Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2018

FRIDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Neil Improv


MASTER CLASSES & INTENSIVES

FINDING REST IN THE MIDST OF STRESS: MIND-BODY APPROACHES
(Wellness and Prevention; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Carolyn Braddock, MA
Helen G. Dolas, MS, MT-BC

Objectives:
 
1.  Identify 3 or more ways that breath, sound, and movement can be used in treatment, educational, and other settings to quickly calm the nervous system. 
2. List 2 or more benefits of using guided imagery/ sensory imagination for facilitating relaxation in treatment, educational, and other settings.
3. Describe 1 or more types of relaxation-inducing voice/sound that can be made to facilitate stress management in clinical work and elsewhere with people of all ages.
4. Identify 1 or more ways to clarify and evaluate stress/traumatic responses before it accumulates.
5. List 2 or more simple techniques involving breath, sound, and/or Tai Ji and Qi Gong-based movement to unwind stress immediately.
6. Describe 2 or more acupressure techniques for stress relief that can be used for self-management of symptoms.

Braddock, C. (1995). Body Voices: Using the Power of Breath, Sound and Movement to Heal and Create New Boundaries. PageMill Press.

Al Huang, C. (2011). Embrace Tiger, Return to Mountain: The Essence of Tai Ji. Singing Dragon.

Berry, C.R. (1996). Coming Home to Your Body: 365 Simple Ways to Nourish Yourself Inside and Out. PageMill Press.

FACILITATING DRUM CIRCLES: A MASTER CLASS FOR CLINICIANS & EDUCATORS
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
John Fitzgerald
Helen G. Dolas, MS, MT-BC
Daniel A. Walsh, MS, MT-BC

Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least one major concept of drum circle facilitation that can provide structure for working with clients in group or individual treatment.  
2. Describe 2 or more basic rhythm facilitation techniques that clients themselves can facilitate, to strengthen confidence, self-expression, positive-risk taking, and leadership skills.  
3. Identify 2 or more ways to adapt facilitation techniques to different populations. 
4. State 2 or more ways that drum circles can reduce stress. 
5. Explain 2 or more ways that drum circles can be used to build empathy and community. 
6. Describe 2 or more drum circle activities that can increase focus and attention.

Bittman BB, Berk LS, Felten DL, Westengard J, Simonton OD, Pappas J, Ninehouser M. (2001). "Composite Effects of Group Drumming Music Therapy on Modulation of Neuroendocrine-Immune Parameters in Normal Subjects," Journal of Alternative Therapy.  Jan, 2001.  p. 38-47.
 
Bittman MD, Karl T. Bruhn, Christine Stevens, MSW, MT-BC, James Westengard, Paul O Umbach, MA. (2003) "Recreational Music-Making: A Cost-Effective Group Interdisciplinary Strategy for Reducing Burnout and Improving Mood States in Long-Term Care Workers," Advances in Mind-Body Medicine.  Fall/Winter, 2003. p.4-15. 
 
Bittman et al. (2004). "Recreational Music-Making: An Integrative Group Intervention for Reducing Burnout and Improving Mood States in First Year Associate Degree Nursing Students: Insights and Economic Impact."  International Journal of Nursing Education and Scholarship. Vol. 1 Article 12.

 

 
PUPPET MAKING & STORYTELLING: FOSTERING STRENGTHS, RESILIENCE & INCLUSIVITY IN GROUP WORK
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lani A. Gerity, DA, ATR
Susan Ainlay Anand, ATR-BC, ATCS
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define at least 3 factors that foster a positive sense of community with a variety of traumatized and stressed populations during uncertain times. 
2. List at least 3 techniques featuring working with stories in the art room to
build community and support integration in a variety of traumatized, oppressed, and/or displaced groups of all ages. 
3. Describe at least 3 resilience-focused strategies that can be implemented within any group art therapy practice to promote emotional and community integration.
 
Figley, C. R. (2002). Treating compassion fatigue. New York: Routledge 
 
Griffith, J. L. & Griffith, M. E. (2002) Encountering the Sacred in Psychotherapy.  New York: Guilford Press. 
 
Kretzmann, J. and McKnight, J. (1993)  Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets,  Evanston, IL: Institute for Policy Research.
 
