Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2017

SATURDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES

THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF GROUP CREATIVE PROCESS: ANALYSIS IN REAL TIME
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
John Bergman, MA, RDT, MT, BCT 

Objectives:
1. State and describe 3 strategies for initiating theatre arts based work with clients with complex symptoms and histories.
2. Recognize and describe 2 possible basic neural changes through the use of simple biorhythm measuring tools. 
3. Organize the outline for a performance based wellness project using the four basic Process Markers. 
4. Describe and implement three arts therapy based techniques for incorporation in a performance based wellness project.

Bergman J (2013) “The theatre of meeting: the history of drama and other experiential therapies as neurological analogs” in Current Perspectives and Applications in Neurobiology: Working With Young Persons who are Victims and Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse. Eds: Longo R, Bergman, J et al. MA: Neari Press


INTEGRATING YOGA & ART THERAPY FOR GROUPS
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Karen Gibbons, ATR-BC, PYT, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Identify the qualities as they pertain to therapeutic applications of at least 3 mudras (yogic hand gestures). 
2. Identify and describe the clinical relevance and uses of at least 3 yoga poses. 
3. State and describe how to link at least 3 art directives with yoga interventions to address clinical treatment goals.

Khalsa, Hari Kirin Kaur. Art & Yoga: Kundalini Awakening in Everyday Life. Santa Cruz, NM: Kundalini Research Institute, 2011. Print.


SATURDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

LISTENING TO CLAY: JANIE RHYNE'S GESTALT ART EXPERIENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT

Objectives:
1. Use 2 methods to describe form as described by Rhyne's Gestalt Art experience.
2. Learn 2 methods to assist clients to describe what is seen in their artwork, facilitating enhanced potential for clinical insight. 
3. Identify 2 methods of reflective writing, transcribing what their hands "know" into the metaphors that can be recorded for exploration in treatment.

Kagin, S., Lusebrink, V., (1978). The Expressive Therapies Continuum. Art Psychotherapy, (5)4, 171-180.


TOUCH DRAWING FOR SELF-CARE & CREATIVE RENEWAL
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Shemaya Blauer, LCSW
Deborah Koff-Chapin

Objectives:
1. List the 4 essential art materials and the 5 steps to creating a series of Touch Drawings for use in clinician self-care. 
2. Describe 3 properties of Touch Drawing that make it particularly effective for therapist self-care. 
3. Define and apply 3 ways of using Touch Drawing as a method for the practitioner to transition between client sessions.

Fisher, P. & Anderson, K. (2002). When working hurts: Stress, burnout and trauma in human, emergency, and health services. Victoria, BC: Spectrum Press.


PLAY THERAPY THROUGH A JUNGIAN LENS: EXPLORING THE INNER LIVES OF CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Maxine McCleery Bowden, LMFT, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Articulate at least 1 rationale for utilizing Jungian Play Therapy. 
2. Identify 4 different Jungian concepts that can inform a Play Therapy practice that utilizes a Jungian perspective. 
3. List 3 specific techniques that can be used by play therapists utilizing a Jungian perspective.

Green, Eric J. (2014). The Handbook of Jungian Play Therapy with Children and Adolescents. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University.


ENGAGING RESISTANT ADOLESCENTS: PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR CLINICIANS AND OTHERS
(Human Growth and Development)
Deb Brass, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Learn and identify 3 common causes for adolescent resistance to therapeutic services. 
2. Learn and identify 4 developmental changes that occur in the adolescent stage of Human Development, that impact therapeutic work. 
3. Identify 2 strengths and 2 areas of liability that they possess in relation to working with adolescent populations.

Parisian, K (2015). "Identity formation: Art therapy and an adolescent’s search for self and belonging". Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 3, 130-135.


MULTIMODAL TECHNIQUES FOR MOVING BEYOND ILLNESS & STRESS
(Wellness and Prevention)
Lucia Capacchione, ATR, REAT, PhD

Objectives:
1. List 5 ground rules for effective Creative Journal application with children, teens, adults individually or in groups. 
2. Describe 5 techniques for teaching stress reduction and body awareness to clients of all ages. 
3. Identify 5 populations that would benefit from application of the expressive arts techniques presented and experienced by participants.

