What to expect at SOUL 2018

Workshops: It’s never too late to add more tools to your toolbox! Tap into your inner geek through these hands-on, interactive, stimulating workshops to boost your professional knowledge.

Learning Tours: Step outside the box! Discover the hidden gems of Soulful  Winnipeg through these offsite learning tours. From canoeing through the veins of Winnipeg, cycling through gritty neighbourhoods, visiting the guts of landfills, or absorbing the glory of historic architecture, explore what makes planning fascinating. 

Concurrent Sessions: From gritty places forgotten and stories untold, to building new Soulful places; learn about the unique projects, opportunities and lessons our professional planners navigate every day. Using lessons from planning projects, emerging research, or every day multi-disciplinary planning practice, our inspiring speakers will share their perspectives, ideas, and maybe even confessions!

Story Sessions: Once upon a time, we shared stories; stories of triumph, stories of challenges, and stories where we explored our dilemmas. Join us in listening to 20 minute stories using photos, music, poetry, and art. 

All tours and workshops are offered at an additional cost and have limited capacity, so sign up early!

Agenda

CONFERENCE PROGRAM:  The entire conference program and schedule (outlined in detail below) are preliminary only and subject to change. In the interests of improving and delivering the best possible conference program, the organizers reserve the right to amend the conference program and schedule.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION:  Some sessions and activities are included in registration, while others may be optional, require pre-registration, and / or be subject to additional costs. For full details on what is or is not included in the various registration options, please view the Registration Information page. 

 

PROGRAM UPDATES:  The schedule & program details below are updated as of July 1st 2018. Please check back here regularly and review the details below for any changes or updates.

  Go
  • Closed  Closed
  • Optional  Optional
  • Fee  Fee
  • Thursday, July 19, 2018
  •  

    Workshops

    8:45 AM  -  4:00 PM
    Planning and Design for Soul, Grit and Authenticity - Urban Design Charrette Workshop  (WOR-02)
    The Urban Design Charrette is a full day workshop in an interactive, participatory, mini-charrette format. The session will demonstrate practical design approaches to respond to the conference theme “Soul, Grit, and Authenticity,” using demonstration site(s) in Winnipeg. The workshop will demonstrate urban design methods and techniques, and show the value of charrettes as a key urban design tool in the planning process. This design-focused event is a full day workshop in an interactive, participatory, mini-charrette format. Participants will meet at 8:45am and workshop will begin at 9am.

    COST: $125 + GST

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Learning Tours

    9:45 AM  -  2:00 PM
    Growing Small-Town Soul  (LT-02)

    Learn how rapid growth rural communities preserve their history, welcome newcomers, and build complete communities. Step just outside of Winnipeg to join us for a tour of several communities that are experiencing inter-census growth rates between 20 - 40%. On this bus and walking tour, you will learn how the Mennonite settlement pattern and culture of Steinbach has been integrated into the downtown streetscape; learn how the Town of Niverville has capitalized on growth to create a variety of housing options, including support for aging in place; and, travel through time at the Mennonite Heritage Village and taste traditional ethnic fare at the Livery Barn restaurant located in a turn-of-the-century Russian Mennonite Street Village. Tour will meet at 9:45am and depart at 10am.

    COST: $80+ GST

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    12:15 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Soul Cycle  (LT-04)
    Experience some of Winnipeg's most vibrant neighbourhoods from a new perspective. Our knowledgeable guides will take participants to the Forks, Osborne Village, Corydon Avenue, Wellington Crescent, Wolseley, West Broadway, the West End, and the Exchange District. The tour will allow participants to see the variety of bike facilities that Winnipeg has to offer, including on-street, off-street, and buffered lanes. The group will stop for locally renowned refreshments at key stops along the route. Rental bikes provided by The WRENCH, a local charitable non-profit that uses reclaimed bikes from the landfill to provide youth with the opportunity to re-build or repair themselves a custom bike through classes & educational programming at our inner city workshop. The WRENCH also re-builds bikes for rent and sale through their social enterprise program, LocalMotion. If you want to rent a bike for the week of the conference, please email them or visit www.thewrench.ca for more info. Tour will meet at 12:15pm and depart at 12:30pm

    COST: $50+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    12:15 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Soul of the Seine  (LT-01)

    See a city from a new perspective as you paddle down Winnipeg's Historic Seine River. This intimate and scenic river meanders through the heart of the city from the south Perimeter Highway to its confluence with the Red River. Its waters and banks are home to an abundance and variety of wildlife seldom encountered on more remote water bodies. Our guides will share development stories as we paddle quietly through residential neighbourhoods and learn about conservation easements, land dedication, and other tools have helped preserve a riparian area known as the “Bois Des Esprits”. Tour will meet at 12:15pm and depart at 12:30pm.

    Novice canoeists are welcome, but participants should have experience getting in and out of a canoe, turning a canoe, and stopping a canoe safely. 

    COST: $65 + GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Workshops

    12:30 PM  -  4:00 PM
    The Climate Atlas: Science, Storytelling and the Future of Planning  (WOR-03)

    The flagship project of the Prarie Climate Centre (PCC) is their national-scale Climate Atlas. The Climate Atlas is an interactive tool for planners to learn about climate change through models and documentary videos collaboratively developed with local and Indigenous knowledge holders. Combining climate science, mapping, and storytelling, the Climate Atlas brings the global issue of climate change closer to home, inspiring local, regional, and national action and solutions. This workshop will go through the Atlas’ capabilities and collect participant feedback for further optimization. Participants will meet at 12:30pm and depart at 12:45pm

    COST: $30+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Speaker:
    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Learning Tours

    12:30 PM  -  3:45 PM
    ACCESS in Practice: Award Winning Inclusive Design  (LT-05)

    Visit three best-practice examples of universal design led by members of the Winnipeg Access Advisory Committee, representatives from the facility, and design professionals: “The Miracle Garden” at the Victoria General Hospital; "Specialized Services for Children and Youth", in what was once a Christie’s Biscuits factory; and the “Parks Canada Accessible Playground” at The Forks National Park. At each facility, the architect, planner and/or owner will be involved in the on-site presentation to outline project challenges and the exemplary use of universal and inclusive design. Tour will meet at 12:30pm and depart at 12:45pm

    COST: $35+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Evening Activities

    6:30 PM  -  8:30 PM
    CIP/MPPI SOUL 2018 Welcome Reception  (REC-1)

    The conference kicks off with a Winnipeg welcome at the award-winning architectural marvel that is the Canadian Museum for Human Rights—the world’s only museum that explores human rights as a concept and aspiration. Starting at 5:30pm delegates will have the opportunity to explore the special Nelson Mandela exhibit. At 6:30pm, the reception will open in Buhler Hall on the main floor to reconnect with fellow planners and friends from across the country, and to enjoy food and drink catered by CMHR’s ERA Bistro. Ticket includes admission, hors d'oeuvres, and a drink ticket. 

    NOTE: There is no additional cost for this event for Full Conference attendees, however to help us plan accordingly pre-registration is required to attend - be sure to select this item and sign up when registering online. Cost for one day attendees or extra companion tickets: $80.00
     Optional 
  • Friday, July 20, 2018
  •  

    Meals

    7:30 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Breakfast  (BKF-1)
     Optional 
     

    Plenary Speakers

    8:30 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Opening Remarks & Keynote Speaker- Dr. Leela Viswanathan  (KEY-1)

    As an opening inspirational keynote speaker to the CIP/MPPI SOUL 2018 conference, Leela aims to encourage the audience to reflect upon their capacities to transform places and to uncover stories that can lead to better connections between planners and diverse communities. Threaded throughout Leela’s keynote address will be how empathy, human connection, and more critical appreciation for expertise are foundational to her belief in the power of planning with—and not simply for— communities.

