Agenda

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  • Optional  Optional
  • Fee  Fee
  • Monday, September 30, 2019
  •  

    PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

    12:00 PM  -  12:00 PM
    (Tuesday, October 1, 2019)
    Food Defense Consortium Meeting
    This complimentary Pre-Conference Session is only open to food & beverage INDUSTY attendees to the Food Safety Consortium. More information coming!
    Fee  Optional 
    1:00 PM  -  12:00 PM
    (Tuesday, October 1, 2019)
    Food Safety Auditing Fundamentals - 1 Day Course

    Food Safety Auditing Fundamentals 1.0 day @ the FSC

    The FSAF course begins with the general auditing knowledge, skills and abilities found in applicable ISO standards for auditors, and builds on those skills to meet the requirements for a qualified food safety auditor. Attendees completing the course will be proficient in planning food safety audits, conducting onsite audit meetings, verifying food safety and prerequisite programs, and conducting onsite facility inspections. The course concludes with a review of critical post-audit activities such as corrective action review, verification and audit reporting. Role playing, group exercises and other learning techniques are used to reinforce understanding of the course materials. Auditing techniques demonstrated are applicable to announced and unannounced first, second and third party audits for all product types.

    Who Should Attend?

    Food safety professionals that need to meet the requirements for a Qualified Auditor will benefit from this comprehensive course. Participants charged with managing supply chain compliance audits are encouraged to also complete Part 1, Building a Supplier Audit Program, in addition to this Course. Part 1 is a ½ day course offered in a Virtual format that can be completed before or after Part 2. Contact the instructor, Patricia Wester at trish@pawesta.com for additional information on this course and other AFSAP training events.

    Auditor Credentials

    The FSAF course meets the training requirements for the NEHA Certified in Food Safety Supplier Audits (CFSSA) credential. Credential Applications and Exams are arranged separately through NEHA, more information can be found at www.neha.org

    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional 
  • Tuesday, October 1, 2019
  •  

    PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

    8:30 AM  -  5:00 PM
    Preventive Control for Human Food Course - Blended Onsite/Online Training

    The Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-based Preventive Controls for Human Food regulation (referred to as the Preventive Controls for Human Food regulation) is intended to ensure safe manufacturing/processing, packing and holding of food products for human consumption in the United States. The regulation requires that certain activities must be completed by a “preventive controls qualified individual” who has “successfully completed training in the development and application of risk-based preventive controls”. This course developed by the FSPCA is the “standardized curriculum” recognized by FDA; successfully completing this course is one way to meet the requirements for a “preventive controls qualified individual.” This Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA) Blended Training course was developed to provide an alternative for individuals to complete the FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food course. The Blended course consists of 2 parts. Part 1 is online and Part 2 is instructor-led. Both parts must be completed in order to obtain the certificate.

    This FSPCA PCQI training is offered as a Blended training course with 50% online and 50% instructor-led, Tuesday, October 1 at the Food Safety Consortium Conference in Schaumburg, IL with Dr. Robert Brackett instructing.

    The registration fee for the FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food Blended Course includes full registration to the Food Safety Consortium Conference!

    Once you begin the process, you need to complete the Part 1: Online course first, prior to the Part 2: Instructor-Led course at the Food Safety Consortium Conference in Schaumburg, IL.

    Presented by:

    IFSH-IIT-Logo-140x75

    Fee  Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    FSSC 22000 Focus Event 2019
    East Salon

    Key members of the FSSC 22000 Team will provide an update on the latest FSSC 22000 developments.

    Topics to be covered include:

    • the newly published FSSC 22000 Version 5
    • the impact of the new ISO 22000:2018
    • the application of the FSSC Global Markets Program to smaller and medium sized organizations.

    Speakers:

    • Jacqueline Southee, NA Representative
    • Cor Groenveld, Market Development Director
    • Cornelie Glerum, Managing Director, FSSC 22000
    • Carry Transit, nationwide distribution and logistics provider, will give practical insight into the benefits Transport and Storage scope of FSSC 22000.

    Registration for this event includes the Food Safety Consortium plenary by Frank Yiannas, Deputy Commissioner, Food Policy & Response, FDA, and the hosted reception in the exhibit hall.

