Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2018

 

THURSDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Bending Trio

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

THE POWER OF AWARENESS: THE SCIENCE AND PRACTICE OF PRESENCE
(Human Growth and Development; Wellness and Prevention; Cross-Disciplinary Offerings)
Daniel J. Siegel, MD
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 2 or more ways that Mindful Awareness changes the structure of the brain.
2. Name 3 components of Mindful Awareness practice that science shows are important for effective outcomes in clinical work.
3. Identify 4 physiological functions that presence improves or enhances that would favorably impact mental health and the treatment process.
 
Siegel, D. (2016). Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human. NY: W. W. Norton & Company.
 
Siegel, D. Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation. (2010). NY: Bantam Books.
 
Siegel, D. The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child. (2018). NY: Bantam Books.



THURSDAY MASTER CLASSES & INTENSIVES

WHY THE ARTS WORK BETTER TOGETHER: A COHERENT THEORY FOR MAXIMIZING THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Judith Greer Essex, PhD, REAT, ADTR, LMFT
Wes Chester, MA, CAGS
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define the concepts of intermodality and polyaesthetics as they relate to using the arts in counseling and psychotherapy.
2. Describe 3 or more ways of making an intermodal transfer during an expressive arts therapy session.
3. List 2 or more advantages to working with multiple art disciplines in an expressive arts therapy-based session.
4. Identify 1 or more clinically strategic rationales for shifting from art or writing activities to an embodied approach in a therapeutic session.
5. List 1 or more benefits of using a rational framework for decision-making in clinical situations vs relying on clinical intuition and past experiences.
6. List 2 or more sensory or communication pathways that, when engaged, facilitate the therapeutic efficacy of the arts therapies in mental health treatment.

Knill, P.K., Levine, E.G., and Levine, S.K., ( 2005) "Foundations for a Theory of Practice" (pp. 75-172) in Principles and Practice of Expressive Arts Therapy: Toward a therapeutic aesthetic. Philadelphia PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Knill, P.J., Barba, H.N., Fuchs, M.N. (2004) "Part One: The Integrated Use of the Arts in Healing the Psyche." (pp. 21-52) in Minstrels of Soul. Toronto, ON: EGS Press.  

Knill, P.K. (1999) "Soul Nourishment, or the intermodal language of imagination." in Levine S.K. and Levine, E.G. Foundations of Expressive Arts Therapy (pp. 37-52). London, UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

BOOKS BY HAND: HOLDING SECRETS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Linney Wix, PhD, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 or more ways of understanding the use of the word secret in therapeutic contexts.
2. Describe 2 or more handmade book formats useful to working with secrets in art therapy and art education settings. 
3. Identify 2 or more ways that making books in therapeutic and educational settings can promote healing and wellness in makers. 
4. Describe 2 or more benefits of using simple bookmaking processes with clients and students to facilitate self-understanding.  
5. Identify 2 or more bookmaking tools and ways to adapt them for use with various populations. 
6. Describe 2 or more benefits of using simple bookmaking processes with clients and students to facilitate self-understanding.

Abbenante, J. and Wix, L. 2016. "Archetypal art therapy." In Gussak, D. and Rosen,  M., (Eds.), Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Art Therapy. Wiley. 

LaPlantz, S. (1995). Cover to cover: Creative techniques for making beautiful books, journals & albums. Asheville, NC: Lark.

Rivers, C. (2014). Little Book of Book Making. New York: Potter Craft.

DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-Based Practices; Research)
Kathryn Johnson, PhD, ATR

Objectives:

1. List the required materials for administering a DDS for assessment and research. 
2. State the 3 directives for administering a DDS for assessment and research. 
3. Name 5 or more structural characteristics from the DDS Drawing Analysis Form used in rating DDS Series.
4. Identify 3 or more features of scientific research that are part of the 30-year international study of the DDS.
5. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations.
6. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice.
7. List 3 graphic elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
8. List 3 graphic elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with depression that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
9. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed as bipolar-manic phase hat distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
10. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with borderline personality disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
11. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
12. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.

