Expressive Therapies Summit 2016: Registration Site

SATURDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES

DEEP CLAY: GETTING THE INSIDE OUT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Michelle Rhodes, ATR-BC, LCSW-R, NCPsyA

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 2 advantages of therapeutic clay work for 3 different client populations.
2. Describe at least 3 ways attachment issues might affect a client's therapeutic clay work.
3. Define the alchemical process in relation to a post-Jungian approach to therapeutic clay work.

Sholt, Michal, and Tami Gavron. "Therapeutic Qualities of Clay-work in Art Therapy and Psychotherapy: A Review." Art Therapy 23.2 (2006): 66-72. Web.

 

DOLL MAKING IN THERAPY & COUNSELING: COLLABORATORS IN HEALING 
(Wellness and Prevention; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Frances A. Smokowski MFA, MAAT, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:

1. List and describe 7 basic steps for doll construction.
2. State a minimum of 1 therapeutic benefit of using doll construction as a transitional object in treatment.
3. Describe a minimum of 3 ways that sewing with clients may enhance the therapeutic experience.

Hemingway, Karen. The Encyclopedia of Stitches: With 245 Stitches Illustrated and 24 Exquisite Projects. London: New Holland, 2006. Print.

 

ZEN & BION: CLINICAL PRACTICE, PERSONAL INTEGRATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Seiso Paul C. Cooper, Sensei, LP

Objectives:

1. Verbalize the theoretical and philosophical background of 2 Zen meditation styles.
2. Identify 2 similarities and 2 differences between Bion’s technical recommendations and Dogen’s instructions for meditation.
3. Describe 2 explicit methods and 2 implicit methods for integrating Zen practice and teachings into psychotherapy.

Biron, W. R. "Notes on Memory and Desire." E, Psycho­analytic Forum II.3 (1967): 271-80. Print.

 

ADDRESSING SEXUALITY & DESIRE ACROSS THE LIFESPAN: A MULTIMODAL EXPRESSIVE ARTS APPROACH
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Ginna Clark, MA, LPCC, ATR-BC
Val Jones, MA, LMHC

Objectives:

1. Describe 3 or more ways of using art to explore sexual issues with clients.
2. List 4 or more clinical considerations when working with diverse sexual issues in treatment.
3. Describe 2 or more experiential exercises for working with sexual attitudes in counseling and psychotherapy.

Levine, S., Risen, C, & Althof, S. Handbook of clinical sexuality for mental health professionals. New York, NY: Routledge. 2010. Print.

 

THE BROKEN BOWL PROJECT: ADDICTION TREATMENT AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF WABI SABI
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Christa Brennan LCAT, ATR-BC, CASAC
Christine Randolph, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 2 philosophical similarities of Alcoholics Anonymous and Zen Buddism.
2. ​Identify a minimum of 2 clinical benefits when working in addictions treatment of taking ownership of our own brokenness rather than rejecting, or being ashamed of​ it.
3. ​List and describe the phases that span from relapse to recovery ​as paralleled in the Broken Bowl process.

Stanton, J. Kenetha.  (October 9, 2013). Becoming a Kintsugi-style Healer. Retrieved from  http://akintsugilife.com/2013/10/09/becoming-a-kintsugi-style-healer

 

TRANSFORMATIVE MOMENTS & TECHNIQUES IN PLAY THERAPY: SACRED AND PROFANE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S
Sarah Caprioli, LMHC

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 3 elements commonly present in a “moment of meeting."
2. Describe 2 methods for processing transformative moments.
3. List at least 2 strategies for responding to the intrusion of the "profane" in play therapy.

Pargament, Kenneth I., Julie J. Exline, James William Jones, and Edward P. Shafranske. APA Handbook of Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association, 2013. Print.

 

WISE MIND BOOKS FOR TRAUMATIZED & DISSOCIATIVE CLIENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jessica Masino Drass, MA, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 3 techniques that can be used to incorporate other media into the process of creating wise mind books with clients.
2. Explain 3 methods of using long-term art projects when working with clients with complex trauma and dissociation.
3. Identify and define 3 DBT skills that can be utilized in clients' artmaking process.

Linehan, Marsha. Cognitive-behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. New York: Guilford, 1993. Print.

 

EXPRESSIVE ORIGAMI THERAPY: HOLDING, FOLDING, HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Toshiko Kobayashi, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives: 

1. List a minimum of 3 clinical populations appropriate to use expressive origami therapy interventions.
2. Describe a minimum of 2 therapeutic qualities of origami.
3. Practice and be able to implement at least 1 origami experience within individual and/or group clinical work.

Smith, John. COET'91: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Origami in Education and Therapy. Birmingham: British Origami Society, 1992. Print.

 

BUILDING & MANAGING YOUR PRIVATE PRACTICE: FINDING A PROFESSIONAL VOICE
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Emery Mikel, ATR-BC, LCAT, LCPAT
Reina Lombardi, ATR-BC, LMHC
Erika Hamlett, MA

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 3 ways to engage in private practice.
2. Describe at least 1 reason emphasizing clinician individuality is beneficial when establishing and marketing a private practice.
3. Identify and describe at least 2 ethical considerations for establishing and operating a private practice.

