Expressive Therapies Summit 2016: Registration Site


STUDIO APPROACHES IN TREATMENT
TRACK
 

SELECT ANY ONE OR MORE DAYS


 

WHAT'S YOUR PASSION? 

BOOK MAKING, WEAVING, PAPER, CLAY 

 

 

THURSDAY, November 10

10:00 am - 5:15 pm
Weaving New Narratives Using Expressive Arts & Traditional Mexican Techniques
SESSION FULL

Pratt Institute
200 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn
Graduate Department of Creative Arts Therapy, Co­-Host

Wendy Phillips, PhD, REACE, LMFT
Charity Eugair
Elizabeth Walker

In Mexican traditional healing systems, "La Curandera" is a woman who heals the physical and psychological problems of members of the community by restoring balance. One of the specialists among Curanderas is "La Tejedora," a woman whose practices involve the use of cloth and metaphor. Textiles are a component of many ritual practices, including quilting and backstrap weaving. This 6-hour master class will be informed by "La Tejedora's" use of sewing as an expressive medium for healing, integration, and bringing into balance. Participants will be invited to experience the power of integration using the metaphor of metamorphosis, exemplified by the processes of cocooning and emerging. The metaphor of metamorphosis is particularly relevant for clients who have experienced trauma. Multimodal expressive arts processes will be used in this session including voiced reflections, writing in prose and poetry, somatic work, expressive movement, meditation, and the creation of individual and collective textile art pieces.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC



10:00 am - 5:15 pm
SAORI: Mindfulness Weaving for Everyone
SESSION FULL

College of New Rochelle 
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Jennifer Murphy, ATR-BC, LMHC
Yukako Satone
Ria G. Hawks, MS, CNS, CPNP

It's easy to express yourself through color, texture, and rhythm with SAORI — a form of mindful meditative weaving from Japan. Dedicated to free expression and self-development, Loop of the Loom is bringing this method to New York City; their free-form "happy weaving" approach employs brightly-hued natural fibers and threads to create colorful, one-of-a-kind tapestries. Their goal is not just to teach a craft, but to encourage self-exploration and promote competency and healing through the artistic process. In this daylong Master Class, participants will learn about the origins of SAORI and how it is currently being used by art therapists and others to work with people of all ages and abilities in a variety of therapeutic settings that include hospitals and homeless shelters. Join us to celebrate the beauty of imperfection, an aesthetic that is eminently compatible with the creative arts in psychotherapy. No previous experience is necessary. Please Note: Registration is very strictly limited to 8 participants who will be given ample time to spend at the looms.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC



10:00 am - 5:15 pm
Re-Shaping Body Image: Tape Sculpture as Arts-Based Social Justice
SESSION FULL

Pratt Institute
200 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn
Graduate Department of Creative Arts Therapy, Co­-Host

Amanda Bechtel, MS, ATR-BC, LCPC, LCPAT
Laura Teoli, MS, ATR-BC, LPC
Laura Wood, PhD, RDT-BCT, CCLS, LMHC

Both in media and personal relationships we are confronted with overt and covert messaging about our bodies, their appearance, and functioning. Advertising promotes the idea that thinness and happiness are linked. Idealized bodies featured in the media can lead to increased body dissatisfaction in both men and women. Furthermore, weight stigma contributes to stereotypes such as overweight people being lazy or lacking self control. Body image is a multifaceted construct and is intricately linked to our experiences within such constructs as gender, ethnicity, ability, and/or personal relationships. As clinicians, it is important for us to be aware of our own experiences and potential biases. As multiculturally-aware therapists, we have the opportunity to model positive body image for our clients and support them in deconstructing harmful narratives. Participants in this workshop will construct life-size body sculptures and will process their experiences using drama therapy techniques. Concepts and processes will be relevant to therapists across the expressive modalities. Finished sculptures will be installed at a conference location to engage the wider community in an open discussion related to body image, body ideals, and our own roles in perpetuating or altering the dominant social narrative.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC

FRIDAY, November 11

9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Painterly Printmaking through Monotypes & Monoprints: A Studio Skills Session

College of New Rochelle
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Bruce Waldman, MFA

This daylong master class is designed for those who love to draw and paint, since monoprints/monotypes incorporate draftsmanship and direct painting. We’ll approach the process in a unique way: first drawing and painting in color with rollers, brushes, and palette knives, then exploring how to use found materials to create textures that enhance the atmosphere and mood of the image. We will focus on pulling light out of a dark background as well as working dark on light. People of all ages and abilities who love to draw find freedom using these techniques; their color sense is expanded, and their drawing abilities can evolve. Expressive arts therapists, in particular, will understand how this studio skill can be incorporated into their clinical work. No prior experience with printmaking is required.

Please Note: This session is not eligible for continuing education credits.