TRAUMA-INFORMED MOVEMENT PRACTICES: A CONTINUUM OF APPROACHES
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Amber Elizabeth Gray, MPH, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, LPCC
 
Objectives Forthcoming
 
SOCIAL EMOTIONAL ARTS ON A SHOESTRING FOR INDIVIDUALS & GROUPS IN ALL SETTINGS - DAY 2
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Kathy Cass, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, C-IAYT, AHC
Erica Curtis, ATR-BC, LMFT
Vanya Green, MA, MT-BC, LPCC
Myriam Savage, PhD, RDT-BCT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Based on day two's curriculum, state one effective way to establish rapport when offering an arts activity to someone for the first time.
2. For each of the two art forms learned today, identify one way to facilitate engagement of reluctant participants.
3. Describe how one activity learned on day two can be adapted to accommodate cognitive or physical limitations and group participation.
4. Give two examples of how other art forms can be integrated into a specific activity learned on day two.
5. Identify at least two ways to talk nonjudgmentally about art in order to encourage engagement and dialogue.
6. Describe at least two important guidelines in choosing music for a client.
 
Puetz TW, Morley CA, and Herring MP.  "Effects of creative arts therapies on psychological symptoms and quality of life in patients with cancer."  JAMA Internal Medicine. 2013; 173(11):960-969.
 
Uttley L, Scope A, Stevenson M, Rawdin A, Taylor Buck E, Sutton A, et al. "Systematic review and economic modelling of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of art therapy among people with non-psychotic mental health disorders." Health Technology Assessment, 2015;19(18).
 
Nilsson U.  "The anxiety- and pain-reducing effects of music interventions: a systematic review". AORN Journal, 2008; 87(4):780-807.
 
DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-Based Practices; Research)
Kathryn Johnson, PhD, ATR

Objectives:
1. List the required materials for administering a DDS for assessment and research. 
2. State the 3 directives for administering a DDS for assessment and research.  
3. Name 5 or more structural characteristics from the DDS Drawing Analysis Form used in rating DDS Series.  
4. Identify 3 or more features of scientific research that are part of the 30-year international study of the DDS.  
5. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations.
6. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice. 
7. List 3 graphic elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
8. List 3 graphic elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with depression that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
9. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed as bipolar-manic phase hat distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
10. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with borderline personality disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
11. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
12. List 3 elements from the graphic profile of research subjects diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder that distinguishes them from research subjects with other diagnoses.
 
Mills, A., Cohen, B. M., & Meneses, J. Z. (1993). "Reliability and validity tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 20(1), 83-88. 
 
Betts, D. (2013). "Art therapy assessments with diverse populations: The Diagnostic Drawing Series" (addressed by Cohen, Mills, and Ichiki). In P. Howie, S. Prasad, & J. Kristel (Eds)., Using art therapy with diverse populations: Crossing cultures and abilities (pp. 46-47). London: Jessica Kingsley. 
 
Mills, A. (2003) "The Diagnostic Drawing Series." In C. Malchiodi (Ed.), Handbook of Art Therapy, pp. 401-109. New York: Guilford.











FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

MANAGING CYBERBULLYING, SEXTING & OTHER DIGITAL DANGERS THROUGH PLAY THERAPY
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Leslie Baker, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, RPT-S, LMFT

Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more psychological dangers from sexting, porn viewing, and cyberbullying impacting youth and their families that will manifest in play therapy and other types of clinical treatment. 
2. Describe and discuss 2 or more strategies that play and arts therapists can employ to assist parents/caregivers toward developing a healthy relationship with technology for children and teens. 
3. Describe how to apply 1 or more family play therapy/creative arts-based assessment techniques for identifying unhealthy technology use by youth and their families.
 
D’Antona, R., Kevokian, M., & Russom, A. (2010). "Sexting, Texting, Cyberbullying & Keeping Youth Safe Online." Journal of Social Sciences (1549652), 6 (4) 521-526. 
 
Hansen, E. (2011). "The Child as Pornographer." South Atlantic Quarterly, 110 (3), 673-692. doi:10.1215/00382876-1275833 
 
Hinduja, S., & Patchin, J. W. (2008). "Cyberbullying: An Exploratory Analysis of Factors Related to Offending and Victimization." Deviant Behavior, 29(2), 129-156. doi:10.1080/01639620701457816
 
POETRY FOR ALL POPULATIONS & SETTINGS: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR GROWTH & TRANSFORMATION
(Human Growth and Development)
Robert Carroll, MD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more ways that expressive use of language can be used to facilitate healing, growth and transformation in individuals, groups, families and community. 
2. Clarify 1 or more ways that sensory input can be used to make experience more “real” in treatment. 
3. Describe 2 or more writing and reading activities that can be used in counseling or psychotherapy with individuals, families, groups and community.
 
Robert Carroll, Amazing Change: The Wisdom Illness, Death and Dying Provides. Bombshelter Press 2009 
 
Robert S. Carroll, "Finding the Words to Say it: The Healing Power of Poetry," eCAM, Summer, 2005; Oxford University Press. 
 
