Expressive Therapies Summit: Los Angeles 2018

SUNDAY LEARNING OBJECTIVES


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MASTER CLASSES

JUNGIAN SANDPLAY THERAPY: AN INTERACTIVE INTRODUCTION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Marion Anderson, PhD, STA/ISST, CGJLA/IAAP
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 4 or more symbolic components of sandplay therapy appropriate for clinical use with populations of all ages. 
2. Describe 3 or more healing effects that sandplay can have on the psyche of children, teens and adults. 
3. Identify 3 or more approaches for activating the healing potential of sandplay on the psyche when using a Jungian approach. 
4. Describe 4 forms of transference that occur in sandplay therapy. 
5. Identify 2 basic concepts of the theoretical foundation of sandplay therapy. 
6. Describe 2 functions of the symbol in Jungian Sandplay therapy.
 
Anderson, M. (2011). "Flooding and Grieving." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, XX(2), 65-74.
 
Anderson, M. (2016) "The sandplay collection and its possible implications in the transference relationship." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, XXV(1), 109-113. 
 
Weinrib, E. (1983).  Images of the Self.  Boston, MA: Sigo Press.
 
THE TRAUMA CONTINUUM: AN EXPLORATION THROUGH ONE CANVAS PROCESS PAINTING
Paige Asawa, PhD, MFT, ATR-BC
 
Objectives Forthcoming
 
SOULCOLLAGE® FOR INSIGHT & TRANSFORMATION: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Kathryn (Kat) Kirby, ATR-BC
Chantel Zimmerman
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more types of clinical settings in which SoulCollage® could provide an appropriate structured intervention. 
2. Define the term 'archetype' and explain how it might be used in clinical settings in relation to the SoulCollage® process. 
3. Explain 3 or more ways in which SoulCollage® can be used with clients in recovery from addictions and eating disorders. 
4. Name the 4 suits in the SoulCollage® deck and list 3 reasons why this structure is important for using the  SoulCollage® process in a therapeutic setting.  
5. Identify 3 benefits of using the  SoulCollage® technique with people diagnosed with depression.  
6. Describe 2 different ways of combining the SoulCollage® process with other expressive arts therapies disciplines to design sessions for working with young trauma survivors. 
 
THE DANCING MINDFULNESS APPROACH TO EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPY: TRANSFORMING TRAUMA & SHAME
Jamie Marich, PhD, REAT, RMT, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 3 elements of psychotherapeutic approaches that appear in Dancing Mindfulness (e.g., Gestalt, psychodrama, mindfulness, movement/dance therapy, coping skills/breath work/somatic.  
2. Describe 3 or more benefits of a movement-based, holistic practice for emotional healing, specifically within the context of evidence-based practices in the psychological professions.  
3. Explain 2 or more ways to access body-based coping in clinical treatment and wellness management. 
4. List 3 or more components of an effective expressive arts-based treatment or wellness plan that addresses shame constructs.  
5. Identify the 7 elements of the Dancing Mindfulness approach and how they correspond to clinical constructs.  
6. Describe 1 or more short mindful movement sequences for working with clients in a clinical setting.
 
Marich, J. & Howell, T. (2015). "Dancing Mindfulness: A phenomenological investigation of the emerging practice." Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 11(5), 346-356.  
 
Caldwell, C. (2014). "Mindfulness and bodyfulness: A new paradigm." The Journal of Contemplative Inquiry, 1(1), 77-96. 
 
FOCUSING-ORIENTED EXPRESSIVE ARTS: A MINDFULNESS-BASED SOMATIC APPROACH
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Laury Rappaport, PhD, MFT, REAT, ATR-BC
Zoe Rappaport
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 1 or more qualities of what the "Focusing Attitude" is that is relevant to clinical practice. 
2. Identify and describe the 3 main approaches of Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts that can be related to clinical practice.
3. Name 1 method to use Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts (FOAT®) with individuals.
4. List 1 intermodal application of FOAT® that can be used with groups.
5. Identify 1 caution of using FOAT® with trauma and people with severe and persistent mental illness.
6. Describe 1 way the felt sense can be used as method to facilitate expression through the different arts modalities- e.g. art, music, dance-movement, writing. with a variety of populations.

 
Rappaport, L. (2009). Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy: Accessing the Body's Wisdom and Creative Intelligence. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 
 
Rappaport, L. (2014). Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies: Theory and Practice.
 