Mikel, Emery Hurst. The Art of Business: A Guide for Creative Arts Therapists Starting on a Path to Self-employment.  Print.

 

FATBOOKS FOR CULTIVATING SAFE CONNECTIONS WITH TRAUMATIZED CLIENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lisa Miller, LMFT
Denise Anima, LMFT
Erin Edwards

Objectives:

1. Identify SAMSHA's 6 key principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach.
2. Define 1 or more grounding and/or meditation technique(s) that can support the development of safe connections.
3. List and describe 2 types of Fatbook pages that can be implemented to address secure client attachment.

Malchiodi, Cathy A. Creative Interventions with Traumatized Children. New York: Guilford, 2008. Print.

 

KELLOGG'S GREAT ROUND OF MANDALA: PATHWAYS TO WHOLENESS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jordan S. Potash, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 archetypal and imaginal principles for use in clinical and non-clinical work.
2. Identify at least 2 settings in which to use arts-based archetypal and imaginal strategies.
3. Identify at least 3 archetypes embedded in patterns of consciousness and life experiences.

Stein, Murray. Jung's Map of the Soul: An Introduction. Chicago: Open Court, 1998. Print.

 

TREATING ASD USING ART THERAPY & MOVEMENT: ESTABLISHING ENGAGEMENT, CONNECTION & COMMUNITY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dana Whiddon, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT
Diane Metviner, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 or more ways that art therapy interventions can encourage improvement in non-verbal and verbal expressive language skills for clients with ASD, DD, IDD and Medical DD. 
2. List 2 or more ways to be an active listener and observer when working with non-verbal and/or partially verbal clients.
3. Describe 3 or more interventions that exhibit sensory/tactile/texture sensitivities as well as fine and gross motor skill challenges in a supportive and nurturing manner.

Malchiodi, C. A. The Soul's Palette: Drawing on Art's Trans-formative Powers for Health and Well Being. Boston, MA: Shambhala Publications, 2002. Print.

 

VALUING PROCESS & PRODUCT: THE BENEFITS OF PRINTMAKING IN ART THERAPY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Patricia Quinn, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Bruce Waldman, MFA

Objectives:

1. Introduce 2 or more printmaking processes that can be used effectively in art therapy with clients including people with autism, addictions, dementia, or physical challenges. 
2. Identify 2 or more key concepts for properly organizing clinical and studio space for creating and storing multiple prints so that they can be used as reference points in counseling and psychotherapy.
3. Describe 3 or more ways to use printmaking to stimulate freedom of expression and develop narratives for use in clinical settings.

White, Lucy Mueller. Printmaking as Therapy: Frameworks for Freedom. London: Jessica Kingsley Pub, 2002. Print.

 

 

PAPERS

CONSULTATION SESSION WITH JUDITH RUBIN: CHILD & FAMILY ART THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment))

Judith A. Rubin, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM

Objectives:

1. List 3 or more factors that impact the efficacy of child art therapy.
2. Identify 3 or more settings in which child art therapy can be provided to enhance the quality of care for children and adolescents.
3. Explain 2 or more reasons why it is essential to include the whole family when working with children in treatment.

Rubin, J. A. (2005). Child art therapy: 25th anniversary edition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.

WHAT HOLOCAUST ARTISTS’ WORK CAN TEACH US ABOUT CLINICAL PRACTICE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Elizabeth Hlavek, ATR-BC, LCPAT

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 common themes found in Holocaust artwork.
2. Identify 3 goals of clinical practice that can be exemplified through Holocaust artwork.
3. Define at least 4 different categories of Holocaust artwork.

Wix, Linney. "Art in the Construction of Self: Three Women and Their Ways in Art, Therapy and Education.” Dissertation Abstracts International 64.02 (2003): 245. Print.

 

MUSIC THERAPY & ALEXITHYMIA: A STUDY OF TURKISH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ayse Kaya Göktepe, Phd Candidate

Objectives:

1. Define the term Alexithymia.
2. Describe the differences between active and passive music therapy techniques used in the clinical research.
3. State and describe the results of the research on the effects of music therapy in the treatment of alexithymia.

Allen, Rory, and Pamela Heaton. "Autism, Music, and the Therapeutic Potential of Music in Alexithymia." Music Perception 27.4 (2010): 251-61. Print.

 

ART AS INTERVENTION WITH YOUNG MALAY UNWED MOTHERS
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Mohd Makzan Musa

Objectives:

1. Identify and describe a minimum of 3 psycho-social stressors young Malay unwed mothers experience with unexpected or unwanted pregnancy.
2. Name and describe at least 3 art activities that may be utilized to manage psycho-social stressors of women living in Malay shelters.
3. Verbalize at least 2 benefits of art therapy interventions with young mothers.

Malchiodi, Cathy A. Handbook of Art Therapy. New York: Guilford, 2003. Print.

