66th SEPA Annual Meeting

Continuing Education

The Raymond D. Fowler Continuing Education Program

April 1st – April 4th , 2020 The Sheraton New Orleans

Continuing Education Workshop and Lecture titles will be announced in December. All workshops this year offer three (3) hours of Continuing Education credits each. The cost for the three-hour workshops is $50 for professionals and $25 for students. Online registration for CEUs will open once the workshop and lecture titles have been announced and will remain open until March 15th, 2020.

Checks will be accepted for Continuing Education until March 15th, 2020. Names and email addresses must accompany all checks or they will be mailed back to the sender. Please send all correspondence to SEPA c/o The Citadel Psychology Department 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.

The Southeastern Psychological Association is committed to a full program of continuing education for its members and for other interested colleagues. Workshops are open to all registered attendees of the SEPA meeting. Each workshop description details the intended audience. Graduate students may register to attend workshops without endorsement of a faculty member.

Continuing Education credit also will be offered for presentations by the SEPA Invited Speakers, marked with a [CE] throughout the meeting program. Each of these sessions will offer one hour of credit for a fee of $10. Although any registrant may attend these one hour sessions, a Continuing Education certificate will be awarded only to those attendees who also remit the $10 payment and submit an evaluation form.

If you have already registered and would now like to add continuing education to your registration, please click on "Already Registered" below and modify your registration. All onsite registrations and payments for Continuing Education workshops and lectures will be processed at the SEPA Continuing Education Registration Desk.

Onsite registration will also be available at the Continuing Education Desk during the Annual Meeting April 1st – April 4th.

If interested in presenting a workshop please complete one of the following applications and submit to Dr. Keeley. All approved presenters will receive free registration to the 2020 Annual Meeting in exchange for their participation.

Workshop Application

Methodology Workshop Application

Regular CE Workshops Click on the + sign to expand

Workshop A – Thursday, April 2, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside A

Title: Advanced Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB) Interpretation Using Case Examples

Presenter: Gordon Cappelletty, Ph.D., Lenoir-Rhyne University

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

Created and developed through grants from the National Institute of Mental Health. the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB) is an integrated, modular battery of neuropsychological tests. Because of its ease of administration and relative brevity, it has come to be used frequently as part of a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. Using case examples to highlight research findings on the criterion validity of the NAB, this workshop will advance participants' skills in drawing meaningful, empirically defensible hypotheses from the NAB results.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the results of recent research regarding diagnosis and treatment recommendations of individuals with neurocognitive limitations.
  • Identify the role an individual's background and presenting difficulties play in the interpretation of results from the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery based on recent research.
  • Discuss how to generate empirically defensible hypotheses regarding an individual's functioning and prognosis when using the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery in a clinical setting.
  • Describe the limitations of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery in the assessment of neurocognitive injury and disease processes in clients.

Level: Advanced

Target Population: This workshop targets professionals who provide neuropsychological evaluations and assumes a working knowledge of neuroanatomy.

Workshop B – Thursday, April 2, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside C

Title: Developing Resilience for Counselors and Clients

Presenter: Christopher Cronin, Ph.D., Saint Leo University

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

This workshop will provide participants with specific evidence-based strategies for enhancing their clients’ and their own resilience. Numerous studies, many from the area of positive psychology, demonstrate the importance of resilience in overcoming trauma.  Participants will complete a brief self-assessment on resilience. Four specific areas for enhancing resilience will be covered: physical, cognitive, social/familial and spiritual. The workshop will use didactic presentation, group discussion and case examples. Participants will receive a workbook detailing the specific techniques that they can introduce into their practice to help their clients build resilience.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the empirical contributions from positive psychology regarding the beneficial effects of resiliency skills for clients and counselors.
  • Discuss how to incorporate resiliency building techniques into their clinical practice.
  • Describe how to reliably assess their own and their client’s resiliency levels and identify areas needing improvement.
  • Describe how to analyze and evaluate the empirical literature regarding client and counselor resiliency.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: This workshop is appropriate for beginning counselors, graduate students training to be counselors, and experienced counselors.

