Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2018

SATURDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Ryzman - Jamerson sm


MASTER CLASSES

TAMING THE BULLY WITHIN THROUGH INNER FAMILY HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Lucia Capacchione, ATR, REAT, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify the Aware Ego and 4 sub-personalities that make up the Inner Family. 
2. Describe 4 expressive arts modalities for accessing and dialoging with the Inner Child and Inner Parent sub-personalities. 
3. Define the role of the Aware ego, Witness and Higher Power in Inner Family Work. 
4. Identify 4 journal writing and drawing techniques for accessing and expressing emotions.
5. List 4 ground rules for assuring emotional safety in journal keeping.    
6. Identify 5 expressive arts therapy techniques for supporting inner child healing.
 
Capacchione, L. (1981) Recovery of Your Inner Child, Simon & Schuster, NY, NY.
 
RHYTHMIC ATTUNEMENT: ATTACHMENT, EMBODIED EMPATHY & INTERPERSONAL NEUROBIOLOGY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Mitchell Kossak, PhD, REAT, LMHC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Clarify 3 important skills in identifying and gaining practical applications of rhythmic attunement in treatment. 
2. Define 3 ways to apply rhythmic attunement to clinical work. 
3. Explain 3 theoretical underpinnings in working with rhythm to help to promote individual and community resonance and relationship, thereby promoting  balance within ourselves, our clients, and among group members. 
4. State how to utilize 4 different art mediums toward establishing attuned states of connectivity. 
5. Describe 3 ways that the nervous system is affected by interpersonal neurobiology. 
6. Clarify 3 ways attunement and attachment relates to expressive arts clinical practice.
 
Kossak, M. (2015).  Attunement in expressive arts therapy: Toward an understanding of embodied empathy.  Springfield, Ill:  Charles Thomas Ltd. 
 
Kossak, M. (2008). Attunement and Free Jazz. Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy. Retrieved from http://www.voices.no/mainissues/mi40008000271.php  
 
Erskine, R. (1998). "Attunement and involvement: Therapeutic responses to relational needs." International Journal of Psychotherapy, 3(3), 235-244.
 
THE WIZARDRY OF OZ:  CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF BAUM'S CLASSIC FAIRY TALE FOR HEALING TRAUMA
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Gita Morena, PhD, CST-T, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more expressive art skills that can be used therapeutically with traumatized children and adults to amplify healing metaphors in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
2. Identify 3 or more phases from the archetypal theme of Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey that appear in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and relate to the therapeutic treatment of traumatized adults. 
3. Describe 1 or more active imagination or ritual that can be used in a therapeutic group setting to address issues of post-traumatic stress. 
4. Describe 3 or more symbolic images that appear in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
5. Describe the term the individuation and how it manifests in sandplay therapy. 
6. Identify 1 or more examples of how unconscious material appears in expressive art and sandplay therapy interventions.
 
Morena, Gita Dorothy. (2000) The Wisdom of Oz: Reflections of a Jungian Sandplay Therapist, Frog, Ltd, Berkeley, California. 
 
Morena, Gita. (1994). "Beyond the Rainbow." Journal of Sandplay Therapy , 4(1). 
 
Morena, Gita Dorothy. (2015). "The Baum Legacy: Dorothy’s Journey as a Metaphor for Spiritual Awakening." The Baum Bugle. 59 (2).
 
EMOTIONAL RENAISSANCE: ENHANCING AFFECTIVE EXPERIENCE & DEVELOPMENT
(Human Growth and Development)
Brant Wadsworth, PhD, RDT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more physiological patterns associated with basic emotions that are relevant to the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. 
2. Evaluate 2 or more personal paradigms regarding emotions and healing in treatment.
3. Identify 3 or more applications of Emotional Renaissance or Rocky Mountain Alba Emoting work in clinical settings with people of various ages. 
4. Define 3 therapeutic benefits of bottom-up affective processing and expression. 
5. Identify 2 diagnostic applications of Emotional Renaissance or Rocky Mountain Alba Emoting in clinical settings.  
6. Describe 2 paradigms within the research of emotion and affect that influence clinical practice. 
 
