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  • Optional  Optional
  • Wednesday, October 16, 2019
  •  

    (Thursday, October 17, 2019)
    Early Conference Attendee Check-In 3PM - 7PM
  • Thursday, October 17, 2019
  •  
    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Bfast Buffet, Welcome & Announcements
    Ballroom
    Conference Attendee Check-In 7AM - 5PM
    Exhibitor Hall Open 8AM - 5PM
    Center Hall A
    8:45 AM  -  9:45 AM
    General Session “Beyond Classification” with LeDerick Horne
    Ballroom

    Diagnosed with a learning disability in the third grade, LeDerick Horne defies any and all labels. He’s a dynamic spoken-word poet. A tireless advocate for all people with disabilities. An inspiring motivational speaker. A bridge-builder between learners and leaders across the U.S. and around the world. An African-American husband and father who serves as a role model for all races, genders, and generations.

    LeDerick Horne will provide strategies for increasing the academic performance, self-determination, and self-advocacy skills of students with disabilities. As an entrepreneur and performance poet with a learning disability who has worked as an advocate on the national, state and local level, LeDerick Horne provides a unique prospective on education reform and issues related to creating a more equitable society. This emotionally stirring talk offers moving verses empowering information that will prepare the audience to challenge stereotypes, rethink pedagogy and improve the lives of people with disabilities

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize strategies for increasing the academic performance, self-determination, and self-advocacy skills of students with disabilities.

    2. Express the youth perspective on living with a learning disability.

    3. Identify disparities in the educational system.

    Speakers:
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A01: Functional Transition Assessments 101  (Education Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    This session will focus on the various ways to assess students in the domains of: independent living, employment, community participation, recreation/leisure, and self-determination. This presentation will differentiate between surveys, questionnaires, checklists, and formal assessments that measure functional ability versus those that measure interest. It will also inform participants of the background and validity of the assessments and provide resources that can be implemented with students and in programs.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will increase their understanding of how to assess their students/young adults in the domains of: independent living, community, employment, and self-determination.

    2. Participants will learn how to identify the appropriate functional assessments to use for their individual students.

    3. Participants will gain insight on how to use assessments to guide their post-secondary outcomes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A02: Transition to College: A Program for Success  (Education Track)
    Room: Marquette

    Students in a post-secondary program will discuss the barriers and successes they experienced during their transition to college. A panel discussion with students with a variety of disabilities, including intellectual disabilities, will share their experiences.

    Objectives:

    1. Audience will learn about programs Lewis and Clark offers to students with various disabilities.

    2. Audience will hear transition experience from parents and students (past and present).

    3. Audience will learn about practices that lead to students’ success.

    4. Audience will be able to ask questions and engage in discussion with the panel of students/parents.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A03: Creating Social, Professional & Community Partnerships Across Neighboring Transition Programs  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    Stevenson District 125, Barrington District 220, and Lake Zurich District 95 have created a partnership that has utilized multiple service providers, community resources, and experience to provide students with an integrated socialization education. Presenters will provide information on the planning, costs, and implementation of creating various community-based socialization opportunities.

    Objectives:

    1. An attendee will leave this session with ideas of how to create a partnership with another district for the purpose of enhancing student socialization opportunities.

    2. An attendee will leave this session with a variety of real-life socialization ideas and steps for how to plan, fund, and implement (for districts with various socioeconomically status).

    3. An attendee will leave this session with an understanding of how to assess students’ socialization and apply the data collected to their respective (socialization) IEP goals.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A04: Catch ‘em While They're Young!  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    Participants will understand the importance of Centers for Independent Living in developing youth with disabilities. They will study collaborative logistics (youth program); seeing an innovative approach to taking youth from reliance on their families and schools to the boundless possibilities of independent living, employment readiness and self-advocacy skills.

    Objective:

    1. Through this interactive presentation, participants will learn the who, what, when, where and how of developing consumer control among youth with disabilities as they prepare to transition to adulthood.

     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A05: Counseling Teens on Sexual Health and Risky Behaviors  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    It can be difficult for physicians and pediatric providers to speak to their patients about their sexuality, or their sexual health, including their behaviors and decisions. Routinely addressing sexual health issues can help destigmatize the subject of sex and sexual behavior and increase patients’ comfort level in seeking care. Providers need to be comfortable broaching these topics with their adolescent patients in order for youth to disclose sensitive information. The Counseling Teens on Sexual Health and Risky Behaviors training is one of a five-part series developed by the Illinois Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics (ICAAP) for our Adolescent Health Provider Education initiative through the Illinois Department of Public Health, Illinois Adolescent Health Program.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify effective sexual health education tools and resources for patients and their families.