Workshop C –   Thursday, April 2, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, Bayside C

Title: Psychotherapy for Older Adults: Holistic Care

Presenters: Lee Hyer, Ph.D., ABPP, Gateway Psychiatry Residency Program & Mercer School of Medicine
Catherine Yeager, Ph.D., Augusta University/Medical College of Georgia

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

Based on our new book on the assessment and treatment on older adults (2019), this workshop presents an in-depth and clinical discussion on psychotherapy for this population. It is intended to be practical and clinical. The psychotherapy model is based on five core domains of problems relevant to older adults.  These include depression, anxiety, cognition, health (morbidities, pain, sleep, and lifestyle habits), and life adjustment.  This presentation will be case-based, emphasizing core psychotherapy stages, including a renewed emphasis on the importance of consensual validation and empathy (common factors) which foster the application of mini-modules (e.g., behavioral activation), empirically supported strategies (e.g., CBT), and lifestyle interventions (e.g., exercise and sleep).  Importantly, the nuance of health issues as related to psychotherapy will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe knowledge, skills, and experience relevant to psychological practice with an older population that discusses and expands the APA Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Older Adults.
  • Discuss a stage model of psychotherapy specific to a geriatric population in each of the five domains of depression, anxiety, cognition, health, and life adjustment issues. 
  • Identify health issues and use of psychiatric (and other) medications in the treatment of older adults along with interventions a psychologist may employ in these situations. 
  • Discuss the importance of personality in treatment for older adults from a holistic perspective.

Level: Intermediate

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop D – Thursday, April 2, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, Bayside A

Title: Anxiety in Young Children: A Review of Assessment Approaches and Evidence-Based Interventions



Presenter: Brian Fisak, Ph.D., University of Central Florida

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

The purpose of this workshop is to provide an overview of evidence-based assessment and intervention strategies for anxiety and related disorders in preschool-aged children. An overview of the current research literature in regards to treatment and prevention strategies will be discussed. This includes a description of existing programs and a discussion of specific intervention strategies for clinicians working with anxiety in young children. Further, the workshop will include a discussion of assessment and outcome measures available to clinicians interested in working with anxious preschool children. Finally, nosology, prevalence, and etiology of preschool anxiety will also be briefly addressed.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

Describe existing treatment options for preschool anxiety and related disorders and the status of the research on the effectiveness of these approaches.
Discuss approaches designed to prevent anxiety in preschool-aged children and the status of the research in regards to the effectiveness of anxiety prevention. 
Identify assessment strategies commonly used to assess anxiety and related disorders in preschool-aged children.
Describe the nosology, prevalence, and etiological factors commonly associated with anxiety in preschool-aged children.
Level: Intermediate

Target Population: Open to all
Workshop E – Friday, April 3, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside C

Title: Suicidality Among African American Teens

Presenters: Meg Milligan, Ph.D., Troy University
Renita Davis, MSW, Troy University
Mary Sewell, MSW, Troy University
Hall P. Beck, Ph.D., Appalachian State University

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

This workshop addresses suicidality as a global public health crisis, per the World Health Organization, that differentially affects populations. While African Americans overall tend to have lower rates of death by suicide, younger age groups’ rates are increasing. This phenomenon is explored by examining a brief history of suicide; suicidality in editions I through 5 of the DSM and beyond; research, risk factors and warning signs for African American teens; and a case study from the personal experience of one of the presenters. This workshop includes interactive experiential assessment, prevention, and intervention activities as well as handouts with resources for practical application.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe suicidality as it relates to African American adolescents.
  • Discuss the history of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) as it relates to suicidality.
  • Describe risk factors and warning signs specific to African American adolescents.
  • Identify culturally aware prevention and intervention strategies for African American adolescents.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop F – Friday, April 3, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside A
Title: Child-Adult Relationship Enhancement (CARE) Training

Presenters: Elizabeth Brestan-Knight, Ph.D., Auburn University
Giselle Jimenez, Auburn University
Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