    Meeting is open to:

    • Food and beverage manufactures
    • Certified companies and companies interested in becoming FSSC 22000 certified
    • Certification bodies and contract auditors
    • Accreditation bodies, Training Organizations
    Fee  Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Sanitation Workshop
    This complimentary Pre-Conference workshop sponsored by Bayer Digital Pest Management, is open to all Food Safety Consortium registrants and is included in your registration fee. Make sure to register so that we can reserve your seat.
    Fee  Optional 
     
    1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Welcome and Key Note Plenary
    East Salon
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Plenary Session: Recalls Panel Discussion
    East Salon

    Recalls Panel Discussion moderated by Rob Mommsen, Director of Global Quality & Food Safety, Sabra Dipping Co.  Panelists:

    • Don Zink, Ph.D., President, IEH Consulting Division of Foods and Regulatory Compliance, retired Senior Science Advisor CFSAN FDA
    • Craig Wilson, VP Quality and Food Safety, Costco Wholesale
    • Daniel Dwyer, JD, Partner Kleinfeld, Kaplan, & Becker
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Plenary Session: Food Defense Panel Discussion

    Food Defense Panel moderated by Steven Sklare, Food Safety Academy.  Panelists:

    • Jason P. Bashura, MPH, RS, Sr. Mgr., Global Food Defense, PepsiCo
    • Jill Hoffman, Director, Global Quality Systems and Food Safety at McCormick & Company
    • Clint Fairow, M.S. Global Food Defense Manager, Archer Daniels Midland Company
    • Jacqueline Southee, North America Representative, FSSC 22000
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    4:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Enterprise Risk Management: The Untapped Tool to Elevate Food Safety & Operational Risks Management
    East Salon
    Let’s face it. If you are in the business of processing, packing, storing or transporting food, you are in the business of risk management. At the core, food safety is an enterprise-level risk and should be identified as one of the top enterprise risks to your organization. Food safety programs are ultimately managing risk, and should be tied to your corporate risk management program. Leveraging enterprise risk management principles ensures a cross- departmental approach to food safety from the top-down, and increases the likelihood of long-term adoption and success. Panelists will share their insights on the following: • why managing these programs at an enterprise level is so important and impactful, • strategies for incorporating food safety management programs to the enterprise-level and • why this is so vital to effective food safety management but also to overall enterprise growth. Moderator: Melanie Neumann, J.D., M.S., EVP and General Counsel, Matrix Sciences International, Inc.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    5:00 PM  -  6:30 PM
    Welcome Reception in Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
  • Wednesday, October 2, 2019
  •  
    8:30 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Breakfast Refreshments in Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  9:45 AM
    Plenary Session: Validation Considerations and Regulations for Processing Technologies
    East Salon
    In this presentation, pathways to compliance with FDA regulations will be discussed from the standpoint of the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act and new FSMA regulations. Different types of information the agency requests in the review process for novel technologies will be discussed and examples will be cited. The presentation will present basic requirements of the new FSMA Preventive Controls Rule and how these requirements should be taken into consideration during process validation. Some of the topics to be discussed include: basic validation test design, process critical factors, general guidance and record keeping.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     