 

MIND-BODY CONNECTIONS IN VISUAL ARTMAKING
(Research and Program Evaluation)
Girija Kaimal, EdD, MA

Objectives:

1. Identify a minimum of 3 salivary biomarkers that can be used in research studies.
2. State and describe the process and implementation of a study using the brain imaging technology of functional near infrared spectroscopy.
3. Describe and be able to link mind and body outcomes in art therapy.

Irani, Farzin, Steven M. Platek, Scott Bunce, Anthony C. Ruocco, and Douglas Chute. "Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS): An Emerging Neuroimaging Technology with Important Applications for the Study of Brain Disorders." The Clinical Neuropsychologist 21.1 (2007): 9-37. Web.

 

CLINICIAN-CREATED WORKS IN SESSION: ETHICAL & OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Haley Fox, MA, PhD, ATR-BC, MT-BC, REAT, LMHC/LPCC

Objectives:

1. Define the term "resonance."
2. Name 3 therapeutic benefits of sharing original artwork with clients.
3. Describe an ethical dilemma related to sharing original artwork with clients and how to address it in a clinical setting.

Jahn, Robert G., and Brenda J. Dunne. Margins of Reality: The Role of Consciousness in the Physical World. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1987. Print.

 

WORKSHOPS

UNDERSTANDING ETHICS AND BOUNDARY ENTRAPMENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Ethics)
Eleanor C. Irwin, PhD, RDT, TEP

Objectives:

1. List 1 or more examples of over-identification and 1 or more examples of under-identification in a clinical situation.
2. Identify 2 questions that one should ask oneself, if one becomes aware of a possible counter-transference reaction.
3. Describe 2 or more treatment scenarios that could lead to an ethical lapse by the counselor or therapist.

PROCESSING GRIEF TOGETHER: ESSENTIAL ISSUES & MULTIMODAL APPROACHES

(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Career Development and Counseling)

Liisa Murray, MS, MT-BC
Ali Schechter, MS, LCAT, R-DMT
Suzanne Deisher, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Tiffany del Fierro, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT
Mary Farkas, MA, RDT, LCAT
Kaitlyn Kelly, MS, MT-BC, LCAT
Kate Kavitski MA, RDT, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Identify 4 ways grief is experienced by clients and therapists.
2. Identify and describe 3 ways grief impacts professional work.
3. Describe 4 multi-modal creative arts therapy directives used in processing anticipatory or current grief for both self and clients.

Jones, S. H. "A Self-care Plan for Hospice Workers." American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine 22.2 (2005): 125-28. Print.

 

THE TRICKSTER IN TREATMENT: MANAGING UNEXPECTED & UNUSUAL CLIENTS AND SITUATIONS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kim Anderson, MSW, ATR-BC, LCSW

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 2 methods to engage unconventional clients.
2. Articulate at least 2 methods of understanding the underlying meaning of bewildering client behaviors.
3. Verbalize how clinician countertransference can be beneficially utilized in clinical work with unconventional clients.

McNiff, Shaun. "Treating images as persons and dialoguing with them" Art Heals. Boston and London: Shambhala Publications, 2004. Print.

 

MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN THROUGH ART MAKING & MINDFULNESS MEDITATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ziva Argevani-Zaff, ATR

Objectives:

1. Identify and describe at least 2 art therapy and mindfulness meditation techniques used to address treatment goals of patients with chronic pain in group or individual settings.
2. Describe at least 1 way art interventions can inform assessment and treatment of persons with chronic pain.
3. Identify and describe at least 2 arts based interventions that promote a mind-body connection for clients experiencing chronic pain.

Shapiro, B. ""All I Have Is the Pain": Art Therapy in an Outpatient Chronic Pain Relief Unit." American Journal of Art Therapy 11.24 (1985): 44-48. Print.

 

SACRED CREATIONS: EX-VOTOS & DEVOTIONAL ART IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Michelle L. Dean, MA, ATR-BC, CGP, LPC

Objectives:

1. List at least 3 therapeutic applications for utilizing ex-votos and devotional art forms in therapy.
2. Identify the 3 structuring devices of the ex-voto and their relationship to the corporeal world and the divine.
3. Name at least 2 ways how devotional art may be utilized with individuals who have experienced trauma.

Da Silva, Natália Marques, Kristin G. Congdon, Mariolini Rizzi Salvatori, and José Cláudio Alves De Oliveira. Requesting Miracles: Votive Offerings from Diverse Cultures: March 26 to June 5, 2010. Winter Pak, FL: Crealdé School of Arts, 2010. Print.

 

FUSIBLE QUILTING IN THERAPY: IRONING OUT ISSUES, PIECING TOGETHER COMMUNICATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Sharona Bookbinder, BSc, MBA, DTATI, OATR, RCAT, RP

Objectives:

1. List and describe a minimum of 3 clinical populations or settings that may benefit from use of fusible quilting interventions.
2. Identify at least 2 clinical objectives that can be achieved through use of fusible quilting interventions.
3. Articulate a minimum of 2 safety considerations when employing fusible quilting interventions in clinical settings.

Dalley, Tessa. “Art Therapy with the Elderly & Terminally Ill” Art As Therapy.  Tavistock, 1984. Print.