    Keynote Speaker:
     Optional 
     

    Story Session

    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Story Session 1  (STORY-01)

    Story 1: Completing Communities: Connecting the Past with the Present in Grand PrairieDespite the evident benefits of ‘Complete Communities’, such initiatives face opposition. Using an example from the City for Grande Prairie, this presentation will discuss the opportunities and challenges presented by the Area Development Plans; the need to build on historical significance of neighbourhoods; and how to develop an interconnected multi-pronged strategy.

    Story 2: Big Wheels Keep on Rolling! Rails to Trails Projects from Minneapolis to Helsinki: Inspired by the work of the “Rails to Trails” movement, this presentation showcases how urban areas similar in size, climate, density, growth, and topography to Winnipeg, converted abandoned railway infrastructure into active transportation routes. The presentation will highlight the benefits of the Midtown Greenway (Minneapolis) and the Baana (Helsinki), and emphasize how these projects brought SOUL to their local community.

    Story 3: "Better Get Hit In Your Soul": Planning Music Cities: Around the globe, planners and governments are recognizing the role that music plays in defining the soul of a place. Music can inform and influence policy, planning, community development, building, tourism and branding, economic development, and quality of life. Often, however, music is an untapped resource in planning soulful cities, and is treated as a nuisance, not an opportunity. Sean will review the pressing issues facing music scenes in cities around the world, identify some instructive cases of successful planning for safety, diversity, and economic development with music, and suggest ways forward for Winnipeg and other midsize Canadian cities.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    A Story of Water: Shoal Lake 40’s Journey to Freedom  (SS-06)
    In 1914, an aqueduct to pipe freshwater from Shoal Lake to Winnipeg turned Shoal Lake First Nation into an island, cut off from the mainland and deprived of safe and reliable access and opportunities. After years of lobbying, creative advocacy, and building unique partnerships, Shoal Lake 40 finally started construction on their road to the mainland—appropriately called Freedom Road. This session will share the story of Shoal Lake 40 and the different players who navigated rocky waters, pushed boundaries, raised alarms within their communities and institutions, and pulled through in the spirit of reconciliation. What does it take to correct a historical wrong? Join us to reflecting on the story and the song of Freedom Road.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    From Application to Approval: Can Municipalities Use Subdivision Regulation to Foster Soulful Places  (SS-07)
    With the help of planning tools and the subdivision process, Municipal governments make decisions that balance community aspirations with landowner rights, neighbourhood concerns, and Municipal priorities. Recently, Manitoba has introduced a Subdivision Application Map (SAM) prepared by a Manitoba Land Surveyor as a requirement to optimize the process and provide detailed information early in the subdivision review process. In this session, the Province of Manitoba will outline new challenges and provide an overview of the SAM. Municipal lawyer, Greg Tramley, will examine the role of municipalities in the subdivision approval process and talk about how to achieve fair and transparent subdivision decisions.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    In Our Backyard: The Joy of Working on Controversial Projects  (SS-01)

    M’akola Development Services, based in Victoria, B.C., has over 30 years experience as a non-profit development consulting team with Indigenous roots. Join three project managers from M’akola to hear about their development stories—both on and off-reserve—and share your own project and community stories. Specific examples include:

    • Anticipating and managing pre-conceived notions from communities and clients;
    •  Managing the shifting sands of client and community support on projects;
    • Navigating the complex environment of the political influence of projects;
    • Big C and little c consultation: managing Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities expectations around consultation.

    Speaker:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Notes from a Music City: Actions to Protect and Grow Toronto's Music Industry  (SS-03)
    Toronto is one of the most varied and vibrant music cities in the world. Its 250 live music venues range in size from small DIY spaces to huge arenas. Toronto’s music scene serves residents, attracts visitors, employs artists, and engages with other cultural industries such as film, television, fashion, food, and interactive media. Densification is creating a risk for live music venues in Toronto in the form of gentrification and displacement. To ensure the continued success of the music industry, the City must balance the impacts of development with the needs of businesses. This session describes the actions taken by planners, economic development specialists, and the private sector to protect and support Toronto's music industry assets.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Reinforcing the Soul:  Strategic Growth Plans in Fredericton and Saint John  (SS-05)
    Fredericton and Saint John, New Brunswick, are economically and culturally different cities with soulful downtowns full of heritage buildings and home to lively music and food scenes. Recognizing how important soul and authenticity are to attracting immigrants and growing their "knowledge" economies, Fredericton and Saint John have recently completed milestone planning studies aimed at reinforcing and growing their urban cores with new, sensitive development. This session will describe the successful engagement processes and policy outcomes of the studies, which offer many lessons for any Canadian mid-city seeking more urban soul in the face of suburban and rural growth pressures.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    The Forks Railside: Placemaking in the Historic Heart of Winnipeg  (SS-08)
    Since the beginning of the renewal of The Forks site in 1989, the former Canadian National Railway (CNR) East Yards have been completely transformed. What was once a desolate and inaccessible industrial site, is now Winnipeg’s foremost destination. In early 2013, The Forks Renewal Corporation (FRC) embarked on a comprehensive planning exercise to shape the long-term vision for the Railside lands—comprised of two of the largest surface parking lots in downtown Winnipeg. Consistent with FRC’s founding mission statement, the 12-acre site will become a dynamic mixed-use neighbourhood. Building on the rich amenities of The Forks, Railside is envisaged as a model urban community, seamlessly integrated into the existing site context that supports a diversity of housing types, demonstrates design innovation and excellence, enhances connectivity with the broader City and adheres to FRC’s ambitious sustainable development goals. This presentation will detail the evolution of the plans for Railside, from the conception of the vision to today.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    The Soul of a Street: From Infrastructure to Inspiration on Dundas  (SS-02)
    The Six Points Interchange is not only the host of the first set of intersecting complete streets to be constructed in Toronto, but also provides the necessary infrastructure to support a new Regional Hub. With a focus on prioritizing the public realm and the pedestrian and cyclist experience, the Six Points Interchange received an Award of Merit at the City of Toronto’s 2017 Urban Design Awards for its generous public boulevards, public art features, stormwater filtration system, and multi-modal infrastructure. During this session, attendees will learn about the new urban design and engineering trends used in Six Points Interchange’s cycling infrastructure and road design.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Urbanizing Suburbia: the Canadian Experience  (SS-04)
    Canadian suburbs are often seen as monotone, homogenous, static, unsustainable, drab, and soulless. But they are changing, and even urbanizing! This session will look at the evolution of suburbs from across Canada with a particular focus on social, community aspects, such as their increasingly diverse population, aging, social cohesion, public vs. private realm and placemaking.
     Optional 
     

    Meals

    12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Awards Luncheon  (LUNCH1)
    Come celebrate this year's Fellow Induction presentation, and the winners of the Awards for Planning Excellence.
     Optional 
     

    Workshops

    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Whole-Hearted Engagement -Three Powerful Tools for Generating Collaborative Stories  (WOR-06)
    This workshop will provide participants with a chance to learn about, and try out, innovative techniques for engaging stakeholders. Workshop attendees will get hands-on experience in a safe environment, followed by a discussion of when and where to use different techniques. Participants will also be encouraged to think critically about how these techniques might (or might not) be suitable to use in specific planning contexts. Through fun, interactive exercises, three methods of engagement will be used to draw out individual stories and support the development of a collective story.

