ACU 2018 Annual Conference

Agenda

Click here to see the 2018 Schedule-at-a-Glance (pdf)

 

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  • Sunday, July 29, 2018
  •  
    4:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Pre-Conference Workshop - Making Workforce Work in Your Community  (Pre Conf 2)
    Whether you are employed by a PCA or a Health Center, engaging partners as part of you overall workforce or recruitment plan is vital to your success as an organization. During this session, you’ll learn why it is important of engaging community members as a part of your workforce activities, along with how to engage these various members of your community. You’ll take away some practical tools and tips to implementing this process. This session will feature some small group work as we break into teams based on organization type.
    Fee  Optional 
    4:00 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Pre-Conference Workshop - Using Your Voice: Advocacy 101  (Pre Conf 1)
    This session will shed some light on the process of how legislation is introduced, considered and debated, and signed into law and what you can do to influence public policy. It will also cover basic principles of successful advocacy and a summary of tactics that build power and influence for individuals and grassroots organizations.
    Fee  Optional 
     

    General Session

    6:30 PM  -  8:30 PM
    Welcome Reception
    Welcome Reception and Awards Ceremony
  • Monday, July 30, 2018
  •  

    Workshop Session #1

    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Best Practices for the Recruitment and Retention of Clinical Providers in Safety Net Clinics  (Workforce)
    Smithson Room

    In the continuously evolving healthcare environment it can be difficult for health centers and safety net clinics to recruit and retain clinical staff while remaining competitive. Ashley Colwell, Illinois Primary Health Care Association's Associate Director of Clinical Services and Workforce Development will share strategies clinics can utilize to positively impact their recruitment and retention efforts. Ms. Colwell brings eleven years of Federally Qualified Health Center workforce experience and will share ways you can develop or revitalize the recruitment and retention processes at your clinic. Numerous best practices will be shared. Ms. Colwell will highlight key stakeholders needed for recruitment and retention success. National, state and local level programs and organizations that can have a positive impact on recruitment and retention will be highlighted. Attendees will leave the session with recruitment and retention ideas that can be easily implemented. Ms. Colwell brings eleven years of Federally Qualified Health Center workforce experience and will share ways you can develop or revitalize the recruitment and retention processes at your clinic. Numerous best practices and resources will be shared. Programs and organizations available to assist health center recruitment and workforce development efforts will be also be highlighted. Attendees can leave the session with recruitment and retention ideas that can be easily implemented.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will be exposed to best practices for recruiting clinicians into their clinics.
    2. Session participants will gain knowledge of retention best practices.
    3. Attendees will develop an understanding of organizations and resources available they can utilize to positively impact their recruitment and retention efforts.

    Speaker: Ashley Colwell, MS, PHR, SHRM-CP

    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Building Partnerships to Leverage Resources and Improve Health  (Practice)
    Dumbarton Room

    Those who live in poverty experience multiple complex barriers to achieving equitable health outcomes. The cost burden often falls on Emergency Departments and the broader community, while these individuals and families experience a significant reduction in quality and years of life. Learn how Catherines Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center Look Alike in Grand Rapids, Michigan, improved heart health outcomes for underserved populations through community-based, collaborative programming. This session will help you analyze your community, identify community needs and assets, forge strong, strategic cross-sector partnerships, and leverage resources. Ultimately, you'll learn how to address your community's needs with your community's assets.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify and leverage community resources to address a complex problem.
    2. Identify and engage strategic cross-sector partners for program collaboration.
    3. Identify best practices for collecting and implementing patient input in order to improve engagement and clinical outcomes

    Speakers: Karen Kaashoek, BA, RN, MBA
    Jess Eglington

    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Equity, Education and Expansion: The New Haven Primary Care Consortium  (Practice)
    Algonquin Room

    Nearly all care to the underserved in New Haven, Connecticut is provided by three distinct entities: Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH), Fair Haven Community Health Center (FHCHC) and Cornell Scott Hill Health Center (CSHHC). There are significant opportunities for improved partnerships among the institutions, and the New Haven Primary Care Consortium (NHPCC) is seeking to address those opportunities. Join this session to discover how the NHPCC is being structured to ensure greater integration of medical, mental health, and dental services for the community; and how the Yale departments and the FQHCs are working together to create an operating model that blends the best aspects of training and service. By committing to data integration, the NHPCC will support seamless information transfer between YNHH, FHCHC, and CSHHS which in turn ensures that up-to-date information about patients are available to all providers. The shared electronic health record will allow them examine differences in access, quality, and outcomes by unique patient cohorts. The NHPCC will also serve as a focal point for expanded training of residents in topic areas of health justice, social determinants of health, health disparities in the New Haven community, and strategies to address disparities through community organization partnerships. The proposed NHPCC model will be able to positively influence the community across many domains and the workshop will address the clinical practice, operational, financial, educational and community implications.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Learn about community/academic partnerships in the US.
    2. Learn about pipeline implications for medical education in a large, multidisciplinary FQHC setting.
    3. Learn about clinical, operational, financial and educational challenges of large-scale community partnership endeavors.

