Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2017

SUNDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


MASTER CLASSES

TAMING THE BULLY WITHIN THROUGH INNER FAMILY HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lucia Capacchione, ATR, REAT, PhD

Objectives:
1. Identify the Aware Ego and 4 sub-personalities that make up the Inner Family. 
2. Describe 4 expressive arts modalities for accessing and dialoging with the Inner Child and Inner Parent sub-personalities. 
3. Define the role of the Aware ego, Witness and Higher Power in Inner Family Work.

Capacchione, L. (1981) Recovery of Your Inner Child, Simon & Scuster, NY, NY.


KELLOGG'S GREAT ROUND OF MANDALA: PATHWAYS TO WHOLENESS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jordan Potash, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT, LCAT

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 therapeutic benefits to creating mandalas in clinical and non-clinical work. 
2. Identify the stages of Joan Kellogg's Archetypal Stages of the Great Round of Mandala and what each signifies. 
3. Apply Kellogg's theory to at least 1 mandala to identify embedded archetypes.

Stein, Murray. Jung's Map of the Soul: An Introduction. Chicago: Open Court, 1998. Print.


SUNDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

DEEPENING APPROACHES TO IMAGE & METAPHOR FOR EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPISTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT
Linney Wix, PhD, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. List and describe 6 of archetypal psychology's 'gadgets' as a method of working with images in therapy. 
2. Apply 2 methods used in archetypal art therapy, involving art making and writing, that facilitate deepening client awareness and insights about the psychological content contained in the imagery. 
3. Describe and apply 2 methods for accessing metaphor through poetic process and be able to name at least 2 clinical areas in which this approach is beneficial.

Hillman, J. (1981). Archetypal psychology: A brief account. Dallas, TX: Spring Publications.


SANDTRAY BASICS: CREATING MINIATURE WORLDS IN PLAY THERAPY & FOR PERSONAL GROWTH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Leslie Baker, MA, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, MS, MFT, NCC, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. Identify 2 examples of how child development is reflected in the sandtray during the play therapy session. 
2. Describe 1 or more differences between the way that children participating in play/expressive art therapy and adults use sandtray. 
3. Identify 5 questions/observations that play therapists and expressive art therapists can use in processing sand trays with clients.

Boik, B. L., & Goodwin, A. E. (2000). Sandplay therapy: A step-by-step manual for psychotherapists of diverse orientations. New York: Norton, W. W. & Company.

Homeyer, L. E., Sweeny, D., (2014). Sandtray therapy: A practical manual, Third edition (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Turner, B. A. (2005). The handbook of Sandplay therapy. United States: Temenos Press.



ESTABLISH RAPPORT WITH AT-RISK YOUTH USING THE enACT METHOD 

(Human Growth and Development)
Bradford Bancroft, RDT, LMFT
Diana Feldman
Miles Grose

Objectives:
1. State 3 therapeutic benefits of using the enACT method's games and techniques with vulnerable youth. 
2. Describe how role play exercises can be used to develop a new understanding of the trauma, disengagement and fear in the populations you serve. 
3. State a minimum of 2 ways clients may reveal their inner feelings and frustrations through these safe and playful experiences.

Feldman, Diana; Ward, Emilie; Handley, Serena; Goldstein, Thalia R. (2015). "Evaluating drama therapy in school settings: A case study of the ENACT programme," Drama Therapy Review, Volume 1, Number 2, 1 October 2015, pp. 127-145(19)


ART-BASED THERAPY FOR CHILDREN INCORPORATING MINDFULNESS & SELF-COMPASSION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Rebecca Bokoch, MA
Noah Hass-Cohen, MA, PsyD, ATR-BC 

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more mindfulness-based empirical outcomes as a result of using this group structure with children. 
2. Explain 2 or more conceptual differences between mindfulness and self-compassion, particularly as they pertain to working with young people in treatment. 
3. Describe 3 or more components of a 6-week self-compassion, mindfulness, and art-based group curriculum that can be used in counseling, play therapy, and psychotherapy in a variety of clinical settings.

Coholic, D. A., & Eys, M. (2015). "Benefits of an arts-based mindfulness group intervention for vulnerable children." Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal, doi:10.1007/s10560-015-0431-3


YOGA, AYURVEDA AND THE CREATIVE ARTS THERAPIES: FOSTERING HEALING & BALANCE
(Wellness and Prevention)
Kathy Cass, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, CYT, E-RYT

Objectives:
1. Define Ayurvedic Yoga Therapy
2. Identify and describe 3 Ayurvedic Yoga tools to integrate into their personal and professional practice. 
3. Describe a minimum of 3 treatment objectives that can be addressed through the combination of Ayurvedic Yoga and Creative Arts intervention techniques.

