WHAT TO EXPECT AT BUILDING RESILIENCE 2017: 

Pre-Conference Workshops: For hands-on experience, stimulating discussions, and interactive learning, don’t miss these workshops taking place Saturday, 17 June, open only to Full Conference and Sunday registrants.

Short Sessions: Learn about what professional planners are working on across the country at the concurrent sessions. Panels of speakers will share emerging research, thought- provoking perspectives, and promising practices from their communities.

PechaKucha Style Events: This fast-paced new format will feature five to six snapshot presentations on a range of planning topics that are sure to engage audiences and get delegates talking.

Learning Tours: If you want to get out and experience Calgary by foot, bike, or bus, the learning tours are a perfect opportunity to explore young, historic, and revitalized communities, and get an inside look at local projects and initiatives.


Tours and workshops are offered at an additional cost and have limited capacity, so sign up early! 

Agenda

CONFERENCE PROGRAM:  The entire conference program and schedule (outlined in detail below) are preliminary only and subject to change. In the interests of improving and delivering the best possible conference program, the organizers reserve the right to amend the conference program and schedule.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION:  Some sessions and activities are included in registration, while others may be optional, require pre-registration, and / or be subject to additional costs. For full details on what is (or is not) included in various conference registration options, please be sure to click on the 'Fees & Registration' link in the menu on the left.

PROGRAM UPDATES:  The schedule & program details below are updated as of 10 March, 2017. Please check back here regularly and review the details below for any changes or updates.

  Go
    • Saturday, June 17, 2017
    •  
      7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
      Light Continental Breakfast  (BKF-1)
      Get energized for the day's workshops with a light continental breakfast.
       

      Workshops

      9:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
      Urban Design Charette  (WOR-01)
      The Mini- Charrette session will demonstrate the application of City of Calgary urban design tools, policies and guidelines to plan and implement for change, for sustainable and healthy development, for authentic place making and for thriving communities.

      Cost: $135.00

      10:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
      Urban Land Institute UrbanPlan  (WOR-02)
      UrbanPlan is a curriculum created by Urban Land Institute and delivered to high schools,universities and groups of public officials throughout the United States and Europe. The mission of UrbanPlan is to create a more sophisticated level of discourse among local stakeholders involved in land use decisions through education of tomorrow’s voters, neighbors, community leaders, public officials, and land use professionals. Participant teams respond to an “RFP” (request for proposals) for the redevelopment of a blighted site in a hypothetical community.This involves both financial and planning evaluation of a project to redevelop a Hypothetical Downtown Location.

      Cost: $155.00

      1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Development Charges – Someone Has To Pay, But Who?  (WOR-03)
      Municipalities are increasingly challenged to balance their finances to meet community expectations and foster development. Planners play a role in working with others to address the planning and financing of new infrastructure to support sustainable growth. Working with Urban Systems, the City of Regina and City of Calgary recently undertook processes to update their respective development charge policies. Results reduced municipal risk and increased the developers’ responsibility while building support with stakeholders and Council. Join them in a workshop where they will share lessons learned while undertaking a mock policy review process to consider different perspectives, how new growth-related infrastructure could be paid for and implications of different options on different stakeholders. Participants will also explore what ‘benefit’ means in the context of new infrastructure; development charges and their relationship to greenfield growth and intensification; and how creating effective policy can support the building of resiliency in their communities.

      Cost: $30.00

      1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Planning for a Resilient Future - A Spatial and Policy Framework for Community Energy  (WOR-04)
      This session, led by some of the leading energy planning and distributed energy experts from across Canada, will enable delegates to learn about and discuss some of the creative measures planners are taking to drive climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts locally, in a cost effective and affordable manner. We will explore how community energy measures (land use, energy efficiency in buildings, and distributed energy resources) are simultaneously leading to deep greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, enhancing community resilience and driving economic competitiveness.The workshop will include a presentations, an interactive energy mapping exercise, a panel discussion and a tour of the ENMAX District Energy Centre.