SATURDAY, November 12

9:00 am - 10:30 am
Therapeutic Weaving Projects Using Everyday Materials
SESSION FULL

Executive Conference Center
1601 Broadway (enter on 48th Street)

Xenia M. Rybak, MS, MPS, CCLS

Over the centuries, weaving has evolved from serving a strictly practical purpose into an artistic medium. While the first woven pieces involved only the natural materials that were available in a particular area or region, weaving arts can now be seen to include not only yarn, fabric, and paper, but also plastic, rubber, and other detritus of our industrialized society. The benefits of weaving are not limited to artistic and practical uses, however. During this 90-minute workshop, we will focus on the therapeutic benefits of weaving. Participants will learn ways to create a variety of weaving projects using everyday art supplies. These projects can be adapted for use with a variety of client populations. Therapeutic benefits of weaving with individuals and groups will also be discussed.

Eligible for 1.5 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 1.5 Clock Hours: NBCC




10:50 am - 12:20 pm
Constructing Balinese Baskets for Communication, Community & Harmony

Executive Conference Center
1601 Broadway (enter on 48th Street)

Denise Malis, PhD, MFA, ATR-BC, LMHC
Kelly Reedy, BFA, MA

Canang sari, or small basket-making, is a Balinese ritual tradition stemming from the deep-seated belief that human beings and their environment are inextricably related. The basket as a concretized symbolic reflection of universal ‘holding space’ represents both the maker and the community as well as how the maker and community are interwoven/interrelated. This hands-on tradition of cutting/folding/looping/stitching a container from palm leaves allows for the individual to maintain harmony between the self, the community, and the natural environment. Art therapists typically work in urban settings with populations that have limited access to nature. Despite living in close proximity to others, urban dwellers often experience feelings of isolation as well as a lack of community. This workshop will explore the relationship that exits between natural materials, ‘making special,’ and interpersonal connections. Balinese basket techniques will be used to construct unique containers and other small objects that form expressions of harmony between the maker and the community and that symbolize a therapeutic holding space.

Eligible for 1.5 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 1.5 Clock Hours: NBCC

 


9:30 am - 12:30 pm

Fusible Quilting in Therapy: Ironing Out Issues, Piecing Together Communication

Executive Conference Center
1601 Broadway (enter on 48th Street)

Sharona Bookbinder, BSc, MBA, DTATI, OATR, RCAT, RP

This 3-hour workshop focuses on how to use fusible quilting in long-term care, community arts, and various clinical settings. Fusible quilting is a versatile medium that combines cotton fabrics and fusible web to create multi-layered textile images—without sewing. Examples of work by multidisciplinary staff and clients (geriatric, palliative, and cancer care) demonstrate the adaptability of this technique and how it is an effective tool for communicating feelings, best-practice concepts, and educational material and for achieving therapeutic goals. The application of fabric layers, the phases of construction, and the evolution of the image are akin to a narrative therapy modality. The value-added hands-on component integrates nicely with the multi-dimensional history that unfolds within a patient-focused model. A presentation of fusible quilting projects highlight this medium’s diversity, therapeutic value, and teaching potential. In this workshop, participants will engage in an experiential using irons to fuse prepared fabrics, creating their own textile images. No previous quilting experience is required.

Eligible for 3.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 3.0 Clock Hours: NBCC


9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Doll Making in Therapy & Counseling: Collaborators in Healing

College of New Rochelle
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Frances A. Smokowski, MFA, MAAT, ATR-BC, LCAT

Most creative arts therapists are familiar with the usefulness of transitional objects for facilitating positive attachments, bridging low levels of trust and binding high level of anxiety. Amplified personal meaning and other process-enhancing qualities can be facilitated through doll making, particularly if the doll is made from materials already infused with memories, such as outgrown clothes and garments from significant others. Self-creating comfort toys seems to invite healing interaction and investment on a deeper level, and can aid in self-soothing and building inner security. This workshop will direct participants through the step by step creation of a doll from repurposed and/or remaindered fabric. Basic construction approaches will be presented as well as options for embellishment. Participants will leave with a working knowledge and first hand experience in a variety of crafting skills; hand stitching skills will be emphasized throughout the session. Participants with machine sewing experience can easily adapt the presented approaches on their own. No prior sewing experience is required.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC



 

9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Deep Clay: Getting the Inside Out

College of New Rochelle
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Michelle Rhodes, ATR-BC, NCPsyA, LCSW-R

The beauty of clay is that it can take any form; the tactile experience of working with it in therapy can enhance and enrich the process of self-­exploration and transformation. This daylong Master Class will explore this shape-­shifting medium through an in-depth, hands­-on approach. Coupled with journaling and peer discussion, participants will have the opportunity to experience the use of clay as a way to relieve stress, stimulate the imagination, and discover deep connections within. We'll also explore the interrelationships of developmental levels of expression, play, resistance, diagnosis, psychotherapeutic interaction, and the limits and advantages of ceramic materials and techniques in the therapeutic context. The information and experiences offered will be applicable to clinical treatment with diverse populations.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC


 

9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Expressive Origami Therapy: Holding, Folding, Healing

Pratt Institute
200 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn
Graduate Department of Creative Arts Therapy, Co­-Host