Mills, Anne, Barry M. Cohen, and Jackie Z. Meneses. "Reliability and Validity Tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy 20.1 (1993): 83-88. Web.

Betts, D. (2013). "Art therapy assessments with diverse populations: The Diagnostic Drawing Series" (addressed by Cohen, Mills, and Ichiki). In P. Howie, S. Prasad, & J. Kristel (Eds)., Using art therapy with diverse populations: Crossing cultures and abilities (pp. 46-47). London: Jessica Kingsley.

Mills, A. (2003) "The Diagnostic Drawing Series." In C. Malchiodi (Ed.), Handbook of Art Therapy, pp. 401-109. New York: Guilford.

INTERNAL FAMILY SYSTEMS (IFS) & ART THERAPY: INTRODUCING THE JOURNEY THROUGH COLLAGE & CLAY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Salicia Mazero, MA, ATR, LPC

Objectives:

1. Define 3 or more basic principles of the Internal Family Systems (IFS) model of treatment that can be applied to clinicians’ current therapeutic approaches.
2. Clarify 3 or more ways that IFS and art therapy theory complement each other to promote transformation for clients in both individual and group settings.
3. Describe the 3 types of “Parts”, defining 1-2 examples of the roles they each play within the internal family system.
4. Identify the 8 qualities of self leadership in the IFS model of treatment and how these would be recognized within both the clinician and the client to develop a more compassionate therapeutic process.
5. List and define the 6 “F’s” of the IFS process.
6. Describe 4 IFS-informed art interventions used to identify parts and their relationship to each other, fostering unblending,  enhancing internal dialogue and increasing self-compassion in both the clinician and the client.

Schwartz, R.A.(1995). Internal family systems therapy. NY:Guilford Books.

Goulding,R., Schwartz, R.A.(1995). The Mosaic mind. NY: W.W.Norton.

Lavergne,M. (2004). "Art therapy and the IFS therapy: an integrative model to treat trauma among adjudicated teen girls." The Canadian Art Therapy Association Journal, 17(1),17-36. 

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL ARTS ON A SHOESTRING FOR INDIVIDUALS & GROUPS IN ALL SETTINGS - DAY 1 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ping Ho, MA, MPH
Lori Baudino, PsyD, BC-DMT
Gabrielle Kaufman, MA, LPCC, BC-DMT, NCC 

Objectives:

1. Based on day one's curriculum, state one effective way to establish rapport when offering an arts activity to someone for the first time.
2. For each of the two art forms learned today, identify one way to facilitate engagement of reluctant participants.
3. Describe how one activity learned on day one can be adapted to accommodate cognitive or physical limitations and group participation.
4. Give two examples of how other art forms can be integrated into a specific activity learned on day one.
5. Explain at least two ways that writing/poetry can enhance cultural competence.
6. Explain at least two reasons that synchrony through movement has value in clinical practice.

Puetz TW, Morley CA, and Herring MP.  "Effects of creative arts therapies on psychological symptoms and quality of life in patients with cancer."  JAMA Internal Medicine. 2013; 173(11):960-969.

Uttley L, Scope A, Stevenson M, Rawdin A, Taylor Buck E, Sutton A, et al. "Systematic review and economic modelling of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of art therapy among people with non-psychotic mental health disorders." Health Technology Assessment, 2015;19(18).

Nilsson U.  "The anxiety- and pain-reducing effects of music interventions: a systematic review." AORN Journal, 2008; 87(4):780-807.

TF-CBT, EMDR, CPP IN PLAY THERAPY & TRAUMA TREATMENT: EVIDENCE-BASED AND CREATIVE ARTS PRACTICES 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment  )
Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S

Objectives:

1. List 3 or more of the core components of trauma-informed therapies and how they are correlated with play therapy principles.
2. Facilitate 5 sensory and play-based activities that can be used in child play therapy practice.
3. Identify 3 of most prevalent diagnostic categories related to children with histories of complex trauma that are typically seen in clinical treatment by play therapists and others.
4. Describe 1 or more key features of TF-CBT as it can be applied to working with traumatized young people in treatment. 
5. Describe 1 or more key features of EMDR as it pertains to treating young people in play therapy.
6. Define 2 or more key features that would characterize “healthy play” in traumatized youngsters .