Panksepp, J. (2009). "Brain emotional systems and qualities of mental life: From animal models of affect to implications for psychotherapeutics." In D. Fosha, D. J. Siegel & M. F. Solomon (Eds.), The healing power of emotion: Affective neuroscience, development & clinical practice. (pp. 1-26). New York, NY US: W W Norton & Co. 
 
Bloch, S. (1993). "Alba Emoting: A psychophysiological technique to help actors create and control real emotions." Theatre Topics, 3(2), 121-138. doi: 10.1353/tt.2010.0017 
 
Wadsworth, Brant P., "Rocky Mountain Alba Emoting Training for Creative Arts Therapists" (2015). Expressive Therapies Dissertations. 12. http://digitalcommons.lesley.edu/expressive_dissertations/12



SATURDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

SUICIDE PREVENTION & RISK ASSESSMENT WITH YOUTH: WHAT THERAPISTS NEED TO KNOW
Leslie Baker, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, RPT-S, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more warning signs to identify potential suicidal behavior in children and teens in play therapy settings. 
2. List 3 or more protective factors that may reduce the risk of suicidal behavior in children and teens working in play therapy. 
3. Describe and apply 2 or more play therapy based interventions to reduce suicidal thoughts/ideation and/or suicidal behaviors in children and teens.
 
TRANSFORMATION OF FAILURE & SELF-BLAME: TECHNIQUES FROM THEATER OF THE OPPRESSED
(Human Growth and Development)
Brent Blair, PhD
Mady Schutzman, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 3 cognitive limitations associated with a perception of having failed at a particular task, goal, or life objective. 
2. Describe and practice two techniques (embodied and narrative) to assist clients in converting "failure narratives" into tools of resilience. 
3. State a minimum of 3 therapeutic actions that can be achieved with clients using drama therapy narratives.
 
FACILITATING SENSATION, EMOTION & TRANSFORMATION THROUGH ART THERAPY THEORY: A CRASH COURSE
Michael A. Franklin, PhD, ATR-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 practical contemplative methods for working with countertransference in treatment.
2. Name and define 3 approaches to meditation that support clinical work. 
3. Name and apply 3 contemplative approaches for counselors and therapists coping with stressors to avoid burnout in their clinical work.
 
Franklin, M.; Rothaus, M.; Schpock, K. (2005). "Unity in diversity: Communal pluralism in the art studio and the classroom." In Kaplan, F. (Ed.), Art therapy and social action: Treating the world’s wounds. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 
BRIDGING SPIRITUAL CONCEPTS WITH CLINICAL APPROACHES: PERSON-CENTERED EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPY
(Human Growth and Development)
Maria Gonzalez-Blue, MA, REAT, REACE
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe the Person-Centered approach as it pertains to expressive arts work in therapy.
2. List 2 or more of Natalie Rogers' Creative Connection multimodal process approaches.
3. Explain 3 or more way to incorporate spiritual elements in therapeutic process with individuals and groups toward strengthening the whole client.
 
Interview with Maria Gonzalez-Blue http://www.psychotherapy.net/interview/expressive-arts-therapy 
 
Interview with Natalie Rogers https://www.psychotherapy.net/article/expressive-art-therapy
 
CLINICAL AND CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS IN COUPLE AND FAMILY ART THERAPY
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Janice Hoshino, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more systemic frameworks in working with couples and families in create arts therapy. 
2. Identify 3 or more creative art therapy techniques in working with couples and families.
3. Evaluate 3 or more multicultural frameworks with various presenting issues that couples and families bring to the clinical setting. 
 