Robert S. Carroll, Jack Coulehan, Kykosa Kajangu, "Wisdom Poetry Trialogue," Journal of Poetry Therapy, v.19:4, pp.195-227, Dec. 2006.
 
CREATIVE COMPOSING FOR NON-TRADITIONAL LEARNERS OF ALL AGES: SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL THEMES & TECHNOLOGY
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Lisa A. Crawford, MA, PhD
Kate Richards Geller, MA, MT-BC, LCAT
 
Objectives:
 
1, List 2 or more social-emotional themes that can be addressed in composition-related group activities. 
2. List 1 or more ideas related to self followed by organization and discussion of ideas considered. 
3. State 3 or more social-emotional feelings that can be addressed while composing in therapeutic groups.
 
Crawford, L., Cho, E., Ilari, B. (2018).  Chapter 5: "Singing and elders: A framework of interrelated factors found through life experience learning." AIRS
 
Crawford, L. (2016). Composing in groups: Creative processes of third and fifth grade students. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. 
 
Ilari, B., Chen-Hafteck, L., & Crawford, L. (2013). "Singing and cultural understanding:  A music education perspective."  International Journal of Music Education, 31(2), 202-216.
 
MANAGING BIG FEELINGS & BEHAVIORS IN KIDS THROUGH THE ARTS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Erica Curtis, ATR-BC, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1.  List 3 or more reasons that creative arts techniques are more effective than traditional approaches when working with children who present with challenging behaviors. 
2. Explain 2 or more arts-based approaches to containing and debriefing a common challenging behavior exhibited by a child or adolescent. 
3. Develop an intervention plan featuring 2 or more arts-based interventions for promoting creative problem solving in young people who exhibit challenging behaviors.
 
Bethune, S. (2014). "Teen Stress Rivals that of Adults." American Psychological Association, 45(4): 20. 
 
Rosal, M., McCulloch-Vislisel, S., and S. Neece. (1997). "Keeping Students in School: An Art Therapy Program to Benefit Ninth-Grade Students." Art Therapy, 14(1): 30-36. 
 
Stewart-Brown, S., Fletcher, L., and M. E. J. Wadsworth. (2005). "Parent–Child Relationships and Health Problems in Adulthood in Three UK National Birth Cohort Studies." European Journal of Public Health, 15(6): 640–646.
 
MINDFUL CLAY TECHNIQUES FOR COMPASSIONATE CLINICAL PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Michael A. Franklin, PhD, ATR-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name the 3 applied methods of imaginal mindfulness.  
2. Clarify the differences between empathy and empathic clinical methods.  
3. Describe 3 empathic skills for forming attuned resonant responses when working with challenging clients in treatment.
 
Bollas, C. (1987). The shadow of the object: Psychoanalysis of the unthought known. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. 
 
Franklin, M. (1999) "Becoming a student of oneself: Activating the witness in meditation and super-vision." American Journal of Art Therapy, 38(1), 2-13. 
 
Franklin, M.A. (2012). "Know thyself: Awakening self-referential awareness through art-based research." Journal of Applied Arts and Health: Special Issue on Art-Based Research: Opportunities & Challenges 3 (1), 87-96.
 
PLAY AS ARCHETYPE & AGENT OF TRANSFORMATIONAL CHANGE
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Lorraine R. Freedle, PhD, ABPdN, LCSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more ways that working with Jungian archetypes can promote psychological change in treatment through play therapy, counseling, and the expressive arts. 
2. Identify 2 or more play therapy methods associated with each of the four functional domains of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT). 
3. Describe 3 or more goals from your personal 'Play Inventory' for enhancing productivity, clinical effectiveness, creativity and/or life satisfaction through play and play therapy.
 
Brown, S. (2009).  Play:  How it shapes the brain, opens the imagination, and invigorates the soul.  New York:  Penguin Group. 
 
Freedle, L. R. (2017).  "Healing trauma through sandplay therapy:  A neuropsychological perspective."  In B. Turner, (Ed.), (pp. 190- 206).  The Routledge International Handbook of Sandplay Therapy, New York:  Routledge. 
 
Gaskill, R. L. & Perry, B. (2013). "The neurobiological power of play using the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics to guide play in the healing process." In C. Malchiodi & D. A. Crenshaw (Eds.), (pp. 178-196).  Creative arts and play therapy for attachment problems, New York: Guilford.
 
EXPANDING THE CAPACITY FOR JOY, GRATITUDE & AWE THROUGH DRAMA THERAPY
(Human Growth and Development)
Bonnie Harnden, MA, RDT
 
Objectives:
 
1.  Identify 3 or more findings embodying recent research on awe and gratitude through drama therapy. 
2. Describe 2 or more ways to harness the power of awe and gratitude to foster resilience among clients in clinical practice. 
3. List 1 or more practical tools to use with clients to help them build more resilient nervous systems.
 