    COST: $50+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Talk & Tour

    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Downtown Winnipeg and the Market Lands: Building Opportunities for Heart, Art, and Soul  (TT-01)

    This session combines a presentation on Winnipeg’s Historic Exchange District followed by a tour of the area.

    Presentation: Art, Design and Public Engagement in Planning Our Urban Space - Winnipeg's Market Lands Story: The redevelopment of the former police headquarters in Winnipeg’s downtown now known as the Market Lands, presents an unparalleled opportunity to create something unique. CentreVenture, Public City, Blueprint and Synonym Art Consultation created a campaign that engaged the public and area stakeholders with the challenging dynamics of celebrated and controversial architecture and the potentially powerful but uniquely undefined legal caveat on the land requiring a “public use”. The site itself is right in the heart of Winnipeg's cultural district, renowned in Canada for its visual and performing arts scene. The Exchange is not short of Soul and this campaign was all about tapping into and celebrating that energy. Winnipeg joined together to map, paint, program and party the Soul into this space. This paneled presentation from the design and public engagement project team,will take you through the events that took place, the excitement, the techniques, lessons learned and the possibilities yet to unfold.

    Tour: Downtown – The Heart and Soul of Our City:Take a walking tour of downtown Winnipeg with CentreVenture, the City’s downtown development agency. Learn about CentreVenture’s unique urban development tools, such as tax increment financing, heritage tax credits, and more. Tour the new Sports, Hospitality and Entertainment District, and see the exciting construction activity at True North Square. Learn how the rail lines became Waterfront Drive and see the new and unique downtown streetscape elements in the east Exchange District. Finally, visit the Market Lands, the historic site of Winnipeg’s public market, and the largest new development opportunity in the heart of the Exchange District.

    COST: $20+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Learning Tours

    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Broadway Modernism  (LT-06)
    The Broadway Modernism tour focuses on the post-1945 development of this area as a premier business district and the collection of modernist architecture designed by some of Winnipeg’s most notable firms. Broadway between Main Street and Osborne Street has long been an address of prestige, book-ended by two dominant, significant works of architecture—Union Station to the east and the Manitoba Legislative Building to the west. The early history of the avenue was as a desirable residential neighbourhood, with little commercial activity; however, a building boom in the late 1950s to early 1970s was responsible for the development of the Broadway, as we know it. All surfaces will be wheelchair and stroller accessible.

    COST: $20+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Speaker:
    Fee  Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    North End Community Planning: Soul Revival?  (LT-08)
    The Canadian Pacific Railway mainline, and its Winnipeg yards, are one of the largest railway yards in the world. They also act as a physical barrier, separating Winnipeg’s North End from the rest of the city, which creates a unique neighbourhood dynamic. While many individuals and organizations within the area are committed to strengthening the social, economic, and cultural fabric of the community, negative local perceptions and government funding cuts create a complicated climate. On this tour, you will visit a local architect with a passion for the needs of the North End community—including public toilets, an arts-based curatorial collective responsible for several multi-storey Main Street murals, a women’s centre working to create positive development opportunities, and more. Come with an open mind and a respectful attitude, for despite much adversity, it is the heart of the North End residents that remains the vibrant soul of this community.

    COST: $40+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Bringing the UN's New Urban Agenda to Canada's Healthy Communities  (SS-12)

    CIP is teaming up with Canada’s Public Health Officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, to discuss the importance of designing healthy communities and how the principles of the UN New Urban Agenda can be implemented by planners across Canada. Dr. Tam, will be speaking about her Report on the State of Public Health in Canada, addressing “the tremendous potential that changing our built environment has for helping all to live healthier lives”. One of her calls to actions is more dialogue across the many disciplines involved in community planning and health promotion, so that neighbourhood design considers and promotes physical activity, healthy diets, and mental wellness. Olimpia Pantelimon, Chair of the CIP Healthy Communities Committee, will unveil CIP’s draft national planning policy on Healthy Communities, followed by an overview of UN-Habitat’s New Urban Agenda, presented by Dr. Sasha Tsenkova, Co-chair of the CIP New Urban Agenda Committee. The session will conclude with a discussion on the New Urban Agenda, why it matters to Canadian planners, and how to apply CIP national policy tools and evidence to foster healthy communities. Participants are also encouraged to share their own personal experiences and examples from across Canada.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Building Inclusive Communities: Planning for Rural Migration into Northern Ontario  (SS-13)
    Over the past fifteen years, a significant number of Amish and Old Order Mennonite farmers have moved to northern Ontario, where these farmers have increased access to local food, broadened the productive spectrum of crops, and improved food sovereignty. For some northern communities, new economic development and resulting intensification of land use, have been encouraged and community renewal is underway. For others, intensification has been stalled as a result of social conflicts and apprehension from community members. This session will explore how northern Ontario communities have coped with the influx of Old Order Mennonite farmers, the role of planners and other municipal employees, and the benefits of building a community inclusive of all members of society.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Community First: Putting People at the Heart of Planning in Sydney, Australia  (SS-49)
    Sydney is in an elite class of global cities – but that demand also poses incredible pressures of growth. While planning for an additional 1.7 million people, 817,000 jobs, and 725,000 units by 2036, planners are challenged with managing growth while preserving the strong local character, soul, and identity of Sydney’s neighbourhoods that attracts people to Sydney in the first place. This international case study will explore Sydney’s growth challenge, and how it has led to a new approach to planning that puts local character and communities at the heart of the work we do.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    D.I.Y. Neighbourhood! Toronto's 'How-To' Guide for Infill Development  (SS-09)
    The Neighbourhood Character Design Guidelines Template and accompanying “How To” Manual allows residents and community groups to participate in and shape their neighbourhoods. Since each neighbourhood is unique, residents are provided with the process and tools to prepare their own Character Design Guidelines. In this session, participants will learn about planning within communities experiencing rapid change and development, methods and tools for engagement to incorporate local knowledge, developing a document that builds on existing policies while responding to diverse communities, and graphic approaches that help illustrate planning, design principles, and performance guidelines.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Projet Bonaventure: de l’autoroute au boulevard  (SS-11)
    Le tronçon de l’autoroute Bonaventure situé entre le milieu du canal de Lachine et la rue Notre-Dame appartenait à la Ville de Montréal jusqu’à sa démolition en 2016. Plutôt que d’investir pour prolonger la vie utile de cette structure sur pilotis construite en 1966, la Ville a choisi de la remplacer par un boulevard urbain. Cette opération d’envergure permet de renouveler une entrée majeure du centre-ville, de retisser les liens entre les secteurs lui étant adjacents et de soutenir le redéveloppement urbain.Dans une optique de renforcement de l’image de Montréal à différents niveaux, le projet se distingue par la qualité et la fonctionnalité de ses aménagements. Il fut essentiel de réaménager cet axe en tenant compte de la variété des besoins des usagers et d’assurer un accès efficace au centre-ville. Les éléments suivants ont contribué à la création d’un lieu symbolique pour Montréal: - l’aménagement de voies réservées pour les autobus, de nouveaux aménagements cyclables et de trottoirs conviviaux;- l’aménagement de lieux publics de plus de 24 000m2 qui répondent au besoin en espaces publics dans le secteur;- l’implantation de deux œuvres d’art majeures aux extrémités du nouveau boulevard urbain qui confèrent au lien un caractère distinctif.
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Stories of Climate Resiliency: Valuable Lessons on Community Identity from Extreme Weather  (SS-15)
    The goal of the session is to share valuable lessons learned by communities across the prairies with other planners across Canada who will experience similar extreme weather. The risks and opportunities from climate change will force planners, governments, and communities to better integrate complementary planning processes that result in enhanced community and landscape resiliency to climate change impacts. Manitoba Sustainable Development and guest speakers will share key challenges, lessons learned and best practices, and identify where the nexus exists between various planning processes, the role of planners, and ensuring local and regional resiliency for a changing climate.
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Zoning for Soul: The Relationship between Zoning, Streetscaping, Public Art and a Sense of Place  (SS-10)
    When people think of soul, zoning isn’t exactly the first thing that comes to mind. However zoning, and other boring-sounding municipal initiatives, can impact on feelings and social connections in spaces. At minimum, zoning and streetscaping can have an ‘influencer’ role in the environment-experience continuum. This session will explore the relationship between zoning, streetscaping, public art and sense of place, using a Winnipeg downtown shoulder neighbourhood as a case study. The neighbourhood has recently seen a host of improvements, brought to fruition through players working together (City, arms-length and private sector), while leveraging new zoning and housing tools. How are priorities shifting as we move toward a pedestrian-focused, complete community-oriented future? Come listen and discuss!
    Speaker:
     Optional 
     

