Program

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  • Closed  Closed
  • Optional  Optional
  • Thursday, April 11, 2019
  •  
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    Opening Remarks and Plenary Address
    Salon 2 & 3
    Understanding Human Brain Development and Disease: From the Embryo to Brain Organoids

    Watch the Videocast Live
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    9:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Poster Session 1
    Exhibit Hall A
     Optional  Closed 
    10:30 AM  -  11:30 AM
    BRAIN Science Communication Workshop
    Delaware
    How to Talk to the Public about BRAIN Science will be led by NPR's Jon Hamilton at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 11, 2019. Hamilton is a journalist and science correspondent for NPR's science desk and focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather. Hamilton is an English graduate from Oberlin College and received his Master's Degree in journalism from Columbia University.
    Register Now!
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    11:45 AM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch
    (On your own)
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Research Highlight Talks: Session 1

    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 1: Cells & Circuits
    Salon 1

    Multi-Site Non-Invasive Magnetothermal Excitation and Inhibition of Deep Brain Structures
    Speaker: Polina Anikeeva

    PESCA: A Scalable Platform for the Development of Cell-type-specific Viral Drivers 
    Speaker: Sinisa Hrvatin

    Second-generation Monosynaptic Tracing
    Speaker: Lei Jin

     Optional  Closed 
    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 2: Recording, Modulating, and Imaging Technologies
    Virginia

    Tools for Noninvasive Brain Imaging, Decoding, and Modulation
    Speaker: Walter Besio

    Extending Multiphoton Microscopy to Deep Brain Imaging in Freely Moving Mice
    Speaker: Diego Restrepo

    Customized Computing for Calcium Image and Electrophysiological Signal Processing in Closed Loop
    Speaker: Jason Cong

     Optional  Closed 
    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 3: Understanding the Brain
    Washington 1 & 2

    Dynamically Relevant Motifs in Inhibition-dominated Neural Networks
    Speaker: Carina Curto

    Development of Preconfigured and Replay Sequences in the Hippocampus
    Speaker: George Dragoi

    Functions of Time and Space (and their Laplace Transforms) in the MTL
    Speaker: Marc Howard

     Optional  Closed 
     

    Research Highlight Talks: Session 2

    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 1: Cells & Circuits
    Salon 1

    Characterizing Area Specific Cortical Cell Types in the Developing Human Brain
    Speaker: Aparna Bhaduri

    Engineering Photoactivatable Toxins for Long-term Synapse Silencing
    Speaker: Matthew Kennedy

    Viral-Assisted Circuit Mapping Of Cell-Specific Output Pathways of the GPe
    Speaker: Aryn Gittis

     Optional  Closed 
    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 2: Recording, Modulating, and Imaging Technologies
    Virginia

    Focused Ultrasound and Functional MRI for Combined Neuromodulation and Imaging of Non-human Primate Brain Circuits
    Speaker: Charles Caskey

    Early Feasibility Study of a Visual Cortical Prosthesis for the Blind: The Orion Visual Prosthesis System  
    Speaker: Jessy Dorn

    Neuroroots as Ultra-low Damage, Scalable Neural Interfaces
    Speaker: Nick Melosh

     Optional  Closed 
    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 3: Understanding the Brain
    Washington 1 & 2

    Discovering Dynamic Computations from Large-scale Neural Activity Recordings
    Speaker: Tatiana Engel

    PESCA: Reverse Engineering the Brainstem Circuits that Govern Exploratory Behavior  
    Speaker: David Kleinfeld

    LFADS-PBT: A Large-scale Deep Neural Network Training Framework for Generalized Inference of Neural Population Dynamics
    Speaker: Chethan Pandarinath

     Optional  Closed 
     

    Symposia Sessions

    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Bridging Animal and Human Brain Research with fMRI
    Washington 1 & 2
    Rapid developments in MRI data acquisition and hardware technologies have dramatically boosted our capability for detailed and fast brain imaging in humans, but there are still questions about exactly how fMRI reflects the various neuronal responses we want to study. This symposium will provide cutting-edge insights into physiological contributions to the fMRI signal, showing how new types of data and advanced methods are bridging the gap between invasive neurophysiology and noninvasive neuroimaging.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Emerging Technologies in Studying Spinal Cord Circuitry and Dynamics
    Virginia
    The spinal cord is an active gateway and hub for information to and from the periphery and the brain and a major central nervous system structure with complex interneuronal circuitry, yet recent advances in the understanding of the neuronal dynamics in the spinal cord that underlie behavior has lagged relative to that in the brain. Emerging tools for the visualization and monitoring of the dynamic activity of neurons in the spinal cord during behavior, along with advances in molecular approaches to understand cell diversity and circuitry, are helping us decipher the functions and neural encoding mechanisms of the spinal cord. Discussion will focus on what is needed in the field to further advance the understanding of spinal cord computations and dynamics and how to integrate this information with the neuronal activity in the brain.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Optical Recording of Released Neurotransmitters, Membrane Voltage Changes, and Second Messenger Cascades
    Salon 1