Harnden, B. (2014). "You arrive: Trauma performed and transformed." In N. Sajnani & D. R. Johnson (Eds.), Trauma-informed drama therapy: Transforming clinics, classrooms, and communities (pp. 122-151). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. 
 
Fredrickson, B.L., Cohn, M.A., Coffey, K.A., Pek, J., & Finkel, S.M. (2008). "Open Hearts Build Lives: Positive Emotions, Induced Through Loving-Kindness Meditation, Build Consequential Personal Resources." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95(5), 1045–1062. doi:10.1037/a0013262 
 
Paul K. Piff, Pia Dietze, Matthew Feinberg, Daniel M. Stancato, Dacher Keltner. "Awe, the small self, and prosocial behavior." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2015; 108 (6): 883 DOI: 10.1037/pspi0000018
 
TRANSFORMING UNSETTLING NEWS & IMAGES: EXPRESSIVE ARTS FOR EMPOWERMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lisa Herman, PhD, MFT, REAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more conceptual framework of liminal space and the practical application of the arts as an entry into this space. 
2. Identify the social issue that is most affecting the therapist and how to manage personal emotions as they affect our clients. 
3. List 3 or more lessons learned from engaging a social issue through dwelling with a disturbing image about a social issue and making art.
 
2017: "Playing with Auschwitz: a liminal inquiry into evil." In E.G. Levine & S. K Levine (Eds.), New developments in expressive arts therapy: The play of poeisis. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 
 
2015:  "Review: Attunement in the Expressive Arts – Towards An Understanding of Embodied Empathy." M. Kossak. Charles C. Thomas Publishers Ltd. In Journal of Applied Arts and Health: Springfield, Ill.  
 
2015: "Transpersonal Space/Time Through the Arts." International Journal of Transpersonal Studies. Volume 34.
 
DIVERSITY: A CREATIVE COLLECTIVE EXCHANGE
(Client Populations and Multicultural Competence; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Denise Boston, PhD, RDT
Maria Gonzalez-Blue, MA, REAT, REACE
Diana Elizabeth Jordan, MFA/OTA
Rahul Sharma, PsyD
Shelly Tochluk, PhD
 
1. State 2 ways to apply arts-based and diversity-focused practices to your work.
2. Discuss at least 2 benefits of culturally responsive strategies to imagine and actualize meaningful art experiences.
3. Explain at least 2 ways to utilize the arts to facilitate social cohesion and social inclusion. 
Hocoy, D. (2005). "Art Therapy and Social Action: A Transpersonal Framework." Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, (22)1, pp. 7-16.  
Talwar, S. (2014). Social Justice Art: A Framework for Activist. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.  
Tochlock, S. (2008). Witnessing Whiteness: First Step Towards an Antiracist Practice and Culture. Lanam, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Education. 
 
OPIOID ADDICTION & CREATIVE HEALING:  COACHING THROUGH STIGMA & CHRONIC RELAPSE TO RECOVERY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lisa Hope, ATR-BC, LADC, LCAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define 2 or more individualized methods for helping addicted clients maintain hope throughout the stages of chronic relapse. 
2. Define 3 or more recovery tools that can be used to combat recidivism and promote relapse prevention. 
3. Define 2 or more creative art experientials that strengthen recovery for individuals with substance use disorders
 
Gorski, T. (2007)  The Gorski-Cenaps Model for Recovery and Relapse Prevention: A Comprehensive Overview of a Research-Based System that Works 
 
Gorski, T. (2009)  Passages through recovery: An action plan for preventing relapse 
 
Chopra, N. & Marasa, L. (2017) "The opioid epidemic-Challenges of sustained remission."  International Journal of Psychiatry
 
EXPRESSIVE ARTS & PLAY THERAPY FOR CHILDREN ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM: MUSIC, MOVEMENT & ART
(Human Growth and Development)
Jane Ferris Richardson, EdD, ATR-BC, RPT, RPT-S, LMHC
Joanne Lara, MA, CTC, MSEd

Objectives:
 
1. List 3 ways of engaging autistic children and “different learners” more deeply through art and play therapy approaches. 
2. Describe 2 or more reasons why the sensory properties of art and sand therapy materials are especially significant for children with learning differences in play therapy treatment.  
3. Identify 3 or more tangible benefits of integrating therapeutic music activities into play therapy treatment and other clinical work with autistic children and “different learners” to improve their clinical progress.
 
Gallo, L. & Rubin, L. C. (2017). Play-based interventions for children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders. New York, Routledge. 
 