    Speaker: Douglas Olson, MD

    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Promoting Growth, Stability & Diversity in Primary Care Workforce  (Policy)
    Douglass Room

    There are numerous strategies that tackle the primary care shortage facing our nation, nearly all of them requiring partnership across sectors. In 2017, CPCA created a Primary Care Workforce Policy Coalition made up of over 60 partners across multiple sectors in order to impact workforce legislative changes that promote growth at all levels of the care team, and ensure that the primary care workforce better reflects diverse and underserved communities. This session will walk participants through the steps of building a policy coalition; delineating roles in an informal collaborative; ensuring effective internal/external communications channels; and fostering agreement and energy around focused policy solutions.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify sectors in which collaboration would be helpful to impact policy activities, as well as identify strategies for building and improving partner relationships.
    2. Design a Policy Prioritization process that ensures partner voice is heard, encourages buy-in and support, and results in actions the Coalition can share.
    3. Begin to design a Communication & Outreach Plan that promotes effective stakeholder engagement.

    Speakers: Christina Hicks, MSOD
    Beth Wrobel, BSME

     

    Workshop Session #2

    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Interprofessional Educations Role in Treating Vulnerable Populations  (Practice)
    Dumbarton Room

    Interprofessional education has been endorsed by the Institute of Medicine because of the impact it has on the quality of health care delivery. Health Care for the Homeless and other community health centers serving vulnerable populations are settings in which the complexity of patients lend itself to an interdisciplinary delivery model. Shared decision making and problem solving are integral in health care delivery to persons who are vulnerable and fosters continuity of care. This allows students to master communication skills and knowledge share in interprofessional groups. Ultimately, when professionals deliver care incorporating this delivery model the quality of care is enhanced, the cost of care delivery is reduced, and the number of medical errors are reduced. In addition, providers of care and patient satisfaction are likely to improve. A number of academic institutions are incorporating interprofessional care activities for health-related disciplines including pharmacy, medicine, nursing and social work. The use of interprofessional teams in various contexts could potentially enhance efficiencies in health care delivery and bridge critical gaps in care.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe means in which students can learn about the roles and responsibilities of other health professionals involved in the provision of care to vulnerable populations.
    2. Discuss the importance of engaging various health professions in the care of complex patients with multiple chronic diseases.
    3. Understand the positive outcomes associated with interprofessional care delivery and discuss best practices related to interprofessional education.

    Speaker: Pia Valvassori, PhD, ARNP

    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Medical Legal Partnership at HealthLinc: Transforming the Health Care Team  (Practice)
    Douglass Room

    In 2016, HealthLinc, a FQHC located in northern Indiana, was thrown in the middle of an environmental disaster when 1,500 patients of its East Chicago clinic were told the West Calumet Public Housing facility was located on top of the USS Lead Superfund Site. The announcement caused stress and concerns for the patients, their health care providers and the community. This presentation will describe the journey that HealthLinc embarked upon, along with Indiana Legal Services, to address the health-harming legal needs this crisis brought our attention to by creating a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). It began in its East Chicago Clinic, and then expanded to all 10 clinics. Through a grant from the Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute in late 2017, HealthLinc began working with the Indiana University School of Medicine and a diverse group of community partners to identify, prioritize and implement evaluation measures relate to the HealthLinc MLP initiative.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to identify the impact that unmet legal needs can have on the health of patients.
    2. Participants will learn about the various steps required to implement a new MLP and measure its impact including the engagement of legal partners; the training of staff and providers; modification of the EHR and workflow; marketing to patients; and the conduct of program evaluation.
    3. Participants will be able to describe specific MLP cases and their legal and health outcomes.

