Each category below identifies the child welfare professionals and partnering stakeholders who would be most interested in the particular workshop topic. However, participants are invited to go to any workshop they are interested in. The categories are as follows:

System & Program Leadership
(DCF, CBC Lead Agency, CMO Directors, Program Administrators and Managers, Development Staff, Quality Managers, Supervisors)

Practice & Caregivers
(Hotline, Education, Child Protection Investigators, Case Managers, Licensing, Adoptions, Independent Living, GALs, Relative/Non-Relative Caregivers, Foster and Adoptive Parents, Other Providers)

Legal
(Dependency Judges and Magistrates, Other Court Personnel, Children's Legal Services, Parents' Attorneys)

Agenda

  Go
    • Tuesday, August 29, 2017
    •  

      Registration

      8:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
      Registration Check-in
      11:30 AM  -  1:00 PM
      Exhibitor Meet & Greet
      Meet and connect with exhibitors/sponsors in the Exhibit Hall. Grab-and-go lunches, snacks, and beverages will be available for purchase.
       

      General Session

      1:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
      Opening General Session
      DCF Secretary:
      Keynote Speaker:
      2:30 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Refreshment Break
       

      Advanced Training Workshops

      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Adoption Interventions: Understanding Florida Statute, Administrative Code and Best Interest Factors  (Legal)
      Florida Statute was amended in July 2016 to include factors that the court must consider in determining whether the best interest of a child is served by transferring custody to a prospective adoptive parent(s) chosen by the parent or an adoption entity. This workshop will discuss the changes to Florida Statute and Administrative Code regarding interventions for the purpose of adoption and the Best Interest Factors that should be considered when reviewing these cases. Finally, this workshop will provide an overview of adoption assistance benefits for interventions. Legal
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Building and Strengthening Multi-System Collaboration: Improving Services for Multi-System Children  (Leadership)
      Children who are dually served by different state agencies tend to face the most monumental obstacles and issues. This is further compounded by the confusion surrounding the multiple agencies charged with their care. In responding to the need for improved communication and collaboration for this population, the Interagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was enacted in 2012. In 2017, the agreement was amended to promote more effective collaboration among state agencies and providers charged with serving children involved in multiple systems. This workshop will discuss the new guidelines and reporting expectations for professionals at the local, regional and state levels. Presenters will provide perspectives from the various levels of the system and will share data about the children served through this process, as well as best practices from throughout the state. Leadership
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Child Safety: Promoting Safe and Healthy Sleep for Relative Caregivers and Children  (Practice)
      In this workshop, participants will gain awareness of innovative findings related to child safety and well-being from a federal demonstration project implemented in Pinellas and Hillsborough counties. This program evaluation used a randomized control trial with more than 1,500 kinship caregivers. This workshop will show the evidence from that program, highlighting that kinship caregivers have troubled sleep (67%) and are caring for children who are waking up during the night and restless. During the project, 29% of kinship caregivers were taking sleep aids, and 64% of children were taking medications that caregivers were concerned could be impacting their sleep. This workshop will highlight a sleep hygiene education program which can educate caregivers on safe sleep (co-sleeping, sleep positioning infants) and healthy sleep practices for themselves and the children in their care, instead of a reliance on prescription sleep aids. Practice
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Conflict Management: Diversity of Mind, Unity in Focus and Sustainable Passion  (Practice)
      Chapter 39 of Florida Statutes requires partnership between the Department, agencies, courts and local communities. Reality reveals conflict and requires conflict management. What’s a person to do? Ideas must be developed, and something practical must be done with them. This will be an interactive and informative workshop on developing long-term sustainable solutions to turn destructive conflict into constructive conflict.This workshop will explore the differences between Child Protective Investigations, Case Management, and Children’s Legal Services’ roles, language and perspectives. The goal for participants is to recognize that constructive conflict results in systemwide growth and improvement while staying focused on our common goal regarding the child and permanency. Participants will leave with the tools to stretch thinking, helping everyone to reach the Aha! moment to long-term sustainable solutions. Note: Several concepts are based on the book, Quiet Leadership, by David Rock. Practice
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Focus and Change: Scaling Caregiver Protective Capacities in Case Management  (Practice)
      How do we know what must change for the families we work with in case management? How do we know what is the right intervention for the family? What are we needing to change? These are all questions that are raised when case management agencies begin their work with families.The Family Functioning Assessment Ongoing and the Family Functioning Assessment Progress Update are intended to inform the case plan outcomes, including the targeted intervention, and assess for progress change. Identifying what must change and when change has occurred requires the assessment and scaling of the parents’ caregiver protective capacities. Florida Child Welfare Practice has developed standardized definitions for each of the caregiver protective capacities to guide case managers in their assessments. This workshop will assist participants in understanding the concept of caregiver protective capacities and provide for guided case practice in applying the standardized definitions. Practice
      Speakers:
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Fundamental Rights in Florida's Child Welfare System 2.0: Where are we now?  (Legal)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.The scope of the fundamental liberty interests in the care, custody and control of children has been thrust into the spotlight in Florida's dependency proceedings through legislation, rule-making and court decisions over the last two years. This workshop will examine how the 2016 legislative revisions to section 63.082(6), Florida's adoption intervention statute, are being implemented by the trial and appellate courts. Topics covered also will include how courts are applying the Florida Supreme Court's holding in S.M. v. Department of Children and Families, as well as the most recent activity regarding ineffective assistance of counsel, including the status of the pending changes to the Rules of Juvenile Procedure. Legal
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Hiding in Plain Sight: Substance-Exposed Children  (Practice)
      Screening for substance misuse can be extremely challenging because the entire family covertly, and sometimes overtly, is involved in the “Great Cover-Up.” It is essential for the child welfare professional to learn how to see through and beyond the denial, minimizing and rationalizing that create such a smokescreen that children are hidden in plain sight. This workshop will highlight: 1) what information is necessary to accurately identify substance misuse when the parent’s use is hidden behind secrecy and deceptions, 2) what information on the family needs to be included in the referral to help an assessor complete a substance abuse evaluation, and 3) how the professional evaluation should inform the safety planning and interventions with the family. Practice
      Speakers:
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Promoting Child and Family Well-Being Through Civil Rights Compliance  (Practice)
      Federal civil rights laws protect children and families from unlawful discrimination in the administration of child welfare programs, activities, and services. During this session, representatives from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights will provide an overview of the Human and Health Services and Department of Justice child welfare guidance clarifying child welfare agencies’ obligations under federal civil rights laws. The presentation will also include a primer on Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and its applicability to child welfare activities. Practice
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Saving Our Boys to Save Our Girls  (Practice)
      I AM: The Empowerment Project is a unique prevention program designed for male youth who may engage in the crime of human trafficking and related behaviors. This workshop provides a holistic view of the circumstances or vulnerabilities that may lead a young man to engage in criminal behaviors inclusive of human trafficking or gang-related activity. By discussing the trafficker as someone needing prevention services, we position ourselves on the national level to make systemic changes for young men in order to enhance their well-being and to potentially save our young ladies. Practice
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      The Importance of ICWA: A Look at History, the Law, and New Regulations  (Legal)
      This workshop will inform participants on the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and why the Act is in existence. Specific topics to be covered will include an overview and discussion of the new ICWA regulations. In addition, the participants will increase their understanding of how to apply the new ICWA regulations. Legal
      Speakers:
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Transforming the Dependency Court Model: Update on Florida's Early Childhood Courts  (Legal)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.Florida now has 18 specialized Early Childhood Court (ECC) teams that serve families with children under age 5 in dependency. The families served by ECC teams have multiple needs, most with parents struggling with some combination of substance use, trauma or family violence, and mental health issues. Using a coordinated team approach, the ECC model focuses its approach on being as therapeutic as possible. In this workshop, each of the three core team branches will share with participants key principles from the ECC model that are most influential in their work. Legal
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Using the Safe and Together Model to Improve Assessments Using the Six Domains of Information Collec  (Practice)
      In this workshop, participants will learn how to apply the Cross Walk between the Safe and Together Model and the Six Domains of Information Collection. This tool, developed for Florida, provides questions that guide domestic violence assessment in domestic violence and non-domestic violence cases. It will demonstrate how to use these questions as part of a universal screening strategy as well as to create stronger Family Functioning Assessments and Safety Plans in domestic violence cases. The Safe and Together Model is the Florida Department of Children and Families' contracted approach to addressing domestic violence. It has evidence connecting it to reductions in out-of-home placements in two Florida regions, as well as evidence of increased identification of domestic violence in one region. Practice
      Speakers:
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Whamm, Boom, Kapow! Florida Youth SHINE Shares How You Can Bring Out the Superpower in Every Kid  (Practice)
      What do kids in care have in common with superheros? They are tough, resilient, have secret talents and were involved in the system! Superman was adopted, Spiderman was in relative care, Batman was in a pre-adoptive placement, Robin was on runaway status until Batman took him into kinship, and Wonder Woman was raised in a group home. Children in care really are superheros! However, many youth in the system can feel powerless and that they have no voice. Florida Youth SHINE members will use the power of their voices to discuss issues, experiences, and solutions that impact the system, as well as how they have been able to harness their powers and be empowered to become superheros. Topics in this workshop will include siblings, biological families, foster parents and recruitment, positive relationships, mental health, education, abuse and neglect, resiliency and other themes. Learn how to help a future superhero and empower youth to express their secret talents for good in the world. Practice
      3:00 PM  -  5:15 PM
      Youth Mental Health First Aid - How to get this critical program started in your community  (Practice)
      This workshop will inform participants about Youth Mental Health First Aid. Youth Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour training designed to teach parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, school staff, peers, neighbors, health and human services workers, and other caring citizens who regularly interact with young people how to help an adolescent who is experiencing a mental health or addiction challenge or is in crisis. In this workshop, you will learn some of the key components covered in the training, as well as how to build this resource into your system of care as a key component of integration between the child welfare and behavioral health service delivery systems. Participants will also learn about finding nearby courses, obtaining certification to become an instructor, and understanding the benefits of this program to your service array. Practice
       