Cavett, A.M. (2015) "Playful Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for School-age Children." In Drewes, A.A. & Schaefer, C.E. (Eds.) Play Therapy in Middle Childhood. Washington: APA.

Adler-Tapia, R. & Settle, C.  (2008).  EMDR and the art of psychotherapy with children.  New York:  Springer Publishing Company.

Green, E. J. (2012). "Facilitating resiliency in traumatized adolescents: Integrating play therapy with evidence-based interventions." Play Therapy, 6(3), 10-15.

THE WAY OF THE JOURNAL: THERAPEUTIC WRITING IN CLINICAL PRACTICE 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathleen (Kay) Adams, PTR-M/S, LPC

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 or more theoretical approaches to therapeutic writing. 
2. List 5 or more discrete journal techniques that can be used in a variety of clinical settings with clients of all ages.
3. Experience 3 or more writing processes with opportunities for sharing in small or large groups afterward.
4. List 2 or more predictors of client success with expressive writing. 
5. Differentiate among the 3 phases of the Journal Ladder.
6. Identify how to use writing with 3 or more client presenting problems.

Adams, K. "Expression and Reflection: Toward a New Paradigm in Expressive Writing" (2013). In K. Adams (ed) Expressive Writing: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Pennebaker, J.W. (2013). Writing to Heal. Denver: Center for Journal Therapy.

Thompson, K. Therapeutic Journal Writing: An Introduction for Professionals  (2014). London: Jessica Kingsey.

THERAPEUTIC USE OF SAND MINIATURES - AN OVERVIEW 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Harriet S. Friedman, MA, MFT, CST-T/STA/ISST
Betty Jackson, CST-T, LSW

Objectives:

1. List 2 or more benefits of using miniature figures in experiential activities in clinical practice with people of all ages. 
2. Describe 3 or more differences between sandtray therapies and Jungian Sandplay therapy, as developed by Dora M. Kalff.
3. Identify 3 or more archetypal figures or symbols that typically occur in sandtray images/sequences and describe their use in treatment.
4. Identify 2 or more ways to recognize the healing process in a sandplay case.
5. Name 2 or more ways that the sandplay technique facilitates and supports the developmental stages in children and adults.
6. Describe 1 way that the sandplay process can deepen the analytic process.

Friedman, H.S. & Mitchell, R.R. (2008). Supervision of Sandplay therapy. New York, NY Rutledge Press.

Mitchell, R.R., & Friedman, H.S. (1994).  Sandplay: Past, Present, and Future.  London: Routledge Press.

Weinrib, E. (1983).  Images of the self.  Boston, MA: Sigo Press.

 









THURSDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

EXPLORING SEXUALITY & GENDER IDENTITY AS ASPECTS OF SPIRITUALITY: PSYCHODRAMA WITH LGBTQ CLIENTS 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development)
Paul Lesnik, LCSW, ASW, TEP

Objectives:

1. Identify 2 or more philosophical underpinnings of psychodrama as they pertain to the exploration of sexuality and gender identity in counseling and psychotherapy.
2. List 2 or more ways that sexuality, gender expression, and/or identity can be linked to spirituality.
3. Describe 2 or more psychodrama techniques that can be used in individual or group settings to explore and enhance acceptance of sexuality, gender identity, and gender expression.

Blatner, A. (2000). Foundations of Psychodrama: History, Theory, and Practice, Fourth Edition. Springer Publishing. 

Gershoni, J.  (2003). "Toward Acceptance and Pride: Psychodrama, Sociometry and the LGBT community." 197-214. Psychodrama in the 21st Century: Clinical and Educational Applications, Springer Publishing.