Rappaport, L. (2016). "Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy" in J. Rubin. Approaches to Art Therapy, 3rd edition. NY: Routledge.


SUNDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

 

TRAUMA-INFORMED APPROACHES TO BULLYING & VIOLENCE: DRAMATIC OPTIONS FOR SAFER SCHOOLS
(Cross-disciplinary Offerings from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Bradford Bancroft, RDT, LMFT
Diana Feldman, RDT, LCAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. State 3 or more behavioral manifestations in students that are the result of traumatic experiences. 
2. List 2 or more ways that embodied/role play techniques can be used to ameliorate the impact of trauma on students. 
3. List 2 or more empathy-based therapeutic techniques for working with students in clinical and educational settings.
 
“The Enact Method of Employing Drama Therapy in Schools”  In Current Approaches in Drama Therapy Second Edition (Ed. Johnson & Emunah, 2009)  co-written by Diana Feldman and Emilie Ward, LCAT, ENACT Director of Research & Training 
 
"Evaluating Drama Therapy in School Settings: A Case Study of the Enact Programme” · In The Drama Therapy Review November 2015 · Co-written by Diana Feldman and Thalia R. Goldstein, Pace University researcher  
 
Horowitz, Rob (2011). Social and Emotional Development and Theater Skills in ENACT Workshops: Context, Conditions, Process and Outcomes. Sponsored by the Ford Foundation; Columbia University; Peer reviewed by the American Evaluator’s Association.
 
SONGS, CHANTS & FINGERPLAYS: HIGH-ENERGY MUSIC & MOVEMENT FOR PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
(Human Growth and Development)
Carol Ann Blank, PhD, MT-BC, LCAT, LPC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 5 or more songs appropriate for working with early childhood populations in group and individual treatment.  
2. Describe 2 or more criteria for evaluating the appropriateness of songs for use in early childhood music groups, according to the model described in this workshop. 
3. Explain 1 or more ways that songs can be used to address various domains of  physical, emotional, social, cognitive, or sensory development in children.
 
Blank, C. A. (2013). "Music Together." imagine, 4(1), 98-99. http://imagine.musictherapy.biz
 
Blank, C. A., & Guerriero, A. M. (2011). "Reunifying families in crisis through music therapy and Music Together". imagine, 2(1), 58-59. http://imagine.musictherapy.biz/Imagine/imagine__online_magazine_files/imagine%202%281%29%202011.pdf 
 
Guilmartin, K. K., & Levinowitz, L. M. (2009). Music Together family favorites songbook for teachers. Princeton, NJ: Music Together LLC.
 
AYURVEDIC COUNSELING IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: BALANCING SEASONAL & LIFE RHYTHMS
(Wellness and Prevention)
Kathy Cass, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, C-IAYT, AHC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe the Ayurvedic "clock" of daily and lifespan cycles as it pertains to therapeutic wellbeing.   
2. List 3 Ayurvedic yoga techniques that can be taught to clients to help them achieve improved self-care.
3. Identify a minimum of 3 treatment objectives that can be addressed through the combination of yoga and movement-based intervention techniques.
 
Frawley, Dr. David. Ayurveda and the Mind. WI: Lotus Press, 1996. 
 
Frawley, Dr. David and Kshirsagar, Suhas. The Art and Science of Vedic Counseling. WI: Lotus Press, 2016. 
 
Halpern, Dr. Marc. Healing Your Life, Lessons on the Path of Ayurveda. WI: Lotus Press, 2011.
 
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY & SELFIES: FACING SHAME, IMAGING EMPOWERMENT 
Deborah Cluff, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Apply at least 1 projective technique with images. 
2. Identify and describe at least 2 somatic experiences (interocept) when viewing images and relating to shame. 
3. Define shame as opposed to other negative emotions on an affective basis.
 
EXPLORING & FACILITATING PIVOTAL MOMENTS IN TREATMENT THROUGH NEUROBIOLOGY-INFORMED DRAMA THERAPY
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Pam Dunne, PhD, RDT, BCT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more techniques for expanding pivotal moments in counseling or psychotherapy. 
2. Identify 3 or more neurological ways the brain responds to pivotal moments in life and treatment. 
3. Identify 3 or more ways that integrating creative arts can enhance the efficacy of pivotal moments work in treatment.
 