    2. Interpret patient situations in which further sexuality counseling is necessary.

    3. Demonstrate educational materials to aid in planning safe, professional, and compassionate treatment options to patients with regard to sex and sexuality-based behaviors.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A07: An Overview of DRS Home Services Program  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    The Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) Home Services Program provides services to individuals with severe disabilities, so they can remain in their homes and be as independent as possible. This presentation will provide an overview of the eligibility requirements and types of services provided to those individuals enrolled in the program.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn the eligibility requirements for an individual to receive services through the Home Services Program.

    2. Attendees will learn how to submit a referral to the Home Services Program.

    3. Attendees will learn about the different services provided by the Home Services Program.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A08: Checking The Boxes: Ensuring a Smooth Transition to Employment  (Employment Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    The Chicago Lighthouse offers a robust list of programs that adequately prepare individuals for living successful and independent lives. The Youth Transitions program collaborates throughout the year with the Employment Services team to maintain the skills developed during high school years to prepare post transition students for entering the workforce.

    Objectives:

    1. Increase the knowledge and skills of leaders who guide youth.

    2. Deepen the knowledge of programming for youth who are blind/visually impaired.

    3 Identify ways to increase confidence and independence in youth.

    4. Demonstrate how obtaining a job increases self-esteem.

    5. How to develop comprehensive job readiness program.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A09: Job Task Preference Assessment for Students with ASD and ID  (Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    The presentation will describe a research study in which paired-stimulus job task preference assessments were conducted using objects, pictures, and videos to present job task choices to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). The assessment procedure will be demonstrated, and attendees will have the opportunity to practice conducting the assessment.

    Objectives:

    1. Understand the research base supporting the use of paired-stimulus assessments to determine job task preferences of students with ASD and ID.

    2. Be able to use the assessment method to assess the job task preferences of students with ASD and ID.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A10: Implementing the Transition Process into General Pediatrics Primary Care  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    In this session we will describe the experience of our feasibility study. The aim of the Quality Improvement project was to educate and increase use of the tools and processes highlighted in the six core elements of transition for patients 18 years or older by providers for all adolescent patients in pediatric primary care practice settings.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the Six Core Elements of Healthcare.

    2. Identify coding/billing and supportive documentation needed for transition encounters.

    3. Explain to increase understanding and familiarity of EHR tools which were created for pediatric providers transitioning patients from their practice.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B01: Getting to Know Students Descriptively, rather than Evaluatively  (Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    The Discovery process is the foundation for customized, supported employment for students with significant impact of disability. The key to successful Discovery involves active, targeted observations of students and writing observations descriptively. This activity-based session will demonstrate the skill and value of writing descriptively.

    Objectives:

    1. Review an evaluative summary and a descriptive writing example of a student participating in an activity.

    2. Analyze the two approaches in determining which provides more meaningful information for employment opportunities.

    3. Audience members will acquire strategies of writing descriptively.

    4. Observe a video of a person participating in an activity. practice writing descriptively. and assist in critiquing others’ writing.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B02: Autistic Utopia: An Introduction to Autistic Culture and the Autistic Mind  (Community Track)
    Room: Marquette

    In this session participants will be immersed into Autistic Culture by being introduced to the principles of autistic rights, the code of autistic self-advocates, and the pride of autistic empowerment. Participants will also be given a full perspective of autism and the experiences of living on the spectrum from the view of an autistic self- advocate. Simulations and videos will be shown with this presentation demonstrating sensory overload and the workings of the autistic mind.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees in this session will learn about autistic culture and how it pertains to autistic pride, autistic respect, and autistic rights.

    2. Attendees will also experience guided simulations of autistic sensory overload and mapped out autistic thinking patterns that can better equip neurotypical minds to empathize with autistic minds.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B03: Fast Track Transition Services  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) will provide an overview of Fast Track Transition Services, guidelines and expectations in the provision of services. Discussions on services, providers, and leading examples.

    Objective:

    1. Participants will gain further information on Fast Track Transition Services, changes to the contracts, and expansion models.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B04: Incorporating Elements of Transiton in a Busy Outpatient Practice  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    Educate health care professionals (pediatricians, internists, family practitioners, and nurse practitioners) on the basics of transition and how to incorporate transition in their daily busy outpatient practice.

    Objectives:

    1. Recall the six core elements.

    2. Differentiate between the adult vs pediatric medicine and how it impacts transition.

    3. Illustrate how to incorporate strategies to address core elements used during a brief visit.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B05: Developing a Peer Patient Advocate Program  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    To address the many concerns in healthcare for transition patients with Sickle Cell Disease, we have initiated the peer patient advocate (PPA) program. The mission of the PPA is to bridge the divide between the population with sickle cell and the medical community by allowing an individual with -Sickle Cell Disease to assist the patient and the medical staff with managing the patient's care, post-secondary education, and workforce development.