Winters, Natalie.  (2000). "The Psychospiritual in Psychodrama: A Fourth Role Category." The International Journal of Action Methods, Vol. 52, (2).

DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS: ASSESSMENT, ALLIANCES & ANGER ISSUES 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Assessment)
Anne Mills, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT

Objectives:

1. List 1 or more benefits of focusing on pacing and containment in the clinical process.
2. Name at least 1 evidence-based finding of distinctive characteristics of Diagnostic Drawing Series created by people diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder.
3. Identify 2 main ways trauma survivors express anger, aggression, and rage.

Mills, A. (2009). Teaching affect tolerance to anger-avoidant trauma survivors: An art therapy-based approach using The Anger Protocol. Alexandria, VA:  Guild Press.

Mills, A.  (2011).  "Therapist’s Page:  Adjunctive Therapy."  In Many Voices (Ed. Lynn Waznak), April. p. 6 – 7. Available at http://www.manyvoicespress.org/backissues-pdf/2011_04.p

Mills, A., & Cohen, B. M.  (1993).  "Facilitating the identification of multiple personality disorder through art:  The Diagnostic Drawing Series."  In E. Kluft (Ed.), Expressive and functional therapies in the treatment of multiple personality disorder.  Springfield:  Charles C Thomas.

ECO-ART THERAPY: GROUNDING CLINICAL PRACTICE IN NATURE
(Wellness and Prevention; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ellen Speert, ATR-BC, REAT

Objectives:

1. List 3 or more earth-centric metaphors that can be used in creative work in counseling, arts therapies, and psychotherapy.
2. Describe how to gather 3 or more natural elements with which to make meaningful creative responses for use in clinical situations and settings.
3. Identify how to integrate 2 or more expressive arts processes to deepen connection to the natural world in daily life and in therapy.

Biermann, H. (2013). The Stehekin kite project and the practice of eco-art therapy.  Proceedings,  American Art Therapy Association, Seattle, 2013.

Gage, D. & Speert, E. (1995). Collaborating with artists: Individual and communal healing. Proceedings, American Art Therapy Association, San Diego, 1995.

Roszak, T. (1993). Awakening the ecological unconscious. In Context, 34, 48-51.

EMOTIONAL REGULATION & CONNECTION THROUGH MOVEMENT FOR FAMILIES: A NEUROSCIENCE-INFORMED PROCESS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Lori Baudino, PsyD, BC-DMT

Objectives Forthcoming

Black, J. E., Isaacs, K. R., Anderson, B. J., Alcantara, A. A., and Greenough, W. T. (1990). Learning causes synaptogenesis, whereas motor activity causes angiogenesis, in cerebellar cortex of adult rats. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A 87, 5568–5572. doi: 10.1073/pnas.87.14.5568

Hänggi, J., Koeneke, S., Bezzola, L., and Jäncke, L. (2010). Structural neuroplasticity in the sensorimotor network of professional female ballet dancers. Hum. Brain Mapp. 31, 1196–1206. doi: 10.1002/hbm.20928

Siegel, DJ, & Bryson, TP. (2011). The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. Delacorte Press - Publisher.  

EXPLORING THE SACRED THROUGH ART PSYCHOTHERAPY

(Human Growth and Development)
Debra Linesch, PhD, MFT, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify 1 or more ways that counselors, arts therapists, and others can engage with sacred practices that have clinical relevance.
2. Describe 3 or more processes that can help engagement in contemplative processes within the therapy context that are otherwise typically associated with religious practices.
3. Describe 3 or more ways that spiritual concepts and practices can inform clinical interventions in mental health practice.

Linesch, D. (2017). Imagery in interfaith dialogue: Informed by the practices of art psychotherapy. The Arts in Psychotherapy 53, 23-27.

Linesch, D. (2014). Clinical art therapy and Hebrew calligraphy: An integration of practices. Journal of Clinical Art Therapy, 2 (1).