Kerr, Hoshino, Sutherland, Parashak, and McCarley. (2008) Family Art Therapy: Foundations of Theory of Practice. New York: Routledge Chapter: 2) The Development of Family Therapy and Family Art Therapy (Hoshino) Chapter 5) Structural Family Art Therapy Chapter 9) Narrative Art Therapy within a Multicultural Framework
 
MANDALA SYMBOLISM IN SANDPLAY AND ART
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jill Kaplan, MA, MFT, CST-T
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define the meaning of “mandala” in art and culture and describe its potential significance in clinical work. 
2. Identify the significance of the appearance of a mandala in sandplay process. 
3. List 3 or more art activities that can be used incorporating mandala symbolism in creative arts activities and sandplay process work, applicable to all ages and abilities in individual or group treatment settings.
 
Jung, C.G. (1972) Mandala symbolism. Bollingen: Princeton 
 
Ruth Ammann, (1991). Healing and Transformation in Sandpay. Open Court: La Salle, IL.
 
Edinger, E. (1992). Ego and Archetype. Shambhala: Boston.
 
TOUCH DRAWING: AUTHENTIC, SOULFUL EXPRESSION IN CLINICAL & CREATIVE PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship
Shemaya Blauer, MSW, LCSW
Deborah Koff-Chapin
 
Objectives:
 
1. List the 4 essential art materials and the 5 steps to creating a series of Touch Drawings for use in clinician self-care.  
2. Describe 3 properties of Touch Drawing that make it particularly effective for therapist self-care.  
3. Define and apply 3 ways of using Touch Drawing as a method for the practitioner to transition between client sessions.
 
Fisher, P. & Anderson, K. (2002). When working hurts: Stress, burnout and trauma in human, emergency, and health services. Victoria, BC: Spectrum Press.
 
CONSTRUCTING BALINESE BASKETS FOR COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY & HARMONY
(Wellness and Prevention)
Denise Malis, PhD, MFA, ATR-BC, LMHC
Kelly Reedy, MEd, MA, AThR
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more methods that adapt natural materials into objects of enhanced attachment to be utilized in the practitioner’s clinical practice. 
2. Describe 3 or more ways to amplify the therapeutic relationship through the incorporation of meaningful objects into the therapeutic holding space. 
3. Evaluate 1 or more ways to incorporate the metaphor of the basket into clinical treatment, symbolically interweaving the individual and community.
 
Camic, P. M., Brooker, J., & Neal, A. (2011). "Found objects in clinical practice: Preliminary evidence."  Arts in Psychotherapy, 38(3), 151-159. 
 
Chan, S. M., Kalmanowitz, D., & Potash, J. S.  (2012).  Art therapy in Asia: To the bone or wrapped in silk. London, England: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.  
 
Mulitalo-Lauta, P.T., & Menon, K.  (2006).  "Art therapy and Pacific Island peoples in New Zealand: A preliminary observation and evaluation from a Pacific Island perspective."  Social Work Review, 18(1), 22-30.
 
THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF MUSIC-FACILITATED IMAGERY: THE BONNY METHOD
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Sherry Raley, PhD, FAMI, MT-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Explain the neurological basis for the therapeutic efficacy of imagery. 
2. Describe 2 or more ways that neurobiology facilitates stimulation of imagery through music.
3. Identify 2 or more types of ‘shifts’ in imagery and describe how they relate to a client's clinical symptoms and/or issues.
 
Alluri, V., Toiviainen, P., Burunat, I., Bogert, B., Numminen, J., & Kliuchko, M. (2015). "Musical expertise modulated functional connectivity of limbic regions during continuous music listening." Psychomusicology: Music, mind, & brain, 25(4), 443-454. 
 
Hemming, J., & Merrill, J. (2015). "On the distinction between involuntary musical imagery, musical hallucinxsis, and musical hallucinations." Psychomusicology: Music, mind, & brain, 25(4), 435-442. 
 
Lusebrink, V. (2014). "Art therapy and the neural basis of imagery: Another possible view." Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 31(2), 87-90.
 