    Speaker: Beth Wrobel, BSME

    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Purpose. Passion. Partnerships: The Path to Well-Being  (Workforce)
    Algonquin Room

    Burnout is a pervasive problem that is affecting nearly half of healthcare professions across the country. The time to sound the alarm is now! We must act with a sense of urgency because burnout is slowing stealing away the joy of medicine. Burnout is robbing the most vulnerable patients of high quality and compassionate healthcare professionals. Although burnout has reached frightening levels there are partnerships and strategies to reconnect healthcare professionals to their purpose and passion. Join this session to recognize symptoms of burnout and factors that lead to burnout, identify strategies that can be implemented to address burnout, and develop partnerships that can support practices in retaining high quality healthcare professionals.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understand the burden of burnout among healthcare professionals and recognize symptoms of burnout and factors that lead to burnout.
    2. Become familiar with the impact of burnout as it relates to patient outcomes and identify strategies that can be implemented to address burnout.
    3. Develop partnerships that can support practices in retaining high quality healthcare professionals.

    Speaker: Sophia McIntyre, MD, MPH, MBA, CPE, FAAFP

    11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Ohio Primary Care Workforce Initiative: Clinical Education and Recruitment  (Policy)
    Smithson Room

    According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, various studies and projections show a current and predicted worsening primary care physician shortage. Further compounding the national shortage we face is the maldistribution of primary care physicians. This deficit is of particular concern as the elderly population continues to grow, and many rural, poor, and minority communities remain medically underserved. Ohio’s Community Health Centers are uniquely poised to teach, inspire, & put to work our next generation of primary care providers by exposing students to rich clinical experiences in our network of advanced, modernized primary care settings. Ohio Primary Care Workforce Initiative Beginnings-House Bill 64, Ohio’s state biennial operating budget, including funding (GRF) to support Ohio’s Community Health Centers. OACHC proposed a repurposing of the GRF ($2.7M per year) for workforce development. The OPCWI program is in its 3rd year of the program. The OPCWI is part of the solution to increasing recruitment and retention of providers in areas affected by the vast maldistribution of clinical professionals. Training and education of all primary care team members must continue to move towards the community settings and in particular to FQHCs, located in and serving underserved communities with few alternatives for primary and preventive care.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Expose students to Patient Centered Medical Homes in FQHC practices.
    2. Provide a standardized, high-quality educational experience.
    3. High-quality educational experience while accounting for the loss of productivity associated with precepting.

    Speakers: Ted Wymyslo, MD
    Marie Grady

     

    Workshop Session #3

    3:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Growing our Own: Introducing all Learners and Professional Students to FQHCs  (Workforce)
    Dumbarton Room

    Are you looking to create a pipeline of dedicated clinical staff that understands the FQHC mission? This workshop will describe the approach our institution has taken to overcome common clinical staffing challenges experienced by FQHCs and other public health organizations. Urban Health Plan (UHP), an FQHC network in NYC has been working with many technical and professional schools to develop a clinical workforce from medical assistants to providers. The organizational commitment to teaching and learning and our process to enable clinical learning at all levels with integration of health system sciences, a new pillar of medical education, has been instrumental. Many of the preconceived ideas and myths surrounding the challenges of primary care have been dispelled during the learners rotation experience reinforcing our model as an ideal place to practice primary care.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe the culture of the organization which facilitates teaching and learning.
    2. Demonstrate the administrative and institutional context and processes that enable the work with students.
    3. Demonstrate how our FQHC reflects the newest pillar of medical education called Health Systems Sciences which exhibits the integration of social determinants of health into health care is a win-win for all.

    Speaker: Jennifer Genuardi, MD

    3:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    IT Systems Considerations for Safety Net Disaster Preparedness  (Practice)
    Smithson Room

    Natural disasters and other public health emergencies pose unique challenges for healthcare safety-net organizations. During and following a disaster, community health centers, along with other safety-net organizations, must be prepared to provide continuity for existing patients, while addressing triage and emergent needs of community members. They may also be called upon to render additional, more general services to the communities they are located in. Maintaining business and clinical operations in a disaster scenario requires deep and ongoing preparation, redundant technology and effective communication to optimize services even when infrastructure fails. The presentation will briefly review relevant regulations, and examples will be used to illustrate effective preparation, risk -assessment approaches and responses that optimize resilience for recovery. Participation from attendees will also be encouraged.