Wan, C. Y., Demaine, K., Zipse, L., Norton, A., & Schlaug, G. (2010). "From music making to speaking: engaging the mirror neuron system in autism." Brain Research Bulletin, 82(3), 161-168. 15. 
 
McGarry, L. & Russo, F. (2011). "Mirroring in Dance/Movement Therapy: Potential mechanisms behind empathy enhancement." The Arts In Psychotherapy, 38(3), 178-184.

 








FRIDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

PONGO POETRY PROJECT:  WRITING AS HEALING FOR VULNERABLE POPULATIONS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Richard Gold, MA

Objectives:
1. Clarify 3 or more benefits of poetry in helping vulnerable populations to process trauma for the first time, in a way that promotes self-understanding, builds self-esteem, and provides ongoing support. 
2. Explain 4 or more approaches to writing that provide the emotional and structural support to enable a client to learn a creative process for the first time. 
3. Describe 2 or more specific techniques that can be used to facilitate healing poetry by traumatized individuals who might have great difficulty expressing themselves, and who might have never received treatment, previously.
 
Gold, R. (2014). Writing with At-Risk Youth: The Pongo Teen Writing Method. Rowman & Littlefield Education. 
 
Gold, R. (2018). "Grief, Poetry, and the Sweet Unexpected." Death Studies
 
Gold, R. (2013). Expressive Writing with Teens At Risk. Expressive Writing: Foundations of Practice (edited K. Adams, Rowman & Littlefield Education). 
 
BRIDGING THE COMMUNICATION BARRIER: TECHNIQUES FOR USE WITH NON-VERBAL CLIENTS
(Cross-disciplinary Offerings from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Peggy A. Farlow, MAE, MT-BC

Objectives:
1.  Articulate 2 or more alternate systems that can be used for communicating with non-verbal clients in treatment. 
2. List 1 or more techniques based on direct selection, scanning, and encoding that can be used to communicate with predominantly non-verbal clients of various ages. 
3. Describe a customized communication approach that integrates symbols, language boards, and other systems to enable non-verbal clients to communicate more effectively.
 
Graham, J. (2004). Communicating with the Uncommunicative: Music Therapy with Pre-verbal Adults. British Journal of Learning Disabilities. 
 
Mitchell, W., Franklin A., Greco, V. & Bell. M. (2009). Working with Children with Learning Disabilities and/or Communicate Non-verbally: Research Experiences and their Implications for Social Work Education, Increased Participation and Social Inclusion. The Board of Social Work Education. 
 
Pennington, L., Goldbart, J. & Marshal, J. (2005). "Direct Speech and Language Therapy for Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from a Systematic Review." Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology.
 
EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & VIOLENCE PREVENTION FOR MULTICULTURAL YOUTH: AN EMBODIED APPROACH
(Wellness and Prevention)
Genevieve Dunn, MA, R-DMT
Whitney Bush, MA, R-DMT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 4 or more embodied learning techniques for creating a healthy learning environment, preventing violence in schools and day care programs, and working toward psycho-educational goals in therapy. 
2. Explain 2 or more embodied techniques that can help to decrease anger outbursts, over-arousal, and prejudicial attitudes. 
3. Identify 3 or more breath and movement-based mindfulness techniques that can be used in violence prevention and anger management in treatment.
 
Crime and violence in our schools – an overview of the statistics. (1996) Washington, D.C.: United States National Institute on Justice. 
 
Dusenbury, L., Falco, M., Lake, A., Brannigan, R., & Bosworth, K., (1997) "Nine Critical Elements of Promising violence prevention programs." Journal of School Health, December, 67 (10), 409-414. 
 
Hervey, L., & Kornblum, R. (2006). "An evaluation of Kornblum’s body-based violence prevention curriculum for children." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 33(2), 113–129.
 
EXPLORING ANCESTRAL & CULTURAL LANDSCAPES THROUGH MOVEMENT, STORYTELLING & ART
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Betsy Funk, LCSW, LIMHP, MPA, REAT
Topaz Weis, REACE
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 1 or more goals for exploring a client's cultural roots in the clinical setting. 
2. Define 2 or more aspects of working with cultural ancestry in treatment that can contribute to the client's sense of personal fulfillment and development. 
3. List 3 or more creative arts techniques that can be used to explore cultural and spiritual heritage in treatment.
 
Levin, E; Levin, Stephen; Labaron, M. (2011) Art in Action, Expressive Arts Therapy and Social Change.  
 
Halprin, D. (2003) The Expressive Body in Life, Art and Therapy
 
Roth, G. (1997) Sweat your Prayers; The Five Rhythms of Your Soul.
 