      Welcome Reception

      5:30 PM  -  7:00 PM
      Welcome Reception
      The Welcome Reception is included in your conference registration fee. Please RSVP.
    • Wednesday, August 30, 2017
    •  
      6:15 AM  -  7:30 AM
      Morning Yoga Offered
      Join us for a beginner friendly gentle yoga class. Our class will include breathing exercises, gentle poses, and stress reducing benefits of yoga practice. Beginner and advanced yogis are welcome. Please arrive wearing yoga/exercise clothing, this class will be offered in the yoga studio at the fitness center. Limited space available.
      7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
      Continental Breakfast Provided
      7:30 AM  -  5:00 PM
      Registration Check-in
       

      Workshop Session A

      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Addiction: What Happens to Adult Functioning and Protective Capacity When Drugs Hijack the Brain?  (Practice)
      For years, a paradigm of the addiction treatment community has been that significant drug use causes "arrested development" in individuals using psychoactive substances. However, even “one time” or “controlled” use can contribute to, or even result in, a danger threat. How is a child welfare professional to differentiate between a quick fix (no pun intended) and a pervasive family condition? This workshop will explore how advances in addiction science offer new insights in identifying problems in adult functioning and compromised caregiver protective capacities. Assessment of child safety is not only dependent upon a thorough understanding of how impaired a parent becomes while using, but to what extent his or her neurotransmitter pathways remain compromised after drug use has stopped. Practice
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Arts Based Youth Development  (Practice)
      Participants will actively engage in a lyrical expression creativity workshop while learning about the Arts Based Youth Development (ABYD) model. ABYD is an intentional, holistic practice. ABYD combines hands-on art making and skill building in the arts, humanities, and sciences with a focus on the development of life skills to support young people in successfully navigating the transition into adulthood. The model is a cohesive blending of arts education, life-skill development, and youth mentorship. Participants will gain awareness on how ABYD can be successfully applied in diverse settings, among a variety of individuals. No prior arts skills are necessary to participate in this workshop. Come hear about the various victories and difficulties the ABYD instructors have encountered and triumphed over while serving young people throughout the state of Florida. Practice
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Child Care Placements for At-Risk Children: The New Rule  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide participants with important information regarding the recent changes in eligibility requirements made to the School Readiness Program, specifically for child care placement of at-risk children involved with the child welfare system. Participants will gain awareness on how key areas of changes in requirements will impact child care referrals for at-risk children. Additionally, presenters will discuss practical strategies on making valid child care referrals. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome: What Everyone Serving Child Victims Needs to Know  (Practice)
      In this important workshop, the audience will gain a deeper understanding of Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome. This workshop will positively shape their reactions to, and develop their ability to better support and advocate for, children who disclose sexual abuse. Statistically, child victims of sexual abuse routinely face secondary trauma (including disbelief, blame and rejection) from adults in the course of disclosing their experience. Such abandonment by the very adults most crucial to a child's protection drives the child deeper into self-blame and alienation. In an attempt to prevent such re-victimization within our own system of care, this workshop will introduce evidence that shows children exposed to sexual assault often react very differently than expected. This workshop will educate by breaking down the syndrome into its five categories and will improve understanding of the child's position in the complex dynamics of sexual victimization. Practice
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Creating a Circle of Security in Child Welfare: Engaging High-Risk Parents in Attachment Parenting  (Practice)
      Young children are over-represented in child welfare systems, with many ill effects being documented. Of greatest concern, childhood maltreatment is more likely to recur and to have costs when it occurs early in life. As attachment is key to young children's socioemotional development, attachment-focused parenting interventions should be utilized. Parenting interventions often prove challenging, however, as parents who are child welfare-involved experience their own issues. Consequently, any intervention meant to engage these parents should address their past maltreatment and their current parenting. Circle of Security-Parenting is an evidence-based, attachment-focused program that may serve these parents well. This workshop will discuss the importance of attachment for child welfare. The Circle of Security model will be reviewed in the context of engaging child welfare parents. Key findings from a recent Florida Institute for Child Welfare grant study also will be shared. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Differentiated Case Management in Florida's Dependency Courts  (Legal)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.Differentiated Case Management (DCM), an essential element of effective court management, involves: (1) the screening of cases to identify case complexity and risk factors, and (2) assignment of the case to one of several DCM tracks that would receive a differential judicial response (e.g., method of judicial assignment, level of caseflow management, frequency of hearings, level of judicial oversight, problem-solving court components, and dispute resolution). In 2016, three Florida Circuits attended a national institute to learn the principles and theory underlying an efficient case management system and how to implement DCM in dependency cases. This workshop will describe the efforts of the 13th and 17th Circuits in piloting a new DCM approach. Additionally, participants will learn about the goals and purpose of the DCM program, how the circuits got started (including influencing buy-in from stakeholder groups, the court's screening process and court tracks), and evaluating and measuring success. Legal
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Flying Under the Radar: Mental Injury, A Silent Maltreatment  (Practice)
      What is Mental Injury? How does this maltreatment present and impact other incidents of child abuse and neglect? This practice-focused workshop will provide a greater understanding of the frequency of the mental injury maltreatment and how it coexists within other maltreatments, but is sometimes overlooked. In this workshop, participants will interact with each other to identify types of mental injury suffered by children. Participants will learn how to apply skills learned in the workshop and the importance of sufficient domain documentation to the conditions and symptoms indicative of mental injury. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      FSFN Problems? We Have Answers!  (Practice)
      The FSFN Consultant Network provides FSFN support to front-line staff throughout the state. The consultant group was created to enhance the understanding of the Florida Safe Families Network (FSFN) by promoting communication and ensuring information is distributed to users to improve competency. The Network has representation from DCF, Sheriff’s offices conducting child protective investigations and community-based care (CBC) lead agencies from throughout the state. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Guardianship and Guardian Advocate Training for Attorneys and Advocates Post-Regis Little Act  (Legal)
      This workshop will train attorneys and advocates on what they need to know about guardianship and guardian advocate law to represent foster youth needing guardianship. The workshop will address the Regis Little Act, after two years of implementation, and discuss the successes and challenges that still remain. Additionally, the presenters will highlight current information from throughout the state of Florida and engage participants in an interactive discussion on strategies for implementation and improvement. Legal
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Injury Prevention: Using Home Safety Checklists to Identify Potential Hazards  (Practice)
      Many young parents are unaware of the dangers that lurk in their homes, threatening the health and safety of their children. While much effort is focused on preventing child abuse, every year neglect and hazardous conditions in the home actually cause 2 to 3 times more preventable childhood deaths. For example, the 2016 Florida Child Abuse Death Committee Report, analyzing the 349 deaths that occurred in 2015 and were reviewed by local CADR Committees, found that 59 (75%) were due to neglect and 20 (25%) were due to abuse. Most of the other deaths were the result of preventable accidents related to drowning and asphyxia due to unsafe sleep conditions. Serious injuries are even more common than deaths. This workshop will review common hazardous conditions and practices in the home and the use of Home Safety Checklists to identify them, to explain their danger to the child's caretaker and to advise the caretaker on corrective actions to improve the safety of the home.
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      It Is All Connected: DCF's Contract Oversight Unit's System of Care Review  (Leadership)
      The Department of Children and Families has developed a new review method for monitoring community-based care (CBC) lead agency contracts. The new review will focus on the CBC's system of care instead of monitoring for compliance. This workshop will provide details regarding the process and will also provide valuable information regarding the goals for which CBCs should be striving. The new review emphasizes Leadership and Governance, Quality Management and Performance Improvement, Workforce Management, Service Array, Placement Resources and Process, Practice, Partnerships and Community Relations. This workshop session will demonstrate how quality leadership and practices result in achieving excellence. Leadership