    In this symposium, the speakers will present the most recent progress in developing and improving the fluorescent indicators for various imaging modalities, and the exciting applications that are enabled and currently being carried out, both of which have been greatly accelerated by Brain Initiative funding mechanism. In particular, we would like to showcase recent progress in multiplex imaging for monoamines (Lin Tian, UC Davis), developing a bright and photostable chemigenetic voltage indicator (Eric Schreiter, HHMI Janelia), and neurotransmitter imaging with engineered microbial proteins (Loren Looger, HHMI Janelia). To demonstrate new types of sciences enabled by these sensors, Na Ji (UC Berkeley) will discuss microscopy development to permit in vivo two-photon voltage imaging using a voltage indicator ASAP3. Josh Berke (UCSF) will discuss the dissociation of dopamine release from dopaminergic neuron firing via direct imaging of dopamine release, which is regulated to achieve distinct function. Ryohei Yasuda (Max Planck Florida) will present imaging of signaling activity in single dendritic spines using 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and highly sensitive biosensors. Finally, Tianyi Mao (Vollum, OHSU) will discuss new findings enabled via single cell in vivo imaging of PKA dynamics downstream of norepinephrine, dopamine, and opioids combining FLIM and improved PKA sensors.

     Optional  Closed 
     
    5:15 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Break
     Optional  Closed 
    5:30 PM  -  6:30 PM
    Advisory Committee to the Director BRAIN Initiative Working Group 2.0 Town Hall
    Salon 2 & 3
    Moderator:
     Optional  Closed 
  • Friday, April 12, 2019
  •  
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    Plenary Address
    Salon 2 & 3
    Space and Time: Network Dynamics of the Entorhinal Cortex

    Watch the Videocast Live
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    9:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Poster Session 2
    Exhibit Hall A
     Optional  Closed 
    10:00 AM  -  11:30 AM
    Neuroethics: An Essential Partner to Enhance Neuroscience
    Washington 5

    Come hear BRAIN investigators describe their funded collaborations with neuroethicists and how these partnerships enhance neuroscience research. Also, members of the NIH BRAIN Initiative Neuroethics Working Group will be available to discuss neuroethics with interested investigators.

     Optional  Closed 
    10:30 AM  -  11:30 AM
    BRAIN Science Communication Workshop
    Delaware

    How to Talk to the Media about BRAIN Science at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, April 12, 2019 will be led by Betsy Stark, an Emmy Award winning journalist and former ABC News Business Correspondent. Stark brings three decades of newsroom skills to her leadership role at Ogilvy. She advises clients on all aspects of media engagement and storytelling, helping executives, companies, governments and nonprofits build awareness and tell compelling stories.

    Register Now!

    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    11:30 AM  -  1:00 PM
    NIH Funding and You: A Trainee's Practical Guide to Surviving and Thriving in Your Research Career
    Washington 4
    Trainees supported by the BRAIN Initiative as well as all travel awardees and early career investigators are invited to attend this session run by NIH staff who will discuss the range of funding opportunities, tips for writing successful proposals, and managing your career development and transition plans. The session will include break-out tables for attendees to ask relevant questions directly to NIH Program staff.
     Optional  Closed 
    11:45 AM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch
    (On your own)
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Research Highlight Talks: Session 3

    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 1: Cells & Circuits
    Salon 1

    NeMO Analytics – a Visualization and Analysis Environment for the NeMO Ecosystem
    Speaker: Ronna Hertzano

    Epigenomic Landscape of Mouse Rostral Brain by Single Nucleus Methylation Sequencing  
    Speaker: Hanqing Liu

    Simultaneous Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding and mRNA Expression in Single Cells
    Speaker: Robi Mitra

     Optional  Closed 
    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 2: Recording, Modulating, and Imaging Technologies
    Virginia

    All-optical Electrophysiology Probes E/I Balance in Awake Mice
    Speaker: Adam Cohen

    Nanosensors for Chemical Imaging of Acetylcholine in the Brain using MRI  
    Speaker: Heather Clark

