2019 Agenda

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  • Optional  Optional
  • Fee  Fee
  • Tuesday, May 28, 2019
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    1:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Food Fraud Training Pre-Conference Workshop
    This workshop gives an overview on how to spot food fraud. We will also discuss how to design a food fraud program compliant with both FSMA and GFSI approved food safety management system standards and offer resources to the attendee to help them create their own food fraud program.
    Speakers:
    Fee  Optional 
  • Wednesday, May 29, 2019
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    8:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Registration and breakfast
    8:30 AM  -  8:45 AM
    Opening Remarks
    Hosts:
    8:45 AM  -  9:30 AM
    FDA Presentation
     Optional 
    9:30 AM  -  10:15 AM
    FDA Presentation
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  10:45 AM
    FDA Town Hall Q&A
     Optional 
    11:15 AM  -  12:00 PM
    Blockchain Technology Applications in Agriculture and Food Supply Chains: Use Cases from Around the

    Blockchain technology has now existed for ten years.  In 2018, Walmart announced that all suppliers of fresh leafy greens would be required to participate in their blockchain traceability platform, developed by IBM, before the end of January 2019. The IBM Food Trust initiative is one of dozens of platforms around the world that are using blockchain in food and agriculture supply chains and are already in use or have implemented a proof of concept.  Traceability is only one focus of blockchain use. Other uses of blockchain platforms include commodity management, marketplace creation, data sharing, access to capital, and payment management.

    This presentation will include an overview of different uses of blockchain in food and agriculture supply chains around the world, with an emphasis on Asian markets, and references to relevant use cases. Also included will be a discussion of how other technology, such as IoT (Internet of Things) sensors and AI (artificial intelligence) is being used, and lessons learned from companies that are already using blockchain in their business operations or have implemented a proof of concept. Information was gathered through in-person, telephone, VOIP, and video meetings with project executives, visits to Chinese grocery stores selling products that offer consumer access to blockchain-tracked information (Alibaba-owned Hema and JD.com-owned 7Fresh), presentations at professional events in the US and Asia, and the media.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:00 PM  -  12:15 PM
    Technology Spotlight
    12:15 PM  -  1:15 PM
    Lunch & Networking
    1:15 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Issues and Impact Surrounding GFSI and FSMA

    From this presentation, you will learn: 1. Understanding the differences between GFSI and FSMA. 2. Key FSMA requirements. 3. GFSI conformance to FSMA requirements. 4. How FSMA is addressed in GFSI audits. 5. How findings are presented at closing meetings.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  2:45 PM
    TBA
     Optional 
    3:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Coffee Break & Networking
     

    Breakout

    3:30 PM  -  4:15 PM
    Blockchain Trailblazers
    Learn how these blockchain trailblazers have partnered to design, develop and rapidly adopt digital ledgers, digital identity, trust and transparency with Blockchain. As a leader in open-sour ce blockchain solutions and an early member of Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, IBM is dedicated to supporting the development of openly-governed blockchains. In this presentation you will hear how IBM is working with hundreds of organizations across financial services, supply chains, IoT, risk management, digital rights management and healthcare to implement blockchain applications.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:30 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Canadian food industry perceptions towards food fraud; results from a pan Canadian survey
    Food fraud is becoming a major concern for the food industry, consumers and governments. Although many publications have risen in the past few years on food fraud, they focus more food fraud detection methods and food fraud management in the food industry. This presentation aims at presenting the Canadian food industry perceptions, concerns, and needs towards food fraud and their accomplishments to manage and prevent this scourge. From September 2017 until May 2018, food industry operators from different sectors in Canada have been asked to complete an online survey of 52 closed questions. Question themes were food fraud definition, food fraud regulations, perceptions of food fraud burden globally and locally, food industry responsibility towards food fraud, their capacities to prevent and manage this aspect of food quality and safety, the prevention measures implemented and their relative efficacy and finally questions about food fraud detection methods and their implementation. Answers were gathered and analyzed to build a representative picture of food industry readiness and consciousness of food fraud. The outcomes of this work would provide evidence-based data to (1) better understand needs and concerns of food industry and its capacity to fight food fraud, (2) to leverage these data to develop better tools dedicated to food industry, and data for the food industry (3) to better position their business amongst other companies of the same sector and compare with other sectors.
     Optional 
     
    4:30 PM  -  5:30 PM
    Panel Discussion
     Optional 
    5:15 PM  -  5:25 PM
    Day 1 Wrap Up
    Speakers:
     Optional 
  • Thursday, May 30, 2019
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    8:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Breakfast & Networking
    8:30 AM  -  9:15 AM
    Panel Discussion: Food Safety Supply Chain Vulnerabilities & Solutions

    Jeanne Duckett, Manager, Emerging Technology, Avery Dennison will moderate this panel for the Food Supply Chain Conference. Panels are: Andy Kennedy, Director of the Global Traceability Center, IFT; Lucy Angarita, Director of Supply Chain Traceability for IPC, SUBWAY’s Purchasing Cooperative and Felix Amiri brings perspective from Canada Food Safety Supply Chain Vulnerabilities & Solutions.