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Let's Talk About How We Survive (and even grow through) Difficult Times  (Practice)
      Recent research has dramatically improved our understanding of how a healthy brain develops and what the effects, both positive and negative, are of a child's environment on that development. Childhood trauma has stirred up much conversation, especially about increased risk for numerous negative outcomes. Adverse experiences are not necessarily a prediction of a child's outcomes. When adverse events are buffered with protective factors, resilience is fostered. Resilience, simply defined, means the ability to recover from difficult life experiences, and often to be strengthened by and even transformed by those experiences. Resilient parents have empathy for themselves and others and are able to keep a positive attitude, solve problems creatively and take life's events in stride. The conversations in this session will be led by parents who have partnered with child welfare systems throughout the country to reduce abuse and neglect through the Protective Factors Framework. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Now What? Helping Children Cope with Adoption Disruption  (Legal)
      We try to avoid adoption disruptions at all costs; yet, there are still times when they occur. How do you help a child pick up the pieces after experiencing multiple losses? In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the prevalence of adoption disruptions and the research on disruptions. This workshop will be beneficial for clinicians and families who are working with children who have experienced an adoption disruption. Legal
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Nurturing Natural Relationships: Youth Share How You Can Help Them With Lifetime Relationships  (Practice)
      This workshop will offer a combination of youth voice and advocacy strategies. Florida Youth SHINE members will tackle the complexity of relationships with their parents and their desire to continue relationships with siblings and other relatives. They will share their experiences with maintaining relationships with people who are important to them. Additionally, participants will hear from the youth’s perspective on the role of child welfare professionals and volunteers in helping sort out and support relationships. The presenters will share advocacy strategies for helping children achieve and maintain the relationships they desire. Practice
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Planning for Parenting: Why QPI within the Practice Model Matters  (Practice)
      Research indicates co-parenting is a best practice and serves as one of the core tenets of the Quality Parenting Initiative (QPI). Successful co-parenting is unique to each family. Creating and maintaining a positive relationship between birth families and foster/kinship caregivers begins at the child protective investigator's first interaction with each family and continues through the life of the case, involving the child protective investigator, child welfare case manager, community-based care lead agency, guardian ad litem and the judiciary. While this can be a daunting task, it is possible and has been accomplished with great success with a variety of families throughout Florida. This workshop will highlight practices used in specific areas and share successes of birth families, foster families, and child welfare professionals. We will review how to embed successful co-parenting at every step of the practice model to promote positive reunifications. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Reforming the Juvenile Justice System: The Right Service for the Right Youth at the Right Time  (Practice)
      In 2011, the Department of Juvenile Justice embarked on the greatest transformation of its system. While maintaining public safety continues to be at the core of its services, the Department strives to identify new services and improve existing services for the children in its care; relying on data and research on what works best with this population. This workshop will discuss the various reform efforts implemented over the past several years, including examples of the current service continuum from early intervention to residential placement and aftercare services. Participants will gain awareness of groundbreaking efforts that have been key to transforming service delivery, making the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice a national leader in its field. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Strengthening the Permanency Process: Lessons Learned from the CFSR  (Leadership)
      Permanency for children remains one of the most important and challenging areas for child welfare. The recent findings from the federal Child and Family Services Review (CFSR) identified permanency as an area in need of improvement. This workshop will focus on timely establishment, modification, and documentation of appropriate permanency goals tailored to the needs of the child. A review of the CFSR findings related to permanency will shed light on the importance of child welfare professionals, attorneys, and the courts continuously making concerted efforts to achieve the best form of permanency for each dependent child. Attendees will receive practical guidance on the best practices to employ to properly document the appropriate permanency goal and to ensure caregivers are provided a meaningful opportunity to be heard on the child's needs. Leadership
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Taming the E-mail Beast Using MS Outlook and/or Gmail: Key Strategies for Managing E-mail Overload  (Practice)
      In this workshop session, participants will learn a proven system for taming their e-mail account and strategies for keeping their inbox efficient and under control. The presenter will demonstrate how to get rid of all those "quick little" e-mails once and for all, as well as how to mitigate or even eliminate much of that annoying junk and spam. Participants will also learn several key technical tips, using market-leading software such as MS Outlook and/or Gmail. Practice
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      The Clinical Implications of Misdiagnosis and Over-diagnosis in Children and Adolescents  (Practice)
      Research demonstrates that children and adolescents are often misdiagnosed or over-diagnosed with mental health disorders, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Bi-polar Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other behavioral disorders. With the changes made to the diagnostic criteria of some of the conditions in the DSM-V, it has been debated whether this will reduce or further compound this trend. Moreover, children and adolescents within the foster care system are some of the highest consumers of mental health services and are, thus, more susceptible to inaccurate diagnosis. In this workshop, participants will gain an awareness of the long-term implications of misdiagnosis. Presenters will share case examples for these vulnerable consumers, caregivers and treatment providers. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      There Are No Bad Kids!  (Practice)
      Using a trauma-informed approach to recognize that children's behaviors often stem from ongoing or past family trauma is essential in understanding the dynamics of child functioning in the Child Welfare Practice Model. The key to gathering relevant and sufficient information is an awareness of the effects of childhood trauma on a child's thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. In this workshop, we will explore the reasons for common behaviors in children and use trauma-informed care to acknowledge and describe this behavior. Through this energetic, highly interactive and visual workshop, participants will embark on a journey through decoding and describing child functioning. By observing and engaging in interactive and experiential exercises and demonstrations, participants will leave with a fundamental knowledge of child functioning and how to document and describe this in the Family Functioning Assessment. Practice
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Wagging Tails and Other Indispensable Tools in the Treatment of Trauma  (Practice)
      Denise Conus, Mental Health Program Director and a 32 year veteran of multiple facets of the child welfare system and Brenda Kocher, Certified Trauma Practitioner share their knowledge and expertise of how traumatized children can be best served through trauma-specific  therapies and sensory interventions including the use of highly trained facility dogs.  This workshop will lay a solid but not overly technical foundation of the psychophysiology of trauma and neglect in the developing nervous system and the possible resulting behavioral manifestations. Evidenced based techniques in the treatment of trauma and other successful approaches will be explored.  Examples of how these techniques and the use of the facility dogs have made tremendous differences in the children served at  the Kids House Wayne Densch Children's Advocacy Center in Seminole County and in the Dependency courts in Tampa. Participants will learn what to look for in seeking trauma-specific therapies for their clients.
      Speakers:
      8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Who's on your CSEC team?...The need for a standardized CSEC MDT process  (Legal)
      Thankfully, exploited youth are no longer invisible, and we are stepping up to better understand their experiences and to meet their needs. We know that often high-risk and exploited children have been involved with multiple systems and agencies, and are vulnerable in a variety of ways. Department of Children and Families Operating Procedure 170-14 and the 2014 law that resulted from passage of House Bill 7141 outline the requirement of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) response to commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC). Each county of the state must identify local agencies and professionals who can serve exploited youth's unique needs and create an expanded, inclusive MDT. To provide a truly victim-centered, coordinated and effective CSEC response, it is important to have shared goals and agreed-upon core principles. This training will outline the important components of a CSEC-specific MDT, feature a best practice model and share case studies. Legal
      9:45 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Break
       