    Wireless and Programmable Recording and Stimulation of Deep Brain Activity in Freely Moving Humans Immersed in Virtual (or Augmented) Reality
    Speaker: Nanthia Suthana

     Optional  Closed 
    1:00 PM  -  2:15 PM
    Track 3: Understanding the Brain
    Washington 1 & 2

    Spatiotemporal Patterns of BOLD Reflect Neuromodulation
    Speaker: Shella Keilholz

    Task-dependent Changes in the Large-scale Dynamics and Necessity of Cortical Regions  
    Speaker: Lucas Pinto

    PanNeuro: Leveraging a Community-based Approach for Big Data Neuroscience
    Speaker: Ariel Rokem

     Optional  Closed 
     

    Research Highlight Talks: Session 4

    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 1: Cells & Circuits
    Salon 1

    Development of Genetically-Encoded Barcodes and Probes to Probe Neural Communication Under EM and Fluroscent Microscope
    Speaker: Rongbo Sun, Yulong Li       

    Spatially-targeted Optical Delivery of Genes to Central Nervous System  
    Speaker: Samarendra Mohanty

    Single-cell Multi-omic Profiling Uncovers Gene Regulatory Diversity in Human and Non-human Primate Brains
    Speaker: Chongyuan Luo

     Optional  Closed 
    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 2: Recording, Modulating, and Imaging Technologies
    Virginia

    Effective Brain Stimulation is Linked to Functional Network Markers
    Speaker: Mark Halko

    Imaging Deeper, Wider and Faster: Cornell NeuroNex Hub for Large Scale Recording of Neural Activityy  
    Speaker: Chris Xu

    Flexible Neural Probe Arrays for Large-scale Cortical and Subcortical Recording
    Speaker: Ellis Meng

     Optional  Closed 
    2:20 PM  -  3:35 PM
    Track 3: Understanding the Brain
    Washington 1 & 2

    Using MRI for Pre-symptomatic Prediction: An Ethical Exploration of the Promises and Challenges for Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Speaker: Katherine MacDuffie

    Subthalamic Nucleus Activity Encodes Aspects of Speech Production  
    Speaker: Mark Richardson

    Multiscale Dynamic Modeling and Decoding of Spike-field Activity
    Speaker: Maryam Shanechi

     Optional  Closed 
     

    Symposia Sessions

    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Advanced Circuit and Cellular Imaging Methods in Non-Human-Primates
    Virginia
    Whereas optogenetic and microscopic imaging techniques have proven successful in their ability to manipulate neuronal populations with high spatial and temporal fidelity in species ranging from insects to rodents, significant obstacles remain in their application to non-human primates (NHPs). Robust optogenetics-activated behavior and long-term monitoring of target neurons have been especially challenging in NHPs. Here, we present recent advances that overcome many of these obstacles.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Advances in Mapping Neural Connectivity
    Salon 1
    The BRAIN initiative has produced numerous techniques capable of mapping connectivity in targeted, genetically defined populations of neurons, comprising “neuronal microcircuits”. While the lofty goal of whole-brain mapping remains, these currently available methods are proving to be extraordinary tools in understanding the structure and function of neural networks. The objective of this session is to highlight some of these tools and how they are elucidating the complex relationship between neuronal network architecture and physiological output.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:45 PM  -  5:15 PM
    Integrative Approaches to the Study of Sensorimotor Pathways
    Washington 1 & 2
    To understand how the brain controls behavior, it is critical to identify the underlying neurons and characterize their activity within sensorimotor pathways. In other words, studying activity in only one processing stage is unlikely to provide a comprehensive understanding of how behaviors are generated. New tools available in genetic model systems (worms, flies, fish, and mice) have made it possible to trace information flow through successive stages of neural processing, from the sensory encoding and discrimination, through decision-making, to the generation of precise motor output. In this symposium we will highlight recent advances in four different model systems using state-of-the-art experimental and computational tools to dissect the sensorimotor transformations underlying diverse behaviors, including predator avoidance, locomotor guidance, foraging, and social interaction. The presentations will highlight research that integrates the study of behavior across traditionally isolated subdisciplines within Neuroscience, thereby offering a comprehensive view of brain function. Our main goal is to demonstrate the strategic value in taking an integrative perspective that ignores the traditional boundaries within the field that focus on single tiers of neuronal processing. We also wish to bring together researchers working in different models systems to foster the formulation of general principles the underlie the transformation of sensory information into motor actions.
     Optional  Closed 
     