 

QUICK & CREATIVE ART PROJECTS FOR (VERY) LIMITED BUDGETS
(Media and Materials in Treatment)
Rachel Brandoff, ATR-BC, ATCS, BCPC, LCAT
Angel Thompson, BA

Objectives:

1. List and describe 3 ways of using found objects as art materials in a therapy session.
2. Identify 5 potential partners to tap for a materials search.
3. State and describe 3 methods for engaging clients in art on a budget.

 

ART THERAPY WITH TRANSGENDER & GENDER-EXPANSIVE YOUTH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kelly Darke, MEd, BFA, ATR
Shannon Scott-Miller, MA, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Describe a minimum of 1 culturally sensitive term for addressing transgender youth.
2. Verbalize understanding of, and state where to access, current research related to gender expansive youth.
3. State and describe a minimum of 2 art experientials to address gender identity.

Brill, Stephanie A., and Rachel Pepper. The Transgender Child: A Handbook for Families and Professionals. Cleis Press, 2008. Print.

 

DRAWING (FROM) NATURE: ENVIRONMENTAL ART THERAPY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jean Davis, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Define "Environmental Art Therapy" and how it can be integrated into clinical practice in counseling and psychotherapy.
2. Learn 2 or more key concepts of environmental art therapy that can make it an effective component of a clinical treatment plan.
3. Apply environmental art therapy to at least 2 different populations with a clear understanding of the individual, group and environmental goals.

Roszak, T., Gomes, M.E., & Kanner, A.D. Ecopsychology: Restoring the earth, healing the mind. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books. 1995. Print.

 

GUIDED VISUALIZATION AND MULTIMODAL TECHNIQUES FOR REGULATION, RESILIENCY & RESOLUTION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Daniel Doyle, RDT, EMDR-Certified, LPCC, LMFT

Objectives:

1. Describe and implement 3 guided visualization techniques for reducing anxiety in clients.
2. Describe 3 transitions from visualization into embodiment to further integrate internal resources for clients.
3. Describe 3 indicators that a person has reprocessed trauma successfully.
4. Indicate 3 ways in which integrating drama therapy techniques into trauma work can be effective.

Parnell, Laurel, Ph. D. Tapping In: A Step-by-step Guide to Activating Your Healing Resources through Bilateral Stimulation. Boulder, CO: Sounds True, 2008. Print.

 

NARRATIVE GROUP SONGWRITING FOR COOPERATION & COLLABORATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Janna M. Frelich, MFA, MA, MT-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 or more mental health diagnoses, of which the symptoms may be alleviated by multi-sensory mindfulness.
2. Verbalize how to use at least 3 different musical performance methods in a mindfulness songwriting intervention and describe the differing benefits of each method.
3. Identify at least 2 ways improvisational singing encourages neuro-plasticity.

Baker, F. A., and R. A. R. Macdonald. "Flow, Identity, Achievement, Satisfaction and Ownership during Therapeutic Songwriting Experiences with University Students and Retirees." Musicae Scientiae 17.2 (2013): 131-46. Print.

 

EXPERIENTIAL PSYCHOEDUCATION WITH TRAUMA SURVIVORS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Odelya Gertel Kraybill, PhD, LCPC

Objectives:

1. Define a minimum of 3 concepts essential to working with traumatized populations.
2. State and describe 2 expressive arts tools beneficial in introducing trauma survivors to key concepts essential to their journey.
3. Identify and describe a minimum of 3 demonstrated benefits of experiential psychoeducation over oratorical psychoeducation and consider implications for work with trauma survivors.

Krupnick, Janice L., and Bonnie L. Green. "Psychoeducation to Prevent PTSD: A Paucity of Evidence." Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes 71.4 (2008): 329-31. Print.

 

INTERACTIVE DIGITAL MEDIA FOR STIMULATING DISCUSSION IN GROUP THERAPY
(Wellness and Prevention)
Jonas Hart Ginsburg, LCPC
Sze-Chin Lee, MAAT, LPC

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 or more ways of understanding how family and/or clinical relationships can impact others, especially those struggling with symptoms associated with depression and/or suicidal thoughts.
2. Describe at least 3 ways to increase clinician self-awareness in order to facilitate presence in clinical relationships.
3. Describe three or more ways to clinically support clients managing depressive symptoms.

Rogers, Carl R. On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy. London: Constable, 1961. Print.

 

PSYCHOANALYTIC THOUGHT, CREATIVE PROCESS, AND THE PERSONAL: CLINICAL INTERSECTIONS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Mari Grande, MFA, MSW, NCPsyA, EMDR Therapist, LCSW-R, LCAT

Objectives:

1. List 2 unconscious processes that operate when working with clients in therapy.
2. Define 3 psychoanalytic processes presented in the workshop.
3. Describe 2 or more ways that the psychoanalytic process interfaces with the creative process when working with clients in treatment.

Freud, Sigmund. Complete Psychological Works Of Sigmund Freud, The Vol 9: Jensen's "Gradiva" and Other Works Vol 9.  1908. 141-54. Print.