      Workshop Session B

      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      2017 Developments in Dependency Case and Statutory Law  (Legal)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.This workshop will inform participants about case and statutory laws released since the 2016 Child Protection Summit that have an impact on the dependency process. The cases to be discussed will address various subjects, including procedures that must be observed when a dependency case is litigated, grounds for an adjudication of dependency, grounds for termination of parental rights, and intervention. This workshop also will highlight the laws passed during the 2017 legislative session that will have the most significant impact on Florida's children and child welfare stakeholders. The presenters will offer practical tips to audience members of how to ensure that their daily practice is in conformity with Florida law. Legal
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Advocating for Children Before, During and After Placement in Residential Treatment  (Practice)
      There is no time to waste! Children in or facing residential treatment present unique and complex challenges even for the most experienced advocate. This workshop will provide child advocates of all experience levels with the tools and knowledge to advocate on behalf of children throughout the residential treatment process. Whether the participant is a guardian ad litem volunteer, an attorney or in case management, this workshop will provide the audience an opportunity to develop and/or refine skills in serving children who are placed in or are being considered for placement in a residential treatment center. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Building Communities of Hope: A Model for Child Abuse Prevention at the Community Level  (Practice)
      With the statewide increase in the number of children entering out-of-home care, it is important to explore effective strategies to reach families before child abuse or neglect occurs. Working with national experts from Casey Family Programs, Partnership for Strong Families (PSF) developed a Resource Center Model for child abuse prevention that has proven successful in three hotspot areas of Gainesville. Seeing a similar need in the 12 rural counties served by the agency, PSF replicated this model in Chiefland and opened a center that has served more than 7,500 patrons since 2015. This workshop will focus on the universal elements necessary to implement the model, including the identification of a community's unique strengths and partnerships that ensure successful replication. Participants will leave the workshop with a greater knowledge of evidence-based child abuse prevention strategies and the tools necessary to explore a similar model in their own counties. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Building Leaders One LEGO® at a Time  (Leadership)
      Participants attending this workshop will learn specific strategies for mentoring and developing leadership capacity. Strategies include consideration of the internal factors of turnover and retention, as well as external factors, such as negative media coverage, competing career options that are less stringent, and work-life balance. Many frontline leaders find themselves struggling and overwhelmed, solely because leadership can be lonely and painful, and they were not prepared to handle these issues. There are some very strong lessons that can be learned from The LEGO® Movie, which will be discussed during the presentation. Leadership
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Coaching the Coaches: Skills-Based Coaching in Child Welfare  (Leadership)
      This workshop will inform participants on coaching skills and strategies to use with new staff, focusing on development of a structured approach to coaching using planning, proximity and performance. Specific topics to be covered will include the skills participants need to develop the use of strength-based feedback, collaborative active learning, problem-solving and accountability for quality coaching and fidelity to coaching interventions. In addition, the participants will design one application to isolate a specific coaching strategy and construct a coaching intervention within their own organization. Leadership
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Communication + Clarity = Confidence  (Practice)
      We can "fake it 'til we make it" or we can actually engage and be present when communicating with our families. This interactive workshop creatively analyzes communication barriers from the child welfare professional’s perspective. From the moment a child welfare professional makes contact with a family, verbal communication and attending behaviors can make or break the interaction. Participants will learn how their role and purpose within the child welfare system guide their engagement practice. An active exchange between participants and guided discussion will help child welfare professionals learn that true communication and engagement with families in crisis require skill development and are more than just words on a page. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Discipline without Damage  (Practice)
      When triggered by children's challenging behaviors, we all can unconsciously pass on familiar, false messages of shame and blame that reflect disproven discipline practices experienced in childhood or seen on television. With awareness of how and why, we can choose to actively calm ourselves, empowering us to respond creatively versus react destructively to children who need our help. We can then apply brain-based learning principles and employ "language of safety" to connect with and re-direct children's behavior more effectively and respectfully. Attendees will learn key elements of Conscious Discipline®, an evidence-based approach to managing behavior that meets vital brain needs for safety, connection and age-appropriate problem-solving. In addition, attendees will be provided with numerous practical ideas to implement and share, for example, active calming exercises, recommended responses to manage conflicts, and internet resources. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      ESSA Educational Stability Requirements for Students in Care: A Panel Discussion  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide participants with an overview of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provisions for foster care students. A panel of school district personnel will share how these provisions are being implemented in collaboration with their local community-based care agency. Participants also will learn about the requirements, effective in December 2016, for local school districts and community-based care providers to develop policies and procedures to transport children in foster care to the school of origin. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Florida's KIDS COUNT and They’re Counting on Us!  (Leadership)
      This seminar will focus on data-informed advocacy using permissible, effective communications strategies to reach diverse audiences. Child welfare professionals, community volunteers and family members have the rights and the responsibility to advocate on behalf of their causes, organizations, and the people in their community. The presentation will describe the current state of Florida's most vulnerable children and families and show how data can enhance organizational communications strategies and messaging. The presenters will provide tips for working with public officials, their staff members, the media and community supporters. Leadership
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      From Micro to Macro, Examining the Intersection of Protective Capacities and Protective Factors  (Practice)
      Protective capacities are caregiver characteristics that directly contribute to child safety. Protective capacities contribute to the reduction of risk. Protective factors are attributes of not only the individual and family but also of the larger community that reduce risk and promote the healthy development and well-being of children and families. This extremely interactive workshop will discuss how to increase protective capacities in the families we serve by promoting protective factors to reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect. We will also draw comparisons and illustrate the connection between the Protective Factors and the Protective Capacities so as to ensure an understanding of how each is dependent on the other to best protect children and serve families.
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      FSFN Problems? We Have Answers!  (Practice)
      The FSFN Consultant Network provides FSFN support to front-line staff throughout the state. The consultant group was created to enhance the understanding of the Florida Safe Families Network (FSFN) by promoting communication and ensuring information is distributed to users to improve competency. The Network has representation from DCF, Sheriff’s offices conducting child protective investigations and community-based care (CBC) lead agencies from throughout the state. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Gang Sex Trafficking: What all CPIs and Case Managers should know!  (Practice)
      Gangs conduct criminal activity in all 50 states. Although most gang activity is concentrated in major urban areas, gangs also are proliferating in rural and suburban areas as gang members flee increasing law enforcement pressure in urban areas. During this session, attendees will learn to recognize signs of gang involvement, including gang tattoos, terminology, graffiti and the use of hand signals. Attendees also will be able to recognize the warning signs and risk factors of youth gang recruitment. This session also will discuss the female's role in gangs and how gang sex trafficking differs from other forms of trafficking. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Implementing My JumpVault - The Personal Health Record from a CBC, Youth and Caregiver Experience  (Leadership)
      In this workshop, a panel of several community-based care (CBC) champions, caregivers and foster youth with experience utilizing the system will explain their personal outlook of the Personal Health Record (PHR) Solution, My JumpVault, and lessons learned from the CBC implementation. The panelists will describe how the 24/7 electronic access to the youth's most critical records has saved time and improved quality of services using My JumpVault. Youth also will share their personal experiences of the system empowering their transition through care and adulthood.Participants will learn the various ways CBC champions have encouraged use of the PHR system, the My JumpVault help desk process, and integration of automated information from Sunshine Health and local CBC imaging systems to create the electronic Child Resource Record. The workshop will include a demonstration of new My JumpVault reports built for the CBC champions and how these reports are integrated into the CBC business processes. Leadership
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Making the Most of Psychological and Parenting Evaluations in Child Protection Cases  (Legal)
      Psychologists have much to offer frontline professionals and legal representatives when assessing parents and children involved in child protection cases. Empirically-informed clinical and forensic evaluations can provide valuable information about child and parent functioning, the impact of child maltreatment on the family, case plan recommendations, and how best to achieve lasting permanency. This workshop will help frontline professionals (case managers, guaridans ad litem, child protective investigators, etc.) and attorneys understand the nature and utility of psychological assessments and how best to formulate referral questions to meet the needs of families and the referring agency. Actual cases of substance abuse, domestic violence, and serious mental illness will be used to illustrate learning objectives. The assessment process from referral to report submission will be described, along with legal techniques for making the most of psychological testimony in court. Legal
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      One Agency's Approach to Providing Intensive, In-Home Team Services to Improve Youth Outcomes  (Practice)
      This workshop will include a panel discussion focused on a comprehensive and integrated service delivery approach developed by Citrus Health Network to provide intensive in-home services for youth and families throughout the community to maintain family stability, prevent placement disruption, and prevent entry into child welfare or higher levels of therapeutic care. The Children Community Teams have behavioral health integration at their core and implement a multidisciplinary team of professionals to comprehensively address the needs of the youth and their families. The composition of the teams differs among programs depending on the program goals, philosophy, funding stream, target population and desired outcome. The teams include: Children's Community Action Team (CAT), Children and Adolescent Recovery Assistance Services (CARAS) Program, Children's Crisis Response Team, Families Together Team (FTT) and Foster Care In-home Teams. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Preserving Families through Community Partnerships  (Leadership)
      This workshop will offer participants important information on the Devereux Family Builders program. This collaborative program was developed and designed in efforts to maintain families within their community. The aim is to prevent the sheltering of children into the child welfare system, utilizing strength-based and family-focused tools and working in collaboration with Community Partnership for Children and the Department of Children and Families in Volusia and Flagler Counties. During this workshop session, presenters will describe how their role in the project has influenced a reduction in removals. Additionally, the workshop session will focus on three case studies to outline family successes. In conclusion, presenters will engage participants in a panel discussion. Leadership
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Responding to Child Maltreatment Fatalities in Florida  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide an overview of developments over the past three years and since the passage of Senate Bill 1666 in 2014 of the Department of Children and Families and the Department of Health’s efforts to respond to and prevent child maltreatment fatalities. Participants will learn about trends related to child maltreatment fatalities and the development and implementation of Critical Incident Rapid Response Teams (CIRRT). The role and function of CIRRTs will be compared with the expanded role of the Child Abuse Death Review (CADR) Committees in reviewing all verified and non-verified child maltreatment fatalities in Florida. Attention will be given to processes that have defined these roles, the level to which the actions and responsibilities of CIRRTs and CADR complement one another, and the need for the promotion and strengthening of interagency collaboration to address child maltreatment and fatality prevention throughout Florida. Practice
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Selected Family Interventions-An innovative, therapeutically- and cost-effective treatment approach  (Leadership)
      DISC Village delivers in-home services to families involved, or at high risk for involvement, in the child welfare system in Circuit 2. Recognizing the need for therapeutically- and cost-effective treatment, DISC Village developed the Selected Family Interventions (SFI) program, a comprehensive integrated treatment approach. We recently completed an evaluation of SFI, with clients enrolled between 2011 through 2016. Treatment completion resulted in improved parent-child communication and parenting skills, and decreased parental stress (all p's < .01). We are collecting and analyzing additional data from SFI clients and practitioners, as well as state-level data, and will be comparing SFI's therapeutic effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to programs treating similar populations.
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Serving Special Populations in the Child Welfare System: What ALL Professionals Should Know  (Practice)
      Working with youth and families who are a part of special populations certainly can create additional challenges. Whether that special population is someone identifying as LGBTQ+, CSEC, I/DD or a combination of other populations, professionals need to be aware of the “do's and don'ts” when working with each specific population, evidence-based practices and supported interventions. This workshop will inform participants of the steps to be trauma-informed in assessing needs, providing supportive services and working with youth and families with unique and challenging needs. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Taming the E-mail Beast Using MS Outlook and/or Gmail: Key Strategies for Managing E-mail Overload  (Practice)
      In this workshop session, participants will learn a proven system for taming their e-mail account and strategies for keeping their inbox efficient and under control. The presenter will demonstrate how to get rid of all those "quick little" e-mails once and for all, as well as how to mitigate or even eliminate much of that annoying junk and spam. Participants will also learn several key technical tips, using market-leading software such as MS Outlook and/or Gmail. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      The Power of Thanks: Leadership Essentials  (Leadership)
      This high-energy session will focus on the importance of supporting an engaged, energized workforce using the Culture of Recognition strategy. This approach inspires greater employee engagement and loyalty; stronger, more unified teams and departments; and improved customer satisfaction. Through interactive discussion and hands-on application, participants will gain tools to shape their leadership approach to inspire innovation and retention. Let's make positive energy spread like wildfire! Leadership
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      Understanding the Power of Language in Child Welfare Cases Involving Domestic Violence  (Practice)
      When working with families in the child welfare system who are experiencing domestic violence, the language we use and the way we talk about domestic violence make a difference in whether a perpetrator is held accountable or a survivor is re-victimized. This workshop will discuss the dynamics and common misconceptions of domestic violence, exploring the impact language has on families, specifically the language used to talk about and report on domestic violence in child welfare cases. Finally, this workshop will explore techniques for interviewing survivors, engaging perpetrators, addressing co-occurring substance abuse issues, and utilizing local co-located domestic violence advocates. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:15 AM
      What Is and What Is Not Trauma-Informed Practice  (Practice)
      Trauma-informed care has become the current hype in clinical practice in general, as well as in foster care and adoption practices, specifically. Many foster care and adoption programs purport to deliver trauma-informed care. But do they really? This workshop will explore the essential elements of trauma-informed care as well as delineate "therapeutic" approaches that run counter to trauma-informed practices. Practice
      Speakers:
       