CREATIVE RITUALS FOR PROCESSING GRIEF & CELEBRATING LIFE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Gabrielle Kaufman, MA, LPCC, BC-DMT, NCC
Jennie Linthorst, MA, CAPF
Karen Howard, RMT, CEAP
 
1. State 2 benefits of using music for processing grief.
2. Describe the process of using literature to inspire writing from the soul.
3. Explain 2 ways to use movement to access memories.

Chavis, G. G. and Weisberger, L. L. (2003) The Healing Fountain: Poetry Therapy For Life’s Journey. St. Cloud, MN: North Star Press.

James, J. W., & Friedman, R. (2009). The Grief Recovery Handbook, 20th Anniversary Expanded Edition: The Action Program for Moving Beyond Death, Divorce, and Other Losses including Health, Career, and Faith. Harper Collins. 

Hickman, M. W. (2016). Healing after loss: Daily meditations for working through grief. New York, NY: William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins. 

COMEDY IMPROV THERAPY GROUP & CBT FOR WORKING WITH SOCIAL ANXIETY ISSUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Neal King, LCSW

Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 basic principles of comedy improv techniques needed to facilitate a group specific to Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).  
2. Describe how to incorporate the 4 necessary elements specific to comedy improv into group therapy.  
3. Explain 1 or more ways—and when to—incorporate CBT into the group experience to address co-existing challenges such as low self-confidence, low self-image and fear of failure in group members.
 
Norton, P. (2012).  Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Anxiety: A Transdiagnostic Treatment Manual.  The Guilford Press. 
 
Wiener, D. (1994).  Rehearsals for Growth: Theater Improvisation for Psychotherapists.  W. W. Norton & Company. 
 
Wiener, J. (2003).  Action Therapy with Families and Groups: Using Creative Arts Improvisation in Clinical Practice. American Psychological Association.
 
A NEUROSEQUENTIAL ART APPROACH FOR WORKING WITH KIDS
(Human Growth and Development; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 6-8 art and play therapy interventions that follow the Neurosequential Model. 
2. Identify 6 -8 stages of art development that will help play therapist structure age-appropriate creative play interventions. 
3. Name 4 benefits of using bilateral scribbling in trauma-focused play therapy.
 
Chapman, L. (2014). Neurobiologically informed trauma therapy with children and adolescents: Understanding mechanisms of change. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. 
 
King, J. (2016). Art therapy, trauma and neuroscience. NewYork: Routledge. 
 
Perry, B. (2009). “Examining child maltreatment through the neurodevelopmental lense: Clinical application of the neurosequential model of therapeutics.” Journal of Loss and Trauma.14:240-255, DOI: 10.1080/15325020903004350. Routledge.
 
INTEGRATING SOMATIC & SENSORY THERAPIES WITH PLAY FOR TREATING COMPLEX TRAUMA ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S

Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more movement patterns, gestures or non-verbal cues that play therapists and others can view as an indication of a child’s psychological experience. 
2. Identify 3 or more embodied play therapy techniques for working with trauma-related symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults. 
3. List 2 or more integrative play therapy strategies to improve affect regulation and foster resilience in people with complex trauma.
 
Ogden, P., & Fisher, J. (2015). Sensorimotor psychotherapy: Interventions for trauma and attachment. WW Norton & Company. 
 
Courtois, C. A., & Ford, J. D. (Eds.). (2009). Treating complex traumatic stress disorders: An evidence-based guide. Guilford Press. 
 
Langmuir, J. I., Kirsh, S. G., & Classen, C. C. (2012). "A pilot study of body-oriented group psychotherapy: Adapting sensorimotor psychotherapy for the group treatment of trauma." Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 4(2), 214. 
 
ROLE WORK FOR ADDICTION: HEALING THE EFFECTS OF TRAUMA, SHAME & REGRET
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment
Danielle Levanas, MA, RDT, LCAT

Objectives:
 
1. Identify 1 or more clinically unhealthy roles that emerge in the identity of people living with addiction. 
2. Describe at least 3 role types from Landy’s Role Theory taxonomy. 
3. Explain 2 or more techniques that can be used to introduce the concept of role work with clients in treatment.
 
Landy, R. (2009), "Role theory and the role method of drama therapy," in D. R. Johnson and R. Emunah (eds), Current Approaches in Drama Therapy, Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, pp. 65?88.  
 
Reiter, M. D. (2015), Substance Abuse and the Family, New York: Routledge. 
 
Bailey, S. (2009), "Recovering identity and stimulating growth through drama therapy," in S. Brooke (ed.), The Use of Creative Therapies with Chemical Dependency Issues, 1st ed., Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, pp. 204?17.
 