 

ART THERAPY ADAPTATIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tami Herzog-Rodriguez, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 different approaches to selecting and introducing sensory pre-art materials for children exhibiting resistance to engaging in the art process.
2. Identify and create at least 2 individualized adaptations for basic art tools (i.e. paintbrushes and drawing tools) using art materials available in the workshop.
3. Describe a minimum of 2 varying approaches to art therapy in these treatment settings: hospitals, residential facilities, schools, and community.

Coleman, Mari Beth, E. Stephanie Cramer, Yujeong Park, and Sherry Mee Bell. "Art Educators’ Use of Adaptations, Assistive Technology, and Special Education Supports for Students with Physical, Visual, Severe and Multiple Disabilities." Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities J Dev Phys Disabil 68.2 (2015): 6-13. Print.

 

DREAMTIME & DRAMA: HEALING STORIES OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIA
(Human Growth and Development)
Leonie M. Hurry, BS Sc., Dip. Ed, MVPA, RDT

Objectives:

1. State and describe at least 2 principles of Narradrama in working with children with special needs.
2. Define the concept of externalization through storytelling and imagery of Narradrama.
3. State a minimum of 2 benefits of using storytelling, imagery and Narradrama principles in clinical treatment of children with special needs.

Dunne, Pam Barragar. The Narrative Therapist and the Arts. Los Angeles: Possibilities, Drama Therapy Institute of Los Angeles, 1992, 2006. Ch. 8 144-60. Print.

 

MINDFUL DOODLING: CREATIVE & CLINICAL EXERCISES FOR LIVING IN THE MOMENT
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Patricia D. Isis, PhD, ATR-BC, LMHC, ATCS

Objectives:

1. Define 2 or more behavioral qualities of "mindfulness."
2. Identify 2 Mindful Doodle exercises that would be clinically appropriate for a specific setting and population.
3. List 3 ethical considerations for non-art therapists when using art therapeutically.

Brown, Sunni. The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently. New York: Penguin Group, 2004. Print.

 

BILATERAL ART THERAPY TECHNIQUES FOR BRAIN CHANGE: SCRIBBLING, WIGGLING & MORE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Tally Tripp, MA, MSW, ATR-BC, CTT

Objectives:

1. Describe the basic neurobiology of trauma and articulate why experiential and non-verbal approaches such as art and movement are best practices in trauma treatment.
2. Define bilateral stimulation and be able to use at least 2 bilateral variations, including bilateral scribbling and gentle body movements, to address trauma symptoms.
3. Identify at least 3 grounding, resourcing and stabilization skills that can be used with clients to address symptoms of trauma.

Tripp, Tally. "A Body-Based Bilateral Art Protocol for Reprocessing Trauma." Ed. Juliet L. King. Art Therapy, Trauma and Neuroscience: Theoretical and Practical Perspective.  Routledge, 2016. 173-94. Print.

 

POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY IN ACTION: ENCOUNTERING STRENGTHS, BEFRIENDING RESOURCES 
(Human Growth and Development)
Stephen F. Kopp, MS, TEP

Objectives:

1. Identify at least 2 principles of warming-up that facilitate overcoming resistance for new clients and can be used to evaluate client strengths.
2. Define and articulate the 3 stages of role development in developing strengths in clients.
3. Explain 1 or more action method techniques for grounding clients in strengths and assets.

Gendler, J. Ruth. The Book of Qualities. New York: Perennial Library, 1984. Print.

 

RE-SOURCES : TRANSFORMING EARLY FORMS OF CONNECTION INTO TREATMENT TECHNIQUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ellen Luborsky, PhD

Objectives:

1. List and describe at least 3 RE-SOURCES.
2. Name at least 2 research concepts that support use of these processes in therapy.
3. Identify and verbalize 2 ways to apply the RE-SOURCES in clinical treatment.

Stern, Daniel N. The Interpersonal World of the Infant: A View from Psychoanalysis and Developmental Psychology. New York: Basic, 1985. 148-72. Print.

 

CONSTRUCTING BALINESE BASKETS FOR COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY & HARMONY
(Wellness and Prevention)
Denise Malis, PhD, MFA, LMHC, ATR-BC
Kelly Reedy, MA, BFA

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 techniques that adapt natural materials into objects of enhanced attachment to be utilized in the practitioner’s clinical practice.
2. Describe 3 ways to amplify the therapeutic relationship through the incorporation of meaningful objects into the therapeutic holding space.
3. Understand how to incorporate the metaphor of the basket into clinical treatment, symbolically interweaving the individual and community.

Kalmanowitz, Debra, Jordan S. Potash, and Siu Mei. Chan. Art Therapy in Asia: To the Bone or Wrapped in Silk. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2012. Print.

 

ART THERAPY IN CANCER CARE: STAGE-SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jill McNutt, PhD, ATR-BC, ATRL, LPC

Objectives:

1. Identify 4 stages in oncology care and corresponding art therapy treatment objectives.
2. Define at least 3 art therapy interventions and art media that are indicated and/or contra-indicated at various stages of cancer treatment.
3. Identify at least 1 benefit of using the arts-based methodology of collage as inquiry.

Collie, K. "A Narrative View of Art Therapy and Art Making by Women with Breast Cancer." Journal of Health Psychology 11.5 (2006): 761-75. Print.