CULTIVATING EMOTIONAL RESILIENCY IN KIDS THROUGH MINDFULNESS, MEDITATION & IMAGINATION
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Charlotte Reznick, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 1 relevant research study in the field of mindfulness, meditation, and imagination with children and adolescents. 
2. List 3 physical /psychological instances wherein mindfulness, meditation, and imagination ares appropriate as therapeutic tools for working with children and adolescents in treatment.
3. Describe 3 'steps' in mindfulness
 
Reznick, C. (2009). The Power of Your Child's Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success. Penguin/Perigee, New York, NY. 
 
Reznick, C. (2016). Imagery as a Therapeutic Tool for Children. Transformative Imagery: Cultivating the Imagination for Healing, Change, and Growth. 149-161. Jessica Kingsley, Philadelphia, PA. 
 
Olness, K. and Kohen, D. (1996). Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy with Children. Guilfred Press, New York, NY.
 
EXPRESSIVE WRITING AS REFLECTIVE PRACTICE FOR CLIENTS AND THEIR THERAPISTS
Kate Thompson, MA, CJT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define 3 or more forms of self-reflective writing that can be used in therapeutic practice, as well as for self-supervision by clinicians, in different settings 
2. List 4 or more different expressive writing techniques that can be employed for enhancing self-reflection in treatment. 
3. Describe 5 or more clinical situations or settings where different expressive writing techniques could be employed to enhance self-reflection and promote healing.
 
MOVEMENT-BASED TOOLS FOR ENHANCING CLINICAL ACUMEN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jody Wager, MS, BC-DMT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more movement techniques that promote ‘presence' in the psychotherapy process. 
2. List 1 or more instances of utilizing kinesthetic empathy as a means of better understanding and gathering information about your clients toward enhancing treatment. 
3. Identify 2 or more ‘new' methods of grounding and centering taught in this workshop that can enhance embodied work in treatment.
 
Duros, P. & Crowley, D., (2014). "The body comes to therapy too." Clinical Social Work Journal, 42, (237-246).
 
REVITALIZING ELDER CARE THROUGH MUSIC & COMMUNITY: TAKING THE TIRED OUT OF RETIRED
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Becky Wellman, PhD, MT-BC, LPMT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more challenges older adults face in the current healthcare environment.
2. Describe 2 or more interventions for easing the distress of chronic or degenerative disorders.
3. List 3 or more approaches described in this workshop that caregivers and clinicians can integrate into their work with older adults.
 
Johnson, G., Otto, D., Clair, A. A. (2001). "The effect of instrumental and vocal music on adherence to physical rehabilitation exercise program with persons who are elderly." Journal of Music Therapy, 38(2), 82-96. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1093/jmt/38.2.82 
 
Takahashi, T., & Matsushita, H. (2006). "Long-term effects of music therapy on elderly with Moderate/Severe dementia." Journal of Music Therapy, 43(4), 317-33. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/223549934?accountid=41057 
 
Verrusio, W., Andreozzi, P., Marigliano, B., Renzi, A., Gianturco, V., Pecci, M. T., . . . Gueli, N. (2014). "Exercise training and music therapy in elderly with depressive syndrome: A pilot study." Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 22(4), 614-20. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2014.05.012
 


SATURDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS


MUSIC TOGETHER®: A WORLDWIDE PROGRAM FOR FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Carol Ann Blank, PhD, MT-BC, LCAT, LPC
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more strategies for identifying a child’s music developmental level for facilitating progress in treatment. 
2. Explain 2 or more strategies for creating a musically-focused therapy experience for children and their parents/adult caregivers. 
3. Describe 4 or more creative arts-based post-stressful event interventions to address issues including: children’s speech, executive functioning, attention, sensory integration, and social skills.
 