Capacchione, L.  (2015)  The Creative Journal: The Art of Finding Yourself 35th Anniversary Edition, Swallow/Ohio University Press.


THE SPIRITUALITY - WELLNESS CONNECTION: TECHNIQUES FOR PROMOTING HEALTH & HAPPINESS
(Wellness and Prevention)
Tobi Fishel, PhD

Objectives:
1. List and describe a minimum of 3 ways research suggests that spirituality is good medicine for our health.
2. Implement at least 3 spiritually grounded practices in clinical practice. 
3. State and describe how to address emotional eating through mindful eating practice.

Puchalski, C. M. (2001). The Role of Spirituality in Healthcare. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2001 Oct; 14(4): 352–357.


HEALING GRIEF AND LOSS: RECOVERY THROUGH ART, DRAMA & MUSIC
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Trisha Jauchler, MS, MA, RDT/BCT

Objectives:
1. Describe the relationship between attachment, loss, and the experience of grief. 
2. Define the 5 Tasks of Dying, and how they can be adapted for use in grief work. 
3. Identify the stages of recovering from loss.

Worden, J. William (2009).  Grief Counseling and Grief  Therapy: A Handbook for the Mental Health Practitioner. Springer Publishing, New York.


INTEGRATIVE ART THERAPY: BILATERAL SCRIBBLE, NEUROSEQUENTIAL SQUIGGLE, IFS COLLAGING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT

Objectives:

1. Describe 4 ways Trauma impacts neurobiology and 4 reasons Art Therapy is effective in trauma treatment.
2. Define 3 trauma-informed treatment approaches: EMDR, IFS, Neurosequential Model, naming 4-6 principles of each.
3. Identify and effectively integrate 4 art interventions into these treatment models

Tripp, T. (2016). "Body-based bilateral art protocol for reprocessing trauma". Ed. King, J. Art therapy, trauma and neuroscience. Routledge.173-194.


THE FIVE QUALITIES OF MINDFULNESS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY EXPERIENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Terry Marks-Tarlow, PhD

Objectives:
1. List and describe the 5 modes of mindfulness: still mind/inner refuge; focused mind/laser beam attention; open mind/receptivity; associative mind/creativity and play; and compassionate mind/care of self and others. 
2. Identify 4 creative tools to help induce and identify the signature experience, situational context and relational value of each quality of attention. 
3. Explain clinical applications of mindfulness modes to address the following 4 syndromes and symptoms: depression, anxiety, obsessive thinking, and PTSD.

Marks-Tarlow, T. (2012). Awakening Clinical Intuition. New York: Norton.


WITNESSING LIVES THROUGH ETHNODRAMATHERAPY FOR EMPOWERMENT & SOCIAL CHANGE
(Human Growth and Development)
Stephen Snow, PhD, RDT-BCT

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 ways to utilize drama therapy methods in processing the stories of peoples' lived experience of stigmatization, oppression and marginalization. 
2. Define 3 aspects of the research methodology that implements performance ethnography and results in a performance that constitutes a "Research Report." 
3. Evaluate and describe the ethnodramatherapy process in 3 previously videotaped projects.

Saldana, J. (2011). Ethnotheatre: Research from Page to Stage. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.


INTIMACY & ATTACHMENT: UNDERSTANDING THE PAS DE DEUX
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Wagner, MS, BC-DMT, LPC

Objectives:
1. Identify the 3 parts of our nervous system functioning according to Stephen Porges' polyvagal theory. 
2. Explain the overlap between the 3 major attachment styles and the 3 parts of the nervous system. 
3. Describe 5 Lustier Life Skill exercises with clients to help them shift there nervous system functioning and move into a more secure attachment style.

Porges, S. (2011). The polyvagal theory: Neurophysiological foundations of emotions, attachment, communication, self-regulation., New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.


MUSIC AND PLAY: CHANNELING CHILDHOOD FOR THERAPEUTIC GAIN
(Human Growth and Development)
Becky Wellman, PhD, LPMT, MT-BC 

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 reasons or justifications to utilize music and/or play within their current therapeutic environment to enhance experiences for children. 
2. Identify at least 2 interventions that can be used immediately in your play therapy or clinical practice with children to aid them in meeting their goals, including clear links to developmentally appropriate practices. 
3. Identify at least 1 music and play technique that can be used when working with children who have been diagnosed on the autism spectrum—or with other special needs—in play therapy and other clinical situations.