 

STRESSBUSTING: WRITING THROUGH TROUBLED TIMES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathleen Adams, LPC

Objectives:

1. Identify 1 or more ways that expressive writing can be used for improved stress management.
2. Participate in 5 linked writing processes designed to identify, explore, and shift a specific stress response.
3. Implement 2 or more writing interventions as stress management devices for use with clients, students, and groups.

Siegel, D. (2010). Mindsight: The new science of personal transformation. New York, NY: Bantam.

 

EXPLORING COUPLES' SEXUAL & RELATIONAL DYNAMICS THROUGH ART
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Einat Metzl, PhD, ATR-BC, LMFT, RYT

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 current trends which unite the disciplines of both art therapy and sex therapy.
2. Describe 3 topics related to couples work enhanced by offering creative directives informed by the meeting place of sex therapy and art therapy.
3. Illustrate 2 ways to improve their ability to explore sexual issues within couples treatment.

Buehler, Stephanie. What Every Mental Health Professional Needs to Know about Sex. California: Springer Pub., 2013. Print.

 

INTEGRATING MASCULINE & FEMININE ARCHETYPES FOR SELF AWARENESS AND BALANCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Mimi Moyer, MS LCAT, BC-DMT, RDT, NCC
Sandra Bennett-Pagan, LCSW

Objectives:

1. State and describe a minimum of 3 creative interventions that can be used to facilitate the integration of masculine and feminine personality in clinical treatment.
2. Learn 3 yogic breath exercises that enhance mind-body balance in our clients.
3. List and describe 2 ways that masculine/feminine energies are manifested in the psyche of adults in treatment.

Jung, Carl Gustav. The Archetypes and The Collective Unconscious, Collected Works 9. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Princeton, NJ: Bollingen, 1981. Print.

 

SCULPTING COUPLES: A FAMILY THERAPY TECHNIQUE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Paula Ochs, LCSW, CP, PAT
Jude Webster, DSW, MA, LCSW

Objectives:

1. List and describe the 4 steps to using sculptures in couple’s therapy to address a therapeutic impasse.
2. Explain how to distill 1 verbal problem and translate it into a sculpture.
3. Describe and execute 3 new interventions using sculpting in couples treatment.

Damasio, Antonio R. Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2003. Print.

 

PLAY THERAPY & YOGA TO HEAL THE IMPACT OF TRAUMA
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Michelle M. Pliske, MSW, LCSW, RPT

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 specific avenues in the human stress-response system and neurobiology of trauma.
2. Describe how to successfully combine 6 play therapy practices and yoga techniques for children to develop adaptive coping skills.
3. Verbalize how to create 1 successful and accessible treatment plan with the inclusion of child yoga play therapy.

Perry, Bruce D. "The Neurobiological Power of Play: Using the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics to Guide Play in the Healing Process." Ed. Cathy A. Malchiodi. Creative Arts and Play Therapy for Attachment Problems. By Richard L. Gaskill. New York: Guilford. 2014. 178-91. Print.

 

NARRATIVE SAND THERAPY©: INTO THE HEART OF HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, PhD

Objectives:

1. Describe 4 key principles of Narrative Sand Therapy in clinical practice.
2. Distinguish 3 differences in theory and practice among sandtray, Sandplay, and Narrative Sand Therapy.
3. Explain how to validate and amplify a client’s experience using 2 narrative approaches.

Radley, A. & Chamberlain, K. "The study of the case: Conceptualizing case study research." Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 22, 390-399. 2012. Print.

 

BEYOND RORSCHACH: THE INTERPLAY OF PSYCHO-AESTHETIC ASSESSMENT & THERAPEUTIC PROCESSING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Arthur Robbins, EdD, ATR, HLM

Objectives:

1. Describe at least 2 principles of projective assessments.
2. List and describe at least 3 artistic elements to be considered in analysis of artwork.
3. Identify at least 3 issues of clinical importance that can be accessed through analysis of client artwork.

Robbins, Arthur. The psychoaesthetic experience: An approach to depth-oriented treatment. New York, NY: Human Sciences Press. 1989. Print.

 

MOVABLE BOOKS & POP-UPS: MECHANISMS OF MEANING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kara Rothschild, MS, ATR-BC
Beth Sheehan, BFA

Objectives:

1. List a minimum of 3 different book making techniques that can be used in therapeutic interventions.
2. Identify 3 clinical applications of book making.
3. Name at least 1 diagnostic population and one therapeutic objective that can be addressed through the use of book making in therapy.

Smith, Esther K., Liz Zanis, and Amy Kalyn. Sims. Magic Books & Paper Toys: Flip Books, E-Z Pop-ups & Other Paper Playthings to Amaze & Delight. New York, NY: Potter Craft, 2008. Print.

 

THERAPEUTIC WEAVING PROJECTS USING EVERYDAY MATERIALS
(Media and Materials in Treatment)
Xenia M. Rybak, MS, MPS, CCLS

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 therapeutic benefits of weaving.
2. Describe at least 2 ways to adapt weaving projects to address varying clinical goals.
3. Identify and describe at least 1 therapeutic benefit of using weaving in group therapy.