Hasler, J. (2017). "Healing rhythms: Music therapy for attachment and trauma." In A,. Hendry & J. Hasler (Eds.), Creative therapies for complex trauma: Helping children and families in foster care, kindship care, or adoption (135-153). Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.  
 
Jacobsen, S. L., & Thompson, G. (Eds.). (2017). Music Therapy with Families: Therapeutic Approaches and Theoretical Perspectives. Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 
 
Kern, P. (2010). "Evidence-based practice in early childhood music therapy: A decision-making process." Music Therapy Perspectives 28(2), 116-123.
 
BRINGING PSYCHIATRIC CARE TO LIFE: THE RECOVERY CENTERED CLINICAL SYSTEM
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Stephen Breithaupt, MS, RDT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Explain Yalom’s concept of the importance of working in the “Here and now” in regard to short term psychiatric acute intervention. 
2. Identify the 5 conversations of the RCCS and list at least 1 intervention based on these.
3. List 2 or more ways that passive/routine and active psychiatric rehabilitation differ.
 
Dunne, P., & Rand, H. (2006). Narradrama: Integrating Drama Therapy, Narrative, and the Creative Arts. Los Angeles, CA: The Dama Therapy Institute of Los Angeles.  
 
Yalom, I. D. (1983). Inpatient group psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books. 
 
Wilson, S (2006) Recovery Centered Clinical System: Version #02, 2010. Alameda, Ca: Telecare Corp.
 
DRUM CIRCLE DIALOGUES: FOSTERING MULTICULTURAL COMPETENCY & RESPECT
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Rahul Sharma, PsyD


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more areas for exploration in examining one's own 'growing edge' around diversity work. 
2. List 3 or more techniques involving drumming and dialogue that can enhance expressive group facilitation skills. 
3. Evaluate 3 or more best practices in addressing the complex issues of diversity and social justice in a therapeutic group setting.
 
Resounding Afro Asia: Interracial Music and the Politics of Collaboration (2016), Oxford University Press (book chapter entitled 'Articulating Interracial Space: Funkadesi's 'One Family'.


American Multicultural Studies: Diversity of Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Sexuality (2013) (book chapter entitled 'Multicultural Rhythms:  Musical and Racial Harmony”)


Patel, A.D. (2012). "Language, music, and the brain: a resource-sharing framework." In: P. Rebuschat, M. Rohrmeier, J. Hawkins, & I. Cross (Eds.), Language and Music as Cognitive Systems (pp. 204-223). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 
CULTURALLY-INFORMED CLINICAL PRACTICE: A NARRATIVE APPROACH WITH AFRICAN AMERICANS

Denise Boston, PhD, RDT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more benefits of addressing trauma with African Americans by using the Tree of Life technique. 
2. List 3 or more steps for integrating an African-centered approach in order to facilitate a Tree of Life workshop/therapeutic session  
3. Identify at least 2 that Tree of Life interventions can be implemented in addressing trauma with African American clients and families.
 
DeGruy, J. (2005).  Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and healing. Portland, OR: Joy Degruy Publications.  
 
Denborough, D. (2008). Tree of Life. Dulwich Centre website: http://dulwichcentre.com.au   
 
Rowe, D. M., & Webb-Msemaji, F. (2004). "African-centered psychology in the community." In R. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology (4th ed.; pp. 701-721). Hampton, VA: Cobb & Henry. University system.
 
STRENGTH-BASED TECHNIQUES INTEGRATING NARRADRAMA, CREATIVE ARTS & PHOTOTHERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Pam Dunne, PhD, RDT, BCT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Explain 5 or more benefits of working with positive emotions in clinical treatment that have been substantiated by research. 
2. List 3 or more relevant findings from neuroscience research on the integration of strength-based work and positive emotions. 
3. Describe 4 or more clinical interventions integrating narradrama, the creative arts, and phototherapy to use with adolescent and adult clients and groups.
 