Dunne, Pam (2017). "Insights on Positive Change: An Exploration of the Link between Drama Therapy and Neural Networks." In Collaborative Therapy and Neurobiology: Evolving Practices in Action. Edited by M.N. Beudoin and J. Duvall. New York and London: Routledge 
 
Duvall, Jim and Robert MacLennan. "Pivotal Moments, Therapeutic Conversations, and Neurobiology: Landscapes of Resonance, Possibility and Purpose." In Collaborative Therapy and Neurobiology: Evolving Practices in Action. Edited by M.N. Beaudoin and J. Duvall. 
 
GUIDED IMAGERY FOR BEHAVIORAL CHANGE: PRACTICAL & SAFE TECHNIQUES FOR CLINICAL SUCCESS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
David S. Gordon, PhD
Cynthia Costas Cohen, MA, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more skills necessary to use dynamic guided imagery with clients.  
2. List 3 or more guided imagery techniques for working effectively with a wide range of clients in clinical practice. 
3. Describe how imagery content can be interpreted through 2 or more different psychological models.
 
Rossi, Ernest (1993). The Psychobiology of Mind-Body Healing: New Concepts of Therapeutic Hypnosis.  W.W. Norton and Company, New York. 
 
Zeig, Jeffrey (Editor) (1982). Ericksonian Approaches to Hypnosis and Psychotherapy. Brunner/Mazel, New York. 
 
Watkins, Mary (1977). Waking Dreams, Harper Collins, New York
 
AT THE END OF LIFE'S JOURNEY: CREATIVE ARTS & STORYTELLING FOR RESOLUTION AND ACCEPTANCE
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Trisha Jauchler, MS, MA, RDT-BCT, CBF
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 4 of the Tasks of Dying, as described by Dr. Ira Byock. 
2. Describe 3 or more creative arts techniques that can be effectively integrated into counseling and psychotherapy with seniors and those at the end of life. 
3. List 3 or more end of life losses that client typically experience that can be addressed through creative arts approaches.
 
Byock, Ira.  Dying Well: Peace and Possibilities at the End of Life
 
Gawande, Atul.  Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
 
Halifax, Joan.  Being With Dying: Cultivating Compassion and Fearlessness in the Face of Death.
 
EDITH KRAMER & STRENGTH-BASED ART THERAPY: FOSTERING RESILIENCE
Darcy Marlow, ATR, MEd, LMHC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 cultural, historical, or familial factors that contributed to the development of Edith Kramer’s theory, Art as Therapy. 
2. Explain 3 similarities between Kramer’s theory and Strength-Based Art Therapy and how they can both be used effectively with clients in counseling. 
3. Describe 2 art directives that feature strength-based art therapy approaches that can be used with a variety of clients in different mental health settings.
 
STARTING AN ART HIVE: CREATIVE RECYCLING FOR COMMUNITY WELLBEING
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Janis Timm-Bottos, PhD, ATR-BC
Anna Timm-Bottos, MA
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more characteristics found in 'third spaces' designed for health and wellbeing. 
2. List 4 or more methodologies used by art hives to promote creativity in community.
3. State 1 or more reasons why creative reuse is an essential therapeutic aspect of an art hive.
 
Timm-Bottos, J. & Chainey, R. (2015). Art Hives: How–to-Guide. Retrieved from http://www.arthives.org/blog/art-hives-how-guide- le-guide-pratique-des-ruches- dart 
 
Timm-Bottos, J.  (2011 a). "The Five and Dime: Developing a Community’s Access to Art-based Research." In H.Burt (Ed) pp 97-117. Art Therapy and Postmodernism: Creative Healing through a Prism London: Jessica Kingsley. 
 
Timm-Bottos, J. (2011 b). "Endangered Threads: Socially Committed Community Art Action." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association 28 (2).
 
DISCOVERING DREAM WISDOM: AN EXPLORATION THROUGH ART & JOURNALING
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Nancy Weiss, BCD, LCSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more steps in the dream-tending process that differ from the traditional analytic, interpretive approach. 
2. Identify 3 or more expressive arts techniques that can deepen exploration of dreams or other unconscious material in counseling and psychotherapy.sessions. 
3. Describe at least 4 suggested methods for creating collages of dream images, energies, and emotions.
 
Aizenstadt, S. (2009). Dream Tending
 
Frost, S. ((2010). SoulCollage® Evolving.
 
Weiss, N. (2013) "SoulCollage® and Dream Work" in The Neter Letter June 2010, Vol. 5, #6 (©SoulCollage® Inc). 