Linesch, D. (2008.) Panim el Panim: Facing Genesis Visual Midrash. Los Angeles CA: Mary Mount Institute Press.

MANIFESTING THE ME: THE POWER OF IMAGERY AND POETRY IN MECARDS™
(Clinical Interventions, Ethics that Contribute to Professional Practice; Human Growth and Development)
Nancy Weiss, BCD, LCSW

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 basic strengths of the MeCards process as it pertains to working in clinical settings with children.
2. Describe 1 or more differences between the way to process MeCards4Kids® with children as compared with adults.
3. Identify at least 2 ethical considerations in using this expressive arts therapy method with minors.

Weiss, N. and Raphael, J. (2013). How to Make MeCards4Kids: Creative Expression for Children and Grownups in Their Lives. Hanford Mead Publishers Inc.

Frost, S. (2010). SoulCollage Evolving: An Intuitive Collage Process for Self-Discovery and Community. Hanford Mead Publishers Inc.

Lewis, R. (2010). Taking Flight Standing Still. Touchstone Center Publications.

PAINTING, PROSE & POSITIVE NEUROPLASTICITY: THE RESILIENCE TRIAD
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lisa Mitchell, MFT, ATR, LPC

Objectives:

1.  Identify 3 or more essential components of a resource building art/write activity.
2. Describe 1 or more art/write activities that can enhance resilience and well-being.
3. List 4 or more writing prompts that promote positive neuroplasticity and can be effectively integrated into counseling and psychotherapy work.

Hanson, R. (2013). Hardwiring Happiness. New York: Random House.

Graham, L. (2013). Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Maximum Resilience and Well-Being. California: New World Library.

Armstrong, Courtney (2015). The Therapeutic 'Aha': 10 Strategies for Getting Your Client Unstuck. New York: Norton and Company.

PAPER PUPPETS & HEALING NARRATIVES FOR ELICITING STRENGTHS AND RESILIENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lani A. Gerity, DA, ATR
Susan Ainlay Anand, ATR-BC, ATCS

Objectives:

1. Define at least 3 factors that encourage a positive sense of self and pro-social feelings.
2. List at least 3 ways that focusing on stories of resilience in treatment can enhance feelings of well-being in a variety of clinical and educational populations.
3. Describe at least 3 resilience-focused strategies that can be easily implemented with clinical and educational populations of various ages and abilities in a variety of settings.

Figley, C. R. (2002). Treating compassion fatigue. New York: Routledge

Griffith, J. L. & Griffith, M. E. (2002) Encountering the Sacred in Psychotherapy.  New York: Guilford Press.

Kretzmann, J. and McKnight, J. (1993)  Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets,  Evanston, IL: Institute for Policy Research.






THURSDAY AFTERNOON SESSIONS

THERAPEUTIC SONGWRITING WITH AT-RISK YOUTH: COMPOSITIONS FOR LIFE
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Cynthia A. Briggs, MM, PsyD, MT-BC
Stephanie Holly, MMT, MT-BC
Brian Owens
Ryan Eversole, MT-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 or more music-based strategies that address the needs, concerns, and issues for working with youth who have experienced urban trauma.
2. Describe 2 or more ways to build rapport with urban adolescents in a music therapy session using music to bridge racial difference.
3. List 1 or more of the positive aspects of performance response in adolescents working in a music therapy session.

Baker, F.A. (2013). "Front and center stage: Participants performing songs created during music therapy." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 40 (1), 20-28.  

Baker, F.A.(2015). Therapeutic songwriting: developments in theory, methods, and practice. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.

McFerran, K.(2010). Adolescents, music and music therapy: methods and techniques for clinicians, educators and students. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

EMBRACING THE SEXUAL SELF: TRANSFORMING NEGATIVE SEXUAL SCRIPTS THROUGH DRAMA THERAPY
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Jennifer Stuckert-Knapp, RDT, LMFT

Objectives:

1. Describe 1 or more drama therapy/expressive arts techniques for use in adult sexual history assessment.
2. Describe 1 or more drama therapy techniques for use in the identification of negative sexual cognitions and/or inhibitory sexual scripts.
3. Explain 1 or more drama therapy techniques for use in increasing mindfulness and pleasure.