      Cost: $60.00

       

      Learning Tours

      1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Quarry Park, Calgary: From a gravel extraction site to a green, “complete” community  (LT-02)

      Learn about the evolution of the site from a former gravel extraction and washing plant operation on the banks of the Bow River to a flood proofed, “complete” community with employment, housing and retail uses, served by the future LRT Green line. This tour is a unique opportunity for conference participants to see first hand, the results of the vision and challenges that led to the creation of one of the truly mixed use, green and “complete” communities in Canada.

      Cost: $40.00

       

      Workshops

      2:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      The Future Game – An innovative tool for community engagement in regions facing economic transitions  (WOR-05)
      How do we help people make better decisions about the future of their regions, cities or organizations? The Future Game allows people to practice future thinking by exploring a range of plausible future scenarios, with the results generated through their own decision-making. Teams learn how decisions that seem sensible in the short-term, may have the potential to play out in unpredictable ways. This unique process enables individuals within teams to make decisions for a hypothetical region. The game features printed maps featuring a variety of towns, rural areas, economic activities, environmental features, and social conditions. The process challenges status quo thinking and demands collaboration, teamwork and engagement.

      Cost: $10.00

      Speakers:
       

      Learning Tours

      2:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      The Redevelopment of the Kensington Legion: An Innovative Model for Social Organizations  (LT-01)

      Participants will be invited to join the interdisciplinary project team, including the builder developer and Legion representatives, on the Legion site. The team will lead a discussion that explores the project process from the vision for the site to key lessons learned about building resiliency for social organization, neighbourhoods and the city at large. This learning tour will give participants insights into how an innovative partnership and business model can help social organizations evolve across the country. After a tour of the newly completed Legion, a panel presentation from project team members and plenary discussion with CIP members, participants will be able to mingle and informally meet with members of the project team and the Legion during a cocktail reception to explore the project further. This extended interaction is intended to allow CIP participants to meet the interdisciplinary team as well as Legion members themselves, to understand the drivers of the project as well as the impact this development will have on Legion members and the broader community.

      Cost: $40.00

       

      Evening Activities

      6:30 PM  -  8:30 PM
      Welcome to Treaty 7 Territory, Welcome to Calgary  (REC-1)
      Kick off the 2017 CIP/APPI Annual Conference Welcome Reception at Calgary’s newest architectural icon, Studio Bell - home to the National Music Centre. Part museum, part performance hall, the National Music Centre links Calgary’s musical past with its entertainment future. Join us for an evening of spectacular performances, greetings from local ambassadors, and catching up with friends from around the country - accompanied by a fabulous selection of hors d'oeuvres and appetizers. Event sponsored by the City of Calgary.
    • Sunday, June 18, 2017
    •  
      7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
      Welcome to Calgary - Stampede Style  (BKF-2)
      The Calgary Stampede and the Calgary Municipal Land Corporation are pleased to sponsor the 2017 CIP/APPI Building Resilience opening breakfast.  As Calgary is gearing up to Stampede, please join us in a traditional  Stampede Breakfast complete with western hospitality, entertainment and special guests from our Stampede Volunteers.  Cowboy up in your best Western Gear and come on down.
       

      Plenary Speakers

      8:30 AM  -  10:30 AM
      Opening Remarks & Keynote Speaker- Charles Marohn  (PLS-1)
      Join fellow delegates and the 2017 Conference team for welcoming remarks and the opening keynote presentation: Building Strong Communities – A Pathway to a Financially Sustainable Future. Charles will examine the financial realities facing cities and towns across the country. He will examine how the suburban experiment and reality of growth have influenced planning over the past decades but have not always produced results that provides wealth for communities. Charles will then examine how we can refocus efforts that can help communities of all sizes grow toward a stronger, more prosperous future. His discussion will focus on the future of communities and how they will not look like the present – they may be vastly different. This will include a variety of easy (and cost efficient) projects that can help add value to your community (and your tax base).
      Speakers:
       

