67th SEPA Annual Meeting

Continuing Education

The Raymond D. Fowler "VIRTUAL" Continuing Education Program

March 17th – March 20th, 2021  

 

This year SEPA is offering a variety of workshop topics that vary from one to three hours in length.

 

For professionals the cost for the three-hour workshops is $60.00, the cost for two-hour workshops is $40.00 and the cost for one-hour workshops is $25.00. 

 

All workshops will cost $25.00 for students. 

 

Methodology workshops will cost $50.00 for all participants.


The bundle registration type for professionals and applicable graduate students includes 3 APA sponsored and approved Continuing Education Units/Credits.  For those who choose to purchase a bundle please email the office sepa@citadel.edu your selections instead of choosing the workshops or lectures online - otherwise the system may want to charge you twice. 

 

When you buy the bundle you save money on Coninuing Education Units.  How much you save depends on what you choose to attend.  You get 3, so you could choose 3 lectures which normally cost $10 each or you could choose a 3 hour workshop which normally costs $60.


    

The Southeastern Psychological Association is committed to a full program of continuing education for its members and for other interested colleagues. Workshops are open to all registered attendees of the SEPA meeting. Each workshop description details the intended audience. Students may register to attend workshops without endorsement of a faculty member.

 

Continuing Education credit also will be offered for presentations by the SEPA Invited Speakers.  Each of these sessions will offer one hour of credit for a fee of $10.00.  Although any registrant may attend these one-hour sessions, a Continuing Education certificate will be awarded only to those attendees who also remit the $10.00 payment and submit an evaluation form.


If you have already registered and would now like to add continuing education to your registration, please click on "Already Registered" below and modify your registration.

  

Checks will be accepted for Continuing Education until March 15th, 2021. Names and email addresses must accompany all checks or they will be mailed back to the sender. Please send all correspondence to SEPA c/o The Citadel Psychology Department 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.

 

The Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The Southeastern Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


 

 

Regular CE Workshops Click on the + sign to expand

Workshop A – Thursday, March 18th @ 9 am

Title: Child Adult Relationship Enhancement Preview Workshop:  Unleashing the Power of Play

Presenter: John Paul Abner, Ph.D., Milligan University

Length: 2 hours (2 credits)

Workshop Description:

Child Adult Relationship Enhancement (CARE) utilizes evidenced-based relationship skills to help adults interact with children and teens.  CARE is a set of skills that can be taught to parents and professionals who work with children and youth.  This workshop will review current research on CARE and introduce CARE skills through games, role play, and interactive activities.  This is a preview workshop designed to help participants determine if a full CARE workshop would be helpful in their setting, though it is also an excellent selection for anyone who wants to improve their play skills.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe current research on Child Adult Relationship Enhancement.
  • Identify methods of allowing children to lead play situations.
  • Indicate how play and playfulness can help children, youth, and adults.
  • Identify two strategies for increasing the likelihood that children will follow spoken directions.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: There are no specific requirements to enroll.

Workshop B – Friday, March 19th @ 9 am

Title: Training Undergraduate Students in Conducting Research with Ethnic Minority Communities

Presenter: Anisah Bagasra, Ph.D., Kennesaw State University

Length: 1 hour (1 credit)

Workshop Description:

Research on minority populations is lacking, often due to mistrust among minority populations of both research and researchers. Many undergraduate students wish to conduct research in diverse communities, or within diverse student populations, but need training in culturally-informed approaches to research on and within these communities. This workshop will provide guidance to faculty working with undergraduate students in preparing their students to conduct culturally competent, community-based research in ethnic minority communities. Topics covered include forming community partnerships, establishing mentoring connections with minority faculty, best-practices in designing and collecting data, and overcoming challenges in response rates.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify major challenges when embarking on research projects with undergraduate students, and how these challenges may be amplified in ethnic minority research.
  • Identify available resources and mentors who can be consulted when designing research aimed at specific ethnic, religious, or other minority groups.
  • Describe effective strategies for forming sustainable community-based research partnerships.
  • Describe effective strategies for addressing ethical issues and distrust of research and researchers that could impact the success of student-led research.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: The target population for this workshop is college faculty and graduate students who work with undergraduate students and who currently or plan to engage in undergraduate research mentoring in some form such as CURES, UREs, Honors thesis advising, directed study, and other positions where one is responsible for providence guidance and oversight to student research. This can benefit faculty and graduate students with little or no experience in undergraduate research mentoring as well as those with extensive experience but little experience overseeing ethnic-minority research.