Nagoski, E. (2015). Come as you are: The surprising new science that will transform your sex life. New York: Simon and Schuster.  

Janssen, E. (Ed). (2007). The psychophysiology of sex. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Maltz, W. (2001). The sexual healing journey: A guide for survivors of sexual abuse. New York: HarperCollins.

MAKING MESSY ART: THE POWER OF PAINT AND COLLAGE FOR ALL AGES, ABILITIES & SETTINGS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Elizabeth Youngs, MA, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Identify 5 or more messy art experiences suitable for both individual and group settings with clients of all ages and abilities.
2. List 3 or more sensory art materials that can be effectively used in messy art making tasks in clinical and other settings.
3. Describe 2 or more findings from recent research on brain development that indicate why sensory art activities are effective in helping to access suppressed memories in traumatized people.

Hinz, Lisa (2010). "Expressive Therapies Continuum: A Framework for Using Art in Therapy." Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 5: 221-225, 2010 
 
Lusebrink, Vija (2012) "The Expressive Therapies Continuum." International Journal of Art Therapy, Volume 18, 2013 - Issue 2, Pages 75-85. 
 
Gardner, Howard (1984) Art Mind & Brain, A Cognitive Approach to Art Therapy, Basic Books.

 

TREATING GRIEF & LOSS IN 3 STEPS: A MULTIMODAL ARTS MODEL FOR ALL AGES
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Trisha Jauchler, MS, MA, RDT-BCT, CBF

Objectives:

1. Describe 3 or more ways that creative arts modalities can be effective in the treatment of grief and loss.
2. Identify 2 or more current theories of grief and loss, and their application in group treatment settings for the bereaved.
3. Explain 3 or more reasons why mindfulness and presence are key concepts for clinicians treating the bereaved.

Kubler-Ross, Elisabeth & Kessler, David.  On Grief & Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss.

Worden, J. William.  Grief Counseling and Grief Therapy: A Handbook for the Mental Health Practitioner.

Zamora, Fran & Leutenberg, Ester.  GriefWork: Healing from Loss.

CREATIVITY & NEUROPLASTICITY IN THE TREATMENT OF ANXIETY DISORDERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Pamela M. Hayes, MFT, ATR-BC

Objectives:

1. Describe 2 or more ways that the creative process interacts with neurology to promote change and healing in the treatment of one of the anxiety disorders.
2. Identify 2 or more specific arts-based interventions for moving treatment forward when working with clients who have an anxiety disorder.
3. List 3 anxiety-related obstacles that can affect the capacity for growth and happiness.

Rappaport, L. (2013) Focused-Based Art Therapy: Assessing the Body’s Wisdom and Creative Intelligence. London. Jessica Kingsley Publishing.

Catalani, P (2015) Art Therapy: The Science of Happiness.

Star, K (2017). Treating Anxiety With Art Therapy: Non-traditional treatment options may help manage anxiety symptoms. VeryWell.com. Retrieved from URL: https://www.verywell.com/art-therapy-for-anxiety-2584282

ALIGNING DANCE THERAPY PARADIGMS FOR ENHANCED INSIGHT: MOVING TOWARD TRANSFORMATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Marcia B. Leventhal, PhD, CMA, BC-DMT

Objectives:

1. Define and distinguish 2 dance therapy paradigms from each other: The Newtonian Paradigm and The Quantum Paradigm.
2. List at least 3 primary factors that enable the dance therapist to develop a therapeutic relationship in her clinical work.
3.Identify 2 or more functional and / or pedestrian movements basic to the Newtonian paradigm in dance therapy.

Bohn, D. (1980) Wholeness and the Implicate Order. London; Routledge & Kegan Paul

Hunt, V. (1995) Infinite Mind: The science of Human Vibrations. Malibu, CA: Malibu Publishing Co.