      Short Sessions

      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Biomimicry and resilience  (SS-02)
      Biomimicry is the practice of emulating life’s time tested strategies and deep patterns to generate sustainable designs. Resilience is the ability of a system to continue to function following a disturbance such as those brought on by climate destabilization, economic bursts, and social instability. This talk will give participants an overview and examples of biomimicry as design methodology useful for resiliency in the planning, design and building of cities and communities.
      Speakers:
      11:00 AM  -  12:45 PM
      Charles Marohn: Building Strong Communities - Continued  (PLS1-X)
      In this session, keynote speaker Charles Marohn will delve further into the issues presented during his plenary address.
      Speakers:
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Data Systems and Forecasting Models: Examples from Ontario and Alberta  (SS-06)
      Session description coming soon.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Designing Main Streets as Complete Streets and Places for People: Cross Canada case-studies  (SS-04)
      Session description coming soon.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Reflections on the Planning Process and Public Participation  (SS-05)
      Session description coming soon.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Resilience through generational adaptations  (SS-01)
      This presentation focuses on three key categories of generational resilience that are considered important for Millennials, and discusses the adaptations in planning and design strategies that need to be considered by professional planners and decision makers.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Women in Planning – A Candid Discussion  (SS-03)
      What role do women have to play in the way we design our communities and ultimately our cities? How do women become successful and take on leadership roles in the Planning & Development World? As a female what does it mean to ‘build resilience’ in your professional career? How do the challenges for males and females in our profession differ? How do female leaders remain resilient, push boundaries, inspire and lift-up female counterparts and ultimately create better communities? How do experiences for women differ across various sectors of planning whether it’s in a municipal, developer or consulting environment? This interactive, candid panel discussion and Q&A session will dive deep into these questions and others revolving around the distinctive role of women in planning. City of Calgary Councillor Diane Colley-Urquhart will lead and moderate the discussion with a diverse range of successful and resilient female leaders.
       
      12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Awards Luncheon  (LUNCH1)
      Come celebrate this year's winners of the Young Planners award, President's award, Plan Canada awards, and APPI awards, as well as the Fellow Induction presentation.
       

      Learning Tours

      1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Exploring Inglewood: Calgary's Oldest Neighbourhood  (LT-03)

      Participants will explore one of Calgary’s earliest communities learning about the evolution of this historic neighbourhood. Over 100 years since the community was established, there is still a lot happening in Inglewood! Participants will discover historical buildings, walk the nationally recognized main street, learn about the 2013 flood and ongoing flood mitigation efforts, discuss the future Greenline Light Rail Transit line, and much more.

      Cost: $75.00

       

      Short Sessions

      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Business Investment and Readiness in Alberta  (SS-12)
      Session description coming soon.
      Speakers:
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Case Studies from Recent Alberta Fires: Slave Lake and Wood Buffalo  (SS-11)
      Session description coming soon.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Good in Theory. When Planning Policies and Community Engagement Aren’t Enough  (SS-09)
      This presentation will explore the relationship between municipal policy, public engagement, fear and politics in cases of difficult to locate “special care” land uses. As planners, we often speak of ideal communities as “inclusionary” or “complete” or “healthy;” places where all ages, abilities, and incomes can call home. We will use two case studies to explore what it takes to garner approvals for the difficult-to-locate land uses that make communities truly inclusive: a halfway house that accepts diagnosed pedophiles and a drop-in centre that serves the homeless population. Both developments are located in the City of Calgary. Community outrage, bias, and political influence are significant factors in approvals for special care uses. What can we do as planners when engagement alone isn’t enough, when facts don’t sway opinions, and when the right thing to do isn’t so clear? We will share our experiences navigating these difficult special care applications through to approval.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      How to Build a Shared Community Narrative through Historic Preservation & Placemaking  (SS-08)
      New Orleans is steeped in rich cultural history and celebrated for its resilience. After several decades of depopulation and disinvestment, New Orleans given its recent growth, sizable inventory of historic building stock, and extraordinary civic heritage, the city has attracted millions in public private investments. This wave of revitalization has greatly impacted the character of New Orleans. Yet there are examples of where a shared community narrative still exists as a result of the inclusion of historic preservation and placemaking. The session is intended to frame the discussion of how preservation adds value to community revitalization efforts by exploring the layered and complex history of New Orleans and the stories of its people and places as told through its preserved built landscape.
      Speakers:
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Kolkajen Masterplan - A case study of resilient masterplanning in Stockholm  (SS-07)
      This presentation will take participants through a brief introduction of Stockholm’s Royal Seaport development plan and an exploration of Mandaworks and Stockholm Municipality’s approach to resilient planning and design in the visionary district.
      Speakers:
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Social Cohesion, Intersectionality, Creativity & Resilience: Experiences in Metro Vancouver & Beyond  (SS-10)
      This session consists of a panel of diverse individuals. They will speak about their experiences both locally in Metro Vancouver and internationally in promoting social cohesion, using principles of intersectionality, grassroots organization and an inclusive and culturally aware approach.
       