Frawley, Dr. David. Ayurveda and the Mind. WI: Lotus Press, 1996.


DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS: THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS FOR ADOLESCENTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jeffrey L. Jamerson, MA, PhD

Objectives:
1. Define the basic theory of the expressive remix therapy model and name 2 or more in which it can be used as an adjunct to treatment and work with young people.
2. Identify 3 to 5 digital media resources that can be used in therapeutic interventions in clinical, educational, and other settings. 
3. Name 3 or more ways that expressive remix activities can be used to enhance therapeutic, educational, and creative work with adolescents and others.

Barron, B., Gomez, K., Pinkard, N., & Martin, C. (2014). The digital youth network: Cultivating digital media citizenship in urban communities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.


LAUNCHING YOUR PRIVATE PRACTICE IN EXPRESSIVE THERAPY: BUSINESS, LEGAL & ETHICAL ESSENTIALS
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues; Professional Issues; Ethics)
Reina Lombardi, MA, ATR-BC, LMHC

Objectives:
1. Identify and describe a minimum of 3 ethical considerations when creating clinical paperwork necessary for operating a private practice. 
2. Describe and implement an ethically sound and financially viable method for creating a fee structure in private practice. 
3. State 3 or more administrative tasks grounded in an ethical framework that clinicians should initiate prior to opening a private practice. 

Mikel, Emery Hurst. The Art of Business: A Guide for Creative Arts Therapists Starting on a Path to Self-employment.  Print.


POETRY/BIBLIOTHERAPY FOR MENTAL ILLNESS: FOSTERING RECOVERY, INSTILLING HOPE
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Perie J. Longo, PhD, PTR, LMFT
India Radfar, BA, CAPF

Objectives:
1. Identify the 4 steps of poetry therapy through processing sample poems presented in a packet for therapeutic use. 
2. Describe the 5 criteria for literature to be used in a therapeutic setting to include accessibility, clarity, emotion, fresh language and importance of hope. 
3. Explain 4 ways the Significant “Other” in a poem or piece of literature awakens memory, provides an anchor for the reader, validates them and inspires release of their own words.

Mazza, N. (1999) Poetry therapy: Interface of the arts and psychology. CRC Press.


TOKENS OF ESTEEM AND AFFIRMATION: ARTIST CHALLENGE COINS 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Gretchen Miller, MA, ATR-BC, ACTP

Objectives:
1. Describe 3 examples connected to the history and significance of Challenge Coins used to symbolize achievement, community building, and instill a sense of belonging. 
2. State 3 ways Artist Challenge Coins (ACCs) can be adapted to use with a variety of populations and therapeutic settings. 
3. Describe a minimum of 1 value of using Challenge Coins with varied clinical populations.

Jessica Masino Drass (2015) "Art Therapy for Individuals With Borderline Personality: Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Framework", Art Therapy, 32:4, 168-176, DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2015.109271


FOCUSING-ORIENTED EXPRESSIVE ARTS: A MINDFULNESS AND SOMATIC-BASED APPROACH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Laury Rappaport, PhD, MFT, REAT, ATR-BC
Zoe Rappaport

Objectives:
1. Describe the theoretical origins of which Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts Therapy is based. 
2. Describe what the "Focusing Attitude" is.
3. Describe how to express a felt sense through the arts.

Rappaport, L. (2009). Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy: Accessing the Body's Wisdom and Creative Intelligence. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


MILITARY SERVICE MEMBERS AND THE CREATIVE ARTS: INTERDISCIPLINARY CARE
(Wellness and Prevention)
Rebecca Vaudreuil, EdM, MT-BC
Melissa Walker, MA, ATR
Megan Wong, MM, MT-BC

Objectives:
1. Define 2 of the signature wounds and accompanying symptomatology that military service members are diagnosed with and experience. 
2. Describe the approaches of 2 national programs working towards expanding the use of music and art therapy with military populations on a national scale. 
3. Explain at least 2 reasons why national expansion and integration of creative arts in the military health care should be considered a “need-to have” rather than a “nice-to have.” 
4. Identify 2 creative arts therapies interventions—one music therapy and one art therapy—and explain the applicable context for utilization with military populations as facilitated in an interdisciplinary/co-treatment model.

