their experience accessing health care, obtaining family planning services and accessing other needed supports and services. Feedback gathered through these sessions will inform all areas of BWIAH programming. Participants in this session will learn about listening session logistics, data collection and analysis and, most importantly, the major themes and insights gathered directly from community participants.

  

Workshop Block 4

Cycle of Addiction (Part 1) Dr. Paul Updike, Medical Director of the Chemical Dependency Program and the St. Vincent’s Health Clinic at Sisters Hospital in Buffalo. Through his work as Medical Director, Dr. Updike provides medical supervision for the Opioid Treatment Program, has developed and directed team standards for monitoring patient treatment plans, and instituted Suboxone treatment which dramatically increased capacity to treat opiate dependency. His presentation will review the opioid epidemic, the pathophysiology and consequences of Opioid Use Disorder, treatment options with a focus on the chronic disease concept, and Opioid Use Disorder in pregnancy. In the second session of this 2-part presentation, Dr. Updike will review cases to help understand how to approach patient/clients who present with challenging addiction management issues.

Engaging Fathers Keston Jones, Founder and Executive Director of the Foundation for the Advancement and Rehabilitation of the Marginalized. A stable and supportive dad equates to better outcomes for mother, child, and the family at large. As home visitors and family support service workers, it is important to recognize that fathers play a vital role in the positive outcomes of children and families, and when successfully engaged, can be supportive in ensuring that pregnant and breastfeeding moms receive the proper emotional support, nutrients, and assistance with caring for infant children. This presentation will discuss the ways in which individual home care workers, agencies, and systems can develop better father-friendly and supportive engagement practices. By the end of this presentation, the SMART objectives will be: one, for participants to understand the issues that may negatively impact a father’s ability to parent his child, and how they can better address them; two, why it is important to hire staff that are familiar with the population and community we serve; and three, what are the overall benefits that fathers provide to their families, and what agencies can do to advocate for more father inclusion as a whole.

How to Impact Policy at the Community Level Michelle Gerka, Vice President for Family and Community Education at Cicatelli Associates Inc. and Gricel Arredondo, Director at Cicatelli Associates Inc. Working towards community change requires an understanding of how to impact policy at the organizational and community level. However, working towards policy change requires a specific set of knowledge and skills. This workshop will define policy change at both the organizational and community level, outline steps towards creating, adapting, and implementing policy changes with community-based organizations, and review the skills necessary to impact change. We will also discuss the importance of two major components of achieving successful policy change outcomes: organizational capacity and organizational buy-in.

Sexuality in the Digital Age Janis Whitlock, Ph.D., MPH, Director of the Cornell Research Program on Self-Injurious Behaviors as well as the Youth Risk and Opportunity Lab at Cornell University. The digital age has ushered in many new and novel outlets for youth interested in accessing sexual information, adult entertainment, and social and sexual networking. However, the digital terrain is so quick to change that adolescents and young adults are largely left on their own to navigate the more sexualized elements of the digital world. This workshop will include activities designed to foster discussion about the nature and challenges of this new age as well as productive strategies and resources for meeting these challenges. 

Working in Rural Settings: A Conversation Jennifer Abrams, Program Manager, Victim Advocacy Services of Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson. Serving rural communities brings its own set of challenges, especially when we are dealing with sensitive aspects of our clients’ lives. This workshop seeks to break the isolation felt by rural service agencies while providing a space to share successes and challenges and brainstorm together how to move forward discussion about the nature and challenges of this new age as well as productive strategies and resources for meeting these challenges.

 

Workshop Block 5

Cycle of Addiction (Part 2) Dr. Paul Updike, Medical Director of the Chemical Dependency Program and the St. Vincent’s Health Clinic at Sisters Hospital in Buffalo. Through his work as Medical Director, Dr. Updike provides medical supervision for the Opioid Treatment Program, has developed and directed team standards for monitoring patient treatment plans, and instituted Suboxone treatment which dramatically increased capacity to treat opiate dependency. His presentation will review the opioid epidemic, the pathophysiology and consequences of Opioid Use Disorder, treatment options with a focus on the chronic disease concept, and Opioid Use Disorder in pregnancy. In the second session of this 2-part presentation, Dr. Updike will review cases to help understand how to approach patient/clients who present with challenging addiction management issues.

Engaging Parents and Caregivers: Expanding Efforts to Increase Impact Tiffany Brec, Campus Project Coordinator, Vera House in Syracuse, Chris Kosakowski, Educator and Social Worker, Vera House. Many of us wish to identify ways to more effectively involve the parents/caregivers of our program participants. In this workshop participants will join into an in-depth conversation about common barriers to engaging parent/caregivers, as well as possible solutions to overcoming those barriers. Through interactive dialogue, participants will explore strategies that are creative and new.

“It Takes the Village”: Integrating Preconception Wellness into Routine Services, Meeting Women Where They Are Cheryl Hunter-Grant, LMSW, Executive Director, Lower Hudson Valley Perinatal Network & Vice President of Perinatal Programs for Children's Health and Research Foundation, Inc. There are many opportunities to engage women of childbearing age in a Life Planning conversation which includes their Reproductive Life Plan. This workshop will present strategies that can be used in local Maternal Child Health and adolescent programs to integrate preconception wellness into their routine services. 

The ABCD Approach to Working with Rural Communities Jutta Dotterweich, Director of Training and Technical Assistance, ACT for Youth Center for Community Action, Cornell University. Too often in rural communities, we see the glass half empty. We see lack of resources and opportunities. Looking through the lens of the asset-based community development (ABCD) approach we will see the glass half full. In this workshop, participants will explore how they can engage community residents, associations, and organizations and create change by identifying and building on their assets such as their talents, skills, resources, and relationships.

The Many Ways I’m Me: Exploring the Intersections of Identity Michele Luc, Trainer, ACT for Youth Center for Community Action and Extension Support Specialist, Cornell University Cooperative Extension – NYC. As discourse on diversity has become more commonplace, there is a growing need to include intersectionality in these discussions. In this workshop, participants will explore the various layers of identity and discuss how the intersection of those identities contributes to power and marginalization at both the personal and societal levels.

 

 


    • 7:30 AM  -  9:00 AM
      Registration and Breakfast
      9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
      Welcome and Opening Keynote: Exploring Unintended Pregnancies through a Reproductive Justice Lens
      10:45 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Workshop Block 1
      12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
      Lunch and Afternoon Keynote: Intersection of Human Trafficking and Public Health
      2:00 PM  -  3:45 AM
      Workshop Block 2
      3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Workshop Block 3
      5:30 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Networking Event

       

      7:30 AM  -  8:00 AM
      Breakfast
      8:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
      Welcome
      8:45 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Workshop Block 4
      10:15 AM  -  11:30 AM
      Workshop Block 5
      11:45 AM  -  1:15 PM
      Lunch and Afternoon Keynote: Compassion Fatigue and Resilience
      1:30 PM  -  2:45 PM
      BWIAH Provider Meetings
      3:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
      Closing and Evaluation
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