      General Session

      11:15 AM  -  12:30 PM
      Networking Lunch
      12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
      General Session
      Trauma Past, Trauma Present: Relevance of Trauma to Professionals Working with Victims of Child Abuse and their Families

      Seventy percent of adults in the United States have experienced some type of traumatic event at least once in their lives − 223.4 million people. Adverse Childhood Experiences studies show that many of these traumas occur before age 18 and result in disrupted brain development and adoption of at-risk health behaviors, and increase the risk for disease, disability and social problems in children and adults, including developing physical and mental illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognized this epidemic requires a public health response at a national level, state and local level. Evidence has shown that by implementing trauma-informed practices within all human service systems impacting youth, adults and their families, individuals are empowered to build their resilience and enhance their overall health and well-being.

      In this presentation, Dr. Allison Sampson-Jackson will define trauma (also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences or child traumatic stress) and the impact of trauma on the developing brain as well as on the ability to trust others (attachment). Common coping behaviors exhibited by youth, caregivers and adults who have experienced complex forms of trauma also will be discussed. Specific attention will be given to the impact of trauma on children who are involved in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

      Throughout the presentation, Dr. Sampson-Jackson will discuss her journey and experiences with complex trauma as a child and caregiver. She will discuss ways in which different systems and people within systems hurt her recovery as well as helped her recovery. She will focus on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s call to us all … that trauma-informed care asks all human service professionals to realize the widespread impact of trauma, recognize the signs and symptoms of trauma, and respond by integrating trauma-informed knowledge into all policies, procedures and practices while actively resisting re-traumatizing the youth, families and adults we serve.
      2:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
      Break
       