Toshiko Kobayashi, ATR-BC, LCAT

Expressive Origami Therapy is a creative clinical technique that has been practiced internationally with survivors of severe trauma, in community post-disaster care, and with individuals and families in counseling and psychotherapy. It has also been used for the promotion of wellbeing in non-clinical populations. This 6-hour master class will provide a quick overview of the history of paper making and folding, particularly as they pertain to the development and practice of origami in Japan. We’ll explore the therapeutic qualities of working with origami and how they relate to the theory of Expressive Origami Therapy. Case study examples will illustrate Expressive Origami techniques in clinical use, highlighting the distinction between origami as a traditional craft and Expressive Origami’s practice in the creative arts therapies. Hands-on origami experiences will include both individual and group work. No previous knowledge of origami is necessary, though is certainly welcome. More importantly, having a basic understanding of the practice of creative arts in counseling and psychotherapy is recommended.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC




9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Valuing Process & Product: The Benefits of Printmaking in Art Therapy
SESSION FULL

College of New Rochelle
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Patricia Quinn, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Bruce Waldman, MFA

Printmaking offers art therapy clients an array of processes that can help them to understand cause and effect and even commit to an image that will become part of their personal iconography. The mastery of tools and mediums, as well as the mindful exertion of physical pressure, can facilitate the sublimation of psychic tensions through creative activity. Manipulating images through printmaking techniques allows issues to be worked out symbolically; creation of iconography can strengthen personal identity. In this daylong master class we will discuss the benefits of printmaking in the clinical setting, including etching, lithography, screen and block printing. We’ll discover how printmaking's reversals and indirectness can offer clients in art therapy a level of freedom and psychic distancing that facilitates insight by allowing unconscious content to surface. Then, to demonstrate, we’ll create monotypes and monoprints, printmaking techniques that don’t require special equipment or extensive technical training, and can be created in a single treatment session. No previous printmaking experience is required.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC



9:30 am - 5:00 pm
The Broken Bowl Project: Addiction Treatment and the Philosophy of Wabi Sabi

College of New Rochelle
29 Castle Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10805
Graduate Program in Art Therapy/Counseling, Co­-Host

Christa Brennan, ATR-BC, CASAC, LCAT
Christine Randolph, ATR-BC, LCAT

In this daylong master class, we will review the primary models of addictions treatment, addiction concepts, and explore the phenomenon of resiliency. We’ll consider Alcoholics Anonymous and its holistic approach to addiction, which shares a surprising number of philosophical similarities with Zen Buddhism. The Broken Bowl Project is based on the Japanese philosophy of Wabi Sabi and the ancient practice of Kintsukuroi: Wabi Sabi embraces the flawed or imperfect aspects of life. Kintsukuroi is the practice of repairing broken pottery with gold. Just as these approaches treat the cycle of breakage and repair as part of an object’s history rather than something to be discarded or disguised, addiction treatment using the expressive arts therapies helps those damaged by addiction to repair and revitalize the “vessels” that contain their thoughts, experiences, and feelings. Through the Broken Bowl process, the healing power of creativity and its role in facilitating resilience is externalized, illustrating the phases that span from relapse to recovery. Although developed for working with addicted populations, this technique can be used by mental health professionals working in a variety of settings.

Eligible for 6.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 6.0 Clock Hours: NBCC



2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Movable Books & Pop-Ups: Mechanisms of Meaning

Executive Conference Center
1601 Broadway (enter on 48th Street)

Kara Rothschild, MS, ATR-BC
Beth Sheehan, BFA

Book making has virtually unlimited possibilities and can be easily applied in both art education and art therapy settings. Making books can also be applied to working with a wide range of students and clients to help them tell their stories in a creative, fun and non-intrusive way. In this 3-hour workshop, participants will learn quick and easy ways to create interactive paper art using pop-up techniques as well as basic movable book 'tricks.' Participants will have opportunities to practice the techniques introduced in this workshop so that they can easily apply book making to their work in essentially any setting. This workshop is suitable for therapists, educators, students, and others seeking a creative process that offers the potential for both intimate reflection as well as psychological distance. Also, it promises to be a lot of fun!

Eligible for 3.0 Credit Hours: ATCB Only



SUNDAY, November 13

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Weaving, Moving, Healing: The Kobbe Project

Executive Conference Center
1601 Broadway (enter on 48th Street)

Mia de Bethune, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT
Nelly Edmondson, MA, MS
Jennifer Wiles, MA, BC-DMT, LMHC

Kobbe is an old Flemish word for ‘spider web,’ nature's original weaving technique. In this 3-hour workshop, participants will learn about the relationship between weaving and healing practice from members of the Kobbe Project, a group of artists and creative arts therapists. Individual and collaborative forms of weaving and therapeutic weaving techniques that participants will be able to implement with clients as well as groups will be introduced. These may include weaving as a metaphor for life-narrative through journaling; creating inexpensive looms for personal weaves; weaving with non-traditional and recycled materials; collaborating on a group weave, and integrating weaving with expressive movement. A short film about the Kobbe Project’s recent installations and collaborative weaving projects at the Catwalk Art Residence in Catskill, NY will also be screened. Previous experience with weaving and textiles is not required.

Eligible for 3.0 Credit Hours: ATCB; ASWB, APA, MFT, Nursing; SWNYS
Eligible for 3.0 Clock Hours: NBCC

 

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