ASSBI 2020 Conference Bite Size!

Agenda

  • Friday, May 22, 2020
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    How to plan and implement single-case designs Part 1: an introduction to the method

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    Brought to you by Professor Robyn Tate

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

    Synposis: The past three decades have seen an exponential rise in the number of single-case designs (SCD) reported in the neurorehabilitation literature.   SCDs use a prospective, quantitative, experimental methodology for the intensive study of an individual who serves as his or her own control.  They are thus to be distinguished from the uncontrolled, anecdotal case description or observational study.  SCDs use a specific methodology and are applicable to both the clinical setting and the research environment. 

    This practical “how-to” webinar provides an introduction to SCD methodology.  A more advanced learning module is provided in Part 2 of this series. This webinar first introduces basic concepts used in SCDs.  It then describes the common types of designs encountered in the literature.  The third section presents a 10-step procedure for designing and implementing a SCD, described in Tate and Perdices (2019).  This procedure covers the types of issues involved in selecting the dependent variable/s (target behaviour/s) and independent variable (the intervention), as well as design selection and monitoring progress.  Finally, the webinar concludes with description of a framework for conducting SCDs in clinical practice using the Model for Assessing Treatment Effect (MATE).

    Webinar outcomes:  at the end of this webinar, delegates will have knowledge of: 1. situations in which to use a SCD; 2. basic concepts involved in SCD methodology; 3. common types of single-case designs, 4. a structure to implement a SCD for an applied research study; and 5. a framework for using single-case methods in clinical practice. 

    Target audience:  researchers; clinicians in allied-health and medicine; advanced students

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional  Closed 
  • Friday, May 29, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    How to plan and implement single-case designs Part 2: ensuring scientific rigour
    Brought to you by Professor Robyn Tate

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

    Synposis:  This practical “how to” webinar builds on information presented in Part 1 of this series.  It assumes the delegate has knowledge of basic concepts pertinent to single-case design (SCD) methodology, the common types of designs, a procedure to implement a SCD, and a framework for using single-case methods in clinical practice. 

    This webinar focuses on how to ensure a SCD is scientifically sound.  It first addresses threats to internal validity and how they apply to SCDs.  It then describes Standards of Design as published by the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC).  The third section presents the internal validity subscale of the Risk of Bias in N-of-1 Trials Scale and shows how it can be used in the planning stage of a study to maximise scientific rigour and minimise threats to internal validity. Finally, the webinar concludes with a description of WWC Standards of Evidence for establishing evidence-based treatments.

    Webinar outcomes:  at the end of this webinar, delegates will have knowledge of: 1. common threats to internal validity as encountered in SCDs; 2. the four WWC Design Standards for SCDs; 3. the seven internal validity items of the Risk of Bias in N-of-1 Trials Scale and how they can be used to minimise threats to internal validity; and 4. WWC Standards of Evidence.

    Target audience:  researchers; clinicians in allied-health and medicine; advanced students

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional  Closed 
  • Friday, June 26, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Digital technologies in neuro assessment and rehabilitation

    This 90 minute webinar will feature the undernoted speakers each presenting for 15 minutes and will be followed by live Q & A.

    Cost: $120 - non-member, $80 - member & student non-member, $60 - student member

    To see the abstracts click here. For the speakers bios please click on the speakers url.

    Dr Elizabeth Beadle: Understanding the role of telehealth and implementation into a community brain injury service;

    Prof Tamara Ownsworth: Use of a telehealth platform to provide psychological support to people with glioma: The Tele-MAST pilot study;

    Dr Michelle Kelly: Telehealth-based assessment of cognition, social cognition, mood and functional independence in older adults;

    Ms Megan Topping: Training sector professionals to support people with disability to develop participant led videos: an independent evaluation;

    Ms Melissa Brunner: How can we help people with traumatic brain injury to use social media during rehabilitation and beyond

    LIVE Q & A
    Fee  Optional  Closed 
  • Friday, July 31, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Managing people with brain injury at home

    This 90 minute webinar will feature the undernoted speakers each presenting for 15 minutes and will be followed by live Q & A.

    Cost: $120 - non-member, $80 - member & student non-member, $60 - student member

    To see the abstracts click here. For the speakers bios please click on the speakers url.

    Prof Skye McDonald: The Carers Way Ahead. A new on-line resource to assist families of people with traumatic brain injuries and challenging behaviour

    Dr Alinka Fisher: Navigating the challenges in conducting behaviour intervention research with families

    Ms Katherine Cameron and Nina Wegener: Now we’re home, how do we keep the conversation going?  An interdisciplinary approach to communication partner training

    Ms Jaycie Bohan: “All the things that you don’t think about when you’re leaving hospital…”: client and family member experiences of an ABI transitional rehabilitation service pilot

    LIVE Q & A
    Fee  Optional 
  • Friday, August 21, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Investigating social cognition in dementia syndromes
    Brought to you by Professor Olivier Piguet

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

    Synopsis of session: Dementias are progressive neurodegenerative brain disorders which manifest clinically in many different forms, depending on the type, location and severity of the underlying pathology. With the ageing of the population, it is becoming urgent to ensure an early and accurate diagnosis. Clinical diagnostic criteria have been proposed in recent years, but these do not generally include social cognition despite the fact that social cognition processes are supported by many of the brain structures that undergo pathological changes in dementia.