      Workshop Session C

      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Best Practice Parenting Models  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide participants with an overview of the Nurturing Parenting Program (NPP) and Parenting Journey Program (PJP). NPP is an evidence-based, in-home parenting program, and PJP is an evidence-informed parenting program. Participants will gain an awareness of the unique strengths of each model. The workshop will demonstrate how the models can be used consecutively to provide parents insight into their parenting, as one connects to how parents were parented (PJP) and the other gives parents hands-on application of new parenting skills (NPP). The workshop will review the outcomes Devereux Kids has experienced using each curriculum, including testimonials from parents completing each curriculum, as well as child welfare professionals referring to each program. Practice
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Breaking Barriers and Increasing Permanency through Technology: TELEHEALTH – the New Connection  (Leadership)
      This workshop session will address common barriers to achieving child well-being, health, safety, and permanency, and outline how technology can be utilized in overcoming these barriers. IMPOWER, Florida's leading provider of telehealth with more than 25,000 services conducted, will outline their successful journey in utilizing state-of-the-art technology to increase access to care, improve collaboration of care, remove geographical barriers and bring care to the child (even in the most remote locations), overcome shortages of practitioners, and eliminate wait times for behavioral health services. The workshop will also focus on how the multi-participant, HIPAA-compliant, telehealth platform is utilized to improve coordination of care by allowing numerous individuals, such as judges, legal advocates, dependency case managers, parents, caregivers and treating practitioners, to have simultaneous, real-time, face-to-face discussions, regardless of varying geographical locations. Leadership
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Building Leaders One LEGO® at a Time  (Leadership)
      Participants attending this workshop will learn specific strategies for mentoring and developing leadership capacity. Strategies include consideration of the internal factors of turnover and retention, as well as external factors, such as negative media coverage, competing career options that are less stringent, and work-life balance. Many frontline leaders find themselves struggling and overwhelmed, solely because leadership can be lonely and painful, and they were not prepared to handle these issues. There are some very strong lessons that can be learned from The LEGO® Movie, which will be discussed during the presentation. Leadership
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Busting the Myths and Uncovering the Ins and Outs of the Florida Abuse Hotline  (Practice)
      The Florida Abuse Hotline is the gateway to Florida’s child welfare system. This workshop session will dispel myths and common misconceptions of report acceptance at the Hotline. The work performed at the Hotline impacts the work of every child protective investigator, case manager and other frontline child welfare professionals. However, few truly understand what happens inside the walls of the Florida Abuse Hotline. This training will offer a brief highlight of the professionally mandated reporter requirements, as well as provide an overview of the role of the Hotline Counselor and Criminal Analyst. The presenters will discuss the assessment process and what happens to the information provided to a Hotline Counselor. This training will strive to bust the myths and common misconceptions for why the Hotline may or may not accept a report you provide. Practice
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Evaluation of Early Childhood Court Teams in Escambia and Okaloosa Counties  (Legal)
      The purpose of this grant-funded project was to fulfill two specific gaps in the implementation of the Escambia and Okaloosa County Early Childhood Court Teams (ECCTs). These gaps were: a) the need for evaluation and b) the need for trauma-informed training to enhance the functioning of the ECCTs. The project was funded by the Florida Institute for Child Welfare in the College of Social Work, Florida State University. The evaluation incorporates five major components. One component is an impact analysis using quasi-experimental designs to compare safety and permanency outcomes between ECCT and non-ECCT families. This workshop session will share findings that are the most noteworthy contributions to the evidence base on early childhood courts. Legal
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Florida's Restorative Practices Models for Crossover Youth  (Leadership)
      Youth in Florida’s child welfare and juvenile justice systems face unique challenges that include frequent placement changes, diminished academic progress, cumulative effects of childhood trauma, and a greater likelihood of arrest from incidents at school and at home. The Florida Departments of Children and Families and Juvenile Justice are implementing a collaborative approach that focuses on coordination of services to promote success for dependent youth who crossover, or are at risk of crossing over, to delinquency. Representatives of the Florida Department of Children and Families, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, and Children’s Legal Services will discuss the risk factors and issues pertaining to crossover youth, highlight the Marion County Crossover Youth Model Plan, and focus on implementing restorative practices to build connection among the population we serve to ultimately minimize interaction with the juvenile justice system.
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      FSFN Problems? We Have Answers!  (Practice)
      The FSFN Consultant Network provides FSFN support to front-line staff throughout the state. The consultant group was created to enhance the understanding of the Florida Safe Families Network (FSFN) by promoting communication and ensuring information is distributed to users to improve competency. The Network has representation from DCF, Sheriff’s offices conducting child protective investigations and community-based care (CBC) lead agencies from throughout the state. Practice
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Helping Children at Times of Stress and Trauma  (Practice)
      This workshop will inform participants of how child welfare staff interact with children during some of the most stressful times imaginable – times such as following an experience of physical or sexual abuse, when they are being removed from their home and parents, when a parent fails to show up for a visit, or after the death of a loved one. Child welfare professionals, caregivers, and providers in the system of care are all faced with trying to understand what is going on for the child and how to help, while also managing their own feelings. The presentation will consist of case examples, role plays, and experiential exercises to provide an overview of what is happening for the child, a review of how staff can be in touch with and understand their own feelings, and strategies to help children feel more calm and comfortable during times of extreme stress and trauma. Practice
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      How do we put it all together? Multi-disciplinary teaming for court-involved teen moms and babies  (Leadership)
      Case discussions for court-involved teen moms and their babies are an essential ingredient for the team work required to support both generations. This workshop will use a unique format in conducting a staffing on one multi-system young family with attendees selected to participate in key roles. The staffing will consider the needs of the teen and the baby, and will include a foster parent, case manager, guardian ad litem, and other court and community partners in determining how to move forward. Attention to the dual development needs of the adolescent and baby, the history of trauma, the need for protection and safety, and support of the developing relationship will all be considered. A specific action plan will be developed for an upcoming court hearing where an individualized case plan will be presented to the judge for approval. Surrounding this discussion, key concepts of infant mental health, trauma-informed care, team work, and serving trafficked youth will be addressed. Leadership
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      ICPC: It does not have to be a four letter word!  (Practice)
      The Interstate Compact for the Placement of Children (or ICPC) can be a great tool to permanency when utilized correctly. The ICPC process can also seem complicated and a daunting task to undertake if you are not familiar with the Compact or the resources available to assist an out-of-state placement. This presentation is going to break down why ICPC is important and how it affects the lives of children in care and their families. Best practices, with real-world examples and field experience, will be discussed to highlight how we can reach placement faster. From shelter to adoption, knowledge of ICPC and how to prevent delays is crucial to finding forever families for our children. Of course, the pitfalls of permanency delays, visitation issues and the dreaded litigation and liability that can result also will be explored. Practice
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Kid's Rights, Lawyer's Responsibilities  (Legal)
      Children's lawyers in dependency cases are supposed to address all of the child's legal needs. Some of these legal needs are obvious and others not so much. This workshop will help lawyers and other interested attendees identify the rights that children have and the issues that may arise out of those rights. It will also provide workshop attendees with tools to help them learn how to advocate for those rights. Legal
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Lessons Learned in the Development of a Comprehensive Trauma-Informed System of Care  (Practice)
      This workshop offers information on a specialized, trauma-informed system of care that has been implemented in Miami-Dade County, Fla., to meet the needs of child welfare-involved youth who have been commercially sexually exploited. This system of care includes three key components: 1) Specialized Human Trafficking Court; 2) The Miami CARES Project; and 3) The CHANCE program. Key components of these programs will be described, with an emphasis on the successes and challenges of implementing a trauma-informed approach across systems. Solutions to these challenges, including the development of specialized trainings and protocols, will be highlighted. Practice
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Mental Health Care and Civil Rights of Deaf and Disabled Children in the Child Welfare System  (Legal)
      This presentation will review the Department of Children and Families Office of Civil Rights' commitment to help facilitate effective communication under the recent joint guidance issued by the Department of Justice and serve as a strong resource for each stage of the family services’ processes and systems. The presenters will guide the audience through the decision-making process for treatment or placement, and recognize where deaf and hard-of-hearing children differ from other disability groups. The use of subject matter experts and community resources will be discussed. Addressing the mental health care needs of these children is an integral component to effective care. Clinical presentation of psychiatric illness often differs in children who are deaf/hard of hearing compared to hearing counterparts. This workshop will educate the participants on the culturally and linguistically affirmative manner of mental health assessment and treatment of these youngsters. Legal
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Overview of Chapter 39 for Pro Bono and Registry Attorneys ad Litem for Children with Special Needs  (Legal)
      This workshop will provide a basic overview of Chapter 39 for pro bono and registry attorneys appointed pursuant to section 39.01305, Florida Statutes, to represent dependent children who have certain special needs. Children with special needs include those in or being considered for placement in skilled nursing homes or residential treatment centers, those who refuse to take prescribed psychotropic medication, those with developmental disabilities and victims of human trafficking. This workshop is designed for attorneys who are not familiar with Chapter 39 or have a limited knowledge of or little experience with dependency law. Legal
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Psychotropic Medications 101: Pertinent essentials for all involved in the child welfare system  (Practice)
      The use of psychotropic medications among children in out-of-home care has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. This workshop will provide information related to oversight, education and the need for psychiatric consultations regarding psychotropic medication utilization for youth in out-of-home care. Practice
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Right Measures, Right Data, Right Results: Data Analytics & Results-Oriented Accountability (ROA)  (Leadership)
      In this workshop session, the presenter will share insights derived from the application of data analytics and the implementation of Results-Oriented Accountability (ROA) to Florida's Child Welfare Practice Model. Participants will gain an awareness of the ROA cycle of accountability model and receive an update of ROA implementation, including the creation of outcome measures, public-facing dashboards, and the application of evidence-based and research-informed practices. Participants will learn information derived from applying data analytics algorithms to child welfare data and how these and continuing insights can supplement and support child protective and child welfare decision-making for effective child and family outcomes. Included in this discussion is how data analytics can identify and communicate complicated patterns within complex family dynamics, as well as its dependence on quality data management. Leadership
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Suspensions, Expulsions, Arrests and Baker Act…Oh No!  (Practice)
      This workshop will inform participants about students with disabilities who exhibit behavioral and/or sensory issues that result in an increased risk for disciplinary actions, such as suspensions, expulsions, arrests, or Baker Acts. Specific topics covered include: the appropriate supports and services necessary to prepare students to gain educational benefits from school; teaching youth the skills necessary for independent living, college or career readiness and the advocacy tools required to ensure the student's rights are protected; use of restraint and seclusion and how to keep the student safe. The presentation will consist of case scenarios with open dialogue between presenters and participants to identify the issues and how to effectively advocate to resolve concerns regarding federal and state law, case law, and state board rules. Practice
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      TEAM-Together Everyone Accomplishes More  (Leadership)
      Substance Use Disorders (SUD) are one of the leading causes of removals. Coordination among the child welfare system and behavioral health providers is an essential component to the safe reunification of families. Henderson Behavioral Health (HBH) successfully serves this population through two programs funded by the Broward Behavioral Health Coalition. HBH's Family Engagement Program (FEP) and Family Intensive Treatment team (FIT) have consistently positive outcomes. FIT utilizes evidence-based practices such as Seeking Safety, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Circle of Security and Child Parent Psychotherapy to enhance caregiver protective capacities while treating substance use disorders. In partnerships with child protective investigations and the local community-based care lead agency, ChildNet, FEP and FIT serve as examples of what child welfare and behavioral health integration can accomplish. Leadership
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      The Battle is Not Without an Army: The Human Trafficking Team in the Child Welfare Arena  (Practice)
      Human trafficking has plagued our society for decades. These victimized children often come into the child welfare system with a wide array of needs and psychological damage. Thankfully, they have numerous expert individuals awaiting them and offering to help overcome the issues in human trafficking. We need an army to combat the challenges human trafficking victims face, such as frequent departure from safe housing in the child welfare system; resistance to services; challenges with prosecution; and building and litigating a legal case. This training will fully explore the key players necessary for the effective healing of the human trafficking victim and management of his or her case in the child welfare system. These key players aim to ensure that the dependent child will receive all of the legal protection and service necessary to break the cycle of abuse. Practice
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      The Florida Child Welfare Practice Model: Practice with Confidence…Not Fear  (Legal)
      The Florida Child Welfare Practice Model promotes a common language in assessing child safety, using a standardized framework to identify unsafe children and guide case planning/services to address the child's needs and diminished caregiver protective capacities. With everyone speaking the same language and using the same tools, the stage is set for confidence in decision-making. So, why the struggles? Practitioners are challenged in their quest for fidelity to the model. Fear of making the wrong decision, unsure of decisions made in an environment of intense scrutiny from the public, and the perception of child welfare create an environment of fear and intimidation. No one wants to be "that" guy! This workshop will present a two-part, focused look at the model from the investigation and legal perspective. The presenters will take practitioners on a walk-through of various pitfalls and discuss strategies that practitioners may utilize. Legal
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      What Is and What Is Not Trauma-Informed Practice  (Practice)
      Trauma-informed care has become the current hype in clinical practice in general, as well as in foster care and adoption practices, specifically. Many foster care and adoption programs purport to deliver trauma-informed care. But do they really? This workshop will explore the essential elements of trauma-informed care as well as delineate "therapeutic" approaches that run counter to trauma-informed practices. Practice
      Speakers:
      2:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
      What to do with Present and Impending Danger: Intensive In-Home Support for Safety Plans  (Practice)
      In this fast-paced work, investigators and case managers are expected to make very difficult safety and removal decisions daily when families have present and impending danger. Family situations are increasingly complicated. We have a new safety management service that has been designed to help. Come hear about the ways that children who were at high risk of removal are visited three times per week to increase the family's protective capacities and to support safety plans. This trauma-informed model has helped to keep 93% of the children served safe at home by helping parents work through crises and the things that are causing stress for them on a day-to-day basis. This workshop uses genograms, ecomaps, and parenting worksheets as it focuses on parenting techniques and routines. Participants will be able to locate resources, identify relatives, friends, neighbors, churches, and community organizations as a support to stabilize the family. Practice
      3:45 PM  -  4:00 PM
      Networking Break
       