      Pecha Kucha Style Presentations

      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Pecha Kucha for Planners Part I  (PKN-01)
      1. Triple Bottom Line Optimization for Land Use Plans
      2. Allies on Trails & Bikes: supporting reconciliation by building trails & healthy relationships
      3. Young Canadians and Planning: Highlighting Progress and Challenges
      4. Planning for Industrial and Economic Resiliency in Sidney, British Columbia
      5. How to capture vulnerability to enhance resilience?: the case study of Saint-Raymond in Quebec
      6. How can we improve urban resilience with open data?

       

       

      Short Sessions

      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Growth Management in a Canadian Context  (SS-14)
      Session description coming soon.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Indigenous Economic and Cultural Resiliency  (SS-13)
      In this presentation, we will discuss a definition of Indigenous economic and cultural resiliency; and share a series of case studies where Canadian Indigenous communities are achieving greater self sufficiency and preserving their traditions, values, and culture.
      Speakers:
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Is the Dual Planning System of New Zealand under the Resource Management Act a Resilient Process?  (SS-15)
      Session description coming soon.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Panel Discussion Involving Fellows on Current Planning Topics  (SS-16)
      Fellows of the Institute will have a discussion on current planning topics and respond to questions from the attendees.
      Speakers:
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Pro Forma Analysis and Resilience  (SS-17)
      This workshop will use a commercial project as a case study to demonstrate how planners could utilize pro formas to model the financial performance of a development and then test scenarios that evaluate the economic viability of planning initiatives that are expected to generate community benefits. The workshop will introduce participants to a basic pro forma Excel spreadsheet analysis that includes costs and expenditures, land value residuals, project valuation, rates of return and sensitivity analysis. The intention of this workshop is to demystify the pro forma analysis process by making the material accessible to planners. Participants will learn how pro formas can be used in development reviews and during the planning policy formulation process to identify initiatives that enable developers and non profit organizations to incorporate resilient planning objectives into their projects.
      Speakers:
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Project Resiliency: Examples from Edmonton  (SS-18)
      Session description coming soon.
       

      Pecha Kucha Style Presentations

      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Pecha Kucha for Planners Part II  (PKN-02)
      1. Changing the Urban Fabric - Allowing Coach Houses in Ottawa
      2. Toward More Complete Communities: Business out of the Box
      3. Ted Talks
      4. Calgary’s Unique Model: A Resilient Force in our City
      5. Is there any contradiction between temporary urbanism and long term planning of urban mega-projects? Two cases study in Montreal
    • Monday, June 19, 2017
    •  
      7:00 AM  -  7:30 AM
      Breakfast  (BKF-3)
      7:30 AM  -  9:00 AM
      CIP Annual General Meeting  (CIP-AGM)
      Join the CIP Board of Directors as they provide highlights from 2016.
       