    Breakout

    10:00 AM  -  10:45 AM
    How to prepare ourselves in this data-driven transitioning time for the smart food safety era?
    East Salon
    In April, the FDA made a statement for the first time that the smart food safety era is starting. Right after that, a rising amount of related discussions and technology solutions have surfaced to help advance the food safety industry. Admitting that technology could potentially assist us with FSMS efficiency, we need to ensure the risks are still controlled and the integrity of the FSMS is not compromised. In this session, the presenter will share what the smart food safety era means to our daily operations, and how to prepare for changes with the introduction of technology. Also, the presenter will share some lessons learned from others’ experience during this transition period so we can avoid common pitfalls. Lastly, attendees will learn how to take full advantage of the data and learn from it to continuously improve our food safety management systems.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Supply Chain Adulterants – #1 Cause of Recalls
    Schaumburg EF
    Supply chain issues account for more than half of all food recalls. That’s why the Food Safety Modernization Act now requires food companies to identify and assess “known or reasonably foreseeable biological, chemical and physical hazards” in their supply chains that could pose a food safety threat to their customers. But despite these new laws, there is still a long way to go:
    • Globally, we’re on pace to have over 3000 food recalls in 2019
    • The majority of these recalls will be due to supply chain adulterants such as microbes, pesticides, allergens, drug residues, illegal colors, etc.
    • Some adulterants are the result of food fraud but the vast majority occur naturally or are accidentally introduced.
    • Research suggests that the average food company has visibility into less than 10% of the knowable events that could be considered when assessing adulteration risk.
    Industry best practices in their present form simply aren’t up to the task of providing fast, accurate identification of current supply chain threats. In this talk we’ll share research showing why most food companies are coming up short in this critical area and we’ll demonstrate how improving visibility into what’s actually happening in the global supply chain can be your biggest opportunity to reduce recall risk, increase customer safety, and comply with FSMA
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  10:45 AM
    The Role of Water Activity in the Food Safety and Modernization Act
    Schaumburg GH
    Water activity has been integral in defining potentially hazardous foods in the US Food Code for many years. With new changes because of the implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), there may be some question if water activity will continue its important role in ensuring safe and quality products. New FSMA guidelines heavily emphasize preventative measures to reduce or eliminate safety risks. Designing a product with an intrinsically low water activity is the essence of preventative controls, which would indicate that water activity testing will remain a critical tool for food safety. It also opens the possibility for increased utilization of hurdle technology where water activity can be used in combination with other hurdles for even more effective preventative controls. This webinar will provide a review of the role of water activity in meeting FSMA requirements and its importance for monitoring risk-based preventative controls.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     
    10:45 AM  -  1:30 PM
    Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  1:30 PM
    Lunch in Exhibit Hall
     Optional 
     