Leventhal, M. (2008) "Transformation and Healing Through Dance Therapy; The Challenge and Imperative of Holding the Vision." AJDT 30: 4-23. Springer Publishing Company. Republished in unabridged version 2013 Moving On, DTAA Volume 11, Numbers 1 a 2: 43-60.

CROSS-CULTURAL CREATIVITY EMPATHY: MULTIMEDIA EXPERIENTIALS INSPIRED BY ART THERAPY IN MEXICO
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Einat Metzl, PhD, ATR-BC, CST, LMFT
Ana Laura Treviño Santos

Objectives:

1. Describe 3 clinical benefits of practicing cross-cultural art therapy with adolescents and adults.
2. List 3 ways that expressive media, symbolic communication, and art techniques can be used to communicate creative empathy and connect people despite cultural differences and prejudices.
3. Identify how creative empathy can be employed in clinical work with 2 clients from different countries/cultures of origin.

Linesch, D, Metzl, E. S. & Treviño, AL (2016). "Various Aspects of Art Therapy in Mexico/Algunos Aspectos de la Terapia de Arte en México." The Wiley Handbook of Art Therapy, 745-752.

Tucker, N. , Treviño, A. L. (2011). "An Art Therapy Domestic Violence Prevention Group in Mexico." Journal of Clinical Art Therapy, 1(1), 16-24, retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/jcat/vol1/iss1/7

Linesch, D., Ojeda, A., Fuster, M. E., Moreno, S., & Solis, G. (2014). "Art therapy and experiences of acculturation and immigration." Art Therapy, 31(3), 126-132.

SELF-REGULATION FOR AT-RISK CHILDREN THROUGH FIVE-SENSES LEARNING & NATURE-BASED PLAY
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Blair Paley, PhD
Jolie Delja, MS
Clare Gorospe

Objectives:

1.  List 2 or more SEEDS Program techniques for promoting self-regulation in at-risk children through Five-Senses and nature-based play.
2. Identify 1 or more best practices for utilizing Five-Senses and nature-based learning activities and play to promote positive parent-child interactions.
3. Describe 2 or more nature and art-based activities that are suited for working the children and families in clinical practice.

Gerry, D., Unrau, A., Trainor, L.J.  (2012).  "Active music classes in infancy enhance musical, communicative and social development."  Developmental Science, 15, 398-407.

Pears, K. C., Kim, H. K., Healey, C., Yoerger, K., & Fisher, P. A. (2015). "Improving child self-regulation and parenting in families of pre-kindergarten children with developmental disabilities and behavioral difficulties." Prevention Science, 16, 222-232.

Strife, S., & Downey, L.  (2009).  "Childhood development and access to nature:  A new direction for environmental inequality research."  Organization and Environment, 22, 99-122.

DISRUPTING DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIORS WITH COMPASSION & ART THERAPY
(Human Growth and Development)
Suzanne Silverstein, MA, ATR
Genia Young, ATR-BC, LMFT

Objectives:

1. Learn 2 mindfulness approaches that students can utilize when dealing with anxiety, or disruptive behavior.
2. Learn 1 art therapy technique for students to utilize as a means of self-expression.
3. Learn 2 community building circle time activities for both elementary and secondary students.

Jameson, Ella. "Is Mindfulness the Secret Behind Better Health & Making Kids Behave?" Retrieved from https://mindfulnessinschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Mindfulness-the-Secret-Behind-Better-Health.pdf

Feigenberg, L. F., & Ribic, S. (2017). "The State of Kindness According to Kids: Caring, Compassion, and Empathy in the Next Generation." Highlights Magazine. Retrieved from https://www.highlights.com/sites/default/files/public/sotk17_report_final.pdf.

Lorain, Peter. (2012). Handling Disruptive Students: A Delicate Dance for Any Teacher. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/tools/handling-disruptive-students.html.