      Circuit Breakout Sessions

      4:00 PM  -  5:30 PM
      Circuit Breakout Session
      Circuit Breakout Sessions offer an excellent opportunity for local communities to come together, take pride in accomplishment, and set new goals to strive for standards of excellence in serving others. Community Planning Sessions are convened by geographical areas that align with the Community-Based Care lead agencies and by circuit.
    • Thursday, August 31, 2017
    •  
      6:15 AM  -  7:30 AM
      Morning Yoga Offered
      Join us for a beginner friendly gentle yoga class. Our class will include breathing exercises, gentle poses, and stress reducing benefits of yoga practice. Beginner and advanced yogis are welcome. Please arrive wearing yoga/exercise clothing, this class will be offered in the yoga studio at the fitness center. Limited space available.
      7:30 AM  -  9:00 AM
      Continental Breakfast Provided
       

      Workshop Session D

      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      2017 Developments in Dependency Case and Statutory Law  (Legal)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.This workshop will inform participants about case and statutory laws released since the 2016 Child Protection Summit that have an impact on the dependency process. The cases to be discussed will address various subjects, including procedures that must be observed when a dependency case is litigated, grounds for an adjudication of dependency, grounds for termination of parental rights, and intervention. This workshop also will highlight the laws passed during the 2017 legislative session that will have the most significant impact on Florida's children and child welfare stakeholders. The presenters will offer practical tips to audience members of how to ensure that their daily practice is in conformity with Florida law. Legal
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Advances in the Retention and Development of Child Welfare Staff  (Leadership)
      Retaining and developing child welfare staff can pose many challenges. DCF Central Region has developed a formula integrating everything from creating a Leadership Academy, incorporating Retention/Development Specialists to provide support to prevent burnout, vicarious trauma, life balance, conflict resolution, emotional intelligence (EQ) and more! The formula is further enhanced with an expectation of cascading a strong message and a call to action for all persons in a leadership role to create a “safe” place for this mission-critical population to perform at its potential. By “safe” we mean a respectful, supportive, engaged, resourceful, and learning environment that not only celebrates our successes but sees shortcomings as opportunities for growth. We believe in a culture led by “servant leaders” who have embraced the “vulnerability” of the human condition, not only of those we serve externally but of those we serve internally. In this workshop, attendees will receive important information on the topics of workforce retention, the engagement, assessment and development of a skilled workforce, and creating and sustaining a “safe” work culture. Leadership
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Advocacy or Apathy?....Autism Assessments within the Scope of a Family Functioning Assessment  (Practice)
      The Centers for Disease Control report that 1 in 68 children in the United States is diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This number has risen steadily over the past 20 years and represents an emerging segment of our youth population. A lack of understanding regarding the behaviors and characteristics of children on the autism spectrum presents significant implications for child welfare professionals. Individuals with ASD are impacted in the domains of communication, behavior and social interaction, often exhibiting unique responses, particularly in unfamiliar or stressful environments. Workshop participants will learn how to identify and distinguish behaviors and characteristics of individuals on the autism spectrum to enhance the information-gathering process for documenting how the child functions. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Attorneys for Children: Good for Kids (and you, too!)  (Legal)
      This workshop will examine the positive role that children's counsels play in improving outcomes for children and the child welfare system as a whole. This workshop will address the distinct role of the child's counsel and the standards for representing children. It will also address the benefit to each other party of having a represented child and provide strategies for collaborating with attorneys for children to promote the best interests of children. The workshop also will review the various ways children acquire counsel with an emphasis on circumstances under which children have the right to appointed, compensated counsel. Legal
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Building Community Supports to Strengthen Families through Engaging the Faith Community  (Practice)
      Community-Based Care Agencies and the faith community have a similar mission and goals to support strong healthy families and ensure safe childhoods. Understanding one’s mission and role plays a critical part in identifying and building supports that are needed to engage the faith community across a continuum of care. This interactive presentation will allow participants to develop an understanding of how to engage the faith community to achieve positive outcomes for children and families. Participants will learn strategies for working in partnership to build a local faith-based initiative. In addition, the success of a local faith-based initiative resulting in increased resources and supports for children and families will be highlighted. This workshop will engage participants in identifying both universal and targeted efforts to be utilized as an effective model in building protective factors and permanency through faith-based initiatives and partnerships. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Changing the Course: Pathways to Addiction Stabilization and Recovery for Families and Youth  (Practice)
      When it comes to the topic of youth substance abuse, many prejudices and stereotypes perpetuate the fictional belief that attempts at recovery are futile for helping professionals and that relapse is inevitable. This workshop will utilize evidence-based practices to identify foundations for stabilization and recovery, examine services that are age/developmentally appropriate, discuss steps and strategies for creating supportive change environments, and provide guidelines that are inclusive and family-focused. Specific topics to be covered will include existing pathways that guide youth and their families toward stabilization by using family systems models and creating environments supportive of recovery. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome: What Everyone Serving Child Victims Needs to Know  (Practice)
      In this important workshop, the audience will gain a deeper understanding of Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome. This workshop will positively shape their reactions to, and develop their ability to better support and advocate for, children who disclose sexual abuse. Statistically, child victims of sexual abuse routinely face secondary trauma (including disbelief, blame and rejection) from adults in the course of disclosing their experience. Such abandonment by the very adults most crucial to a child's protection drives the child deeper into self-blame and alienation. In an attempt to prevent such re-victimization within our own system of care, this workshop will introduce evidence that shows children exposed to sexual assault often react very differently than expected. This workshop will educate by breaking down the syndrome into its five categories and will improve understanding of the child's position in the complex dynamics of sexual victimization. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Ethics and Certification  (Practice)
      Child welfare professionals have been certified by the Florida Certification Board (FCB) since 2011. In that time, more than 200 certified professionals have been the subject of an ethical investigation; almost half have lost their credential and their ability to work in the child welfare field due to ethical violations. In this workshop, participants will be provided with an overview of the FCB's Code of Ethics and important information regarding the investigation and disciplinary processes. Participants also will be provided with real-life case examples of ethical conundrums faced by the workforce and will problem-solve in an effort to develop appropriate responses to difficult situations. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Florida's New Medicaid Appeal Process: How to Use It To Help Children Access Health Care Services  (Legal)
      This workshop will review changes to Florida's Statewide Medicaid Managed Care (SMMC) program being implemented that will impact how children in care appeal denials of Medicaid services. Medicaid recipients, including children in care, must now exhaust their health plan's internal grievance and appeal process before filing a request for a Medicaid Fair Hearing when services are denied. Most Fair Hearings relating to Medicaid services will now be heard by the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) instead of the Department of Children and Families. The workshop will examine the new requirements and important differences between filing a grievance or appeal with a child's SMMC health plan and a Fair Hearing request with AHCA. Participants will learn about key service and coverage issues to be aware of when navigating the new system. Legal
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Focus Household: Why Does it Matter?  (Practice)
      Child welfare professionals are familiar with the many possible combinations of blended family structures that are encountered in everyday practice. Understanding and correctly mapping complex families to the Family Functioning Assessment (FFA), whether during the investigation phase or ongoing case management, is critical. The child welfare professional must determine which households must be the "focus" of a separate or combined FFA. Determinations must be made quickly and with accuracy, about who has "caregiver" responsibilities and who must be the "focus" of the assessment process in order to adequately evaluate protective capacities. Questions also arise in the assessment process about how other adult household members should be evaluated, based on what role they play within the family. This workshop will distinguish how family dynamics drive important child welfare decisions. The workshop session will be highly-interactive and will provide many useful resources. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Gang Sex Trafficking: What all CPIs and Case Managers should know!  (Practice)
      Gangs conduct criminal activity in all 50 states. Although most gang activity is concentrated in major urban areas, gangs also are proliferating in rural and suburban areas as gang members flee increasing law enforcement pressure in urban areas. During this session, attendees will learn to recognize signs of gang involvement, including gang tattoos, terminology, graffiti and the use of hand signals. Attendees also will be able to recognize the warning signs and risk factors of youth gang recruitment. This session also will discuss the female's role in gangs and how gang sex trafficking differs from other forms of trafficking. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Improving Outcomes for Young Children in Child Welfare through Trauma-Informed Child Care  (Practice)