    Objectives:

    1. Express how to teach patients about advocacy.

    2. Use tools that strengthen patients' disease knowledge.

    3. Recognize how to equip patients with life skills through a peer patient advocacy program.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B06: Self-Advocacy and Disclosure  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    LeDerick Horne will share his personal educational story and explain how the assistance from different people helped him be successful. He will provide great insight into disclosing disabilities, specifically in the workplace. Participants will discuss how sharing your strengths, weaknesses, and the accommodations you need and using resources and allies, can set you on a path for success.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify people who can help individuals successfully transition to adulthood.

    2. Explain pros and cons of disclosing disability in the work place.

    3. Recognize ways to share strengths, weaknesses and needed accommodations.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B07: The Joys and Challenges of Medical Transition  (Health Track)
    Room: Illini

    This session will discuss the joys and challenges which can arise as an individual and family transition from the pediatric to the adult world. The session will focus on the skills needed to transition those with great medical and behavioral issues and emphasize the needs for continuity of care. The session will include strategies I have learned to enhance the transition process as my child has gone from the pediatric setting to the adult setting.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify and discuss strategies to improve patient/family relations with health care providers.

    2. Identify potential tools to be used to promote success transition.

    3. Recognize the need for potential strategies to enhance and maintain continuity of care in the transition process.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B08: Using a Community Skills Rubric for Student Assessment & Planning  (Community Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    We will share how we designed a community participation skills rubric and used it to assess students with autism and intellectual disability. We will discuss how teachers used the rubric to identify individual student objectives and plan community experiences. We will provide a sample rubric and documents used for planning.

    Objectives:

    1. Assess students’ community-based money, leisure, vocational, social, safety, and behavior regulation skills as well as the frequency and duration of their community participation using a community participation skills rubric.

    2. Identify students’ strengths, needs, and learning priorities using a community participation skills rubric and related planning documents.

    3. Use data from a community participation skills rubric to plan successful community experiences.

     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B09: Certified Recovery Support Specialist: It's a Brand New Day in Illinois!  (Mental Health/Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    This session will introduce participants to the Certified Recovery Support Specialist (CRSS) credential. It’s a great workshop for individuals who love peer support and want to explore CRSS as a career option. It’s also beneficial for employers who want to learn how CRSS professionals improve healthcare outcomes by practicing recovery support principles for persons in recovery from mental illness/substance disorders.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize the primary role of the CRSS professional.
    2. Identify CRSS domains and tasks within each domain.
    3. Practice a peer support exercise to increase understanding and competency of the recovery support profession.
    4. Gain insight about the CRSS Code of Ethics.
    5. Define how employing CRSS professionals improves healthcare outcomes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    B10: Guardianship & the Alternatives  (Community Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    No two individuals with special needs are the same. This session will cover forms of guardianship as well as the many options to guardianship such as "Supported Decision Making", Powers of Attorney, as well as Limited and Plenary Guardianship, the new E-File Guardian Report requirement, the new Guardian Training Law, the use of Short-Term Guardian Declarations, the Illinois Health Care Surrogate Act, and many related topics.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify when guardianship is appropriate and when alternatives to guardianship are more appropriate.

    2. Explain what is Supported Decision Making.

    3. Distinguish the difference between Limited Guardianship and Plenary Guardianship.

    4. Recognize how to comply with the new E-File Annual Report requirement.

    5. Express what the new required Guardian training is all about.

    6. Explain what is and how do I/we use the Short-Term Guardian Declaration.

    7. Define how best to select future guardians.

    8. Identify the procedure to "get" guardianship.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Lunch Provided
    Ballroom
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C01: Social Security Work Incentives  (Employment Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    An overview of both Social Security Work Incentives Programs, the referral process for Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) services, options available to maintain healthcare coverage while being employed, reporting earnings from employment to Social Security, and an introduction to the Ticket to Work.

    Objective: 
    1. Become familiar with employments affect upon Social Security Disability Benefits, and other state and federal public benefits.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C02: Southern Illinois Transition Project: Transforming Outcomes for Youth with I/DD  (Community Track)
    Room: Marquette

    This session will detail the Illinois Council on Developmental Disabilities (ICDD) journey to invest in Southern Illinois youth ages 14 - 30 who have I/DD. We will describe the evidenced-based practices that underpinned the decision-making process and that continue to guide the work of the project sites. Resources will be shared and representatives from the investment/project sites will share their experiences to date.

    Objectives:

    1. Cite the process ICDD used to develop an investment that truly illustrate the strengths, needs, and barriers specific to Southern Illinois. 

    2. Articulate the evidenced based transition practice that underpinned the decision-making process, the investment, and the final chosen investment sites. 

    3. Describe each of the investment sites and the performance measures that drive their work.

    4. Specify the transition-related evidenced based practices and resources used throughout the development and implementation of this investment.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C03: Preparing Youth with ASD to Transition into Higher Education  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    The number of students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) continues to rise. Many students with ASD are now graduating from high school and entering the college setting. Come explore resources and materials, discuss strategies and engage in dialogue around supporting students with ASD as they transition to post-secondary education.