 








THURSDAY EVENING SESSIONS

STRESSBUSTING: WRITING THROUGH TROUBLED TIMES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathleen (Kay) Adams, PTR-M/S, LPC

Objectives:

1. Identify 1 or more ways that expressive writing can be used for improved stress management. 
2. Participate in 5 linked writing processes designed to identify, explore, and shift a specific stress response.  
3. Implement 2 or more writing interventions as stress management devices for use with clients, students, and groups.

 

Adams, Kathleen, Ed. 2013. Expressive Writing: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

Bolton, Gillie, Kate Thompson and Victoria Field, Eds. 2006. Writing Works. London: Jessica Kingsley.

 

Pennebaker, James W. 2013 . Writing to Heal: A Guided Journal for Writing about Trauma and Emotional Upheaval. Wheat Ridge CO: Center for Journal Therapy.


AUTO-REGULATION AND PLAY THERAPY INTERVENTIONS: HEALING THE BODY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more movement patterns, gestures or non-verbal cues that play therapists and others can view as an indication of a  child’s psychological experience.
2. Identify 3 or more embodied play therapy techniques for working with trauma-related symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults.
3. List 2 or more play therapy strategies to improve affect regulation and foster resilience in people with complex trauma.

 

Elias, C. L., & Berk, L. E. (2002). "Self-regulation in young children: Is there a role for sociodramatic play?" Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 17(2), 216-238.

 

Berk, L. E., Mann, T. D., & Ogan, A. T. (2006). "Make-believe play: Wellspring for development of self-regulation." Play = learning: How play motivates and enhances children’s cognitive and social-emotional growth, 74-100. 

 

Whitebread, D., Coltman, P., Jameson, H., & Lander, R. (2009). "Play, cognition and self-regulation: What exactly are children learning when they learn through play?" Educational and Child Psychology, 26(2), 40.

 

DANCING MINDFULNESS: A CELEBRATION OF SELF-CARE & WELLNESS
(Wellness and Prevention)
Jamie Marich, PhD, REAT, RMT, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS
 
Objectives:
 
1.  Explain the practice of Dancing Mindfulness and its relationship to the expressive arts therapies.
2. Name 2 or more ways to integrate Dancing Mindfulness practices into clinical work with adolescents and adults.
3. List 3 elements of Dancing Mindfulness practice and explain how incorporating them into counseling and psychotherapy can enhance healing from the impact of trauma.

 

 

Caldwell, C.  (2014).  "Mindfulness and bodyfulness: A new paradigm."  The Journal of Contemplative Inquiry, 1(1), 77-96.                 
 
Marich, J. (2015). Dancing Mindfulness: A creative path to healing and transformation. Woodstock, VT: SkyLight Paths Press.
 
Marich, J. & Howell, T. (2015). "Dancing Mindfulness: A phenomenological investigation of the emerging practice." Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 11(5), 346-356.)

 

SOLUTIONS FOCUSED THERAPY & IMPROVISATION: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR YOUTH IN GROUPS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Group Dynamics in Counseling)
Sarah Young-Sheppard, MSW
Suelen Yancor, LCSW
Camille Ameen

1. Explain at least 3 of the assumptions when using SFBT and how it frames the work.
2. Describe at least 2 key techniques unique to SFBT and give specific examples of how they could be used in working with youth.
3. Describe at least 2 ways in which improvisational enactment may enhance choice making in SFBT.
 
 
 
Tohn, S.L., & Oshlag, J.A. (2012).   Crossing the bridge: Integrating solution focused therapy into clinical practice. Sudbury, MA: Solutions Press.

 

Franklin, C., Trepper, T.S., Gingerich, W.J., McCollium, E.E. (Eds.). (2012).   Solution-focused brief therapy: A handbook of evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, Inc.

 

Zucker, M., Spinazzola, J., Alley Pollack, A., Pepe, L., Barry, S., Zhang, L., van der Kolk, B. (2010), "Getting Teachers in on the Act: Evaluation of a Theater- and Classroom-Based Youth Violence Prevention Program."  Journal of School Violence, 9:117-135.

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