    The panel will explore how profitable food supply chain operations can obtain (big data) inventory visibility to meet consumer’s growing demand for quality and transparency also the while increasing efficiencies, saving money and ensuring food safety in an increasingly complex and hyper-connected world.

    In addition, the panel will explore how profitable food service operations can obtain inventory visibility to meet consumer’s growing demand for quality and transparency, while increasing efficiencies, saving money and ensuring food safety in an increasingly complex and hyper-connected world.

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    9:15 AM  -  10:00 AM
    The W's (Who, What, When, Why) of the Foreign Supplier Verification Programs (FSVP) Regulation
    Description: This presentation will provide attendees with an understanding of the “Foreign Supplier Verification Programs (FSVP) for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals” regulation. Goal: Upon attending this presentation, attendees will have a better understanding of how to comply with U.S. FSVP rules and responsibilities.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
    Technology Spotlight 2
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Coffee Break & Networking
     

    Breakout

    10:45 AM  -  11:30 AM
    Blockchain for Food Safety and Freshness
    2018 was a challenging year for food safety and many in the industry turned their attention to blockchain-based solutions for potential answers. While blockchain promises to address some of today’s food safety challenges, the technology is still in early stages of development. Is blockchain alone the best solution for providing true transparency and supply chain visibility to address food safety challenges? In an industry tight on margins, how can a blockchain-based solution provide the benefits and ROI required to make it profitable for suppliers, processors, and grocers? In this session, Bill McBeath, Chief Research Officer at ChainLink Research and Tom Reese, VP of Product and Business Development at Zest Labs discuss research conducted on existing implementations and pilots. The research revealed that a hybrid system model, one that combines blockchain with mature multi-party Networked SaaS-based technology, is the best approach for optimizing traceability and improving food safety across the fresh food supply chain. The limitations and advantages of blockchain will be discussed, in regards to backward and forward traceability, data integrity across the supply chain, and the role of blockchain-enabled smart contracts. They will also discuss how Internet of Things (IoT) sensors can be used to ensure the appropriate data about products and their condition is accurately and autonomously captured as products move from harvest or production to the retailer. In addition to improving food safety and traceability, a hybrid model combining blockchain and SaaS-based applications also provides the ability to integrate freshness management into the system to reduce food waste and costs. Freshness is a prime competitive differentiator for grocers and food service providers. The value of waste reduction and improved freshness for consumers can provide the critical difference in providing a compelling ROI for hybrid blockchain solutions across the supply chain.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  11:30 AM
    Food Fraud - Problem Solved?
    This session will discuss lessons learned and next steps based on the development of the Food Fraud Database. This will include intelligence gleaned from three years of data analysis, current concerns that industry should be aware of, and surprising trends. We will also discuss the application of static data from sources like the FFD to horizon scanning for food fraud. Finally, we will hear from a food industry user about their experience with implementing food fraud mitigation. This food industry member will share general information about their food fraud strategy, best practices, the tools they use, and how they address issues when they find them.
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  11:30 AM
    Supplier Risk Assessment

    With the passage of many Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) compliance dates, as well as recently-released new versions of the GFSI-benchmarked food safety management system standards (SQF, BRC, FSSC 22000, IFS, etc.), companies now need to perform risk assessments on all their suppliers - ingredient suppliers, service suppliers, chemical suppliers, and more.

    Risk assessments must be performed with excellence regardless of whether the supplier is voluntarily audited by a third party. If the supplier is responsible for controlling a SAHCODHA* hazard, the supplier approval requirements of the Preventive Controls regulation (21 CFR 117 Subpart G) require an annual on-site audit as the default verification activity. The challenge is to effectively perform this function without paying a prohibitive cost. Knowing when it makes sense to perform a risk assessment to justify that less frequent auditing (or a different type of verification activity) provides adequate assurance can save a lot of money, but knowing when to take a closer look can save your company millions in the event of a recall, withdrawal, or other PR nightmare at your supplier. The concept of risk assessment has become ubiquitous in the most recent versions of ISO management system standards as well; both ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 22000:2018 focus heavily on the concept of risk assessment throughout the organization.

    This presentation will educate the audience on the meaning of the term "risk assessment" and its constituent parts. Strategies for performing risk assessments will be presented. Examples of real-life supplier risk assessments, both good and bad, will be presented to help make the connection between the real world and the training concepts. This presentation will be given by Debby Newslow, a recognized expert in the field of ISO compliance with extensive experience auditing risk assessments that were performed in a variety of different industries. Debby Newslow will explain what an experienced auditor looks for in a risk assessment, and common pitfalls to avoid based on common findings she has written in the past. This presentation will be valuable for quality assurance personnel, but also purchasing, management, and receiving personnel who may be better suited to identify and report on risks that quality may not know about. Learn about supplier risk assessment wins as well as losses that we have seen over the years so you can avoid making the same costly mistakes.