    Speaker: David Hartzband, D.Sc

    3:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    A Theoretical Approach to Examining the PCMH's Potential in Reducing Health Disparities  (Policy)
    Algonquin Room

    The purpose of this session is to examine the PCMH model’s potential in reducing health disparities utilizing the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Framework. The Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Framework identifies five domains and four levels of influence on Minority Health and Health Disparities. This session will focus on the healthcare system domain of influence and the competencies and/or criteria of PCMH 2017 that can potentially address each of the four levels of influence on minority health and health disparities: individual, interpersonal, community, and societal.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe health disparities in the United States today with considerations and application to PCMH recognized Federally Qualified Health Centers.
    2. Explain the National Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Framework.
    3. Apply PCMH 2017 criteria to the Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Framework.

    Speaker: Denise Anderson, MPH

    3:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Partnerships Across Sectors to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning  (Practice)
    Douglass Room

    Lead poisoning in children imposes lifelong health consequences. In Chicago, where almost 90% of available housing stock was constructed prior to lead paint bans, nearly 2,000 children are lead poisoned every year. Elevated blood lead levels (BLL) in children are associated with adverse cognitive outcomes, lower IQ, and poorer education achievement. This project is a collaborative effort among the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH), Chicago Public Schools (CPS), Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT), the University of Chicago’s Center for Data Science and Public Policy (DSaPP), the Public Health Institute of Metropolitan Chicago (PHIMC), and AllianceChicago to deploy technologies to empower providers who care for pregnant women, children, and families in proactively identifying lead risk and mitigating adverse outcomes and also to contribute to policies to enhance lead prevention. This project harnessed predictive analytics to create a real-time, actionable system to describe and advocate for vulnerable populations. Health Information Technology was leveraged to predict risk and facilitate remediation of lead poisoning hazards before children are poisoned, preventing lifelong detrimental health and development consequences. Multi-sector information management and data sharing demonstrated the potential to yield tremendous benefits as data held by disparate sectors was aggregated to offer more complete, timely and actionable data. Data sharing strategies for quality and safety must be designed to impact individual patient needs while improving the health status of broader populations and leveraging opportunities to improve practice and policies for the benefit of vulnerable populations.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understand how disparate information systems from the public and healthcare sectors can improve information sharing of disease prevalence and can surface the needs of populations who are at highest risk due to their social determinants
    2. Describe how predictive analytics can improve clinical practice
    3. Understand the value of leveraging data and partnerships to change the current model of clinical care from being reactive to proactive.

    Speaker: Nita Mohanty, MD

  • Tuesday, July 31, 2018
  •  

    Workshop Session #4

    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    All of Us: Promoting Inclusivity through Research at Community Health Centers  (Practice)
    Douglass Room

    The National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program invites one million people living in the United States to share their unique health information, through survey participation, physical measurement, and biospecimen donation, in order to improve healthcare for everyone. This session provides an overview of the All of Us Research Program, including its intentional focus on inclusion of underserved populations who have historically been underrepresented in research. The role of community health centers in All of Us, individual health center strategies for participant engagement, and the integration of AmeriCorps Members into Program workflows will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will become familiar with the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program.
    2. Participants will be able to identify several benefits of this research to special populations and underserved communities.
    3. Participants will be able to list the community health centers involved in the All of Us Research Program and become familiar with strategies associated with each community health center, including the integration of AmeriCorps Members into this research.

    Speakers: Amanda Moody
    Kathleen Keogh, LMS 

    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Development of Medical Spanish Curriculum in Primary Care Residency Program  (Practice)
    Smithson Room

    Language barriers contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes for limited English proficiency (LEP) patients. Language concordance between health care providers and patients has been shown to improve health communication and overall patient experience for Spanish-speaking patients. Given the growing demographic of Spanish-speaking patients in the United States and evidence in favor of language-concordant care, it is critical to establish medical Spanish curriculum for healthcare providers, particularly those practicing in underserved, Latino predominant communities. In this presentation, we will describe a toolbox of diverse curriculum activities, ranging from a one-week brief intensive medical Spanish course to four-week international or domestic immersion rotation. We will offer strategies for implementing this curriculum throughout residency and in a variety of settings. We will also share the highlights and the drawbacks in implementing the curriculum.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To highlight the need for medical Spanish curricula for primary care providers, particularly those practicing in underserved, Latino predominant communities.
    2. To describe a toolbox of diverse medical Spanish curriculum activities that can be integrated into residency curriculum for residents at varying levels of Spanish proficiency.
    3. To discuss methods of evaluation of medical Spanish curriculum and of Spanish proficiency in healthcare providers.