LaGasse, A. B. (2014). "Effects of a music therapy group intervention on enhancing social skills in children with autism." Journal of Music Therapy, 51(3), 250-275. doi: 10.1093/jmt/thu012


SATURDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

TRANSFORMATION OF FAILURE & SELF-BLAME: TECHNIQUES FROM THEATER OF THE OPPRESSED
(Human Growth and Development)
Brent Blair, PhD
Mady Schutzman, PhD

Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 cognitive limitations associated with a perception of having failed at a particular task, goal, or life objective.
2. Describe and practice two techniques (embodied and narrative) to assist clients in converting "failure narratives" into tools of resilience.
3. State a minimum of 3 therapeutic actions that can be achieved with clients using drama therapy narratives.

Salverson, J. (2000). Between hope and despair: pedagogy and the remembrance of historical trauma. Rowman & Littlefield; Lanham, MD. (p. 16)


VOCAL PSYCHOTHERAPY: SELF-DISCOVERY THROUGH BREATH & SOUND

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Diane Austin, DA, ACMT, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Discuss at least 3 ways in which the voice can be used effectively in psychotherapy.
2. Define "vocal psychotherapy."
3. Explain "vocal holding techniques," and be able to apply at least 1 of these techniques in clinical practice.

Bruscia, K. E. (Ed.) (1998). The dynamics of music psychotherapy. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.


TECH GONE WILD: SEXTING, PORN & CYBERBULLYING IN PLAY THERAPY AND COUNSELING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Leslie Baker, MA, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, MS, MFT, NCC, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Learn 4 key definitions and 3 dangers sexting, porn & cyberbullying that will increase the play therapist's understanding and identification of problem behavior. 
2. Learn at least 3 parenting tips and resources of sexting, porn & cyberbullying impacting youth and their families. 
3. Explore and practice 3 family play therapy/expressive arts-based therapy/expressive arts-based treatment techniques for assessment & intervention in working with youth & families coping with technology concerns.

Ahlfors, R. (2010). "Many sources, one theme: Analysis of  cyberbullying prevention and intervention websites". Journal Of  Social Sciences, 6(4), 513-520.


TOUCH DRAWING IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Shemaya Blauer, LCSW
Deborah Koff-Chapin 

Objectives:
1. List the 4 essential art materials and 5 steps for creating a series of Touch Drawings that can be used in clinical practice. 
2. Describe 3 properties of Touch Drawing that make it uniquely effective in addressing treatment issues of at least 3 different client populations. 
3. Define 3 ways of using Touch Drawing as a method for the practitioner to transition between clients, and 3 modalities of using Touch Drawing to process the clinician's own work as a therapist.

Rogers, J. E. (2007). The art of grief: The use of expressive arts in grief support groups. New York, NY: Routledge Press.


MIND-BODY APPROACHES TO MANAGING STRESS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Carolyn Braddock, MA 
Helen Dolas, MS, MT-BC

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more ways that breath, sound, and movement can be used in treatment, educational, and other settings to quickly calm the nervous system.
2. List 2 or more benefits of using guided imagery for facilitating relaxation in treatment, educational, and other settings.
3. Describe 1 or more types of relaxation-inducing sound that can be made with simple instruments to facilitate stress management in clinical work and elsewhere with people of all ages. 

Braddock, C. Body Voices, 1994, 1996, Page Mill Press.


SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL AND COGNITIVE GROWTH THROUGH THE ARTS: THE KEY TO KIDS
(Human Growth and Development)
Erica Curtis, LMFT, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. Describe at least 1 arts-based strategy for each of the following when working with children: nurturing connection, promoting emotional well-being, supporting academic success.
2. Identify 3 arts-based strategies for addressing day-to-day challenges when raising or working with children. 
3. Apply 2 arts-based strategies for accessing skills and resources for helping children when experiencing burn out, stress, or frustration.

Robison, K. (2001). Out of our minds: Learning to be creative. West Sussex, United Kingdom: Capstone Publishing Ltd.