      Plenary Speakers

      9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
      Keynote Speaker - Tamika Butler  (PLS-2)
      Join us for Tamika Butler's keynote address, Socially Inclusive Infrastructure.Tamika will examine the need for transportation resilience in our cities. She will look at the need for inclusion of all forms of transportation in our infrastructure and daily lives and the importance of providing options to citizens. She will discuss the work that she has been doing for the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition to expand and broaden cycling infrastructure in Los Angeles (one of the most car oriented cities in the world). Tamika will also look at the need for providing transportation options from a social justice perspective; looking beyond the car and how transportation must serve the needs of people of all different income levels and social classes and how providing transportation options can lead to improving people’s quality of lives, cost savings to governments and other improved social factors.
      Speakers:
       

      Short Sessions

      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Building Resilient Governance and Service Delivery Models – Case Studies from the West Coast  (SS-22)
      In response to changing needs, many communities are searching for the most suitable local governance and service delivery models. In the Victoria Capital Region, there were recent challenges agreeing on regional sewage treatment, highlighting a desire for potential broader integration of services and governance within the region. And on Salt Spring Island, concerns about elected representation and coordination of services led to community interest in studying the possibility of municipal incorporation as a potential means of better meeting the needs of the community. This conference session will explore these two case studies with a view to learn about ‘building resilient governance and service delivery models’ and to also hear about participants’ experiences in other parts of the country.
      Speakers:
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Flood Resiliency: Examples from Alberta and Manitoba  (SS-25)
      Session description coming soon.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Implementing the UN New Urban Agenda in Canada: issues, opportunities and responsibilities  (SS-20)
      Last October, United Nations member nations, including Canada, adopted the New Urban Agenda (NUA) at the Habitat III Quito conference. Reflecting broad input from many groups including planning associations, the NUA is a collective vision and a political commitment to sustainable urban development of socially inclusive, economically prosperous, and environmentally resilient cities. The panel will engage the planning community in discussion of how this powerful, international aspirational document can be used to advance planning in Canada. Presentations will focus on potential implementation strategies, including: a national urban policy, housing as a human right, ecosystem thinking, improving precarious and informal work environments, strengthening citizen participation, and the ‘right to the city.’
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Planning for reconciliation & resilience: A cross cultural approach to land use planning in the NWT  (SS-21)
      Land claims discussions and negotiations over the past 40 years in the Northwest Territories have resulted in a unique political environment for land use planning and an expectation of co-management of land and resources among indigenous and non-indigenous governments. The resilience of planning in a northern context requires new approaches that are collaborative, culturally- relevant, and address underlying historical structures of power and decision-making. Join us for an exploration of how planning can contribute to reconciliation and resiliency through the lenses of two land use planners: one from the Government of the Northwest Territories and one from the Yellowknives Dene First Nation. In both cases, the planners are reacting to an evolving political landscape, and are finding solutions for planning that respect organizational structures, capacity and values.
      Speakers:
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Planning for Resiliency in Capital Cities: Case studies of Ottawa, Washington, and Canberra  (SS-19)
      The session will explore how three national capital planning agencies approach issues of urban resiliency that are general to national capitals (e.g. security) and other issues specific to their geographical surroundings and climate. Through the lens of planning for capital cities, attendees will leave with a better understanding of how their communities can meet the challenges regarding environmental resiliency, disaster recovery, public engagement, and global perspectives on resiliency.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Transit and Infrastructure: Unpacking Impact and Evaluating Planners' Roles  (SS-23)
      Session description coming soon.
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Transportation Plans: Case studies from Edmonton and Mississauga  (SS-24)
      Session description coming soon.
       
      12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Awards Luncheon  (LUNCH2)
      Come celebrate this year's winners of the Awards for Planning Excellence.
       

      Learning Tours

      1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Main Streets - where rubber hits the road  (LT-04)

      Participants will explore how the Main Streets initiative is comprehensively building economic and community resiliency through strategic implementation programs to achieve Municipal Development Plan policies.  The tour will allow participants to visit four of Calgary’s priority main streets learning about the initiative and the opportunities, challenges and impacts on planning on the surrounding communities.

      Cost: $40.00

      2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
      Building Community Resilience - A walking tour of Calgary's Emergency Operation's Centre  (LT-05)
      Community Resilience In Action - the City of Calgary's Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) is The City's command centre in any large scale emergency. The EOC is a facility vital in protecting families, businesses, and communities in Calgary. Participants will get an insider's look at CEMA's EOC and resilience building programs.