Crenshaw, D. (2006) . "Neuroscience and Trauma Treatment". In  Carey, L. (Ed.), Expressive and Creative Arts Methods for Trauma Survivors, (pp. 21-38).Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


EATING DISORDERS: MOVING FROM FEAR TO SELF-MASTERY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Marybeth Weinstock, PhD, BC-DMT

Objectives:
1. List 3 benefits of using Dance/Movement Therapy methodologies for clients with eating disorders. 
2. Describe 3 DMT techniques that can be used to facilitate embodiment for clients with eating disorders. 
3. Identify 1 or more ways in which they can implement skills described in the workshop with clients for whom embodiment is a challenge.

Krantz, A. (1999).  "Growing into her body: Dance/Movement Therapy for women with Eating Disorders".  Journal of the American Dance Therapy Association, 21 (2): 81-103.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

EXPRESSIVE WRITING AS ACTIVISM
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathleen Adams, MA, LPC
Mary Reynolds Thompson, CPCC, CAPF, CJF
Kate Thompson, MA, CJT
Perie J. Longo, PhD, RPT, LMFT
India Radfar, BA, CAPF
Ingrid Tegnér, MSW, M/S, CAPF

Objectives:
1. Demonstrate 2 or more ways that writing can be used for personal change and collective activism. 
2. Describe 2 or more metaphors that can be used in treatment to facilitate conscious change. 
3. Articulate 2 or more individual action plans for personal or community activism. 

Adams, Kathleen (Editor). 2013. Expressive Therapy: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.


SOUND, MUSIC & HEALING: SCIENCE AND CLINICAL PRACTICE IN HARMONY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tobi Fishel, PhD

Objectives:
1. List at least 3 ways sound and music are being studied as healing modalities. 
2. Describe at least 2 ways to use music and sound in the treatment of anxiety, depression, and trauma. 
3. Describe at least 1 way to incorporate music and sound healing into practice with teens.

Gaynor, Mitchell, (2002). The Healing Power of Sound. Boulder, CO: Shambhala Publications.


LET'S ALL PLAY! TECHNIQUES FOR COUNSELORS, THERAPISTS, EDUCATORS & OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Leslie Baker, MA, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, MS, MFT, NCC, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 different theoretical approaches on which specific play therapy techniques are based. 
2. List 3 techniques appropriate for the beginning middle and end phases of play therapy or expressive arts interventions. 
3. Describe 3 play therapy-based techniques easily adaptable to child therapy or expressive arts practice.

Cook, A. S. S., & Dworkin, D. S. (1992). Helping the bereaved: Therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents, and adults. New York: Basic Books.

Friedberg, R. D., McClure, J. M., & Garcia, J. H. (2014). Cognitive therapy techniques for children and adolescents: Tools for enhancing practice. New York, NY, United States: Guilford Publications.

Lowenstein, L. (2006). Creative interventions for children of divorce. Toronto: Champion Press.



DIGITAL STORYTELLING AS A THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION

(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jeffrey Jamerson, MA, PhD

Objectives:
1. Define digital storytelling and identify 2 or more ways it can be used as an adjunct to treatment and work with people of all ages.
2. Identify 3 or more digital media resources that can be used in therapeutic interventions in clinical, educational, and other settings. 
3. Name 2 or more ways that story creation can be augmented using digital media to enhance therapeutic, educational, and creative work with people of all ages.

Ohler, J. (2008). Digital storytelling in the classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.


HOLDING OUR CLIENTS IN OUR BODIES: MANAGING SOMATIC COUNTERTRANSFERENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Gabrielle Kaufman, MA, LPCC, BC-DMT, NCC

Objectives:
1. Clarify 2 ways in which the body responds to trauma. 
2. Explain 3 skills for coping with somatic countertransference. 
3. Identify 2 resources for receiving support with somatic countertransference.

Cozolino. L (2006) The neuroscience of human relationships: Attachment and the developing social brain. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.


MASK MAKING: A MULTICULTURAL PROCESS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Judy Leventhal, LCSW

Objectives:
1. List 3 or more ways that masks can be used to facilitate exploration of issues related to identity and community in counseling, psychotherapy, and educational settings.
2. Describe 1 or more ways that journaling can enhance group connection when used in treatment, educational, and other settings.
3. Identify 2 or more ways that mask making can be used in clinical and educational settings to enhance multicultural exploration and understanding.