HAPTIC PERCEPTION AT THE CLAY FIELD; A SENSORIMOTOR APPROACH TO ART THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Cornelia Elbrecht, BA, MA (Art Ed), AThR

Objectives:
1. Compare and contrast explicit and implicit memory. 
2. Define haptic perception and describe its application within trauma treatment. 
3. List and describe a minimum of 2 therapeutic benefits of sensorimotor based art therapy techniques.

Elbrecht, Cornelia. (2006). The Transformation Journey. The Process of Guided Drawing – An Initiatic Art Therapy. Rütte: Johanna Nordländer Verlag.


MANAGING CONFLICT, EMBODYING NEW NARRATIVES
(Human Growth and Development)
Bobbi Kidder, MA, RDT, BCT
Colin Ward, PhD

Objectives:
1. Identify a minimum of 2 stressors that contribute to personal, social, and political violence. 
2. Describe at least one vulnerability they have experienced or observed that increased the proclivity for toward violence.
3. Define collaborative leadership and state its significance in surviving and thriving after violent experiences.

Hastings, Tom (2006).  The Lessons of Nonviolence: Theory and Practice in a World of Conflict.  Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland and Company Publishers.


ART THERAPY AS A BRAIN-BASED PROFESSION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Juliet L. King, ATR-BC, LPC

Objectives:
1. Explain at least 3 basic functions of neuroanatomy that are related to art therapy theory, practice and intervention.
2. Define the 8 identified ways of intuited art therapist knowing and correlate each of these 8 ways with potential corresponding neurological functions.
3. Name at least 1 protocol for art therapy and neuroscience research that they might be interested in pursuing.

King, J. (Ed.) (2016). Art Therapy, trauma and neuroscience: Theoretical and practical perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge


THE STORY OF FORGIVENESS: CREATING PEACE OF MIND
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Fred Luskin, PhD

Objectives:
1. Define the term forgiveness
2. Describe at least 2 relaxation techniques that can be used to aid change in the client narrative in the treatment context. 
3. Articulate 3 reasons that explain how the forgiveness method is beneficial for health and psychological well-being.

Luskin, FM 2003 Forgive for Good Harper One SF


LIVING WITH INTENTION & AUTHENTICITY: END-OF-LIFE LESSONS FROM  DIGNITY THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Desiree Aspiras, MA
Lori Montross-Thomas, PhD

Objectives:
1. Describe the use of Dignity Therapy in hospice and palliative care populations; provide a general summary of the 29 research articles and outcome studies related to this therapy to date. 
2. Identify your personal story with a focus in 4 main areas: defining events, proudest accomplishments, lessons learned, and goals for the future. 
3. Explain how this personal reflection process could be used with at least 2 different types of clinical populations.

Chochinov, H.M. (2012).  Dignity Therapy: Final Words for Final Days.  Oxford University Press, Inc.: New York, NY.


POETRY, WRITING & WEAVING TO FOSTER STRENGTH, RESILIENCE AND COMMUNITY
(Wellness and Prevention)
Ingrid Tegnér, MSW, CAPF, M/S

Objectives:
1. Define community
2. List, describe and practice 2-3 writing techniques to develop community. 
3. Describe how to integrate poetic imagery with art materials to physically explore the metaphor of weaving inner strength into a community connection.

Stephan, M. J., & Chenoweth, E. (2008). "Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict." International Security, 33(1), 7-44.


INTRODUCTION TO THE THERAPEUTIC USES OF PHOTOGRAPHY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Robert Irwin Wolf, MPS, ATR-BC, NCPsya, LP, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Describe 2 or more types of approaches to working with photographs that can promote personal growth in clinical and educational settings. 
2. Identify 2 therapeutic techniques involving photography that can be used with a wide variety of populations. 
3. Explain 1 or more benefits of using therapeutic photography as compared to other forms of visual arts in treatment.

Weiser, J. (1993). Phototherapy techniques. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

SATURDAY MORNING PLENARY

THE SCIENCE OF FORGIVENESS
Frederic Luskin, PhD

Objectives

1. Define the term forgiveness
2. Describe at least 2 relaxation techniques that can be used to aid change in the client narrative in the treatment context. 
3. Articulate 3 reasons that explain how the forgiveness method is beneficial for health and psychological well-being.

Luskin, Frederic. (2003) Forgive for Good: A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness. HarperOne.


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