      Cost: $25.00

      Speakers:
      2:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
      East Village + St. Patrick’s Island Tour  (LT-07)

      Come join CMLC on a tour of the East Village and St. Patrick’s Island (2016 winner of Great Spaces Canada, Great Public Space award), a 49 acre revitalized community. Participants will review the Masterplan vision, planning principles, and stop at various infrastructure projects to talk about how the project implemented the vision and lessons learned.

      Cost: $25.00

      2:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
      From Pilot to Permanent: A bike tour of the Centre City Cycle Track Network  (LT-06)
      Join City of Calgary Transportation Planning staff, Katherine Glowacz and Kim Fisher, on a bike tour of the Centre City Cycle Track Network. We'll share the story of how the 18 month cycle track pilot project was ultimately approved as permanent by City Council in December 2016. Experience the cycle tracks firsthand and learn how a pilot approach has allowed on going improvements to cycle track end treatments, the re introduction of parking, improved snow maintenance and continued modifications based on public feedback, along with the communication and education tactics used to reach the public. If your city or region is interested in implementing an entire cycle track network all at once, this is a tour you wont want to miss!

      Cost: $60.00

       

      Short Sessions

      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Affordable Housing and Urban Resilience: Comparative Perspectives  (SS-25A)
      The session provides an engaging forum that focuses on the importance of affordable non-market housing provision to build resiliency and respond to economic downturns, recessions, growing social challenges and natural disasters. It explores the potential for collaborative resilience drawing on critical aspects of strategic partnerships of municipalities, private and non-profit agencies to enhance the supply of affordable housing. The presentations explore innovative responses in Canadian and European cities, critically examine successes, and share emerging research and planning practices in a thoughtful dialogue.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Building Community Resilience, Building Libraries  (SS-28)
      Calgary’s New Central Library which opens in 2018, will exemplify international design excellence and an inspired community space. Developed collaboratively by Calgary Public Library, the City of Calgary and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation, the landmark building incorporates the East Village Masterplan, and is founded on extensive community engagement. This session focuses on the future-oriented engagement plan and its methods which engaged all ages; how community feedback and a challenging site influenced a unique building design; and how the building design has in turn influenced the ideation work of the Library’s design team in creating new programs and services that will be offered in the New Central Library. Connections between the Library’s design team and the community are now the norm, and continue to transform and revitalize library services and the work to create the best library in the world.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Climate Change and Resiliency in Canada  (SS-31)
      Session description coming soon.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Creativity and Innovation: Experiences with Tactical Urbanism in Planning Process  (SS-30)
      Session description coming soon.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Critical Reflections on Community Conversations  (SS-29)
      Session description coming soon.
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      Embracing Traditions, Constructing Futures: Reconciling Western Urban Design &Local Culture in Dubai  (SS-26)
      The rapid adoption of Western urban expressions and design are being embraced without an understanding or consideration of their impact on the citizens of the developing world. Governments in the Middle East have interpreted urban development to be the creation of spectacular physical structures strongly influenced by Western architectural designs rather than paying greater attention to local socio-cultural elements. This conflict has increased the gap between its citizens and their urban environment, and has become a vital source of debate for the last ten years. Using Dubai as a case study, this presentation will examine the challenges facing its citizens in reconciling their cultural and religious identity with the rapidly changing urban environment. The presentation will also explore howlocal forms of resiliency like public participation, can be used to address government-led urban planning initiatives that can balance vernacular and Western concepts of urban planning in Dubai.