    Story Session

    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Story Session 3  (STORY-03)

    Story 1: Hear Me Out: Shared Stories from an Accidental Planner:​ Through spoken word, and by sharing my story and a bit of my restless, messy soul, I hope to inspire dialogue, contemplation and awareness amongst participants about the importance of each of our stories as they relate to our authentic selves and our work as planners - how did we get here, what are we doing, and where are we going?

    Story 2: Story, Ceremony and Change: The Role of Personal Narrative in Changing CommunitiesLet’s set aside standard consultation tools and statistical surveys for a moment and reflect on our own experiences of ceremony and adjusting to change. Let’s consider how physical space used for ceremony can reflect a community’s adjustment to new circumstances through digesting, celebrating, reflecting, or healing. In this session, two stories will be presented – one personal and one professional. Both will examine the role of personal narrative and ceremony in changing communities. Participants will be invited to consider their own experiences with change and ceremony to inform their professional practice.

    Story 3: Activating Parks as the Heart of Community: A great design is key to a great park, but a focus on long-term community involvement and programming is critical for a park to become a beloved part of a community. For the last seven years, Park People has worked with residents, non-profits, foundations, and city governments, to activate the power of parks as dynamic outdoor community hubs. This presentation will draw on their experience, examples, and successful outcomes to explore the question: how can we support parks as alive and dynamic places, breaking down barriers and infusing them with the soul of the neighbourhoods that surround them?
     Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    AuthentiCITY: Designing cities for their people  (SS-17)
    What creates an authentic city? That is the question facing Canadian planners and designers. How can we come together to create spaces, places, communities, and cities that reflect our past, acknowledge our present, and plan for our future? How can we integrate divergent views and complex cultural histories into a collaborative and productive dialogue? Participatory Design is a key tool in the process of mindful city-building. It is a focused approach where project stakeholders are actively involved in the planning and design process. In a participatory design process, all stakeholders, including the design team, the client, and the broader community, are brought into the process early, with the intention of collaborating in a meaningful way. It is through this iterative and participant-driven dialogue, that authentic and meaningful conversation can be cultivated and expressed. It is through this often messy, complex, and gritty work that truly SOULful planning and design can take place.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Forgotten SOUL of our Rural Communities - The Fight to Stay Alive!  (SS-20)
    With increased movement of people from rural communities to larger urban centres with more significant resources, retaining families and attracting new residents in small/rural communities is becoming harder. Their fight to stay alive requires support from experienced professionals who are dedicated to meeting their needs and standing up to the barriers that these rural communities face. Nick Pryce from V3 Companies of Canada will share his experiences of working in rural communities across Canada, outline the challenges they face, and discuss how to work with rural communities; as well as challenge the audience to think about its role in rural sustainability.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Its About Time! A New Tool for Measuring Convenient Access to Public Transit  (SS-16)
    Public transportation can promote increased population density, curtail sprawl, reduce the environmental impact of private vehicles, generate economic growth, and have a positive effect on individual’s well-being, only when public transit is convenient, accessible, affordable, and well connected. Despite the importance of public transit, there is currently no standard method to measure what convenient access to public transit looks like. Research developed and presented in this session explains a method to measure convenient access to public transportation using General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data and Winnipeg, as an example.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Redraw, Challenge, and Reimagine: Student Perspectives on Selected Topics in Planning  (SS-18)

    Planning is perpetually situated at the intersection of the past and the present.  To understand what was done – what has worked, and what hasn’t, and what to do – how to practice differently and how to make things better, is to be learning, thinking critically, and acting bravely.  Students have a unique perspective on the SOUL of planning as they redraw the boundaries of PLACE, challenge and reimagine our ROLES as planners, and tell the STORIES that will change our environments, our communities, and our profession.  Explore the meaning of SOUL in planning with students during the following presentations:

    • Paulette D'Eon: Culinary Culture and Local Development: Characteristics for a sustainable and endogenous development model in Acandí, Colombia
    • Lissie Rappaport: Inclusionary Zoning in Canada? Lessons from the American Experience 
    • Joseph Liberatore: Evaluating Frameworks for Transit-Oriented Development in Established Neighbourhoods  

     

     Optional 
     

    Evening Activities

    5:45 PM  -  9:15 PM
    Choose Your Own Adventure- Distillery Tour  (CYOA-1)

    Friday, July 20th 2018 

    5:45pm - 9:15pm

    Departure from Winnipeg Convention Centre

    Check out Winnipeg’s first grain to bottle distillery organized by Winnipeg Tasting Tours (WTT). Start with dinner and a cocktail at Tipsy Cow (gluten free and vegetarian options are available), then head to Capital K Distillery for a tour of their facility, as well as samples and a mixed cocktail. Finish the night at a hip lounge for drinks and music – location to be determined based on availability. Roundtrip transportation will be provided by WTT – pick up and drop off at the Convention Centre. For more information about this tour, please visit https://winnipeg-tasting-tours.myshopify.com/products/cocktail-tour 

    Must be legal drinking age. This tour is non-refundable. CIP and MPPI are acting as booking agent only, and are not responsible for this tour. For more information about this tour please contact winnipegtastingtours@outlook.com 204-995-1581.   

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    6:00 PM  -  10:00 PM
    Choose Your Own Adventure- Downtown Patio Crawl  (CYOA-3)

    Friday, July 20th 2018 

    6:00pm - 10:00pm

    Departure from Winnipeg Convention Centre

    Take a walking tour to four of downtown Winnipeg’s finest summer patios. This tour is organized by the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ and will explore some of downtown’s most unique and sun soaked patios. Appetizers and beverage samplings at each location are provided in the cost of the tour. Locations will be determined based on availability – for more information on potential locations, please visit https://downtownwinnipegtours.com/tours/patio-crawl/

    Must be legal drinking age. This tour is non-refundable. CIP and MPPI are acting as booking agent only, and are not responsible for this tour. For more information about this tour please contact tours@downtownwinnipegbiz.com or 204-958-4640.    

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    6:15 PM  -  9:45 PM
    Choose Your Own Adventure- Brews Cruise  (CYOA-2)

    Friday, July 20th 2018 

    6:15pm - 9:45pm

    Departure from Winnipeg Convention Centre

    Hop on Winnipeg’s first Microbrewery tour organized by Winnipeg Tasting Tours (WTT). Sample beverages from three of Winnipeg’s finest microbreweries. Beer flights/pints at all locations and dinner at one location is included in the cost of the tour – gluten free and vegetarian options are available. Roundtrip transportation will be provided by WTT – pick up and drop off at the Convention Centre. Tour locations to be determined based on availability – for more information on potential locations, please visit https://winnipeg-tasting-tours.myshopify.com/collections/winnipegs-microbrewery-tour

    Participants must be legal drinking age. This tour is non-refundable. CIP and MPPI are acting as booking agent only, and are not responsible for this tour. For more information about this tour please contact winnipegtastingtours@outlook.com or 204-995-1581. 