CARE is a training model designed to teach core positive relationship-building skills often found in parent management trainings, such as Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). These skills are designed to promote positive interactions with children and increase child compliance. Adults who participate in CARE learn how to positively interact with children in the workplace and increase desired child behavior. These skills can be employed to help aid compliance during sessions. This workshop will focus on learning the CARE model and practicing with case examples. Workshop participants will receive a packet of handouts with the CARE skills.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

Indicate how to increase positive child-adult interactions through usage of specific skills.
Discuss ways to apply the skills in their workplace.
Describe ways to increase child compliance.
Identify undesirable ways of interacting with children and practice avoiding them.
Level: Introductory

Target Population: Because the workshop is to teach clinicians how to effectively and positively interact with children, the target population for this workshop is mental health professionals who interact with children in the workplace.
Workshop G – Friday, April 3, 1:00 – 1:55 pm, Bayside A

Title: Cultural Intelligence: The 21st Century Skill

Presenters: Lakshmi Narayanan, Ph.D., University of North Florida
Shanker Menon, Ph.D., American University of Ras Al Khaimah
Cathy Dunn, Ph.D., St. Leo University

Length: 1 hour (1 credits)

Workshop Description:

In today’s increasingly diverse, global society the ability to function effectively in different culturally diverse settings is crucial. This capability is Cultural Intelligence or CQ. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the concept of CQ, its assessment, and its application to business, education, healthcare and other organizational settings. The goals are for participants to experientially learn about CQ and its assessment, apply this knowledge and skill for personal development and application to diverse cultural settings. The instruction approach in this workshop will be discussion, experiential exercises, group work and feedback. Handouts will include the CQ scale and experiential exercises on cultural scenarios.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define CQ and the different dimensions of cultural intelligence.
  • Identify strategies to train and coach individuals to be become culturally more intelligent.
  • Identity four techniques that can be applied to interact effectively with culturally diverse individuals.
  • Describe how to apply CQ Assessment techniques for selection and placement in organizations that are culturally diverse.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop H – Friday, April 3, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, Bayside C

Title: Health Literacy: Making Healthcare Understandable

Presenters: Lindsey Poe, Psy.D., LSU Health Sciences Center
Megan Brokenbourgh, Ph.D., LSU Health Sciences Center
Sandy Hyatt, MA, LSU Health Sciences Center

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 9 out of 10 adults struggle to understand and use health information important to their care, leading to higher health care costs and rates of morbidity and mortality. Individuals with limited health literacy are less likely to follow up on their care and may experience higher rates of psychiatric conditions. This workshop will provide a detailed overview defining health literacy and its impact on patient care and health outcomes. The overall goal is to provide education on the attributes necessary to be a health literate mental health clinician and expand this to organizational needs. Instruction will be conducted through didactic, discussion-based, and experiential exercises.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define health literacy and identify the impact on healthcare costs, morbidity, and patient outcomes.
  • Describe how to create a health literacy plan of action.
  • Identify measures related to health disparities and health literacy.
  • Discuss how to assess and evaluate organizational needs in effective health communication.
  • Describe national and local initiatives on health literacy.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: This workshop is designed for all skill levels of individuals who serve as clinicians and/or educators. It may specifically be of interest to those in program development and health psychology.

Workshop I - Friday, April 3, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Bayside A

Title: Study Abroad: A Path to Intercultural Competence

Presenter: Angelenia Semegon, Ph.D., Flagler College

Length: 2 hours (2 credits)

Workshop Description:

Intercultural awareness is becoming more and more important in the classroom, in the lab, and in the clinicians’ office. Study abroad programs are a very effective way of helping students develop the skills they will need for an increasingly globalized world. This workshop will help participants discover ways in which to embed psychology courses and undergraduate research in a study abroad program with hands-on opportunities to outline the basics of a rich and meaningful program.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the benefits of study abroad for students.
  • Articulate the ways in which study abroad increases intercultural competencies.
  • Identify courses of study within the field of psychology that are appropriate for study abroad.
  • Describe best practices for developing short-term faculty-led study abroad programs.
  • Discuss strategies for measuring program effectiveness.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: This workshop would be appropriate for anyone interested in taking students abroad to study.