GROUP SANDPLAY FOR COUPLES & GROUPS OF ALL AGES
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Gita Morena, PhD, CST-T, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 1 or more ways to introduce symbolic imagery as a way to deepen couple and group therapy interactions. 
2. Describe 1 or more ways to work with expressions of unconscious material to enhance treatment in group/couple communications. 
3. Explain 2 or more differences between interpretive and non-interpretive approaches to group sandplay work.
 
Morena, Gita. (2005). "Language of imagery, language of connection," Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 14 (2).
 
Morena, Gita. (2006). "Using symbolic language with couples and groups." Chapter in Living the tides of Uncertainty.
 
Steinhardt, Lenore. (2004). "Relationship in large group experiential sandplay training." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 13 (2).
 
MAKING MESSY ART: THE POWER OF PAINT AND COLLAGE FOR ALL AGES, ABILITIES & SETTINGS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Anna Reyner, ATR, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 5 or more messy art experiences suitable for both individual and group settings with clients of all ages and abilities. 
2. List 3 or more sensory art materials that can be effectively used in messy art making tasks in clinical and other settings. 
3. Describe 2 or more findings from recent research on brain development that indicate why sensory art activities are effective in helping to access suppressed memories in traumatized people.

Hinz, Lisa (2010). "Expressive Therapies Continuum: A Framework for Using Art in Therapy." Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 5: 221-225, 2010 
 
Lusebrink, Vija (2012) "The Expressive Therapies Continuum." International Journal of Art Therapy, Volume 18, 2013 - Issue 2, Pages 75-85. 
 
Gardner, Howard (1984) Art Mind & Brain, A Cognitive Approach to Art Therapy, Basic Books.

 

IMAGE AND IMAGINATION IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Linney Wix, PhD, ATR-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. List and describe 4 of archetypal psychology's 'gadgets' as ways to work precisely with images in therapy. 
2. List 2 practices used by archetypal art therapists to facilitate the deepening of client awareness and insight regarding psychological content contained in the imagery. 
3. Describe 2 differences between particularizing and symbolizing an image in imaginal/archetypal art therapy practices.
 
Abbenante, J., & Wix, L. (2015). "Archetypal art therapy." In D. Gussak & M. Rosal (Eds.), The Wiley handbook of art therapy (pp. 37-46). New York, NY: Wiley-Blackwell.  
 
Hillman, J. (1978). Further notes on images. Spring: An Annual of Archetypal Psychology and Jungian Thought. Dallas, TX: Spring. 
 
Sells, B. (Ed.). (2000). Working with images: The theoretical base of Archetypal Psychology. Woodstock, CT: Spring.

 









FRIDAY PLENARY & LUNCH SESSIONS

TRIAL, ERROR & JOY IN LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
(Cross-Disciplinary Offerings from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Robert Duke, PhD 

Objectives: 

1. Identify 3 instructional goals that require learners to generate multiple versions of assigned tasks. 
2. Define the role of error-making in the development of creativity. 
3. List 1 or more steps in the process of how error-making enhances memory. 

Duke, R. A. (2009). Intelligent music teaching: Essays on the core principles of effective instruction. Austin, TX: Learning and Behavior Resources.  

Duke, R. A., & Byo, J. L. (2008). The habits of musicianship: A radical approach to beginning band. Austin, TX: Center for Music Learning. Retrieved from http://cml.music.utexas.edu/Habits/HabitsOpener.htm  

Metcalfe, J. (2017). "Learning from Errors." Annual Review of Psychology, 68(1), 465–489. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-010416-044022 

ART AS CONTEMPLATIVE PRACTICE: EXPRESSIVE PATHWAYS TO THE SELF
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Michael A. Franklin, PhD, ATR-BC 

Objectives: 

1. Identify 3 connections between art and yoga as they relate to contemplative practice and therapy.  
2. Name 3 connections between art and meditation as they relate to the practice of art therapy.
3. List 3 ways that visual art relates to contemplative practice.  

Franklin, M. A. (2017). Art as contemplative practice: Expressive pathways to the Self. Albany New York. SUNY Press.  

Franklin, M. A. (2016). "Contemplative approaches to art therapy: Incorporating Hindu-Yoga-Tantra and Buddhist wisdom traditions in clinical and studio practice." In Rubin, J. A. (ed). Approaches to Art Therapy (pp. 308-329). New York: Routledge.  F

ranklin, M. A. (2016). "Essence and art: A contemplative - transpersonal view of art therapy." In Gussak, D. E. and Rosal, M. L. (eds.). The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Art Therapy (pp. 99-111). Chichester, West Sussex UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 

ATCB AND PROFESSIONAL ART THERAPY CREDENTIALING: WHAT’S NEW, WHAT’S OLD & WHAT’S NEXT
(Career Development; Professional Issues)
Ruth Xilomen Rios, MFA, ATR-BC, LMFT 

Objectives: 

1. List 4 professional credentials that are available to art therapists. 
2. Identify 2 resources for accessing information about ATCB credentials. 
3. Describe 1 or more new developments regarding the ATCB Exam. 