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
  • Saturday, July 21, 2018
  •  

    Meals

    7:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Breakfast  (BKF-2)
     Optional 
     
    7:30 AM  -  8:00 AM
    CIP AGM  (AGM)
     Optional 
    8:00 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Poster Playground  (POSTER)
     Optional 
     

    Plenary Speakers

    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Keynote Speaker - Zachary Mannheimer  (KEY-2)
    Every place has a soul that from time to time needs a champion to spark activity, culture, recreation, and build places where people sense vibrancy and connection to their communities. Zachary’s experience on soul and place took hold after settling in Des Moines, Iowa, in 2007. Starting from home in NYC, his journey to Des Moines led him through 22 cities around America. Once settled, he founded the Des Moines Social Club (DMSC), creating Soul and Place through the arts scene. DMSC has hosted over 5000 events and seen over 1,000,000 patrons. His theatrical work and DMSC has been featured in The New York Times, Time Magazine and Politico.Zachary’s work is based on Creative Placemaking for various rural communities of various sizes, with the goal of helping them achieve economic and population growth through cultural and entrepreneurial amenities, concepts, and catalytic projects. In 2017, Zachary founded the Creative Placemaking department at McClure Engineering Company as their Principal Community Planner. Zachary serves on the boards of Iowa Public Radio and Iowa Rural Development Council and shares his home with his wife Sarah, daughters Mira and Fiona and son Benjamin.
    Keynote Speaker:
     Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Canadian Brownfield Redevelopment: Stories of Revitalization  (SS-25)
    Left undeveloped, brownfield sites are a liability for municipalities. They devitalize streetscapes, create gaps in the urban fabric, pose health and safety risks, and generate very little tax revenue. The case for redeveloping these sites is clear. However, municipal planners know that the deck is often stacked against them: the cost of remediating a brownfield site often outweighs its development potential. This session will feature stories from municipal planners that developed innovative policies and incentive programs to catalyze brownfield redevelopment in their community. This will be an interactive session, where participants will be invited to share their brownfield redevelopment challenges and brainstorm solutions.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Costly or Crucial? Stories of Development Cost Charges from the Prairies  (SS-27)
    Imposing fees and charges on development is not fun. In fact, it can be downright scary at times for both the municipality and the development industry. The only thing possibly scarier, however, is the need to put development on hiatus due to lack of servicing capacity. Join the Cities of Regina and Brandon to hear how we weeded through the issues to create development cost charge policies that work within our communities.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Hitting the Streets! Improving Active Transportation through Dynamic Community Engagement  (SS-28)

    This session will include three presentations on active transportation discussing techniques, results, and lessons learned from the following dynamic community engagement projects:

    1. McDermot/Bannatyne Pop-up Protected Bike Lanes – On the narrow streets of Winnipeg’s Exchange District planners moved away from maps and renderings and laid out a life-size experience (Brian Patterson, Urban Systems)

    2. Stratified Sample Door-Knocking – In this unique and tight-knit residential neighbourhood, a high level of engagement started with a low tech personal touch (Jeanette Montufar, MORR Consulting)

    3. Assiniboine River Winter Path Warming Hut – when a frozen river changed from a barrier to a destination, another project grabbed attention through art on ice (Natale Geddes, City of Winnipeg, Office of Public Engagement)

     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Layer by Layer: A New Spatial Data WebApp for Manitoba  (SS-22)
    Manitoba is a collection of 137 Municipalities, 50 Northern Affairs Communities, and 63 First Nations. Each has a unique story, a distinctive identity, and an individual soul, and careful planning is required to realize the potential of each as sustainable, healthy communities and governments. Although it has been widely used for analytic and cartographic purposes for nearly three decades, access to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data, or a method of adopting it, remains a limiting factor for many local governments, planners, commercial industries, and citizens, mainly due to funding and technical expertise. Access to spatial data is problematic in Manitoba, where low population densities in many communities often dictate a lack of capacity. To address this lack of capacity and to aid in the utilization of GIS data, the Manitoba Department of Municipal Relations had created a WebGIS application called the Municipal Relations Land Use and Development Web Application. It allows users to view and perform analysis on planning bylaw and land boundary data for all municipalities in Manitoba. Increasing individual exposure to spatial information and improving geospatial literacy will result in a more holistic understanding of their communities and the environments in which they exist.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    ltst uw’hw-nuts’ ul-wum – We are Working as One: Stz’uminus First Nation and the Town of Ladysmith  (SS-23)
    What role does local government planning have in supporting reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities? What soul-searching and gut-checking does this demand of planners? This presentation will cover the experience of the Town of Ladysmith, working in partnership with the Stz’uminus First Nation, on the creation of a Waterfront Area Plan, with the shared aim of building their relationship. The 50-acre waterfront area is situated on the unceded territory of the Stz’uminus First Nation, whose ancestors managed these lands for harvesting, cultural, spiritual, and economic use since time immemorial. At the heart of the process was a 2.5-day community charrette, which brought together both communities in a design process that culminated in a waterfront plan titled: “ltst uw’hw-nuts’ ul-wum: we are working as one”. Driving the planning process was a need to engage both communities meaningfully, and to ensure equal representation and benefits. This required that the non-Indigenous planning team do much more than listen and learn. It demanded that they challenge themselves to question their assumptions about what constitutes a “good planning process”—and adapting the project process accordingly—and to work toward indigenizing their own perspectives on planning.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Reflections on Identity and Heritage at Ottawa's Chateau Laurier  (SS-21)
    Situated at the junction of the picturesque Ottawa River and the historic Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and a stone’s throw away from Parliament Hill, the Chateau Laurier has been a key landmark in the nation’s capital for over a century. In 2016, a proposal brought forward by a renowned Canadian architect to add a modern addition to support the hotel’s 21st-century business plan attracted nation-wide attention. Ottawans, and many others, expressed dismay: heritage conservation, architectural exploration, community input, and appropriate planning responses are now at the core of the debate. What does this place represent for the people, the city, and perhaps the entire nation? This presentation will tell an on-going story of an iterative learning process and facilitate a discussion about planning, design, heritage, and place-making.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Sites and Sounds on Prince Edward Island: The Intersection of Ethics and Mandate  (SS-26)
    The sounds that reach the Aboriginal Affairs Secretariat and Municipal Affairs Branch of the Province of Prince Edward Island on a day-to-day basis represent two primary groups—the Indigenous community and municipal governments. Whether the sites that provincial staff is mandated to protect relate to the natural or built environment, the Aboriginal Affairs, Archaeology and Planning offices hear stories of space at the most local level. This presentation will speak to the values that guide the work of both departments, as we recognize and react to the impacts of the legacy of settlement and planning functions on an island where socio-economic systems and the physical environment are transforming rapidly. The presenters will speak to recent work that illustrates the intersection between individual ethics and formal mandates in the context of the history, functions, needs, and challenges related to the two First Nations and 72 municipalities on Prince Edward Island.
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Soul Searching: Finding Soul in Halifax’s Centre Plan  (SS-24)
    As of 2018, most of the Halifax Regional Municipality’s “Regional Centre” is governed by planning documents nearly 70 years old. Previous efforts—focused on the twin downtowns of Halifax and Dartmouth—resulted in updated local plans and by-laws that balance concerns about heritage, neighbourhood character, and sensitive development. However, growth in the rest of the Regional Centre has been stifled, with seven decades of amendments taking their toll on the usefulness and usability of the Centre’s main planning documents. Halifax’s new Regional Centre Plan and By-Law are the culmination of nearly ten years’ work to unite the community in search of Halifax’s “soul.” This presentation will address our role, as planners, in the process of discovering the soul of HRM and translating it into policy and regulation. We will discuss the genesis of the Centre Plan, our engagement strategies, and the new ideas and planning tools we are introducing to Halifax for the first time.
     Optional 
     

    Meals

    12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Awards Luncheon  (LUNCH2)
    Come celebrate this year's winners of the Young Planners award, President's award, Plan Canada awards, MPPI awards, and PSTF awards.
     Optional 
     

    Talk & Tour

    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Winnipeg’s Historic Exchange District: Reflections on Planning in Gritty Places  (TT-02)

    This session combines a presentation on Winnipeg’s Historic Exchange District followed by a tour of the area.