Leventhal, J. (1993). Mask Making: A Creative Approach with Adolescents in Distress in California Art Therapy Trends, editor E. Virshup, PhD, ATR. Chicago, Ill: Magnolia Street Press.



FINDING OUR WAY THROUGH CREATIVITY, AGING AND ILLNESS 
(Human Growth and Development)
Wendy Miller, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT, LPC-BCPC, LCPAT

Objectives:
1. Describe how creative aging can enable individuals to grow beyond the limitations imposed by both illness and aging. 
2. Identify at least 2 key concepts in the experience of living with the impact of illness within the family body. 
3. List and describe the key concepts in the developmental work of Gene Cohen in human potential phases, brain plasticity, intelligence, and the role of the creative arts in making aging a more meaningful and positive experience.

Charon, R. (2006). Narrative medicine: Honoring the stories of illness. New York: Oxford University Press.


ETHICS & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR PRIVATE PRACTITIONERS: KNOWLEDGE YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO IGNORE
(Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues, Ethics)
Reina Lombardi, MA, ATR-BC, LMHC

Objectives:
1. Identify and describe a minimum of 3 ethical considerations  when creating clinical paperwork necessary for operating a private practice. 
2. Describe and implement an ethically sound and financially viable method for creating a fee structure in private practice. 
3. State 3 or more administrative tasks grounded in an ethical framework that clinicians should initiate prior to opening a private practice. 

Taylor, Kylea. The Ethics of Caring: Honoring the Web of Life in Our Professional Healing Relationships. Santa Cruz, CA: Hanford Mead, 1995. Print.


BUILDING RESILIENCY IN KIDS THROUGH MINDFULNESS, MEDITATION, AND IMAGINATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Charlotte Reznick, PhD

Objectives:
1. Identify 1 relevant research study in the field of mindfulness, meditation, and imagination with children and adolescents. 
2. List 3 physical and/or psychological areas where mindfulness, meditation, and imagination is appropriate as a therapeutic tool with children and adolescents. 
3. Describe 3 'steps' in mindfulness, meditation, and imagination treatment with children and adolescents.

Davenport, L. Ed. (2016). Transformative Imagery: Cultivating the Imagination for Healing, Change, and Growth. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley.


ECO-ART THERAPY: EXPANDING YOUR PRACTICE THROUGH CONNECTION WITH NATURE
(Human Growth and Development)
Ellen Speert, ATR-BC, REAT

Objectives:
1. List a minimum of 2 metaphors of the earth provided by the presenter and be able to utilize in poetic responses. 
2. Name at least 5 sources of free natural materials to be used in therapeutic interventions. 
3. Define eco-art therapy and identify at least one eco-art therapeutic intervention.

Louv, R. (2005). Last child in the woods: Saving our children from nature-deficit disorder. Chapel Hill:Algonquin Books.


CREATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR WORKING WITH AND CARING FOR OLDER ADULTS
(Wellness and Prevention)
Stephanie Wichmann, LICSW, RDT
Nora O'Connor, MSW, LCSW

Objectives:
1. List 3 everyday signs of professional and personal stress that can contribute to burnout and compassion fatigue while working with older adults. 
2. Describe at least 2 creative/and or mindfulness approaches to manage stress as a caregiver. 
3. Describe at least 2 creative exercises/techniques to integrate into their workplace setting or personal caregiving when working with older adults.

Sajnani, Nisha& Johnson, David Read (2014) (w/16 contributors) Trauma-Informed Drama Therapy. Transforming Clinics, Classrooms, and Communities. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, LTD. Springfield, Illinois.USA.

SUNDAY MORNING PLENARY

CAN PURSUIT OF MEANING KEEP US HEALTHY?
Steve Cole, PhD
John Bergman, MA, RDT, MT, BCT

Objectives 

1. List 1 biological pathway by which psychological processes can affect gene expression in immune cells.
2. List 2 general types of genes that show altered expression as a function of adverse social conditions.
3. Identify 2 positive psychological processes that may protect against the adverse effects of stress on gene expression.

Slavich, G. M., & Cole, S. W. (2013)  "The emerging field of human social genomics."  Clinical Psychological Science, 1, 331-348.


Top