    5:15 PM  -  5:40 PM
    Break
     Optional  Closed 
    5:40 PM  -  6:30 PM
    Plenary Address
    Salon 2 & 3
    Self-Control, Free Will, and Responsibility: A Neurophilosophical Perspective

    Watch the Videocast Live
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
  • Saturday, April 13, 2019
  •  
    8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
    Plenary Address
    Salon 2 & 3
    Dimensionless Numbers in Brain Science

    Watch the Videocast Live
    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    9:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Poster Session 3
    Exhibit Hall A
     Optional  Closed 
    10:30 AM  -  11:30 AM
    BRAIN Science Communication Workshop
    Delaware

    How to Use Social Media to Promote BRAIN Science will be hosted by Rohan Verma, Vice President, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide. Verma will answer questions about the value of social media versus traditional media, when to use it and how. Topics covered include To Tweet or not to Tweet? When do I use Facebook? Should I be on Linked In? What about Instagram?

    Register Now!

    Speakers:
     Optional  Closed 
    12:30 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Lunch
    (On your own)
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Symposia Sessions

    1:45 PM  -  3:15 PM
    Neuropharmacology at the Age of the BRAIN Cell-Census
    Washington 1 & 2
    This symposium aims to stimulate a conversation about the impact of cell-census information enabling precise manipulation of specific circuits on the field of Neuropharmacology. The following timely questions will be addressed: 1/ How can transcriptome data from cell-types be leveraged towards identification of new disease-relevant signaling and the discovery of new therapeutic targets? How can the deconstruction of circuits underlying complex behavioral activity improve the development of more effective drugs? What are emerging approaches that lead to “cell or circuit targeted” neuropharmacology and what are emerging approaches to evaluate target engagement and quantitate drugs bioavailability in single cell types in molecularly-defined circuits?
     Optional  Closed 
    1:45 PM  -  3:15 PM
    Tractable and Realistic Models of Cortex; Biophysically Detailed Neuron and Network Modeling in the Identification of Circuit Function
    Virginia
    The BRAIN Initiative has lead to the wide availability of rich data sets that illuminate the cellular and circuit diversity within cortical networks. In this symposium we will discuss how these data can and must be incorporated into realistic, but still tractable, models of cortex in order to lead to an algorithmic understanding of circuit function. The talks will feature cortical models that include subcellular, cellular and circuit details and will focus on the ongoing development of these models through a closed loop iterative process with ongoing experiments.
     Optional  Closed 
    1:45 PM  -  3:15 PM
    Ultrasound Neuromodulation and Functional Ultrasound Imaging of Brain Activity: from Blood Flow to Molecules
    Salon 1
    Ultrasound is undergoing extensive development as a neural imaging and modulation technology, providing a unique combination of non-invasiveness, penetration depth and spatiotemporal precision. This symposium will assess the current state of the art in functional ultrasound imaging (fUS) and ultrasonic neuromodulation, asking fundamental questions about mechanisms, existing capabilities and future developments. These topics will be addressed by invited speakers from diverse scientific backgrounds, and there will be an overview of ultrasound projects at the BRAIN Initiative meeting.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Focused Sessions

    3:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    BRAIN Initiative Informatics Infrastructure
    Delaware
    The new BRAIN Initiative infrastructure awardees will present brief overviews of their awards. Awardees from the first year will present brief updates. This meeting should be useful both for BRAIN Initiative infrastructure awardees as well as other neuroscientists who want or need to use the developing infrastructure.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Frontiers of Non-Invasive Brain Imaging
    Virginia
    The purpose the focused session is not only to give BRAIN investigators an opportunity to present their exciting research and vision of future directions on non-invasive brain imaging, but also to form a mini-forum to challenge the conventional thinking and stimulate research that may maximally benefit the BRAIN Initiative.
     Optional  Closed 
    3:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Opportunities through the HEAL Initiative for BRAIN Investigators
    Salon 1
    This session will provide introductory presentations on new and exciting programs available through the NIH Helping to End Addiction Long-Term (HEAL) Initiative that may be of interest to BRAIN PI Meeting attendees
     Optional  Closed 
    3:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    U19 Data Science Core Consortium Meeting
    Washington 5
    The Data Science Core is tasked with coordination of data science efforts within their U19 project. The Consortium is made up of individuals from each U19. Six subgroups were formed by identifying shared expertise and interest across teams so that common challenges can be more effectively solved. The purpose of this meeting is for each subgroup to report on their progress to the larger consortium and to discuss future subgroup/consortium efforts.
     Optional  Closed 
     
    5:30 PM 
    Adjourn
     Optional  Closed 
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