    Presentation: Art and Soul in the Winnipeg's Historic Exchange District - Planning for Arts, Culture and Creativity: A graduate research project aimed at understanding planning for arts, culture, and creativity in Winnipeg’s Historic Exchange District, reveals the need for strong civic leadership, and inclusive and equitable planning principles. This presentation will reflect on how planning can assist gritty places to survive gentrification, support the arts, and value culture. The author will also reflect on voices left out, mainly Indigenous Peoples, women, newcomers, and persons with disabilities, and challenge participants to include these voices in future planning.

    Tour: Heritage or Hassle - Planning in the Exchange District: Winnipeg’s Exchange District has the highest concentration of restaurants, shops, art, and entertainment venues in Winnipeg. It is also home to over 100 heritage buildings from modest brick and mortar warehouses and terracotta skyscrapers, to modernist structures of the 1960’s and 70’s. Hear how Winnipeg’s urban landscape developed over time and learn the fascinating social histories behind it all, including financial booms and busts, strikes, riots, and newer developments. You will also learn about the benefits and challenges of heritage preservation, where stakeholders and developers must adhere to a whole different set of rules and policies that affect parking, signage, patios, facades, and more.

    COST: $40+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
     

    Story Session

    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Story Session 4  (STORY-04)

    Story 1: Collaborative Rural Community Energy Planning: From Assiniboine voyageur to Canadian Pacific Railway engineer to implementing Accelerate Kootenays, this is a Canadian connectivity and transportation story. Starting with the historical perspective, this presentation will connect communities from a health and energy lens, demonstrating a model for Canadian planning and collaboration that puts climate action in the fast lane.

    Story 2: Soul Exposed - What Development in Halifax Has Revealed About Our Past: Being one of Canada's oldest settler communities, Halifax still retains fragments of its earliest days, many of which exist below ground, buried under layers of subsequent construction. Sometimes new development unearths relics of the past, including secret tunnels, major infrastructure and whole forgotten neighbourhoods. This presentation looks at examples of discovered artefacts, the stories they tell, and the policy and regulatory reaction to these discoveries.

    Story 3: Canada's Climate Story: Cinema, Maps and the Future of Adaptation Planning: Despite decades of warnings from scientists about the adverse impacts of climate change, we have yet to see a significant shift away from fossil fuels, and very few communities are truly prepared for the social, economic, cultural and environmental change that will take place in the mid to late 21st Century. This presentation will illustrate how participatory filmmaking, geovisualization and climatology, is being used to communicate the real-world impact of climate change.

     Optional 
     

    Learning Tours

    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    A Long Time Coming: the Southwest Transitway, Bus Rapid Transit and Transit-Oriented Development  (LT-09)
    A rapid transit journey 30 years in the making, the first phase of the Southwest Transitway opened in Spring of 2012. The second phase is currently under construction, extending the Transitway to Investors Group Field and the University of Manitoba. A complex project involving rail relocation, a dedicated separated busway with multiple stations, an active transportation network, brownfields, complex drainage issues, extensive engagement, and use of drones & micro-simulation techniques, the Southwest Transitway has transformed public transit in Winnipeg, and spurred the development of a new CFL stadium, an extensive university campus redevelopment plan, and over 2500 units of new residential & mixed-use development. Come on a mobile tour of the Transitway and hear the past, present, and future of this project and rapid transit in Winnipeg.

    COST: $40+ GST

     

    Fee  Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Seeding Soul in New Communities:  How Investments and Planning Are Creating New Places in Winnipeg  (LT-11)

    This learning tour visits five newer communities in south Winnipeg: Bonavista, Sage Creek, Royalwood, Waverley West and the Tuxedo Business Park. Each community provides an example of significant investment in unique features that contribute to the character and design of each community. Each of these communities demonstrates significant changes to past practices in community design and development in Winnipeg while bringing new challenges to the forefront.

    COST: $45 + GST

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

    Fee  Optional  Closed 
    1:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    The Landfills Next Door  (LT-10)
    The southwest corner of Winnipeg contains one of the City’s newest and fastest growing neighbourhoods. It also contains three landfills. These landfills present planners, landscape architects, and engineers with unique challenges in the midst of a largely greenfield development. This mobile tour will examine the approaches used by the City to safely manage development around two closed landfills in the new neighbourhoods. We will visit a former landfill/former police shooting range/retention basin in a new neighbourhood, a closed landfill/new neighbourhood park, and an active landfill and resource management facility. We will also discuss the challenges of planning at the intersection of major public infrastructure and neighbourhood development, while taking in the views from Winnipeg’s largest landmass.

    COST: $35+ GST 

    Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

     