Workshop J –  Saturday, April 4, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside C

Title: Building Better Brains: Buffering the Effects of Toxic Stress Through Positive Adult Connections

Presenters:Kim Zlomke, Ph.D., University of South Alabama
James “Tres” Stefurak, Ph.D., University of South Alabama

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

In the absence of protective relationships, toxic stress in childhood impacts an individual's well-being across the life time. This 3-hour workshop will provide an overview of the state of neuroscience and effects of toxic stress on brain development, engage participants in hands-on interactive learning with the “Brain Architecture Game,” and provide strategies on becoming trauma informed professionals. The Brain Architecture Game is an interactive experience designed to enhance understanding of the science of early brain development and its impact on children and communities. Participants will also learn about principles of trauma-informed care, and emerging research evidence for the model’s impact on provider and client well-being as well as its potential impact on cost-effectiveness of mental health service delivery.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the elements that support young children’s brain architecture and development.
  • Discuss strategies to foster back-and-forth interaction with children on the topic of stress and brain development.
  • Articulate how to engage children in activities that support brain development and learning.
  • Identify principles of trauma-informed intervention and trauma-informed care systemic practices that may reduce retraumatization of clients and/or vicarious traumatization of providers.

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all.

Workshop K –  Saturday, April 4, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, Bayside A

Title:  The Alliance Project: Suicide Prevention Train the Trainer Workshop


Presenters: Erica Szkody, M.S., Mississippi State University
Emily Stafford, Ph.D., Mississippi State University
Mary Moussa Rogers, M.A., Mississippi State University
Ellen H. Steele, M.A., Mississippi State University
Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

The Alliance Project is a suicide prevention gatekeeper program that is designed to give individuals the tools to improve the transmission of social support to youth who may be at risk for suicide to increase the chances they will seek professional services. The Train the Trainer Program will utilize both didactic and experiential (role play) instructional approaches to give those in the mental health field the tools to improve their supportive communication with distressed individuals and to assess for suicide risk. Resources, slides, and handouts of all materials will be provided open source for future use.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

Describe the current risk and protective factors for youth suicide.
Describe how to build rapport with youth, break the ice, and recover when things to do not go as planned.
Discuss how to connect with youth and make appropriate referrals.
Identify at least three referral sources.
Level: Introductory

Target Population: This training is open to all who are interested in suicide prevention and how to improve communication of social support with youth. No previous training or knowledge is required for this workshop.

Methodology Workshops Click on the + sign to expand

Methodology Workshop 1 – Thursday, April 2, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, Bayside B

Title: An Introduction to Multilevel Modeling

Presenters: Zachary Himmelberger, Ph.D., Maryville College
Karen Beale, Ph.D., Maryville College

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

Multilevel modeling is a flexible data analytic technique that has become very popular in the behavioral and social sciences. Understanding the uses—and misuses—of this technique allows researchers and other professionals to better engage with their field. This workshop is designed to build on knowledge of simple linear regression. No previous experience with multilevel modeling is necessary. We will draw on examples from a range of sub-disciplines and research designs to support understanding of the technique. Finally, this workshop will describe how to interpret multilevel models in published manuscripts in order to facilitate statistical literacy.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the appropriate research context in which to apply a multilevel modeling framework.
  • Describe how to read and critically evaluate published research that uses multilevel modeling.
  • Describe statistical models in clear, concise language.
  • Articulate the assumptions of a given statistical model.
  • Discuss how to implement a basic multilevel model.
  • Identify useful resources for further education on multilevel modeling.

Level: Intermediate

Target Population: This presentation is open to all. The only requirement is that participants have a working knowledge of simple linear regression.