    Objectives:

    1. Understand the struggles that an individual with autism spectrum disorder might be challenged with in a college setting.

    2. Provide resources that are relevant and accessible for use by students transitioning to post-secondary.

    3. Identify strategies that can be used to help students on the autism spectrum succeed in college.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C04: Provider and Youth Views on Ideal Transition Planning  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    Most youth with special needs are now surviving into adulthood, where they must navigate a different system of healthcare and adult life. The American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations have established a formal definition of healthcare transition, along with general guidelines for provider best practices. We will review these guidelines and discuss the results of a survey of youth regarding their transition experiences and preferences for transition planning.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain key components of transition planning.

    2. Identify a variety of resources and tools that can help families and providers plan their transition.

    3. Recognize how young adults prefer to have their transition planning needs met.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C05: AAP Bright Futures Guidelines: Implementation for Youth (11-22 Years)  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    The 4th Edition of Bright Futures provides critical information for a variety of audiences who play significant roles in keeping children safe and healthy. This training is intended for providers who care for adolescents’ ages 11-22. They will receive information and resources on how to best implement these evidence-based guidelines into their practices to improve their patients’ health outcomes. The presenters will also discuss the importance of conducting health supervision visits with youth with special health care needs.

    Objectives:

    1. State key clinical content from Bright Futures Guidelines for the Adolescent Years (11-21).

    2. Identify leading evidence-based approaches for providers to address the social determinants of health with adolescent patients’ and their families.

    3. Use practical information, tools, and resources during well-child visits.

    4. Recognize ways to tailor care provided to youth and young adults with special health care needs and intellectual disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C06: I'm Not Your Inspiration, Thank you Very Much!  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    This session will focus on the message the late Stella Young, a comedian and disability rights advocate, conveyed in her famous Ted Talk, "I'm Not Your Inspiration." Her Ted Talk video will be shown. We'll discuss what this means and how to address society's low expectations of people with disabilities starting with today's young people.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will identify the differences between a genuine compliment to a person with a disability versus a compliment based on assumed low expectations of people with disabilities.

    2. Participants will learn how to address situations that imply low expectations for people with disabilities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C07: Comprehensive Council Overview: National Trends, Introduction to Investments, and Goals for IL  (Community Track)
    Room: Illini

    This presentation will review national trends in aging, workforce, and utilization of long term supports and services. In addition, presenter will provide an overview of the Council’s 5-Year State Plan and the mission to invest in community inclusion, integration, and systems change. The presentation will inform participants on the current ICDD investments and important initiatives statewide.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will learn about national trends and data for services pertaining to people with I/DD.

    2. Participants will learn about the Council’s 5-Year State Plan and the mission to invest in community, inclusion, integration, and systems change.

    3. Participants will learn about the current Council funded investments that exist across the state.

     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C08: Special Needs Legal & Future Planning  (Community Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    This session will cover the many legal tools families can use to maintain assets and preserve funds for individuals who receive SSI and/or Medicaid, such as third-party special needs trusts, first party or OBRA special needs trusts, Pooled special needs trusts, ABLE Accounts, including “how much is needed to leave, how divorce impacts benefits, among other related topics”.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss what are and why special needs trusts may be needed.

    2. Describe ABLE Account, when it is appropriate, differentiate between IL Able Account and other alternative state accounts.

    3. How does court order child support impact SSI and Medicaid and what to do to avoid losing benefits when there is a divorce.

    4. How to educate and inform the extended family on appropriate ways to leave gifts and inheritances.

    5. Common attorney drafting mistakes made in special needs trusts that will be an issue for Social Security and the State (HFS).

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C09: How Not To Burn Your Bridges in Your Journey to Achieve the Best Transition Plan  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    This session will look at good communication and discuss how that brings about a transition plan that both sides are happy with. A plan that will best benefit the student in the journey toward adulthood and life after high school.

    Objectives:

    1. Learn what good communication is both verbal and non-verbal and how to look for signs that communication on all levels may be breaking down.

    2. Discuss what mistakes to avoid at meetings to keep communication going to be able to write the best transition plan.

    3. Learn how obstacles can be overcome without this becoming a legal battle.

    4. Discuss communication mistakes that often derail a meeting and how this impedes progress and how to avoid this.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:45 PM
    C10: Transition Program Models and Toolkits  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    Med-Peds PATHways is transition care consultative service that aims to improve health for adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. The Adult Developmental Disabilities Clinic is a medical home providing comprehensive primary care and preventive services to adults with developmental disabilities. We will describe these programs and case examples. A toolkit will be provided for participants to use in their own settings to aid in caring for adolescents and adults with special health care needs.

    Objectives:

    1) Identify where to find information to help patients and families prevent gaps in health insurance.

    2) Identify where to find information to help families obtain adult guardianship.