    Breakout

    1:45 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Bioengineered Food Labelling Requirements: A deep dive into bioengineered crop detection using RTi P
    Schaumburg GH
    While international food trade is growing worldwide, the authorities in each country are setting more and more regulations for ensuring consumer food safety and transparency. Bioengineered (BE) foods are an area where on one hand consumers are asking for more information and on the other hand international trade adds complexities. Across the world, bioengineered food disclosure and labelling is regulated in many countries, including the USA beginning in January 2020. This new regulation supports American consumers who are asking for more traceability and transparency on food products. We are in a world where the amount of bioengineered crops being cultivated and the countries cultivating them is increasing annually. The proper management of bioengineered foods of producers should be addressed concomitantly with proper up stream traceability as well as adequate quality controls with analytical testing tools. This requires a solution that can screen, identify and quantify bioengineered crops to ensure a proper control to provide accurate results to meet regulation, labelling and consumer expectations. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RTi PCR) is the most recognized tool for detection of bioengineered DNA sequences and recommended by Codex Alimentarious, ISO & EU reference laboratory for bioengineered food and feed. A testing strategy using RTi PCR techniques to meet labelling regulations involves a qualitative screening method to determine the potential for a raw material to contain bioengineered foods, additional tests to identify the bioengineered crops in the sample and for bioengineered crops identified, have a quantitative method to determine the % present are also available as next steps if desired. This presentation will highlight the evolving regulatory world of bioengineered foods and a testing strategy using RTi PCR techniques to meet the forthcoming labelling regulations.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Drafting your Food Safety Hiring Strategy for the next 10 years
    East Salon
    Empowering Food Safety executives in attendance to take ownership of the following: 1. Their own personal brand and credibility. By doing this, you create a gravitational pull with top candidates in the market that want to work with you, want to learn from you, and want to develop their careers with you. 2. Take ownership of the Talent Acquisition strategy for their team rather than abdicate the work to HR. For those in attendance looking to own their role in developing strong teams, we'll provide: 1. Short-term and long-term tactics and strategies to IDENTIFY, ASSESS and CAPTURE top talent in Food Safety & Quality.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:45 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Taking an Aggressive Approach to Sanitation: Planning for a Contamination Event
    Schaumburg EF
    Our knowledge of pathogens is increasing, and we now know that it can be commonplace to have pathogens in our facility. Increasingly sophisticated environmental monitoring programs have taught us this. Pathogens are something we need to accept and control as they can certainly contaminate our products. This new paradigm of our environmental monitoring programs have given us better understanding of our risks and greater ability to react to occurrences. The questions are: what happens when things go wrong, how do we fight those battles and what are the proper tools to employ to recover.We will review what a sanitation method needs to do to be effective. This cannot be minimized when evaluating options. We will review a few different offerings in sanitation to decontaminate and discuss where and when each can be appropriate. We’ll also cover how to analyze a sanitation system to assess the likelihood of an event. A contamination issue can just as easily shut down our facilities and some would argue that it would be a likely outcome. The risk analysis of a contamination event would score as high severity and often a likely risk, meaning this needs to be addressed.Our discussion will then center on how to plan for recalls and other business interruptions. How do we plan to react a Listeria, Salmonella, or other pathogen event? This discussion will review how to set up a decontamination plan: what should be included, expected timelines, staffing requirements in a decontamination event, equipment requirements, how to contain an event, and how to execute a thorough decontamination. Lastly, we’ll also discuss the proactive steps to take to make this a planned situation instead of a reactive situation. We want the audience to be prepared to aggressively approach a contamination event, ideas on how to rank their options, how to be prepared to implement on a moment’s notice and in an organized and cost-conscious manner. We want the audience to have a well-thought plan so they can develop a mock / emergency decontamination just as they have mock recall plans in their organizations. They also need to understand that they cannot solely rely on sanitation companies for exclusive labor and must have their own personnel ready to react to events.We then end the session with a question and answer period and group discussion among the audience.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Beyond Meeting the FSMA Regulation, the Business Case for PCQI
    East Salon
    Investing in robust training can result in measurable business impact, beyond reducing liability or checking the FDA’s regulatory boxes. In our discussion, we will highlight how the PCQI training can be utilized at a facility to help increase worker productivity, decrease risks to the company and customers, and improve food safety culture. We will discuss real world scenarios of motivational challenges to changing food safety culture. In addition, we will have a group activity that will include a real-life example of how to change food safety culture through motivational learning. Beyond meeting the regulation, companies should train at the PCQI level to safeguard a company’s product quality, brand, and customer base. The fewer food safety-related claims you have the more that can be saved in costly recalls, loss of current or potential customers, and brand’s reputation. A company with a robust safety culture has a competitive advantage over competitors who are laxer in their food safety and may suffer financially and reputationally from recalls and customer quality assurance complaints. In an era when customers are seeking more information about the food they consume, being a trusted food safety brand can make a company stand above the crowd. In addition, consistent training can help with internal culture change and worker productivity. Working on hazard analysis and defining preventive controls requires that employees show critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Team members taking a curriculum with standardized material and consistent learning objectives can reflect together to identify and document gaps and corrections to practices or processes. They can quickly apply their learning for more accurate analysis of the components of the food safety plan. This is the true impact from investment in high quality instruction.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Laboratory Accreditation and Associated Risks
    Schaumburg GH
    Developing a management system in a laboratory is always challenging, this is especially true for Food Testing Laboratories due to the risk involved. The process approach to many ISO/IEC 17025:2017 requirements now gives the laboratory to ability to control the approach through risk-based thinking. The concept of risk-based thinking is not new to laboratory compliance, but in the past has been incorporated in part by the specificity of requirements within the standard. This short talk will review some common risks and ways that laboratories may minimize or eliminate those risks.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    The Next Generation of Food Safety Starts with the Right Sanitary Design
    Schaumburg EF

    Recalls, foodborne illness outbreaks, and new regulatory rules are challenging nearly every business across the food supply chain to reevaluate its business and procedures as it relates to sanitation and safety. It has led to a significantly higher-level of internal and external environmental and finished product sampling to test for any traces of contamination. But, are we really getting to the root of the cause of the problem to protect the safety of consumers?

    In this session will discuss some of the sanitary issues behind the problems across the industry and present proactive sanitary design strategies to help better protect food processors. Where do gaps exist today?