Collier, Ann Futterman. "The Well-Being of Women Who Create With Textiles: Implications for Art Therapy." Art Therapy 28.3 (2011): 104-12. Print.

 

HOSPICE WORK: CREATIVE ART THERAPIES AT THE END OF LIFE
(Human Growth and Development)
Mary B. Safrai, ATR-BC, LCAT, Reiki Master

Objectives:

1. Define at least 2 characteristics of hospice and palliative care and identify at least 3 ways it benefits patients.
2. Articulate 3 ways creative art therapies can play an important role in improving patient satisfaction during chronic illness and at the end of life.
3. Describe 3 ways that caregivers and staff benefit from a patient's engagement with creative art therapies.

Breitbart, William, Christopher Gibson, Shannon R. Poppito, and Amy Berg. "Psychotherapeutic Interventions at the End of Life: A Focus on Meaning and Spirituality." Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 49.6 (2004): 366-72. Print.

 

GETTING UNSTUCK: FEARLESS WRITING, ACTION & COLLAGE
(Human Growth and Development; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Nancy S. Scherlong, LCSW, PTR, MS

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 patterns of behavior or experiences as “change targets” in clinical treatment.
2. Distinguish 3 between different journal techniques from the Journal Ladder and describe when to use each.
3. Identify a minimum of 2 action methods and describe how to use them in exploring polarities.

Chödrön, Pema, and Sandy Boucher. Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves from Old Habits and Fears. Boston, MA: Shambhala Publications, 2010. Print.

 

WHAT'S A META-FOR? GROUP JOURNALING, POETRY & COLLAGE IN ACTION
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Nancy S. Scherlong, LCSW, PTR, MS

Objectives:

1. Describe at least 2 methods from the action techniques of psychodrama to warm up a group and create cohesion.
2. List 2 or more ways to enact metaphor when using poetry in clinical treatment.
3. Identify 2 or more types of writing interventions using the Journal Ladder that can be used to facilitate exploration of self and identity with clients.

Kopp, Richard Royal. Metaphor Therapy: Using Client-generated Metaphors in Psychotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1995. Print.

 

PARTICIPATORY PHOTOGRAPHY: HELPING CLIENTS OF ALL AGES FOCUS ON CHANGE
(Human Growth and Development)
Maureen Sheehan, MSW, MA Ed

Objectives:

1. Identify and articulate at least 2 ways the photography making process and products can be used to elicit verbal associations and responses to accomplish clinical treatment goals.
2. Learn at least 3 principles for designing, implementing, and evaluating photo therapy approaches in a variety of clinical settings.
3. Learn at least 2 techniques to create a safe holding environment for facilitating the therapeutic process using a participatory photography approach.

Wang, C., and M. A. Burris. "Photovoice: Concept, Methodology, and Use for Participatory Needs Assessment." Health Education & Behavior 24.3 (1997): 369-87. Web.

 

AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT FOR EXPLORING MINDFULNESS & SELF-COMPASSION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jennifer Tantia, PhD, MS, BC-DMT, LCAT

Objectives:

1. Describe mindfulness and self-compassion as applied to Authentic Movement.
2. Compare 3 ways in which previous experience of authentic movement contrasts with the addition of mindfulness and self-compassion as a precursor to the practice.
3. Evaluate 3 ways in which mindful attention and self-compassion can deepen authentic movement experience for their patients.

Goldhahn, Eila. "Is Authentic a Meaningful Name for the Practice of Authentic Movement?"  American Journal of Dance Therapy 31.1 (2009): 53-63. Print.

 

THE EMBODIED THERAPIST: INTEGRATIVE APPROACHES FOR ENHANCING CLINICAL ACUMEN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tally Tripp, MA, MSW, ATR-BC, CTT
Jody Wager, MS, BC-DMT

Objectives:

1. Identify and describe 3 movement and art based experiences designed to help regulate anxiety and affect.
2. Identify 3 non-verbal art and body based methods designed to express emotion and attune to self and other.
3. Identify and describe 2 branches of the nervous system and the concurrent physiological responses of the body to trauma and stress.

Duros, Peg, and Dee Crowley. "The Body Comes to Therapy Too." Clinical Social Work Journal 42.3 (2014): 237-46. Print.

 

DISSOCIATION, SELF STATES & ART THERAPY: WORKING WITH MULTIPLICITY OF SELF
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jessica Whitesel, LPC, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Name at least 3 art-based methods that incorporate self state work into clinical practice with children and adolescents.
2. Describe at least 2 therapeutic outcomes that can be achieved using self state work to address dissociation.
3. Describe how therapist-client dynamics can be explored using an art-based self state approach.

Forgash, Carol, and Margaret Copeley. Healing the Heart of Trauma and Dissociation with EMDR and Ego State Therapy. New York: Springer Pub., 2007. Print.

 

IMAGE AND IMAGINATION IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Linney Wix, PhD, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. List and describe 4 of archetypal psychology's 'gadgets' as ways to work precisely with images in therapy.
2. Apply 2 methods used in archetypal art therapy that facilitate deepening client awareness and insight about the psychological content contained in the imagery.
3. Describe 2 differences between poetically understanding and literally understanding insight in imaginal art therapy practices.