    3) Recognize standards of care for preventive health services for adults with developmental disabilities.

     Optional 
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    D01: Providing & Assessing Health Care Transition in Youth with ASD & Developmental Disabilities  (Health Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    This session will examine the core principles and guidelines for providing health care transition services with information on individual provider, clinic, and system level changes. Dr. Cheak-Zamora will discuss implementation of health care transition strategies, tools, and measures to facilitate communication with families about the transition process and youth/young adult independence.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the importance of the health care transition service delivery and implementation. 

    2.  Use guidelines and tools to implement health care transition services.

    3. Identify and apply tools in which to measure health care transition readiness.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    D02: Overview of the Discovery Process for Transitioning Youth to Employment  (Employment Track)
    Ballroom

    This presentation will focus on using the Discovery process for students with significant impact of disability to transition to customized employment. Discovery uses a qualitative, descriptive, approach in identifying a person’s contributions, conditions for success and interests. This description is then used to develop a customized plan for employment.

    Objectives:

    1. Audience members will envision employment as a possibility for students with significant impact of disability.

    2. Audience members will be empowered to use translation strategies in making the transition process more meaningful.

    3. Audience members will acquire knowledge on strategies to gather descriptive data on a student’s conditions for success, interests and contributions.

    4. Audience members will gain knowledge on developing work experiences that are a match for the student’s contributions, interests and conditions for success.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
  • Friday, October 18, 2019
  •  
    Conference Attendee Check-In 7AM - 10AM
    7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Breakfast Provided and Morning Announcements
    Ballroom
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E01: SSI, SSDI, HFS: Understanding the Alphabet Soup of Government Benefits  (Community Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    This informative interactive workshop will focus on the who, what and when of SSDI, SSI, Medicaid and Medicare. Needing benefits is more vital than ever because more programs are being funded under the waiver system. Critical information will be discussed to help sustain benefits.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will understand the difference between SSDI and SSI.

    2. Attendees will understand the difference between Medicare and Medicaid.

    3. Attendees will understand how benefits change over a lifetime.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E02: Observations & Assessments of Students in Work and Community Settings  (Employment Track)
    Room: Marquette

    When students are placed in work and volunteer community settings, how do you assess their skills and behaviors and how should that information be used to predict outcomes? This session will review setting up individual work/volunteer placements and how to write evaluations unique for each student for predicting outcomes.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will become familiar with writing individual work/volunteer work evaluations.

    2. Attendees will increase knowledge using observation data for predicting outcomes.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E03: Self-Determination in the Transition to Adulthood  (Community Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    Self Determination and three related components self-awareness, self-advocacy and decision making for Youth with Special Health Care Needs (YSHCN)/disabilities are critical in navigating the transition process. Aged youth are more successful when they have knowledge and a “team” helping them navigate the transition years (and further). We will engage in an interactive exercise to apply the components of self-determination and share resources and supports.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the relationship between person-centered planning and self-determination.

    2. Define terms of self-determination, self-awareness, self-advocacy and decision making.

    3. Recognize the importance of self-determination for youth with special health care needs/disabilities.

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E04: A Collaborative Model for a Licensed Therapeutic Recreation Post Transition Program.  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    There is a growing need to provide community based therapeutic day services for individuals with disabilities transitioning out of High School. For many graduates with disabilities the services they receive in High School abruptly end on their 22nd birthday. This is an end to a familiar routine. Living successfully in their home communities as independent as possible has long been considered critical to young adults with disabilities and their quality of life. The ability to engage in activities in the community can provide opportunities for young adults to meet people with like interests, develop new skills, and experience the satisfaction of shared accomplishments while making meaningful contributions to their community. This helps to create a positive balanced adult life. In this session participants will learn the core components of establishing a therapeutic adult day program model.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to identify clients post transition needs.

    2. Participants will be able to identify the core program components used to develop an adult day program.

    3. Participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of therapeutic recreation in the development and implementation of a therapeutic adult day program. 4. Participants will learn the importance of creating an individualized choice-based program.

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E05: Transition In A Digital Age  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    This session will provide practical ways for educators and families to incorporate mainstream technology and resources to promote digital literacy among their students/young adults through the use of Google, smart phones, tablets, apps, dictation, YouTube, and other internet resources. The presentation will go through concrete examples of how to implement these natural supports to further increase employable skills and overall independent living.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will learn practical ways of how to utilize technology to foster independence, develop employable skills, and increase digital literacy.

    2. Participants will understand how to utilize and implement each tool and resource.

    3. Participants will learn a variety of real-life, applicable examples and increase their knowledge of available technology and resources.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E06: Doggone It: Creative Treatment Through Animal-Assisted Interventions  (Community Track)
    Room: Illini

    Are you looking for something that will be fun for you and your students or clients? Animal-assisted interventions can provide an opportunity for increased self-control, improved self-regulation, moments of mindfulness, improved social skills plus many more benefits.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will leave the session having a greater understanding of how Animal-Assisted Interventions can be incorporated into learning tasks and therapeutic outcomes.