 


SUNDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

DEVELOPING SOCIAL GAMES FOR SPECIAL NEEDS & OTHER POPULATIONS: ATTENTION, AFFECT, ACTION
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Stephen Breithaupt, MS, RDT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe at least 1 social game from among the categories of Attention, Affect and Action. 
2. Clarify 1 or more ways that social games can enhance social learning as compared to simple role playing. 
3. Create a social game to use with 1 or more clinical populations that uses at least one of the three major categories.
 
Dunne, P., & Rand, H. (2006). Narradrama: Integrating Drama Therapy, Narrative, and the Creative Arts. Los Angeles, CA: The Dama Therapy Institute of Los Angeles. 
 
Yalom, I. D. (1983). Inpatient group psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books. 
 
Wilson, S (2006) Recovery Centered Clinical System: Version #02, 2010. Alameda, Ca: Telecare Corp.
 
SIX VIEWPOINTS-INFORMED DRAMA THERAPY: BALANCING GROUP PROCESS & CONTEMPLATIVE SELF AWARENESS 
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Daniel Doyle, RDT, LMFT, LPCC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe the Six Viewpoints model and identify 2 examples of its relevance to those practicing psychotherapy. 
2. Identify examples of 2 particular Viewpoints that can help clients gain mastery over 2 challenges they are working on in treatment. 
3. List 3 or more typical treatment goals that can be addressed using this Six Viewpoints/Drama Therapy model.
 
Overlie, M. (2016) Standing in Space: The Six Viewpoints Theory and Practice. Fallon Press. 
 
Bogart, A. & Landau, T. (2004). The Viewpoints Book: A Practical Guide to Viewpoints and Composition. New York: Theatre Communications Group 
 
Johnson, D.R., Forrester, A., Dintino, C., James, M. & Schnee, G. (1996) "Towards a poor drama therapy." The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol. 23, No. 4, 293-306
 
EMPOWERED SEXUALITY: INTEGRATING NEUROSCIENCE, NARRATIVE & SOMATIC PRACTICES
(Human Growth and Development)
Hilary Kern, ATR, CYT, LMFT
Michelle Bee, LMFT, CPT Trainee
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more sociocultural, historical, or familial factors that impact one’s attitude toward sexuality. 
2. Identify 2 or more aspects of  “Core Essence” that can be used to promote change and healing in treatment. 
3. Describe 1 or more key ways that neuroscientific theory of brain integration is relevant to working with sexuality through the expressive arts in treatment.
 
Nagoski, Emily (2015). Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that will Transform Your Sex Life. New York, NY:Simon & Schuster Paperbacks. 
 
Wallace, C. (2013).  Tantra Illuminated: The Philosophy, History, and Practice of a Timeless Tradition. Petaluma, CA: Mattamayura Press. 
 
Findlay, R. (2017). "A Narrative Approach to Sex Therapy."  In Peterson, Z.D. (Ed.) The Wiley Handbook of Sex Therapy (pp. 231-249). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
 
SENSORY TOOLS FOR MINDFUL & JOYFUL LIVING: ENHANCING GROUNDING, PRESENCE & RESILIENCY
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Aimee Levine Dickman, OTR/L, SEP
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 or more sensory tools that can be used to increase a traumatized client's ability to ground and feel safe. 
2. Define the terms proprioceptive and vestibular input as they relate to mindfulness in therapy. 
3. Identify 3 or more creative activities that can be used to enhance a client’s alertness and focus in treatment.
 
Bailliard, A. L. & Whigham, S. C. (2017) "Linking Neuroscience, Function, and Intervention: A Scoping Review of Sensory Processing and Mental Illness." American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2017, Vol. 71, 7105100040p1-7105100040p18. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.024497 
 
Dunn, W. (2001). "The Sensations of Everyday Life: Empirical, Theoretical, and Pragmatic Considerations." American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2001, Vol. 55, 608-620. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.6.608 
 
LeBel, J., Champagne, T., Stromberg, N., & Coyle, R. (2010, March). "Integrating sensory and trauma-informed interventions: A Massachusetts state initiative, part 1." Mental Health Special Interest Section Quarterly, 33(1), 1–4.
 
CULTURAL HUMILITY & THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS: BENEFITS FOR THERAPISTS & COMMUNITY PROVIDERS
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Einat Metzl, PhD, ATR-BC, CST, LMFT
Louvenia Jackson, PhD, ATR-BC, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 aspects of cultural identity that communicate who you are. 
2. Describe 2 ways that knowing yourself better in terms of your cultural identity impacts how you see clients and others. 
3. List 2 ways in which cultural humility can enhance your engagement with clients.
 