FRIDAY EVENING SESSIONS

QUICK COLLAGES FOR CLIENTS OF ALL AGES: PIECING TOGETHER POSSIBILITIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Josie Abbenante, ATR-BC, LPAT
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 2 ways to use Quick Collage techniques in therapy with clients of all ages in psychotherapy and counseling.
2. Practice 2 methods of writing in response to a Quick Collage to enhance treatment objectives with clients in therapy.
3. Describe 3 ways to use Quick Collage techniques to further specific goals in clinical work with clients of all ages.
 
Harrison, H, and Grasdal, P. (2003).  Collage for the soul: Expressing hopes and dreams through art.  Gloucester, MA: Rockport Publishers,  p. 7.
 
Hillman, J. (1977). "Inquiry into image." Spring: An Annual of Archetypal Psychology and Jungian Thought, pp. 62-88. Zurich: Spring.  

Whiting, L. (2008).  Living into art: Journeys through collage.  Paper Lantern: Boyes Hot Springs, CA. 

VISUAL ART JOURNALING TO MANAGE TRAUMATIC STRESS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Art Therapy and Media)
Lani A. Gerity, DA, ATR
Susan Anand, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPAT

Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more therapeutic benefits of an art journal practice for managing traumatic stress. 
2. Identify 3 ways that therapists can adapt art journaling into their clinical practices. 
3. List 3 clinical populations for whom creating an art journal would provide therapeutic benefits.
 
Cohen, Barry M., Barnes, Mary-Michola & Rankin, Anita B. (1995). Managing Traumatic Stress through Art. Lutherville, MD: The Sidran Press.

Jacobs, J., Lorig, S., McCall, A. (2015). Chill and Spill Leader's Companion: Art with Heart Curriculum.  Seattle, WA : Art with Heart Press
.
 
SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE ARTS IN HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONER: A CRASH COURSE
(Research and Program Evaluation, Career Development)
Robyn Flaum Cruz, PhD, BC-DMT, LPC
Lora Wilson Mau, MA, BC-DMT

 

Objectives:
 
1. Describe how to search for and evaluate online research sources and resources. 
2. Identify 3 best practices to efficiently and strategically use social media platforms to promote research in arts in healthcare and creative arts therapies. 
3. Define the essential role of reciprocity in social media networking.
 
Cruz, R. F., (2016). "Dance/movement therapy and developments in empirical research: The first 50 years." American Journal of Dance Therapy. doi:10.1007/s10465-016-9224-2 
 
Mau, L. W., & Giordano-Adams, A. (2016). "Social media and dance/movement therapy: Reciprocity, collaboration, and relationship." Journal of American Dance Therapy Association, 38 (2), p. 378-406. 
 
Mollett, A., Bromley, C., Gilson, C., & Williams, S. (2017). Communicating your research with social media. Los Angeles, CA: Sage.
 
RIBBON, CORD, TWINE, & STRING: WEAVING THREAD ARTS INTO PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Betty Jackson, CST-T, LSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more myths or fairy tales from different cultures that use thread, cord, or string to symbolize human life and destiny.  
2. Facilitate 3 therapeutic thread arts exercises in individual or group psychotherapy practice.  
3. Apply 3 or more therapeutic Thread Arts exercises to psychotherapy practice with clients who have experienced trauma or loss.
 
Siegeltuch, M. (2010). The thread spirit -the symbolism of knotting and the fiber arts. 1: 1-21. 
 
Siegel, D.J. (2003). Healing trauma - attachment, mind, body, and brain
 
Badenoch, B. (2008). Being a brain-wise therapist.
 
AESTHETIC EMPATHY IN THE ART AND TEACHING OF FRIEDL DICKER-BRANDEIS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Linney Wix, PhD, ATR-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 2 characteristics of aesthetic empathy. 
2. Describe the role of the named characteristics in therapeutic art experiences. 
3. Name 2 benefits of FDB’s art teaching approach for therapeutic and educational practice.
 
Dutlinger, A., Ed.  (2001). Art, music, and education as strategies for survival: Theresienstadt
 1941-45. New York: Herodias.
 
Wix, L. (2010). Through a narrow window: Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and her Terezín students.
 Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press.
 
Wix, L. (2009). "Aesthetic Empathy in Teaching Art to Children: The Work of Friedl Dicker-Brandeis" in Terezin, Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association 26 n. 4: 152-158

 




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