    Speaker: Geethi Abraham, MD, MPH

    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Physician Volunteers Close the Gap on Access to Care via Telehealth Technology  (Workforce)
    Algonquin Room

    The MAVEN Project (Medical Alumni Volunteer Expert Network) is a 501(c)(3) organization that engages physicians to volunteer their clinical expertise via telehealth technology to medically under-resourced communities across the country. CEO Lisa Bard Levine, MD, MBA will share how The MAVEN Project leverages telehealth technology and physician volunteers to close the gap in access to care and make clinical expertise accessible regardless of geographic location.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Physician volunteers can be leveraged to close the gaps in access to care.
    2. Telehealth technology is well-suited to reach underserved populations who lack access to care.
    3. Access to specialty care expertise at safety net clinics can improve care for underserved patients.

    Speaker: Lisa Bard Levine, MD, MBA

    11:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    The Outlook for the National Health Service Corps and other Federal Workforce Programs  (Policy)
    Dumbarton Room
     

    Workshop Session #5

    1:30 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Recruitment and Retention of the Dental Workforce at Community Health Centers  (Workforce)
    Algonquin Room

    To improve access to oral health care, many community health centers (CHCs) have expanded to offer dental services, but little is known about the recruitment and retention of this vital workforce. The overarching purpose of this study of the dental workforce at CHCs in Massachusetts is to support CHC leadership with information to guide and improve dental staff recruitment and retention. The study aims to uncover what motivates the dental workforce to work at CHCs as well as the barriers to working at CHCs, and shed light on potential recruitment and retention strategies and challenges. The findings are based on qualitative in-depth interviews with dental directors and a survey of dentists, limited license dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify potential recruitment and retention strategies and challenges for the dental workforce at community health centers.
    2. Identify the motivators and barriers to working at CHCs among dentists, limited license dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.
    3. Describe the role of dental directors at CHCs and the challenges they face.

    Speakers: Bittie Behl-Chadha, PhD
    Shannon Wells 

    1:30 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Understanding the New Shortage Designation System and the Impact on Communities  (Policy)
    Smithson Room
    1:30 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Caring for Refugees, Asylees, and Other Vulnerable Migrants in New Mexico  (Practice)
    Dumbarton Room

    Between 2013 and 2014, an 8.3 million rise in the number of displaced persons was recorded, marking the world’s highest level of forced displacement since the Second World War. One in every 122 humans is living either as a refugee, an internally displaced person, an asylum seeker, or a documented or undocumented migrant. Many of these individuals interface with the healthcare system through the emergency department, urgent care centers, inpatient services, or primary care clinics. We describe the challenges associated with caring for refugees and other vulnerable migrants, and provide recommendations relevant to their care.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Earning the Patient’s Trust by being culturally competent and the use of qualified medical interpreters.
    2. Patient’s Physical and Mental Health Status Well-Being by utilization sensitive patient centered approach history taking methods and physical exam techniques.
    3. Knowing the available resources to health care providers.

    Speaker: Tapuwa Doreen Mupfumira, MD, MP

    1:30 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Managing Patients on DOACs for Stroke Prevention  (Practice)
    Douglass Room

    Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs) have recently been introduced as innovative anticoagulants that do not require regular laboratory monitoring, compared to their vitamin K antagonist counterparts. However, caution needs to be exercised in correct prescription and follow up to satisfy current guidelines and ensure efficacy and safety. Urban Health Plan, a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in NYC, designed DOAC initiation and monitoring tools with reference tables. Through literature search, we gathered prescribing and monitoring criteria with updated clinically significant drug interactions, pre operative guidelines and other data to design objective screening, assessment and patient education tools along with prescribing and monitoring algorithms. These tools have aided in the correct prescription and management of patients requiring long term anticoagulation with DOACs. Urban Health Plan, a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in NYC, designed NOAC initiation and monitoring tools with reference tables. Through literature search, we gathered prescribing and monitoring criteria with updated clinically significant drug interactions, pre operative guidelines and other data to design objective screening, assessment and patient education tools along with prescribing and monitoring algorithms. These tools have aided in the correct prescription and management of patients requiring long term anticoagulation with NOACs.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To demonstrate the efficacy of the DOAC tools in the correct and guideline based prescription, monitoring, risk stratification, and education of patients on DOACs for long term anticoagulation.
    2. To increase provider confidence in the prescription and monitoring of DOACs in the outpatient setting.
    3. To describe how to address insurance coverage of DOACs for patients receiving care in underserved communities.

    Speakers: Haydee Maldonado, BA
    Haya Ahram, MD
    Rafik Yacoub, PharmD, BCGP 

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