Jackson, L. (2016). Acquiring New Knowledge Through Art Self-Exploration and Collective Journaling to Enhance Cultural Humility in Art Therapy (Doctoral dissertation, Notre Dame de Namur University). 
 
Bender, B.,  Metzl, E. S.,  Selman, T.,  Gloger, D., &  Moreno, N. (2015). "Creative soups for the soul: Stories of community recovery in Talca, Chile, after the 2010 earthquake." Psykhe (1), 10-15. 
 
Metzl, E. S. (2009). "The role of creative thinking in resilience after hurricane Katrina." Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts 3 (2), 112-118.
 
ZENTANGLE DRAWING FOR STRESS MANAGEMENT: APPLICATIONS FOR PATIENTS & STAFF
(Wellness and Prevention)
Amy Pfenning, MPS, ATR, CZT
Marian Husted, MScAT, CZT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more benefits of the Zentangle drawing method to help clients cope with stress. 
2. State 2 or more benefits of meditation. 
3. Practice 1 method of drawing that can help reduce stress.
 
Chavan, Y. (2014). Meditation for beginners: how to relieve stress, anxiety and depression and return to a state of inner peace and happiness. Vancover Island, BC: Evita Publishing.
 
Krahula, B. (2012). One zentangle a day: a 6-week course in creative drawing for relaxation, inspiration, and fun. Beverly, MA: Quarry Books. 
 
McNeill, S. (2013). Zentangle basics, expanded workbook edition: a creative art form where all you need is paper, pencil & pen. E. Petersburg, PA: Fox Chapel Publishing.
 
BREEMA: THE ART OF BEING PRESENT
Angela Porter, MA, CATC, CMT, LMFT
Carrie Gray, MA, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more characteristics that distinguish Breema from other body-mind connection approaches currently in popular use.  
2.  List 3 interoceptive indicators that result from the application of Breema principles.
3. Describe 2 or more Breema-oriented self-care exercises that can be used with clients in private or group practice settings. 
 
MUSIC AND IMAGERY IN CLINICAL SETTINGS: A MULTILEVEL STRUCTURED APPROACH FOR SYMPTOM RELIEF 
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Sherry Raley, PhD, FAMI, MT-BC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more differences between the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music and Music Imagery techniques as they are practiced in counseling and psychotherapy. 
2. Explain 2 or more basic characteristics of music used in the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music as compared to Music Imagery. 
3. Identify 2 or more different forms of Music Imagery to address symptom management in clinical settings.
 
Bonny, H. (2002). Music Consciousness: The evolution of Guided Imagery and Music. (L. Summer, Ed.). Gilsum, NH: Barcelona.  
 
Bruscia, K. & Grocke, D. (2002). Guided Imagery and Music: the Bonny Method and Beyond. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona.  
 
Grocke, D. & Moe, T. (Eds.) (2015). Guided Imagery & Music (GIM) and Music Imagery Methods for Individual and Group Therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley.
 
INTEGRATING ANCIENT JEWISH WISDOM & THE ARTS FOR A BALANCED LIFE: LIGHTS OF MUSSAR™ CARDS
Nancy Weiss, BCD, LCSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 2 ways in which the Lights of Mussar™ process can augment the therapeutic process and lessen a client’s symptomatology.   
2. Describe at least 3 expressive modalities that can be incorporated into a Lights of Mussar™ practice 
3. Clarify how the Lights of Mussar™ cards serve to develop insight into internal strengths and identity obstacles that stand in the way of personal growth. 

Jaffe, D. (2016). Changing the World from the Inside Out: A Jewish Approach to Personal and Social Change. Trumpeter.

Morinis, A. (2008). Everyday Holiness: The Jewish Spiritual Path of Mussar. Trumpeter.

Borowith, E. and Weinman Schwartz, F. (1999). The Jewish Moral Virtues. The Jewish Publication Society.

RAGDOLLS & WRITING: TRANSFORMING TRAUMA, FACILITATING GROWTH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Ebony Williams, MFA, MA
 
Objectives:
1. Identify 1 social, 1 emotional, and 1 cognitive skill that doll making develops. 
2. Explain the significance of 2 theoretical orientations that are applied when using doll making in this process.  
3. Describe 3 best practices in working with clients diagnosed with PTSD or dealing with trauma symptoms. 
 
Herman, J. L. (1997). Trauma and recovery (Vol. 551). Basic books.



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