Workshop C – Thursday, March 18th @ 9 am

Title: Working with Muslim Clients: A Guide to Cultural Competency

Presenter: Anisah Bagasra, Ph.D., Kennesaw State University

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

This workshop will provide counselors, researchers, students and other professionals in the field with the knowledge needed to be successful working with Muslim clients. There are a great deal of misconceptions, misinformation, and increasing Islamophobia that shape perceptions of Islam and Muslims, and therefore your success as a culturally competent practitioner. The goal of this workshop is to address major Islamic worldviews, social norms, and common concerns that can impact your ability to effectively engage and communicate with Muslim clients. The goal of the workshop is to provide you with information that reduces implicit bias and increases your level of comfort serving this diverse population.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify existing misconceptions about Islam and Muslims that may influence your own beliefs and attitudes towards the Muslim population, and how these may impact your professional interactions.
  • Describe common Muslim worldviews as they relate to perceptions of mental illness, attitudes towards various treatment options, and typical help-seeking behaviors.
  • Compare common Muslim worldviews to your own expectations about illness and wellness and courses of action.
  • Identify common Muslim social norms and discuss how these social norms may impact your standard interactions and behaviors in the therapeutic setting.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: The target population for this workshop is psychologists in clinical practice, counselors, clinical and counseling graduate students, and other professionals. This will also benefit professors who train students in cultural competency or multicultural counseling, or working with refugee and immigrant populations.

Workshop D – Friday, March 19th @ 9 am

Title: Psychotherapy for Older Adults: Holistic Care

Presenter: Lee Hyer, Ph.D., Mercer School of Medicine & Gateway Behavioral Health

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

Based on a new book regarding assessment and treatment for older adults, this workshop extends this thinking, presenting core psychotherapy strategies for older adults.  These strategies result from four tried-and-true psychotherapy models (supportive therapy, motivational interviewing, CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) and ACT (acceptance and commitment therapy)).   This psychotherapy seminar also builds on previous work espousing five domains necessary for understanding older adults (depression, anxiety, cognition, health (morbidities, pain, sleep, and lifestyle habits), and life adjustment).  Again, the focus is on the nuance of psychotherapy of older adults given any of these problems.   This presentation will be case-based.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify knowledge, skills, and experience relevant to psychological practice with the older population that expands upon the APA Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Older Adults.
  • Identify core strategies for individual psychotherapy for a geriatric population. 
  • Describe the specific value of four psychotherapies, including supportive psychotherapy, motivational interviewing, CBT and ACT.  
  • Discuss an end point holistic model for the psychological care of older adults

 

Level: Intermediate

Target Population: Professional and graduate level psychologists

Workshop E – Friday, March 19th @ 11 am

Title: Emotional Labor and the Pandemic

Presenters: Lakshmi Narayanan, Ph.D., University of North Florida
Shanker Menon, Ph.D., American University of Ras Al Khaimah
Cathy Dunn, Ph.D., St. Leo University

Length: 1 hour (1 credit)

Workshop Description:

The pandemic has changed our lives dramatically, and many businesses and educational institutions all over the world were forced to transition in a very short period of time to doing things virtually. This has led to endless hours of meetings, lectures, learning, training, teaching and so many activities by videoconferencing. One of the greatest stressors we face in the  demands of interacting virtually is to display appropriate emotions in an unnatural environment as we constantly look at the computer screen.  In this workshop we will discuss the concept of emotional labor and related psychological, emotional and behavior strains. The goals are for participants to experientially learn about emotional labor and its assessment, and strategies to minimize emotional labor and apply this knowledge and skill for personal development and application. The instruction approach in this workshop will be discussion, experiential exercises, case studies, group work and feedback. Handouts will include the Assessment of Emotional Labor and the application of strategies to deal with the display and the experience of appropriate emotions when we work virtually.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define emotional labor, deep acting, and surface acting.
  • Describe strategies to train and coach individuals on ways to reduce emotional labor and the control and regulation of emotions.
  • Identity four techniques that can be applied to interact effectively with situations that demand a high tolerance or emotional labor.
  • Describe emotional labor assessment techniques for selection and placement and other human resource strategies to deal with emotional labor in the virtual environment.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop F – Thursday, March 18th @ 1 pm

Title: Small Changes in Course Design Instructors Can Make to Help Veteran Students Succeed

Presenter: Gina Mariano, Ph.D., Troy University

Length: 1 hour (1 credit)

Workshop Description:

Student veterans for many reasons can have a difficult time transitioning to the college classroom environment. The purpose of this workshop is the provide instructors with strategies they can use to help improve course design to better support veteran students in their courses. The instructional approaches to be used include: reflection, goal-setting, and didactic exercises. Some of the handouts for the presentation include an anticipation guide to help attendees understand how the hour will be spent and a course development guide to help faculty as they work to reimagine one of their courses or future courses with some new strategies.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the challenges veteran students face when transitioning from the military to the college environment.
  • Describe the strengths veteran students bring with them that can help them succeed in the college environment.
  • Identify problem areas for veteran students in a course they currently teach.
  • Describe new strategies to aid veterans in a course.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop G – Thursday, March 18th @ 1 pm

Title: Virtually Delivered Interdisciplinary Pain Care Across the Continuum: From Inception to Implementation

Presenters: Nicolle Angeli, Ph.D., James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital
Stacey Sandusky, Ph.D., James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

As the use of telehealth has accelerated during the pandemic, it has brought about opportunities to deliver healthcare in new ways and improve access to specialized care, including to individuals living with chronic pain. The purpose of this workshop is to discuss innovative approaches for integrating telehealth into the treatment of chronic pain. Our goals are to share best practices for effective use of telehealth in pain care. The instructional approach will be a blend of didactic and case discussion. Materials to be used include handouts on mobile applications and videos.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe practical applications of implementing virtual care during and beyond the pandemic to expand access to chronic pain management across the continuum.   
  • Identify challenges and opportunities in utilizing telehealth to deliver interdisciplinary pain care.
  • Identify strategies to facilitate successful development and implementation of virtual pain rehabilitation programming.    
  • Describe best practices for optimizing patient engagement and outcomes with telehealth approaches.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: Open to all

Workshop H – Friday, March 19th @ 1 pm

Title: Strategies for Increasing Students’ Intercultural Competencies with a Faculty-Led Study Abroad Program

Presenter: Jutta Street, Ph.D., Campbell University

Length: 3 hours (3 credits)

Workshop Description:

This workshop will be an interactive discussion on the development of faculty-led study abroad programs that merge intercultural learning and the history of psychology.  Topics are logistics, curriculum, advertising, itinerary, pre-departure orientation, post-trip processing, assessment of intercultural learning, and virtual alternatives to actual travel. Experiential learning at the actual locations associated with the life and work of early psychologists (Berlin, Leipzig, etc.) increased intercultural competence. Our 3-week model includes visits at historic universities in these cities in order to learn about (1) the work of the founders of psychology and (2) faculty and graduate students’ research and differences/similarities in the university and program structures.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify a range of logistical issues involved in the planning of study abroad programs.
  2. Describe various marketing approaches for study abroad programs.
  3. Discuss how to select a valid assessment of intercultural competence.
  4. Describe perspectives on and experiences with increasing cultural awareness of students during study abroad programs.
  5. Identify available virtual alternatives to actual travel options for cultural exchange among students.

 

Level: Intermediate

Target Population: Open to all

Methodology Workshops Click on the + sign to expand

Methodology Workshop – Friday, March 19th @ 1 pm

Title: Applied Multilevel Modeling with Longitudinal Data

Presenters: Zachary Himmelberger, Ph.D., Maryville College
A. Reeves Johnson, Ph.D., Maryville College

Length: 2 hours (2 credits)

Workshop Description:

Developmental research lends itself to questions about the processes of change. However, longitudinal datasets pose unique analytical challenges. Multilevel modeling is a flexible technique that has become the standard way to analyze change. This workshop is designed to provide an introduction to multilevel modeling that is approachable for applied researchers. The workshop will include a conceptual overview, discussions of potential challenges, and examples of implementation.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate questions that can be answered using multilevel models.
  • Describe multilevel models using appropriate statistical terminology.
  • Specify a statistical model to answer research questions specific to longitudinal data. 
  • Identify useful resources for further learning.

 

Level: Introductory

Target Population: This presentation is open to all. The only requirement is that participants have a working knowledge of simple linear regression.

Lectures Click on the + sign to expand

Lectures on Wednesday, March 17th

5 pm – Rosecrans I Address (Christopher Ferguson)

6 pm – Rosecrans II Address (Isha Metzger)

Lectures on Thursday, March 18th

4 pm – Seigel-Wallston Address (Anna Ropp)

5 pm – SEPA Presidential Address (Sharon Pearcey)

Lectures on Friday, March 19th

1 pm – STP Invited Address (Molly Metz)

4 pm - APA Lecture (Isabel Gauthier)

The Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Southeastern Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

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