Lectures Click on the + sign to expand

Lecture 1 – Thursday, April 2, 10:00 – 10:50 am, Napoleon B

Title: “Yass Queen!”  Magnifying the Psychological Benefits of Affirming Black Aesthetics

Afiya Mbilishaka
University of District of Columbia

Ecclesia Holmes, University of Georgia, presiding

Everyday across the globe, Black people have to navigate institutions that meet their presence with policies that police their appearance. Colorism and hair bias have found space within relationships, schools, and employment since the enslavement of Africans in the Americas. Mental health professionals have an ethical responsibility to develop culturally responsive techniques to investigate the psycho-emotional outcomes of discriminatory experiences for Black aesthetics. This presentation will explore the historical context of aesthetic trauma and anti-Blackness, to magnify various techniques at the individual and group level to affirm Black aesthetics through narrative methods, salon-based groups, anti-bias teacher trainings, social media, and policy level interventions.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define aesthetic trauma on individual and institutional levels.
  • Describe a historical timeline for bias against Black aesthetics.
  • Propose complimentary interventions that affirm individuals’ self-worth through Black aesthetics.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 2 – Thursday, April 2, 11 – 11:50 am, Napoleon B

Title: Reclaiming Our Time: How to Survive and Thrive in the Face of Gendered Racism

Jioni A. Lewis
University of Tennessee

Sharon Pearcey, Kennesaw State University, presiding

Although women of color often experience the intersections of racism and sexism in their daily lives, much of the research and clinical practice in psychology has tended to focus on separating and teasing apart the experiences of racism and sexism. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the importance of applying intersectionality theory to our understanding of racism and sexism by centering the experiences of women of color. This presentation will discuss research on gendered racism and identify the psychological effects of gendered racism. In addition, this presentation will highlight the importance of developing healthy coping strategies, cultivating gendered racial identity, and engaging in radical healing as a form of resistance in the current sociopolitical climate.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of gendered racism and gendered racial microaggressions.
  • Describe the psychological effects of gendered racism.
  • Identify how individuals can engage in healthy coping strategies in the face of gendered racism.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 3 – Thursday, April 2, 1 – 1:50 pm, Napoleon B

APA Distinguished Scientist Lecture

Do You See What I See?

Isabel Gauthier
Vanderbilt University

Sharon Pearcey, Kennesaw State University, presiding

Research in visual object recognition has largely focused on mechanisms common to most people, but there is increased interest in whether and how people differ in the ability to recognize objects and faces.  New tests with a variety of familiar categories are being created and validated to measure domain-specific abilities.  Because variability in experience with familiar objects contributes to performance, tests with novel objects were designed and recent work using them provides evidence for a domain-general visual ability that is relatively independent from general intelligence.  This talk will review recent research on efforts to measure the role of a general visual ability and the role of experience in our abilities in recognizing faces and objects.  It will review behavioral studies as well as research measuring functional and structural brain correlates of object recognition skills.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the differences between domain-specific and domain-general influences in object recognition.
  • Explain the evidence supporting the idea that object recognition ability is not explained by general intelligence.
  • Identify real-world domains in which object recognition ability applies.
  • Identify some of the brain correlates of visual object recognition.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 4 – Thursday, April 2, 3:00 – 3:50 pm, Napoleon B

Title: Reaching Everyone: The Science of Student Identity and Success in a Biased World

Elliott Hammer
Xavier University of Louisiana

Rihana Mason, Georgia State University, presiding

The concept of implicit bias has received considerable attention in recent years, especially as researchers have had increasing difficulty finding variation in explicit prejudice in the laboratory. Still, many of us—regardless of our social categories—remain resistant to the possibility that our own judgments and perceptions may be distorted by bias. This resistance is a special problem in the classroom, where faculty and students must bridge gaps in experience in order to understand each other. Even in classrooms where interracial or intergender teaching is the exception, education level, age, and other demographic differences present challenges for reaching students who are different from their instructor. In this session, we will discuss the subtle nature of biases and how they may directly and indirectly influence students’ chances of success in the classroom and the outside world. By reviewing literature on the nature of prejudice, student perceptions of fit in the college classroom, and investigations of bias in the workplace, we will discuss measures faculty can take to ensure that all students have the best chances of success, in the classroom and beyond.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe basic theories of stereotypes and prejudice and their roles in our everyday lives.
  • Identify potential hurdles that women, people of color, and other groups often encounter in their progression through different life stages.
  • Define strategies to foster students’ identities as students, thus maximizing students’ senses of authenticity, inclusion, and belonging in the classroom.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 5 – Thursday, April 2, 4 – 4:50 pm, Napoleon B