Beaudoin. M.N. and Duvall, J. (2017) Collaborative Therapy and Neurobiology: Evolving Practices in Action. New York and London, Routledge 
 
Fredrickson, B.L. (2009). Positivity. Crown Publishers 
 
Dunne, P. Narradrama: Integrating Drama therapy, Narrative and the Creative Arts: Second Edition (2006). Los Angeles: Possibilities Press.
 
POSTCARDS FROM THE SELF: DEVELOPING ARTS-BASED EXPERIENTIALS FOR ALL AGES
Karen Estrella, PhD, REAT, ATR-BC, MT-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more experiential exercises using postcards that can be applied to treatment of clients in community mental health settings and other clinical settings. 
2. List 2 or more factors regarding cultural context when using materials in the expressive arts-based therapeutic relationship.  
3. Describe at least 3 developmental considerations in selecting materials for arts-based experientials in clinical practice.
 
Hinz, L. D. (2009). Expressive therapies continuum: A framework for using art in therapy. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. 
 
Malchiodi, C. A. (2012). "Expressive arts therapy and multimodal approaches." In Handbook of art therapy (2nd ed.) (pp. 130-146).  New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.  
 
Moon, C. H. (2010). Materials & media in art therapy: Critical understandings of diverse artistic vocabularies. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
SCHOOL-BASED EXPRESSIVE ARTS: MULTIMODAL GROUPS FOR GROWTH & CHANGE
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Betsy Funk, LCSW, LIMHP, MPA, REAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more expressive arts-based activities to promote growth for groups of children in the schools setting.
2. Describe 2 or more evaluation techniques for measuring school-based group effectiveness.
3. Identify 3 or more creative arts approaches that can be used effectively with elementary and middle school-aged youth.
 
K Frostig, M Essex (1998) Expressive Arts Therapies in Schools, A Supervison and Program Development Guide. ERIC.108 
 
N Rabkin, R Redmond (2006) "The Arts Make A Difference." Journal of Arts, Management, Law, and Society. 36. 1. 25-32. 
 
MR Jalongo. (1990) "The Childs Right to the Expressive Arts." Journal of Creative Behavior. 27. 9-17.
 
DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS: THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS FOR ADOLESCENTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jeffrey Jamerson, MA, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define the basic theory of the expressive remix therapy model and name 2 or more in which it can be used as an adjunct to treatment and work with young people. 
2. Identify 3 to 5 digital media resources that can be used in therapeutic interventions in clinical, educational, and other settings.  
3. Name 3 or more ways that expressive remix activities can be used to enhance therapeutic, educational, and creative work with adolescents and others.
 
Barron, B., Gomez, K., Pinkard, N., & Martin, C. (2014). The digital youth network: Cultivating digital media citizenship in urban communities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
 
LABYRINTH WALKING AND LABYRINTH SYMBOLISM TO SUPPORT EXPRESSIVE ARTS EXPERIENCES
Kathryn (Kat) Kirby, ATR-BC
Chantel Zimmerman
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more aspects of a labyrinth as the form pertains to the healing arts. 
2. Explain 2 or more ways that the labyrinth can be used by counselors, psychotherapists, and others as a supportive tool for their clients.  
3. Identify at least 3 practical expressive arts-based activities that can be done using the labyrinth in treatment with people of all ages and abilities.
 
Sandor, M. Kay, PhD, RN. (2005)." The Labyrinth: a Walking Meditation for Healing and Self-Care." Explore, the Journal of Science and Healing, 1 (6): 480-483.  
 
White, Mary Joe PhD, RN; Stafford, Linda PhD, RN. (2008). "Promoting Reflection Through the Labyrinth Walk". Nurse Educator, (33 (3): 99-100
 
TOUCH DRAWING: AUTHENTIC, SOULFUL EXPRESSION IN CLINICAL & CREATIVE PRACTICE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Shemaya Blauer, MSW, LCSW
Deborah Koff-Chapin
 
Objectives:
 
1. List the 4 essential art materials and 5 steps for creating a series of Touch Drawings that can be used in clinical practice.  
2. Describe 3 properties of Touch Drawing that make it uniquely effective in addressing treatment issues of at least 3 different client populations.  
3. Define 3 ways of using Touch Drawing as a method for the practitioner to transition between clients, and 3 modalities of using Touch Drawing to process the clinician's own work as a therapist.
 