      Speakers:
      2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
      ˌrekənˌsilēˈāSH(ə)n/ lessons learned from collaborative land use planning in the NWT  (SS-27)
      In this presentation, staff from the Tłįchǫ Government will describe the lands within the Wek’èezhìi Management Area and their importance to the Tłįchǫ; the presentation will outline the planning process to develop the resilient Tłįchǫ Wenek’e; our lessons learned from several years of pre-planning collaboration with Government; and the current process of working developing a mechanism/framework for a future Wek’èezhìi Land Use Plan.
      3:15 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Partnerships for Affordable and Resilient Housing: Lessons from Calgary & Vancouver  (SS-25B)
      Consensus has been building across Canada that the vulnerabilities of low income households needs to be systematically addressed through better policy tools and city-wide initiatives to encourage private and non-profit provision that minimises 'poverty trap' effects. The session will explore a broad spectrum of partnership structures that provide non-market housing to enhance the resilience of Canadian communities. Lessons from Calgary and Vancouver emphasize a multi-sectoral approach, including all levels of government, the private for-profit and non-profit sectors, as well as community involvement. This is presented as the most effective means of producing affordable housing within limited resources and capacity to meet local needs.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Food for Thought: Urban Agriculture and Resliency  (SS-37)
      Session description coming soon.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Planning and Evaluating Sustainable Neighborhood Development  (SS-32)
      Learn how Devens combined green building, low-impact development, smart growth, inclusionary housing, flexible zoning techniques, complete streets, climate change mitigation and adaptation, into an innovative and replicable model of healthy, sustainable neighborhood development techniques for the 21st century and beyond.
      Speakers:
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Planning Strategies to Enhance Community Resiliency  (SS-36)
      Session description coming soon.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Resilient Canadian Urbanism from Coast to Coast  (SS-34)
      This session looks at lessons learned from each region (West Coast, Prairies, Ontario, Quebec, East Coast and the Canadian North) and explores how each designs and plans for resiliency; from new initiatives and projects, to existing ones that have been able to adapt and stand the test of time. The program will provide an overview of the what is being done across the country and how it contributes to community prosperity.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Stampede Park: Calgary’s 130 Year Old Resilient Community Space  (SS-33)
      When the first Calgary Exhibition was held in 1886, most Calgarians and southern Albertans were directly engaged in agriculture. Planners of the event sought to make Stampede Park the gathering place for the community and the agricultural industry year-round. By the mid-20th century, however, oil overtook agriculture as Alberta’s predominant industry. Yet, Stampede Park – home of the annual Calgary Stampede – has remained relevant through careful planning, programming, park developments, and environmental innovations that speak to local and regional heritage, the needs of the agricultural industry, as well as the needs of contemporary Calgary. This panel will investigate Stampede Park as a resilient gathering space. Dr. Christine Leppard will speak to the Stampede’s history of resiliency. Kristina Barnes will examine contemporary planning for agricultural events and initiatives the Stampede has undertaken to remain resilient. Don Teare will discuss the processes of recovering from the disastrous 2013 southern Alberta flood. Lastly, Dr. Shannon Murray will discuss the Stampede’s Indian Village as a cultural safe space and speak to the long partnership between the Stampede and the five nations of Treaty 7.
      3:45 PM  -  5:00 PM
      Technolgical Advancements and Disruptions: Considerations for Planners  (SS-35)
      Session description coming soon.
       