Title: Cognition in the Internet Age

Elizabeth J. Marsh
Duke University

Sharon Pearcey, Kennesaw State University, presiding

The internet is rapidly changing how information is found, used, and shared with others – with consequences for cognition. I will discuss how this emerging area of research can be grounded in basic cognitive science research and how it links to past work on technology and cognition; these approaches will be contrasted to how the science is covered in popular media. I will then discuss some specific internet-related phenomena, such as the effects of habitual reliance on the internet and the metacognitive consequences of searching the internet for information. I will close with speculations about whether this digital expansion of the mind has consequences for cognition even when one is not using the internet.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common cognitive processes and their contribution to internet phenomena.
  • Identify the popular media’s description of cognition in the internet age.
  • Describe new studies showing the consequences of internet searching for beliefs about what one knows.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 6 – Friday, April 3, 4:00 – 4:50 pm, Napoleon B

Title: What About the Self of the Psychologist? Self Care Sense of Self

Charles R. Figley
Tulane University

Sharon Pearcey, Kennesaw State University, presiding

This session offers perspectives on practitioner mental health for themselves and why they rarely develop useful self-care plans. The goal of the presentation is to enable the audience member to be more aware of who he/she is as a psychologist and how best to enhance his/her practice effectiveness through greater self-care enhanced by a self-care plan.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define the mental health risk and protective factors associated with compassion fatigue.
  • Describe the importance of the self in the context of self care.
  • Identify a self-care plan that is explicit, written, and up-to-date.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 7 – Friday, April 3, 5 – 5:50 pm, Napoleon B

Title: Neuropsychology: The Origins and Future of Psychology

Antonio E. Puente
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Sharon Pearcey, Kennesaw State University, presiding

Psychology’s over 125-year history has focused on the making of our discipline a scientific enterprise.  Whereas it could be argued that our questions are no original, there is no doubt that our methodology adds a unique approach that historically as not previously been present in addressing these age-old questions.  In pursuing that goal, it can be argued that psychology has failed to acknowledge and relish our foundations dating back to the works of Wundt and James with its strong focus on the neuropsychological foundations of psychological processes.  In the pursuit of psychology as a science, it can be further argued that we have confused behaviorism with behavioral (and as such, experimental) methodology.  This confusion has had an indirect impact on restricting psychology to behavioral processes and interpretations.  Not until the more recent ideas of neuropsychologists such as Sperry and cognitive psychologists such as Miller, has behaviorism as a psychological paradigm and as a restriction to a comprehensive understanding of psychology been questioned.  As an alternative, the appreciation of both psychology’s origins with its experimental procedures will not only remedy to century long restriction of psychological paradigms but provide a brighter and more robust horizon.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the origins of psychological science as neuropsychological.
  • Articulate the importance and limitations of behaviorism as a paradigm.
  • Describe the importance of interfacing the field’s neuropsychological origins with experimental methodology to provide a more robust psychology.

Level: Introductory, 1 CE credit

Lecture 8 – Saturday, April 4, 8:30 - 9:50 AM, Napoleon B

CEPO Leadership Institute: Work, Life, Balance for Women and Non-Binary People of Color

Jennifer Friday, Ph.D.
Georgia Gwinnett College
Rosemary Phelps, Ph.D.
University of Georgia

The path (way) to leadership is often less structured and intentional for women and people of color. The purpose of this Leadership Institute is to prepare women and non-binary people of color psychologists to recognize and capitalize on their strengths to become leaders in academia, practice, and organizational settings as well as provide knowledge, skills, and strategies leading to effective leadership.

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe different leadership theories.
  • Identify different methods of assessing leadership
  • Discuss how to effectively apply leadership principles in today’s work environment.
  • Develop personal success goals, keeping work and life in balance.
  • Identify and build on personal strengths that lead to leadership success.

The Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Southeastern Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

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