    This webinar will provide an overview of social cognition (i.e., emotion processing, understanding of social norms, empathy and theory of mind) and review the recent literature pertaining to dementia. It will also highlight how investigations of these features will improve early and accurate diagnosis and inform therapeutic interventions that can have a positive effect, not only on the individual diagnosed with the disease but also on their family members.

    Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate

    Learning objectivesBy the end of the webinar, attendees will: (i) have an understanding of the main aspects of social cognition, (ii) be able to identify the profiles of social cognition deficits in the main dementia syndromes, and (iii) understand their neural bases.   

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional 
  • Friday, September 25, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Improving services for Aboriginal Australians after brain injury: Current initiatives and findings

    This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by Prof Beth Armstrong and Prof Juli Coffin

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

    Improving services for Aboriginal Australians after brain injury: Current initiatives and findings to date

    Synopsis of session: Recent research has provided insights from Aboriginal people with brain injury and their families around their journeys of recovery that involve geographical, cultural and linguistically diverse issues. One of the biggest barriers is communication, and without a culturally secure care in place, many Aboriginal Australians are simply not recovering to their full potential.   The webinar will discuss the notion of cultural security in clinical practice. We will explore the journeys of Aboriginal Australians after stroke and traumatic brain injury, highlighting ongoing challenges faced, as well as family and community resources that assist recovery, and new service initiatives aimed at improving access to rehabilitation. The presentation will also outline a program of research informed by Aboriginal people with brain injury and their families. The research involves the co-design of all new initiatives by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers, clinicians and Aboriginal community members. The presentation will provide the background to, findings to date and current initiatives to improve service delivery including the WA based Healing Right Way clinical trial – the first of its kind in brain injury involving Aboriginal people specifically.

    Level aimed for: Basic to intermediate

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understanding of the concept of cultural security.
    2. Understanding of the challenges faced by Aboriginal people after brain injury as well as community resources available.
    3. Practical ways forward for the implementation of culturally secure care for Aboriginal Australians with brain injury.

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional 
  • Friday, October 23, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    What works for training communication partners of people with TBI?

    This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by Prof Leanne Togher and Dr Rachael Rietdijk

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member; $40 - student member

    What works for training communication partners of people with TBI? Lessons learnt from a clinical trial of the TBIconneCT program
    Rietdijk, Rachael1 and Togher, Leanne1
    1
    The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW, Australia

    Synopsis of session: Family members, friends, and carers often find it challenging to communicate effectively and positively with a person who has had a traumatic brain injury. Providing training to these communication partners has been found to be an effective approach. TBIconneCT is a manualised communication partner training program, suitable for delivery over telehealth, which was found to have positive outcomes in a clinical trial. This session will provide an overview of (a) the components of the TBIconneCT program, (b) the findings from the TBIconneCT trial and the clinical implications, (c) qualitative feedback from participants regarding the most important parts of the program, and (d) practical advice about working with people with TBI and their communication partners, including incorporating telehealth.

    Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate

    Learning objectives: By the end of the session, attendees will: (i) be able to describe the TBIconneCT program, (ii) understand the clinical implications of the TBIconneCT trial findings, (iii) identify the aspects of the TBIconneCT training most valued by people with brain injury and their communication partners, and (iv) learn clinically applicable strategies for working for communication partners of people with TBI.

     

    Fee  Optional 
  • Friday, November 27, 2020
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    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    ‘How to’ evaluate mainstream and emerging technologies used for executive function support after BI

    This 60 minute webinar is brought to you by A/Professor Libby Callaway and Professor Grahame Simpson

    COST: $100 - non-member; $60 - member & student non-member;

    ‘How to’ evaluate mainstream and emerging technologies used for executive function support after brain injury: Development and testing of a new scoping framework
    Callaway, Libby; Rendell, Reem; Grahame Simpson; Hurst, Jade; MacClean, Liza and Sloan, Sue
    Session Synopsis: Emerging technologies in the 21st century offer opportunity to change the way support is delivered to people with acquired brain injury (ABI). Smart home, wearable and mobile technologies, and associated mobile applications, can offer new approaches to compensate for executive dysfunction. The growing range of technologies available hold potential to improve independent living in the community. However, tools to guide consideration and selection of technology for compensatory cognitive support are lacking. This ‘How To’ session will present a new framework for scoping and evaluating key features of technology which may be applied to compensate for executive dysfunction following ABI. Key evaluation domains will be outlined and discussed in detail. Workshop attendees will explore use of the framework via a case scenario (contributed by our team’s lived experience collaborators) to evaluate and consider features of a new movement-sensing technology that can be retrofitted into a home to offer audio-prompting support ustomized to a user’s goals and support needs. There will be an opportunity to provide structured feedback about the utility of the framework based on this applied experience.

    Level aimed for: Basic to Intermediate

    Learning objectives: At the end of this session, participants will have: Learnt about a new technology scoping framework developed by a research team in collaboration with people with lived experience of acquired brain injury; health professionals; researchers and social and injury insurers;Gained greater understanding of the domains of evaluation necessary when a person is exploring the use of technology for executive function support following ABI;

    Been offered opportunity to test and provide feedback on use of this framework, using a case scenario contributed by lived experience collaborators;Contributed feedback which will further inform the framework design and utility.

    Fee  Optional 
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