      This workshop was coordinated and approved by the statewide multidisciplinary Dependency Court Improvement Panel chaired by Judge Hope Bristol.Stress and trauma can negatively challenge children's behavior and development. Child care professionals play a vital role in helping buffer the effects of adversity. This session will showcase DCF’s new training, “Trauma Informed Care for Child Care Professionals.” This training is designed to illustrate how by understanding and being sensitive to the child's past and current experiences with trauma, child care professionals can help address the underlying causes of challenging behaviors; reduce stress and prevent re-traumatization; get therapeutic supports; and engage a child in learning and finding success in the classroom. This session also will highlight a successful community partnership which has facilitated quality improvements in early learning for children in child welfare. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Making Everyday Moments Communication Moments  (Practice)
      In this workshop, the presenter will engage participants in an examination of the developmental milestones of children ages 1 to 3 and provide information on how to determine whether a child is developing as the child should when it comes to speech and language development. In addition, the participants will gain awareness of signs indicating a child may need a speech/language evaluation and become familiar with activities that can help increase a child’s communication skills. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Open Doors: A Promising Coordinated System Serving Trafficked and Exploited Victims  (Practice)
      This workshop will offer participants important information on Open Doors, a promising coordinated system to serve sexually exploited and trafficked children and young adults in Florida. The workshop will provide participants with an understanding of how Open Doors will enhance service delivery and improve outcomes for male and female victims, up to age 24. The participants also will learn how the Open Doors network will work with local communities to place sexually exploited and trafficked victims in the care of a coordinated team of professionals supported by a trauma-informed management plan. This workshop will explore how Voices for Florida uses a collective impact approach and business process management principles to create a public-private partnership to address the commercial sexual exploitation of children and young adults in Florida. This framework provides the foundation for the coordination of a cross-sector system of care. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Preparing Foster Care Youth for College Success  (Practice)
      In this workshop, the presenter will share with child welfare professionals, caregivers and other stakeholders how success at the collegiate level can change the life trajectory of foster care youth. This workshop will inform participants on interventions and support programs implemented by the Multicultural Academic and Support Services Office to support the youth’s transition to college. In addition, the workshop will provide information about specific programs at the University of Central Florida offered through the Knight Alliance Program. Participants attending this workshop will learn information on what can be done to prepare foster care youth and families for the collegiate experience. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Preventing Teen Pregnancy among Youth in Foster Care: Possibilities and Challenges  (Practice)
      This workshop informs participants on the results of the implementation of a nationally recognized, evidence-based teen prevention curriculum at eight group homes for youth in Polk, Highlands, and Hardee Counties. Attendance at Wyman's Teen Outreach Program sessions proved to be a predictor of decreases in behaviors associated with poor academic outcomes and pregnancy. While these results were promising, an extremely high attrition rate among foster youth presented unique challenges, limiting expected outcomes. Implications for future implementation among youth in foster care will be discussed. In addition, the findings of interviews with a sample of teen parents in foster care which assessed their current needs and gaps in service will be discussed. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Quality Standards for Residential Group Care  (Leadership)
      The Group Care Quality Standards workgroup was convened by the Department of Children and Families and the Florida Coalition for Children in April 2015. The aim of the workgroup was to develop quality standards for DCF-licensed group homes to ensure that children receive high-quality services that surpass the minimum thresholds assessed through licensing. Drawing upon published research and workgroup expertise, the Core Quality Standards were finalized in August 2015. Following the Department's approval, the Florida Institute for Child Welfare began developing a rating scale designed to assess the extent to which practices in Florida's group homes align with the standards. In this workshop session, participants will gain an awareness of the Core Quality Standards and the Group Care Quality Rating Scale. Presenters will highlight findings from the pilot and field test of the rating scale. Finally, participants will receive information on the statewide implementation plans. Leadership
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Responding to Child Maltreatment Fatalities in Florida  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide an overview of developments over the past three years and since the passage of Senate Bill 1666 in 2014 of the Department of Children and Families and the Department of Health’s efforts to respond to and prevent child maltreatment fatalities. Participants will learn about trends related to child maltreatment fatalities and the development and implementation of Critical Incident Rapid Response Teams (CIRRT). The role and function of CIRRTs will be compared with the expanded role of the Child Abuse Death Review (CADR) Committees in reviewing all verified and non-verified child maltreatment fatalities in Florida. Attention will be given to processes that have defined these roles, the level to which the actions and responsibilities of CIRRTs and CADR complement one another, and the need for the promotion and strengthening of interagency collaboration to address child maltreatment and fatality prevention throughout Florida. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Results of a Federal Kinship Navigation Grant: Building a Support System for Relative Caregivers  (Practice)
      This workshop will describe results and lessons learned from a Florida Kinship Navigation project funded in 2012 by the U.S. Children's Bureau, which served more than 1,550 kinship caregivers in Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties. Attendees will learn about the development of several innovative service features, including TANF enrollment, peer-to-peer navigation, and a kinship interdisciplinary team. This project used a rigorous Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT), including a thorough implementation and outcome evaluation. Specific topics include the evaluation results that illuminate which supportive services and resources available to kinship families promote successful outcomes. Differences of the evaluation results will be presented as they relate to formal and informal kinship families. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      SHINE: A Process to Drive Improvement, Recognition & Accountability  (Leadership)
      In this workshop session, attendees will be introduced to the SHINE review process, a continuous quality improvement initiative started in August 2016 by FamiliesFirst Network. SHINE provides a snapshot of each case manager's work through a strength-focused approach. SHINE tools assist management with the supervision of case managers to improve case practice and to measure fidelity to the Child Welfare Practice Model. Specific aspects of case practice are included: supervision, quality contacts, assessment, safety planning, case planning, and Adoptions/Young Adult Services. Topics are reviewed every six months to allow time to implement improvement strategies. Attendees will learn how data can be used by leadership at all levels for trending performance over time to identify strengths in practice and areas needing improvement. SHINE provides a gauge of where a case manager is meeting standards or might need coaching, training and support. Leadership
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Silent Suffering: Responding to Self-Harm  (Practice)
      Ever struggle with a teen on your caseload or in your home who exhibits self-harming behaviors? This workshop will help uncover the secrecy and uncertainty behind self-injury. This workshop is designed for child welfare professionals and foster parents who work with youth in the foster care system. Participants will gain insight about self-harm and examine the risk factors for youth who have endured trauma. This workshop will explore the myths surrounding self-harm, and participants will learn approaches to address self-injurious behaviors. Participants will increase their awareness of resources and the knowledge of techniques to respond, rather than react to self-harming behaviors. Practice
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      The Florida Navigator: Mapping Your Way through State Agency Disability Services  (Practice)
      This workshop will provide information and a demonstration of the Florida Navigator, an online tool to empower and inform self-advocates, caregivers, and professionals about specific state services available for individuals with developmental disabilities. The Florida Navigator provides users with a simplified path of information to guide users to available services and tailor the results to their specific needs. By answering a few questions, the Florida Navigator will share information on programs and eligibility requirements from various state agencies, including the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, Agency for Health Care Administration, Department of Children and Families, Department of Education, Department of Elder Affairs and the Department of Health. Practice
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Working with Challenging Parents  (Practice)
      Understanding, empathizing with, and collaborating with parents who may have maltreated their children can be challenging. How can parents treat their child that way? Why aren't the parents cooperating with the case plan? Why don't they see I'm trying to help them? These are all questions that naturally happen when working with difficult cases in child welfare where violent and substance-abusing behaviors are common among parents. Through case examples and experiential activities, this workshop will provide insight for child welfare professionals into the "Why" of parents' behaviors to assist in building empathy and compassion for challenging parents. Improving empathy for such parents by understanding their own histories and challenges can allow for improved engagement. Specific strategies for engagement of difficult parents, especially fathers, will be provided, including: how to reach out to parents, ways of increasing collaboration, and motivational techniques. Practice
      Speakers:
      10:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
      Break
       

      General Session

      10:30 AM  -  12:00 PM
      Closing General Session
      FYLA Graduation
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