Hillman, James. Archetypal Psychology: A Brief Account. Dallas, TX: Spring, 1981. Print.

 

A COLLECTIVE HERO'S JOURNEY: BUILDING A STORYTELLING PERFORMANCE USING EXPRESSIVE ARTS PROCESSES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Boaz Zur, MA, CAGS
Vered Zur, MA, CAGS
Keshet Zur, MA

Objectives:

1. Describe 1 or more ways of using storyboards in psychotherapy according to the hero’s journey motif from Joseph Campbell’s work.
2. Identify and define the 3 components of storytelling.
3. Identify at least 2 client needs that can be addressed through intermodal experiential storytelling.

Campbell, Joseph. The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Third ed. Canada: n.p., 2008. Print. Bollingen Ser. XVII.

 

AGEISM & ART-BASED COMMUNICATION IN ELDER CARE (WITH AN ARTFUL LOOK AT RESEARCH RESULTS)
(Research and Program Evaluation; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Erin Partridge, PhD, ATR

Objectives:

1. List and define 4 categories of communication.
2. Describe at least 3 clinically based rationales for use of art based methodology with older adult populations.
3. Identify 2 or more benefits to involving older adults in clinical research.

Boydell, Katherine M., Brenda M. Gladstone, Tiziana Volpe, Brooke Allemang, and Elaine Stasiulis. "The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge: A Scoping Review of Arts-Based Health Research | Boydell | Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research." The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge: A Scoping Review of Arts-Based Health Research | Boydell | Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research. FQS, 2012. Web.

 

LUNCH & LEARNS

BEREAVEMENT & TRANSFORMATION: ART THERAPY AND THE OTHER SIDE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Terri L. Segal, LMFT, ATR

Objectives:

1. Identify a minimum of 2 types of mindfulness practices to induce relaxation with patients.
2. Identify 2 techniques to facilitate a dialogue between a grieving client and their deceased loved ones and name at least 2 therapeutic benefits to such dialogue.
3. Describe at least 4 types of Afterlife communication commonly experienced by grieving clients.

LaGrand, Louis E. Love Lives On: Learning from the Extraordinary Encounters of the Bereaved. New York: Berkley, 2006. Print.

 

ART THERAPIST AS CLIENT MUSE: LESSONS FROM THE LIFE OF LOUISE NEVELSON
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Laurie Wilson, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 ways in which clinicians work similarly to art dealers.
2. Explain 2 significant differences in the ways that art therapists approach their clients versus the way gallery owners deal with the artists they represent.
3. Identify at least 3 ways that art therapists can inspire their clients to make art.

MacKown, Diana. Louise Nevelson: Dawns Dusks. Conversations with Diana MacKown. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1976. Print.

 

PANELS

THE SUPERVISION TREE: GENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Yasmine J. Awais, MAAT, ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT, LPC
Daniel Blausey, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT
Emily A. Reim Ifrach, MAAT, ATR

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 methods to effectively communicate in supervision.
2. List and describe at least 3 unique reasons and related expectations for supervision in different contexts (i.e., classroom group supervision, students in the field, new professionals seeking certification or licensure, seasoned professionals, and supervising across disciplines).
3. List and describe at least 3 methods for obtaining the most of supervision for supervisees.

Schaverien, Joy, and Caroline Case. Supervision of Art Psychotherapy: A Theoretical and Practical Handbook. London: Routledge, 2007. Print.

 

DEVELOPING LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CREATIVE ARTS THERAPISTS: WHAT, HOW & WHY
(Career Development and Counseling; Human Growth and Development)
Girija Kaimal, EdD, MA
Einat Metzl, PhD, ATR-BC, LMFT, RYT
Eri Millrod, MA, LPC, NCC, BC-DMT

Objectives:

1. Articulate at least 2 basic principles of leadership.
2. Describe at least 2 ways that artistic practice enhance development of leadership skills.
3. State at least 2 leverage skills inherent in the creative arts therapies that can be implemented into effective leadership practices.

Johnson, David Read, Susan L. Sandel, and Virginia Eicher. "Structural Aspects of Group Leadership Styles." American Journal of Dance Therapy 6.1 (1983): 17-30. Print.

 

EFFECTS OF ART MATERIALS ON STRESS REDUCTION IN ADULTS: FOUR PILOT STUDIES

(Research and Program Evaluation; Media and Materials in Treatment)

Patricia St John, EdD, ATR-BC, LCAT
Elizabeth Whalen, BA, MS
Patricia Maged, BS, MS
Ashley Boudreau, MS
Patricia Hebron, BFA, MS

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 types of quantitative research used by the researchers and identify at least 3 limitations to their studies.
2. Compare and contrast at least 2 differences among the 4 studies.
3. Identify at least 2 art materials and/or processes that have therapeutic implications for application in future studies and/or clinical settings.

Sandmire, David Alan, Sarah Roberts Gorham, Nancy Elizabeth Rankin, and David Robert Grimm. "The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety: A Pilot Study." Art Therapy 29.2 (2012): 68-73. Print.

 

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