    Speaker:
    Fee  Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Beyond "Pop-Planning": Building Healthy, Equitable, and Soulful Communities  (SS-31)
    Planning reactions to challenging social conditions and environmental concerns often overlook upstream solutions. Planners can become sidetracked by downstream or “pop-planning” approaches. Solutions that rely heavily on technology or focus solely on economic outcomes, for example, oversimplify the complex nature of community issues. Although these tools and techniques can sometimes create advances in practice, they do not always consider what truly gets at the soul of the matter: meaningful, diverse community engagement, multi-sectoral collaboration, and answers that are geared to each community’s reality. BC Healthy Communities’ interactive session will explore tools to develop upstream solutions to deep-rooted community issues, provide new strategies to tackle systemic inequities, and encourage participants to think critically about popular planning reactions to key challenges we face.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    FEMOPOLIS: Cities for Women, Cities by Women, Cities with Women  (SS-32)
    Cities are gendered. While gender identity can be fluid, on average people identifying as women experience the city differently than people identifying as men. Women are more likely to experience urban poverty, head single-parent households, absorb the bulk of household chores and childcare, walk and take transit, have more complex travel behaviour, report urban safety concerns, and experience sexual harassment and assault in the public realm. Yet, these gendered realities are rarely fully considered in the way we design our cities. Although gender awareness is fundamental to the success of 21st-century towns and cities, women are under-represented around leadership tables in local government and urban planning professions. This presentation offers planning precedents from around the world, ranging from “gender mainstreaming” policies in Vienna, to the “gender equal city” of Umea, Sweden. It also draws upon interviews with leading female planners and urban designers on how to bring gender equity to life in our cities and in the city building process.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Grit and Growth: Hamilton's Approach to Intensification for Revitalization  (SS-29)
    Take part in a brief history of Hamilton’s Downtown, from a vibrant epicentre to a gritty, under-utilized core, to the current unprecedented revitalization. Given the many changes that Hamilton has experienced in recent years, an overhaul of the planning framework is now required, which must embrace the creative culture emergence, promote intensification, and create a forward-looking approach.
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Parks as the Soul of Community: Park Provision and Policy across Canadian Cities  (SS-35)
    Parks are the soul of a community. Nearly forty years of research evidence confirms that access to parks support human health and wellness. Although the role of parks is generally accepted as beneficial, parks and recreation programs across Canada vary widely. This session will explore the difference and commonalities in park provisions across Canada through policies developed in Halifax, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Edmonton.
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Partnering for Growth: How Five Saskatchewan Municipalities Found Shared Ground  (SS-30)
    The Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) is a voluntary collaboration between the Cities of Martensville, Saskatoon and Warman, the Town of Osler, and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park. With an anticipated regional population of over a million in the next 60+ years, these 5 municipalities have been working together to develop a Regional Plan to ensure our region is ready for growth, to enable economic prosperity for everyone, and to support the quality of life that we enjoy. This presentation will discuss the process these 5 municipalities undertook to develop the Regional Plan, including the challenges these municipalities have faced during the development of the Plan and the opportunities which have resulted from this voluntary cooperation.
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    The Future of City-Building: Perspectives from City-Building Professionals  (SS-34)
    Moderated by Paul Kennedy (host of CBC’s Ideas), this multi-disciplinary panel discussion will focus on the evolving role of planners and ‘allied’ professionals (i.e. Engineers, Architects, and Landscape Architects) in city and community building. The panellists will touch on a wide range of topics, including the business of city-building, the politics of planning, inter-professional collaboration, amongst others. This session is intended to instigate an engaging dialogue that explores emerging trends in the way we plan and build cities—from public engagement to big data—and the responsibility of city-building professionals in that process.
    Fee  Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Zoning for Cannabis  (SS-36)
    The summer of 2018 will see Canada go green. In this case, going green is less about climate change and more about a changing political climate towards the use of cannabis. The forthcoming legalization of recreational cannabis through Bill C-45 by the Federal Government will create an entirely new landscape for how we produce, purchase, and use this drug within our communities. Planners will need to wrestle with relevant land use planning, zoning, communications, and engagement implications of this substantial change to towns and cities across the country. In this session, new Zoning Guidelines for Cannabis, from Manitoba and Alberta will be reviewed.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     

    Learning Tours

    3:00 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Top Secret Delta9 Cannabis Facility Tour  (LT-12)

    A small group of lucky participants will be delivered to a confidential location to tour a state of the art, Manitoba Cannabis Cultivation facility. Once on site, participants will take a 15-minute journey through the new, high-tech and wonderful world of legalized cannabis.

    COST: $45 + GST

    ​Workshops and tours are non-refundable. 

    Fee  Optional 
     

    Story Session

    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Story Session 5  (STORY-05)

    Story 1: Evolving Ethics: Perspectives from Day 1 to Year 10: With planning decisions shaping our environment and having long-lasting impacts on our communities, our profession needs to plan with soul. How do we evolve as soulful practitioners? This interactive storytelling session will explore the experiences of a recent planning graduate and a planner with 10 years of experience, who work alongside each other in transportation planning and engineering consulting. Their story will explore the role of professional ethics in a technical, political, public work environment.

    Story 2: Developing your Ethic: Reflecting on Working with First Nations Communities: Reflecting on 44 years of working with First Nations communities, this presentation will share personal understandings of First Nation issues and needs gained through experiences as a student and a professional; application of these understandings to First Nation projects, and reflection on key issues to address the recent Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action.

    Story 3: Empowering First Nations Land Development in the Maritimes: Using examples of commercial development initiatives in the Maritime Provinces, this presentation will share stories of successful indigenous development models in Nova Scotia and their inspiration for other First Nations groups. The growing role of indigenous communities in the economy of Nova Scotia will be explored.

     Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Building Bridges: How Community Collaboration & Spirit Influenced the Osborne Bridge Rehabilitation  (SS-41)
    The goal of the Osborne Bridge Rehabilitation was to meet the needs of users: pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. With the community’s participation, the SOUL of the project became: Reach out to the homeless living under the bridge; Reflect community culture, as identified by Neighbourhood Advisory Committee members; Re-design— pedestrians and cyclists were “jay-walking” across 6 lanes of traffic rather than using the river pathway; Embrace the committee’s challenge that a rebuilt “utilitarian bridge could still be beautiful”; Integrate meaningful public art within the bridge structure; Reflect “place”—connecting Winnipeg’s grand institutional neighbourhood with the densely populated, lively Osborne Village (voted Canada’s Greatest Neighbourhood, 2012, CIP). Session participants will learn about the collaborative planning process, the affected and interested sectors of the community included on the Neighbourhood Advisory Committee, and key community background information.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Community Action Through Culture: Prince Albert's Municipal Cultural Action Plan  (SS-40)
    In 2015, the City of Prince Albert led an innovative planning process known as cultural planning that focused on honouring, supporting, and promoting its community’s tangible and intangible cultural expressions of its values, traditions, and beliefs through a three-phased process: 1) Engage the community to map its cultural assets; 2) Develop a made-in and by community-based cultural action plan; 3) Implement and consistently monitor and flex the plan. In this interactive session, participants will first hear the story of the Prince Albert Municipal Cultural Action Plan including its creation, implementation, and evaluation, followed by a facilitated dialogue in the round, with participants asking them to share their own stories related to cultural and related planning.
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Dealing with Odour Nuisance in Rural Communities  (SS-42)
    Rural communities often include (or are adjacent to) agricultural operations, such as livestock farms. These agricultural operations are key to the functionality and productivity of rural communities, but they may also be sources of nuisances to community residents. Odour is considered the number one nuisance associated with livestock operations in rural communities, which is both environmentally and socially challenging. This presentation will address odour issues associated with livestock operations, including sources of odour emission, odour perception and impact on the community, and odour regulations. The emphasis will be placed on a computer model for odour impact assessment. This model predicts odour dispersion in the atmosphere and assesses the level of tolerance to odour in the community.
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Inuit Sustainability Practices in Master Planning at Kinngaaluk Territorial Park  (SS-38)
    For thousands of years, the area surrounding Kinngaaluk Territorial Park has been a place that the Inuit of the Belcher Islands have used for harvesting, both from the land and sea. Though a ‘park’ is not a traditional Inuit concept, resource extraction pressures have grown in Nunavut, and communities, such as nearby Sanikiluaq, see park establishment as a means of protecting these important cultural places. Avatittinnik Kamatsiarniq, meaning “respect and care for the land, animals and the environment” is the Inuit principle of sustainability. Inuit traditional knowledge says that conservation requires a human-animal partnership through harvesting that sustains both parties and the health of a whole ecosystem. Kinngaaluk Territorial Park represents the unique relationship of Inuit to the land. The Master Plan for the park respects and enhances this relationship by protecting Inuit rights to continue to use and enjoy the land and its resources, following the principles of their culture. The presentation will highlight the process and community involvement that planned this unique park that encourages Inuit sustainable harvesting practices.
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Press Time: Benefiting Communitites through Media  (SS-37)
    How can planners distill the essence and soul of complex and abstract community issues, priorities, and vision for use by the media? This presentation explores the role that planning practitioners should play in engaging the public about city building through coordination with media. Panelists will share how they are currently engaging with media and offer their thoughts on ways to further work with media—to demystify planner language, to get the headlines, and to prompt dialogue. An interactive workshop will present ideas on how to present, sell, and manage the narrative of a community vision through media and through your own writing.
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Surfacing the Soul of Professional Fellowship: Stories from CIP Fellows  (SS-39)
    A panel of Fellows offering stories of soul and role in their planning journey and where they learned critical pieces of their craft. The panel will reflect on the possibility of 'planning as soul-work’. Drawing from the Fellows extensive professional expertise this session will bring their more personal experience caring for disadvantaged communities and people, fellow planners, helping the poor and displaced, diverse populations, including immigrants and Indigenous Peoples, elderly and children, planning, and designing healing places.
     Optional 
     

    Evening Activities

    6:00 PM  -  8:30 PM
    Prairie Soul Street Party  (REC-2)

    Head down to Winnipeg’s first ‘woonerf’ for a networking and noshing extravaganza that will feed your soul. Set in one of Winnipeg’s most iconic neighbourhoods and the Exchange District National Historic site, our closing party promises to blend together food, music, design and art into a lively outdoor casual dining experience that captures the essence of our prairie soul. Head out on the town afterwards or just hang-out till the sun goes down, the street lights come on and the music keeps playing. Ticket includes admission, buffet-style dinner, and a drink ticket.