    2. Attendees will understand the importance of animal welfare in this type of intervention.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E07: The Expectation is Recovery: Illinois Public Health Services and Initiatives  (Mental Health Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    This session will provide information and resources available from the IL Department of Human Services that support young adult mental health and wellness.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will be introduced to services and supports for transition aged youth available through the Illinois Department of Human Services.

    2. Participants will understand how to access these services.

    3. Gain an understanding of the wellness and recovery approach to mental health services

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E08: How to be Successful at College with a Disability  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    There are many unknowns when going to college. Go with a disability, there are a lot more unknowns. This session will give the necessary tools to have an awesome first semester.

    Objectives:

    1. Be aware of Department of Disability Services.

    2. Learn how to find good personal care assistants.

    3. Learn how to advocate for yourself in the classroom.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E09: Transition Planning in Your Community  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    Local Transition Planning Committees (TPC) build community through Social Capital. Panelist will discuss what several local TPCs do to identify unmet needs, how ongoing exchange of information is facilitated and how transition age youth, families, school personnel and community providers can benefit from involvement with their local TPC. Discuss ongoing interagency collaboration assisting students in reaching their individualized transition goals and come away with ideas to improve transition outcomes for youth in your own community.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize transition service gaps in communities across Illinois.

    2. Discuss TPCs efforts to address transition service gaps.

    3. Review what TPCs are doing in your community to improve transition outcomes.

     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    E10: Teaching Transition to Trainees  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    The modern adult learner's expectation for learning challenges us to be creative with how we deliver "mandatory" curriculum. This session will demonstrate how to collaboratively provide "transition training content" in a medium that responds to learner expectations through real-time feedback. Through this collaboration, comes active engagement and not passive completion.

    Objectives:

    1. Learn how to complete a needs assessment for necessary educational content.

    2. Understand how to utilize asset mapping to develop unique curriculum delivery methods.

    3. Become comfortable with using real-time feedback through PDSA cycles to modify on-going curriculum development.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F01: You Had Me at SGA  (Community Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    Having a basic knowledge of government benefits, this session will delve deeper to discuss: DAC, 1619, CDR, 18-year olds, QMB types, TPL, Spenddown, IRWE, PASS, and Ticket to Work. Case scenarios will be reviewed.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will understand benefits changes over a lifetime and the problem with IL Medicaid and 18-year olds.

    2. Attendees will understand more about income and IL Medicaid.

    3. Attendees will understand how commercial insurance works with IL Medicaid.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F02: Division of Rehabilitation Services, STEP Program Graduate Follow-up Study  (Employment Track)
    Room: Marquette

    This presentation will focus on outcomes experienced by 5,000 students leaving high school after participation in the DRS STEP program in 2016. Data will be presented on pre-employment transition services received by students and the educational and employment outcomes they have achieved since leaving school.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn about how pre-employment transition services are provided through STEP.

    2. Attendees will learn about the variety of outcomes experienced by students participating in the DRS STEP program.

    3. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss how implementation of pre-employment transition services through STEP contributes to the success of students upon leaving high school.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F03: Classroom Business Approach to Teaching Special Education Outside the Box  (Employment Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    This session will provide insight on starting a vocational based classroom business. PCHS Coffee Express is a transition business established by students in a self-contained classroom with varying disabilities and functioning levels. You will walk away with the tools needed to establish, grow, and maintain a student-led classroom business.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn how to build a vocational-based classroom business.

    2. Attendees will establish specific learning standards attached to skills taught through student-led classroom business.

    3. Attendees will increase their overall knowledge in programming for a variety of needs/levels in a self-contained special education classroom (functional academics, vocational skills, communication skills, daily living skills, etc…)

    4. Attendees will gain techniques to increase collaboration skills among students, students/staff, staff/staff.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F04: Partner, Help, Connect: Supporting Youth with Special Health Care Needs and Their Families  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    The University of Illinois at Chicago’s Division of Specialized Care for Children (DSCC) is a statewide program that serves children and youth with special healthcare needs and their families. DSCC staff helps families find the specialty care and resources they need for their youth to reach their full potential. We draw on the relationships and expertise our staff has built since 1937 to address a youth’s medical, social, behavioral, educational and financial needs. We do this through a process called care coordination, which aims to meet the needs of the youth and family as a whole. This support helps families feel more confident and organized in their youth’s care and become well-prepared for the transition to adulthood. Our care coordination is free for all children and youth who have eligible medical conditions, regardless of their family’s income level. This presentation will discuss DSCC’s eligibility requirements and examples of how our care coordination can benefit families.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the importance of care coordination in partnering with youth, families, health professionals, educators, vocational specialists and others to help connect to services and resources.