    Traditionally, sanitation inside food processing facilities has been viewed as a janitorial type service. In many cases, businesses may even have had multiple different internal or external groups managing the sanitation process. This unfortunately leaves a lot of open holes and questions to be answered about the process and approach to food safety as a whole.

    The new level of complexity around sanitization in today’s world of food processing requires a much deeper level of knowledge and expertise to stay ahead.  From the facility to the equipment to the overall air and water quality, there are endless variables that can impact the effectiveness of sanitation.

    We will also discuss an ever-growing list of new allergens, bacteria and other viruses like the bird flu or swine flu announced on a weekly basis. These require specific research, employee training and management that can impact a broader sanitary design plan.How to find the right food safety partner or structure a food safety team? What questions to ask?I t’s important to find an expert food safety partner or leader who not only understands these variables and how to design custom sanitization programs, but also has the expertly trained staff to help build a proactively monitor, track, report and manage it consistently on a day-to-day basis

    Speakers:
     Optional 
     
    4:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Plenary Session: Food Safety Think Tank - Innovative Food Safety Technologies
    East Salon
    Advisory Board Member:
     Optional 
    5:00 PM  -  6:30 PM
    Reception in Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
  • Thursday, October 3, 2019
  •  
    8:00 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Breakfast Refreshments in Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Plenary Session: Panel Discussion Earning respect - real-life examples of earning and maintaining in
    East Salon

    Panel Discussion moderated by Bob Pudlock, President, Gulf Stream Search Panelists:

    • Jorge Hernandez, Vice President Quality Assurance, The Wendy's Company
    • Al Baroudi, Ph.D. CFS, Vice President, QA & Food Safety, The Cheesecake Factory
    • Marcus Burgess, Sr. Food Safety & Quality Systems Specialist, The Cheesecake Factory
    Moderators:
     Optional 
     