      Evening Activities

      6:30 PM  -  9:00 PM
      O Canada, from Far and Wide  (REC-2)
      Come celebrate this year’s achievements in Canadian planning at the 2017 CIP/APPI Annual Conference Gala Dinner in the Imperial Ballroom of the Hyatt Regency. Perhaps the only thing more impressive than the venue itself will be the food - The Hyatt Regency’s catering team is known to be one of the finest in Calgary. Event sponsored by the City of Medicine Hat and the City of Lethbridge.
    • Tuesday, June 20, 2017
    •  
      8:00 AM  -  9:00 AM
      Breakfast  (BKF-4)
       

      Short Sessions

      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Adapting a Public Organization to a Private Market  (SS-39)
      Session description coming soon.
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Before the Bulldozer Hits the Ground: Measuring Farmland Loss in Southern Ontario  (SS-40)
      We are challenged by a lack of accurate data regarding the loss of prime farmland in Ontario. Delegates will be provided with a new methodology for measuring the conversion of farmland to other land uses through official plan amendments. Data regarding this loss in southern Ontario will also be provided. Such data is not available outside of this study.
      Speakers:
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Building Communities: exploring landscape approaches to heritage and diversity  (SS-41)
      Edmonton has a largely ambivalent relationship with its heritage and heritage resources have not been well integrated into its planning processes. Recently, Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) perspectives have been suggested as a means of reinvigorating Edmonton’s approach to its history and redevelopment. In 2015 the City of Edmonton, the Old Strathcona Foundation, along with international partners together signed a memorandum of understanding outlining a desire to cooperate and to mutually support the development of HUL approaches. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to learn about the latest developments in HUL approaches, as well as to work interactively with expert facilitators to explore potential benefits in relation to a series of planning cases. The workshop will be of additional relevance to planning professionals with interests in: participatory planning and engagement, inclusive city building, the indigenous city and community resiliency.
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Creating Equitable Spaces for Planning with Indigenous Communities in Alberta and Ontario  (SS-44)
      This panel presentation will showcase how resiliency in practice takes on new meaning as municipal planners, First Nations, and planning educators move towards understanding their shared histories of the Indigenous traditional territories that Canadian municipalities reside on. Through a discussion of two case studies, it will be demonstrated that a truly resilient practice requires planners and planning educators alike to first build an understanding and appreciation for their shared history of the land and to create equitable spaces with Indigenous communities.
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Flyover Park - Youth Led Community Design  (SS-43)
      The #flyover kids project is an opportunity in Calgary to reimagine a little lost space beneath the 4 Avenue Flyover, a key walking connection from the community of Bridgeland Riverside with the downtown and river pathway network. The project has involved “hiring” local grade six students and pairing them with University of Calgary Landscape Architecture students. Together, nine groups will develop concepts that enhance safety, add public art, shared street components, play opportunities and LID. With the help of City staff and community specialists including members of Calgary’s Drop In Centre, local business owners, artists and historians, a preferred concept will be chosen. Temporary and permanent elements will be constructed in the summer of 2017 and the lessons learned will inform Calgary’s tactical urbanism program while also showing how meaningful it can be to engage on improving walking – especially with the help of a few #flyover kids.
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Preparing the Planning Profession for Climate Migrants  (SS-42)
      With increasing natural disasters, drought, food insecurity, and sea level rise, climate change migrants are a topic of immense and growing importance on a global scale. The critical task of resettling migrants in receiving cities pose several challenges to the planning profession; housing availability, innovative housing models, and strategies for community integration will be in urgent demand, just to name a few. While most observers tend to think of climate change as something that will only negatively impact developing countries, this event aims to highlight the problems North American cities may encounter as a result of these changes, and inspire planners to anticipate and respond to these impacts in innovative ways. The event will feature UBC SCARP students reporting out on a workshop series that they have been running for the past year, followed by a facilitated discussion session that will feed into a final report.
      9:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
      Shorter roads go a long way: the significance of road length per resident  (SS-38)
      A small drop in density can equal a large rise in the distance between every person and every destination. That greater distance means it costs more energy, time and money for the city to function in its every aspect—for every kind of infrastructure to reach every home, and for each person to go anywhere, do anything. We will present research on how the total per person road length of Halifax has changed while its density has dropped during a twenty year period from 1996 to 2016. We will analyze differences between communities throughout Halifax, offer an estimate of the cost impacts of those differences, and tease out lessons about the efficiency of various development patterns. We will compare Halifax to other cities throughout North America.
      Speakers:
       

      Plenary Speakers

      11:00 AM  -  12:30 PM
      Closing Plenary Panel - Resilience Panel  (PLS-3)
      CIP/APPI are pleased to welcome the Canadian cities that were invited to join the Rockefeller Foundation's prestigious 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) for our closing panel discussion. This panel will feature Chief Resiliency Officers from each of the four 'Team Canada' member cities: Calgary, Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. The panel will feature brief overview presentations by each city on their issues of resilience and then a group discussion on the importance of tackling resiliency as cities and communities deal with issues of financing growth and change, climate change and demographic shifts (to name a few). The discussion will conclude with tips and suggestions for communities of all different sizes on how to approach resilience - since each community has different challenges. A q&a session will follow. Moderator to be announced.
    Top