Rogers, J. E. (2007). The art of grief: The use of expressive arts in grief support groups. New York, NY: Routledge Press.
 
EXPRESSIVE MOVEMENT FOR OLDER ADULTS & NEUROCOGNITIVELY-CHALLENGED POPULATIONS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Donna Newman-Bluestein, BC-DMT, CMA, LMHC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 or more ways to stimulate older adults to move in ways syntonic with that person’s sense of self. 
2. List 3 or more therapeutic benefits of dance/expressive movement sessions for people with dementia. 
3. Describe 3 or more characteristics and skills essential for being a group leader working with people who have dementia.
 
Coaten, R., & Newman-Bluestein, D. (2013). "Embodiment and dementia–Dance movement psychotherapists respond." Dementia, 12(6), 677-681. 
 
Hill, H. & Newman-Bluestein, D. (September/October 2010). "Movement as the medium for connection, empathy, playfulness." Journal of Dementia Care
 
Newman-Bluestein, D. (June 2017). "Improving Quality of Life for People with Dementia through Dance/Movement Therapy." Creativity & Human Development Online Journal.
 
THE HEALING POWER OF STONES: PLAY THERAPY INTERVENTIONS THAT ROCK
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Art Therapy and Media)
Tammi Van Hollander, RPT, LCSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more ways that using stones as props in play therapy can strengthen relationships, build empathy, and enhance resiliency to aid in the healing process. 
2. Identify 3 or more play therapy and/or sand tray therapy interventions that integrate stones and can be used in clinical practice. 
3. Identify 1 or more ways that working with stones as props in play therapy and counseling can promote clinician mindfulness and self-care practice.
 
Seymour, J. W. & Erdman, P. (1996). "Family play therapy using a resiliency model." International Journal Of Play Therapy, 5(1), 19-30. doi:10.1037/h0089353





SATURDAY PLENARY & LUNCH SESSION

THE ART HIVES NETWORK AND THE EMERGENCE OF PUBLIC PRACTICE ARTS THERAPY
(Wellness and Prevention)
Janis Timm-Bottos, PhD, ATR-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more components of Public Practice Art Therapy used within an art hives practice. 
2. List the 3 or more clinical aspects of an art hive. 
3. Identify the steps required to establish a neighborhood art hive for community healing and wellbeing.
 
Oliver, K. & Edwin, S. (Eds.). (2002). Between the psyche and the social: Psychoanalytic social theory. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. 
 
Timm-Bottos, J. (Accepted). "Public Practice Art Therapy: Enabling spaces across Canada." Canadian Art Therapy Association Journal, Philadelphia:Taylor & Francis. 
 
Timm-Bottos, J. (2016). "Beyond counseling and psychotherapy, there is a field." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 33(3), 160-162. DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2016.1199248
 
ENTREPRENEURIAL STRATEGIES FOR REACHING YOUR CAREER SUMMIT
Kathleen (Kay) Adams, PTR-M/S, LPC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify three phases of the entrepreneurial success climb. 
2. Discuss three or more success strategies most appropriate for his/her own private practice or entrepreneurial endeavor. 
3. Choose one or more success strategies to pursue for his/her own business, starting in the next 30 days.
 
Clark, Dorie. Entrepreneurial You. 2017. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business Review Press.
 
Reil, Jennifer and Roger L. Martin. 2017. Creating Great Choices: A Leader's Guide to Integrative Thinking. Cambridge MA: Harvard Business Review Press. 
 
Ross, Deborah and Kathleen Adams. 2016. Your Brain on Ink: A Workbook



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