    Breakout

    10:15 AM  -  11:00 AM
    A Novel Detection Method of Shiga-Toxin-Producing E. coli and Salmonella in Agricultural Water
    Schaumburg GH
    Fresh produce is one of the leading causes of foodborne illnesses in the United States. A wide variety of fresh produce has been associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella outbreaks. The microbiological safety of fresh produce products remains challenging due to the open nature of fresh produce production which makes it susceptible to contaminations from multiple sources including soil, water, biological amendments, and wild animal activities. Agricultural water has been frequently implicated as source of contaminations, including the two major E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks associated with romaine lettuce in 2018. In addition, fresh produce can become contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms during postharvest treatment through poor hygienic conditions such as contaminated rinsing water and equipment. Therefore, it is crucial to adopt effective monitoring method for agricultural water sources and production environment. However, the detection and isolation of STEC and Salmonella presents a technical challenge necessitating time-consuming and costly laboratory procedures that often exceed the technical and financial capabilities of many small growers and reference laboratories. In this study, we have developed a colorimetric screening test for STEC and Salmonella based on a highly selective enrichment medium developed by Paradigm Diagnostics and University of Minnesota. The test has been adapted to microporous filtration membranes and environmental swabs to permit screening of agricultural water and environmental surfaces. The test is suitable for detection of several Salmonella serotypes and the major STEC strains regulated by USDA. The time to detection is twenty hours and the limits of detection (LOD) are 1-14 CFU/mL for agricultural water, and 1-300 CFU/cm2, 8-200 CFU/cm2, 3-200 CFU/cm2 for stainless steel, ceramic and high-density polyethylene plastic surfaces respectively. Confirmation of isolates can be performed utilizing appropriate PCR probes or selective differential agars.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  11:00 AM
    Ask the Experts: What to do when there are Pathogens Everywhere!
    Schaumburg EF
    Learn from sanitation and microbiological experts who fight against pathogens day in and day out. What are their favorite tools and techniques to win the battle to prevent a recall? And, when a contamination issue happens, what needs to be in place to efficiently and effectively to mitigate the risk
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  11:00 AM
    Lessons Learned from Food Defense Intentional Adulteration Vulnerability Assessments
    East Salon
    The FDA requires a vulnerability assessment under the IA Rule. This session will focus on lessons learned from the speaker’s facilitation of almost two dozen intentional adulteration vulnerability assessments and preparation of subsequent food defense plans. The program will answer the following critical questions for the many companies who have yet to perform the required vulnerability assessment under the IA Rule:•Who are the right people to involve in planning and executing the vulnerability assessment?•What information should be prepared in advance of getting a vulnerability assessment team together for the process?•What does it mean to use the Key Activity Types and what other questions need to be answered in order to identify an “actionable process step” under the IA Rule?•How do you move from documenting the vulnerability assessment results to developing a fully compliant food defense plan?•What does a company do if it already has a food defense plan for other purposes such as SQF or BRC certification/compliance?•What is the role of physical security and foundational programs in terms of a comprehensive food defense posture?•What types of records might satisfy the record keeping requirements of the IA rule and how should these be presented in the food defense plan?•What types of mitigation strategies are companies employing and what can be drawn from the FDA’s mitigation strategies database?The program will inform attendees as to the lessons learned from a multitude of regulated food facilities which can be applied to vulnerability assessments yet to be conducted as well as food defense plans which have already been prepared but not yet come under FDA scrutiny. It is an excellent opportunity to get some practical information to conduct more efficient vulnerability assessments and gain more value to protect against acts of intentional adulteration.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Creating effective training programs in food manufacturing
    Schaumburg EF
    Create an effective hands-on, possibly bilingual training program that meets compliance in food manufacturing environments. Learn about tools and resources that are easily available. How to incorporate other languages into your program.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Market Incentives for Safe Foods: The effect of food recalls on food industry firms’ stock prices
    East Salon
    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to identify the impact of a food recall on publically traded firms’ stock market prices, and to describe how this impact can vary due to both characteristics of the recall event and the firm issuing the recall.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:00 PM
    The Use of Strain Typing in Environmental Monitoring - Will it Hurt or Help?
    Schaumburg GH
    All food companies struggle with controlling pathogens in the food processing environment. Relying upon standard environmental monitoring programs, companies have no way of knowing whether positive pathogen findings in the processing environment are resident or transient. The use of stain typing, such as Whole Genome Sequencing, can solve this dilemma. Learn about the risks and rewards of using these cutting-edge techniques.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Lunch in Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  2:30 PM
    Exhibit Hall
    Adventure Hall
     Optional 
     

    Breakout

    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Effective Use of Chemicals
    Schaumburg EF
     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Supply Chain Transparency Panel Discussion
    East Salon
    Supply chain transparency is rapidly becoming a priority ●Enterprises realize the advantages of having and sharing certain information with trading partners and consumers. ■connect with consumers, ■build trust, ■achieve better visibility to all parts of the supply chain to drive improvem
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    2:45 PM  -  3:30 PM
    The Viral Landscape of Testing in the Food Industry
    Schaumburg GH

    The virus monitoring landscape in the US is in a current state of flux, growth, and examination. This symposium will present a multifaceted SME perspective that explores:
    • The Global Virus Landscape: review of the global food safety community response to viral contamination events from proactive and reactive approaches. Discussion of outbreak trends that are changing the way the industry thinks about and approaches virus mitigations and monitoring in the food industry
    • Laboratory Innovations, Considerations, Precautions: expert guidance on virus testing in the modern food microbiology laboratory with use of existing technologies. Review of viral laboratory requirements and validation and verification needs.
    • Regulatory and Epidemiological Perspective: regulatory and clinical implication assessment of the US food outbreak viral landscape. Assessment of US efforts in detecting, controlling, investigating and mitigating foodborne viral illness outbreaks.
    • Practical Application: a food manufacturers perspective on implementing virus testing programs as part of a robust food safety plan. Future and unmet needs

    Speakers:
    Joy Dell’Aringa,  bioMerieux
    Erin Crowley – CSO, Q Laboratories
    Efi Papafragkou, Ph.D- Molecular Virology Team, FDA CFSAN
    Sukhmanpreet Kaur, Nature's Touch

     Optional 
     
    3:45 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Closing Plenary
    East Salon
     Optional 
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