    2. Identify best practices in promoting effective, person-centered transition planning.

    3. Recognize essential areas, including, self-determination and skill development, that are relevant to support independence from youth to adulthood.

     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F05: Transition to Employment for Youth with ASD  (Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    Research indicates that most graduates with autism will have “a difficult time following high school for almost any outcome you choose – working, continuing school, living independently, socializing and participating in the community. Come learn how stakeholders can collaborate to increase employment opportunities and success for youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Objectives:

    1. Increase the awareness of tools and resources for youth with ASD entering the workforce.

    2. Identify best (effective) practices in transition programming for youth with ASD to obtain employment.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F07: Secondary Transition Planning: Compliance + Evidence-Based Practices = Improved Outcomes  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    This session will focus on a transition planning process to develop quality postsecondary transition plans that meet federal and state requirements and incorporate best practice. The presentation includes opportunities to collaborate on quality compliant transition plan components, annual IEP goals, and services to support improved outcomes for students with disabilities.

    Objectives:

    1. Learn a transition planning process to help students attain their postsecondary goals and become as independent as possible.

    2. Increase knowledge and understanding of the elements of secondary transition planning process.

    3. Practice writing compliant quality transition plan components including SMART annual IEP goals.

    4. Collaborate with session participants in the development of transition plan components.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F08: Financial Aspects of Transition Planning Beyond Age 22  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    Topics covered include: Life Care Strategies for Special Needs from a financial concern, Need for a Special Needs trust, How Able Accounts work, SSI and SSDI requirements, Need for Guardianship, Usefulness of a Letter of Intent.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn how to start the process for creating a Special Needs Strategy.

    2. Understand the need for Guardianship or not. 

    3. Understand what a Special Needs trust may be used for.

    4. How to begin an Able account.

    5. How to protect government benefits.

     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F09: Adding Joy to Life - The Critical Importance of Lifelong Friendships  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    This presentation discusses the success of a small, independent community agency in building a sense of community, independence and self-advocacy in adults with developmental disabilities. We use the arts, summer camping and parties to reach individuals and help them expand their friendships and improve their lives.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will understand the relationship between opportunities for developing and maintaining friendships and increased independence, self-advocacy and life satisfaction for adults with developmental disabilities.

     Optional 
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    F10: Why Sex Education is an Important but Overlooked Part of the Transition Plan  (Health Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    This session will look at the importance of sex education in the transition plan and how it intersects with the health and safety of the student. This will also include looking at relationships and preparing students for the pitfalls that might come with these. Discuss why this is necessary and how to provide it in a way that students of varying abilities can understand. An important component will be signs parents and staff should be aware of if abuse is going on.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify what sex education is and how to find and modify the best curriculum for a variety of learners.

    2. Recognize the high rate of sexual abuse perpetrated on people with disabilities and the signs to be aware of that this could be happening.

    3. Attendees will learn that sex education is important for all people from students who are more challenged to those who are college bound.

    4. Attendees will learn the whys and whats of these students and how to prepare them not only for the education they might need at their level but also how to deal with relationships.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G01: Learning More About Medicare and Medicaid  (Health Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    There has never been a more confusing time for anyone trying to understand American healthcare. Medicare, Medicaid, employer insurance, Marketplaces….it can all be very overwhelming. Employment, housing, ongoing education, friends, community supports…so often healthcare planning gets lost in transition planning. Come learn more about the patchwork of healthcare solutions and how transitioning students can prepare for the future.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify who is eligible for Medicare and what Medicare covers.

    2. Identify what groups of people are eligible for Medicaid.

    3. Explain how Medicaid and Medicare work together.

    4. Explain how Medicaid and other insurance work together.

    5. Explain how to apply for Medicaid.  

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G02: Transition Success Stories  (Community Track)
    Room: Marquette
    Students who are in transition now and who have successfully exited will share their stories, both successes and challenges. This includes stories of innovative transition planning, work skill development, job creation ideas, entrepreneurship and customized employment. 

    Objectives:
    1. Express students' successful transition work experiences.
    2. Define how young adults were supported in innovative ways to reach their goals.
    3. Recognize how important the dream of the student is in making this happen.
     
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G03: Break it Down! The Impact of Language on Job Training  (Employment Track)
    Room: Mississippian

    The language used to teach someone a new skill or task can have a great impact on an individual's ability to perform. Learning how to break down tasks, use positive language, and encourage self-advocacy in the work environment can be the keys to success!

    Objectives:

    1. Identify cues that signal a language barrier.

    2. Apply common strategies used to gather and distribute information.

    3. Demonstrate the ability to analyze a task.

    4. Recognize the importance of collaborating with various disciplines.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G04: Working Together to Navigate the Adult Services System  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 5

    Participants will learn about the home and community-based adult services system, how they can access services to ensure that people with disabilities can live, work and learn in the community. We will also discuss resources and strategies they can use to navigate the system to get what they need.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will learn to plan for the services and supports they might want to access as adults (waiver services, housing, employment, day programs).