    NOTE: There is no additional cost for this event for full conference attendees, however to help us plan accordingly pre-registration is required to attend. Be sure to select this optional activity and sign up when registering online. Cost for one day attendees or extra companion tickets: $80.00+ GST
     Optional 
  • Sunday, July 22, 2018
  •  

    Meals

    8:00 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Breakfast  (BKF-3)
     Optional 
     

    Story Session

    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Story Session 6  (STORY-06)

    Story 1: International Research - A tale of Caution (and Optimism) for Canadian Planners: Our approach to international research in this rapidly changing world needs to evolve. The traditional, top-down avenues should no longer be the status quo. This presentation is about professional ethics, the role of academic institutions, and how altering research paradigms can change things for Planners here in Canada.

    Story 2: Is Canada Still A Suburban Nation? Metropolitan Growth Trends from Across Canada: Using analytical maps for all 33 Canadian Census Metropolitan areas with comparisons between data from 2011 and 2016, this presentation will discuss whether or not suburban population growth has slowed and if more people living in the core of Canadian cities, as proposed in many of our plans?

     Optional 
     

    Concurrent Session

    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    (Re)Planning Places of Worship  (SS-47)
    Presentation 1: Current Trends in (Re)Planning Places of WorshipDemographic changes, increasing diversity, rising land values, expanded mandates, declining congregations, and space requirements, are all factors pushing for the retrofit of existing places of worship. This presentation will outline the drivers of change influencing religious buildings and explore current directions for innovative planning and design solutions for these important spaces.Presentation 2: SOUL in Spirit: Converting Places of Worship to Places for LivingOne church asset is property, which presents an opportunity for continued community service through the development of housing, amenities and social space. The presentation will look at infill projects that are remaking the fabric of Canada’s mid-size cities and major urban peripheries, unlocking opportunities that will sustain our communities into the future.Presentation 3: SOUL Mates: Joint Venture Partnership and the Development of West Broadway CommonsThis presentation will showcase Winnipeg’s West Broadway Commons as an example of development that does not alter the form or function of a historic church while creating revenue for the continued sustainability of a heritage building. This joint venture partnership between All Saints Church and the University of Winnipeg Community Renewal Corporation 2.0. proposes to deliver 110 rental apartments and street level commercial space.
     Optional 
    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Back To Our Roots: Growth Management Planning in a Changing Political and Economic Climate  (SS-44)
    Decisions to accelerate the phase-out of coal, the new Edmonton Metropolitan Region Growth Plan, and challenges of being a rural community in an urbanizing world have caused Parkland County to rethink its future growth. Embracing this, the County undertook a unique approach to understanding its growth opportunities. This approach “re-connected” the County to its agricultural roots, unique landscapes, and rural entrepreneurship opportunities to shape responsible growth policies. Parkland County and B&A Planning Group will share their experience with growth management in rural areas to show how planners can propose creative solutions in a changing political, financial, and regional environment.
     Optional 
    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Exploring Western and Haida Planning Paradigms  (SS-46)
    As planners, a key component of our work is to gather and consider diverse perspectives and opinions. This requires us to recognize that there exist different worldviews and knowledge systems. But how conscious are we about how our worldview influences our work? Through this session, we will begin to articulate and make visible the western planning paradigm. We will also work to articulate aspects of the Haida planning paradigm. Finally, we will use the planning process developed by the Haida Nation beginning in the early 1980s as an illustrative example of the interaction between these paradigms.
     Optional 
    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Regenerative + Resilient Development and Design  (SS-51)

    Grab a cup of your favourite morning drink and join us for an interdisciplinary panel, which will delve into the potential for - as well as demonstrated success of - regenerative planning and design in the built environment. Perspectives from architecture, landscape architecture, engineering, and planning will address issues related to climate change, environmental regeneration, Indigenous reconciliation, and holistic health and wellbeing through the built environment.

    The current need for regenerative + resilient development design is urgent. In order to sustain a safe and vibrant quality-of-life, we must respond holistically to the design of our built environment and elevate the potential above common practice. The term “Built Environment” includes a series of nested scales - from buildings to infrastructure to neighbourhoods - that are often connected via the Public Realm. In the face of weather extremes, economic disruption, and resource depletion that are now becoming common place, our societal and planetary well-being depends on the cooperative interaction of all elements in our lives: social, economic and environmental.

    Speaker:
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:15 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Resting Places on the Road to Recovery: The Reinvention of Motels as Transitional Housing  (SS-45)
    Designed for motorists and travellers on the expanding Trans-Canada & Interstate Highway Systems, motels or “motor inns” were built across the continent in the decades after the Second World War. They became important settings in the road film genre, where a journey and its stopping points were often used to reflect the inward transformation of its characters. As Canada evolves into a more urbanized nation of competitive rental markets, its cities struggle to house vulnerable sub-populations. Provincial Governments have been purchasing and renovating motels to provide transitional housing as an interim solution. An increasing number are used for refugees escaping persecution, women and children fleeing domestic violence, and individuals striving to overcome an addiction or stabilize a mental illness. A review of the motel in 20th century North American story-telling can re-frame these overlooked buildings for the modern urbanist, now engaged in the critical work of adapting them for the changing needs of our communities.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
     

    Plenary Speakers

    10:45 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Keynote Speaker - Paul Kennedy  (KEY-3)

    Paul Kennedy has been host of the long-running CBC program/podcast IDEAS for nearly twenty years, although he researched and presented his first radio documentary for the show back in 1977.

    Over the course of his career, he has travelled across Canada, throughout North America, to Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Needless to say he has collected stories about cities, people and places from almost everywhere. He's written about everything from the historic Walled City of Kowloon -- which was once the most populous spot on the planet, with 1.2 million people per square kilometre -- to an experiment in indigenous architecture called "One House-Many Nations", on Opasquawak Cree land, in remote Northern Manitoba -- which is being built using renewable local materials and versatile modular technology. Such places seem so different that they are almost opposites, but they obviously share an abundance of "Soul".

    Paul's work engages what he describes as, "the core curriculum of contemporary culture." Countless people, engaged in an infinite variety of activities, from major cities, small towns and rural places all around the planet have been the focus of Paul's work. They range from the justifiably famous -- Jane Jacobs, Frank Gehry, Ursula Franklin, Todd Saunders, Edward Burtynsky, Margaret Atwood -- to the should-be-famous, like the Vancouver street person who created a successful recycling enterprise called United We Can, because "if society really wants to understand what's garbage and what isn't, it should start by consulting the people that society itself considers to be garbage". That's soul!

    Keynote Speaker:
    Fee  Optional 
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