    2. Participants will learn to identify and utilize information and resources including from The Arc programs (information and resources, family support, networks, training).

    3. Participants will learn to advocate to get the services they need.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G05: CrowdSourcing the Community: Brainstorming Possibilities for a Better Life  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 2

    Do you rely on special programs for yourself, family members, or clients? Existing classes, organizations and events can be open to all if we make the connections. Develop ways to support real participation in community opportunities.

    Objectives:

    1. Develop a greater understanding of possibilities through community connection.

    2. Construct a relationship circle as a first step to building connections.

    3. Participate in discussion and sharing examples of community inclusion.

     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G06: What I Wished Someone Would Have Told me 17 Years Ago  (Education Track)
    Room: Illini

    Parenting is not easy. Parenting kids with disabilities comes with its own set of challenges, one I was not expecting or prepared. Then, came years of IEP meetings, which neither my husband or I knew what to do. This is what I wish I was told years ago. You are important. You are written in the law, IDEA, for a reason.

    Objectives:

    1. Learning your role as the parent in the IEP process.

    2. IDEA gave parents roles and responsibilities

    3. Explain Prior Written Notice is not just time, date and location.

    4. Discuss Parts of an IEP- that often get sped right by but are important.

    5. Identify Organizational tools and having support at the IEP including a binder and Aps to help you keep files. 

    6. Explore Respite ideas to lower physical, emotional and mental stress related to IEPs.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G07: Fast Track Transition provided by Centers for Independent Living  (Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 3

    Fast Track Transition is a new program provided free of charge by Centers for Independent Living (CILs). This program focuses on youth ages 14-21 that are still enrolled in an educational program that are not yet in the Secondary Transitional Experience Program (STEP). CILs are able to provide services in the area job exploration, workplace readiness, work-based learning experiences, post-secondary education counseling and self-advocacy on a one-on-one basis, or in the classroom.

    Objectives:

    1. Participants will become aware of a free resource available to them.

    2. Learn the details of Fast Track and how the Intake Process works.

    3. Explore the Fast Track Program and learn about the experiences provided in the program.

     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G08: Community Involvement: How to be Engaged  (Community Track)
    Room: Salon 6

    The session will talk about community programs and how to be involved in them initially. This will include programs and how to get connected. Then it will transition to how to impact policy and I'll go over my research. Finally, touch on special education.

    Objectives:

    1. Learning to take advantage of community resources.

    2. Making connections to learn from in the community.

    3. Learning about voting rights for your dependent.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G09: Self-Advocacy Matters  (Education Track)
    Room: Salon 1

    Learn what self-advocacy is, why it matters, and how to make little changes that lead to big results in the lives of people with disabilities at your agency/organization/school including the power of power, shifting the power, opportunities for people power and creating a culture of advocacy.

    Objective:

    1. Participants will be able to define self-advocacy.

    2. Participant will be able to list three ways to create a culture of advocacy.

    3. Participants will be able to list three ways to increase self-advocate power.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    G10: Teaching Vocational and Life Skills through Gardening  (Employment Track)
    Room: Salon 4

    Students in the Bridges Program learn essential vocational and life skills through their Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. Students grow, harvest and deliver produce to members who have pre-purchased a share. The gardening program not only teaches functional life skills, but also raises money to support programs and services.

    Objective:

    1. Attendees will learn the benefits of a gardening program and will take away tips to creating a program of their own.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    H01: Supported Decision Making – An Alternative to Guardianship  (Community Track)
    Room: LaSalle

    Will discuss the topic of supported decision making as an alternative to guardianship. As part of the presentation information will be provided regarding why one might consider alternatives to guardianship and relate those topics to Illinois laws. The presentation will discuss current tools available in Illinois for supported decision-making, including powers of attorney, declarations for mental health treatment, and representative payees.

    Objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn about tools available in Illinois to assist individuals with disabilities in a manner that promotes the individual’s dignity and independence, while also ensuring that their needs are met and goals fostered.

    2. Attendees will also learn about why one might consider alternatives to guardianship, including promoting the individual’s person-hood and growth, and the limitations of guardianship.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    H02: Practical Tips to Help IEP Teams Develop Appropriate Transition Plans  (Education Track)
    Ballroom

    A discussion of transition assessments, goals, and services including real life case study examples and case law updates. Participants will also be introduced to Equip for Equality's (EFE's) online transition module by which they answer questions and choose from lists of example assessments to create a template transition plan for discussion at an IEP meeting.

    Objectives:

    1. Know the required ingredients of a transition plan.

    2. Learn about available transition assessments and services.

    3. Use the online transition module to generate a document helpful for transition planning with the IEP team.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
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