     Optional 
    11:30 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Chemical, Biological and Physical Hazards – Current Threats and How to Manage Them
    This talk will demonstrate a faster, more reliable way to identify exactly which issues currently pose the greatest threat to your ingredients. We’ll then conduct a case study on how to assess and “score” each threat to help determine whether it requires a FSMA preventive control.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:30 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Surviving your FSVP Investigation
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    11:30 AM  -  12:15 PM
    What to do When Things go Wrong (with Suppliers)
    What to do When Things go Wrong (with Suppliers) As much as we as food safety and quality professionals try, we still find quality and food safety problems with our products. Many of these issues find us looking to our suppliers, leading us to try to trouble shoot problems and figure out where things went wrong and how to prevent it in the future. Typically, we respond by beefing up our supplier approval programs and increasing our monitoring in relation to those areas. But, what else can be done and how should problems in various areas be addressed? We’ll talk about how to respond to problems in the following areas: •Red flags in the Supplier Qualification paperwork: This is often the first step in the supplier qualification process; what to look for and what the next steps might be •Absent or incomplete Supplier Qualification paperwork: Sometimes the hardest part of supplier qualification is getting the actual information from the supplier, so we’ll discuss tools to make this easier. •Allergen issues: whether it is labeling to formulation to sanitation, all are important areas to look at when dealing with allergens •Food Safety issues: What happens when their food safety plans/systems do not adequately address the hazards; What to do when your hazard analysis of your raw materials do not match the hazard analysis your supplier; what happens when validation studies are irrelevant or not effective •Supplier management: what is your supplier doing to manage their supply chain •Transportation issues: damaged product, pest issues, dirty containers, etc. •Pest Control: signs to look for that your supplier is having pest problems and how to monitor •Sanitation: What to look for to ensure compliance to established programs and effectiveness of sanitation. Additional discussions will revolve around how to leverage team support to achieve the best results in dealing with supplier issues.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     
    12:15 PM  -  1:15 PM
    Lunch
     

    Breakout

    1:15 PM  -  2:00 PM
    FSMA’s Sanitary Transportation Rule is Here: How to Stay on the Right Track
    Companies with more than $500,000 in revenue must comply with FSMA’s Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food rule. The rule sets forth sanitary requirements for shippers, loaders, carriers, and receivers involved in transporting human and animal food to ensure food safety. So, what exactly should companies be doing? Join Alchemy’s Holly Mockus as she explains the rule’s requirements for shippers, loaders, carriers, and receivers and offer specific strategies to ensure compliance.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:15 PM  -  2:00 PM
    The revision of ISO 22000 in 2018 & its contribution to global food safety & regulatory compliance
    ISO 22000 is a publicly available standard for food safety management, written by consensus and used in over 165 countries to control and manage food safety. Many of the facilities using ISO 22000 may be subject to FSMA regulations as part of the global supply chain. In 2018, after 13 years, the ISO 22000 standard has been revised to include improved definitions of terms and the need for a wider appreciation of risks associated with the supply chain. This need to address internal and external risks and monitor them within the management system framework, brings closer alignment to the goals of FSMA, encourages continuous improvement and will improve transparency and confidence in the supply chain.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    1:15 PM  -  2:00 PM
    The Role of Food Standards in Protecting Supply Chain Integrity
    Food supply chains are becoming increasingly complex, and this complexity creates multiple opportunities to damage the integrity of the food supply, either intentionally or unintentionally. Ensuring the overall integrity of the food supply system depends on the integration of multiple control and information systems and on accurate communication between these systems. It is important to recognize that protecting the whole food system requires protecting both the actual foods and the information, such as COAs and specifications, which purport to describe these foods. For foods and food ingredients, protection relies on being able to demonstrate that each substance has the appropriate composition at every step in the supply chain. Appropriate composition is defined through standards, developed by independent experts, that include descriptions of the necessary identity, purity, maximum levels of contaminants, and absence of adulterants. Useful standards are actionable in that they include explicit parameters to determine whether a particular sample meets the standard for that substance (i.e., acceptance criteria) and the methods needed for making that assessment. Ingredient standards are a resource that makes it possible for all participants in the supply chain to align expectations and communicate on an equal basis. This presentation will demonstrate the importance of food ingredient standards and show how they are developed for the Food Chemicals Codex.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:15 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Using Known Food Safety Science & Protocols to Best Comply with FSMA's Sanitary Transportation Rule
    Food safety professionals along the supply chain have found themselves in a predicament when assigned the task of implementing FSMA’s Sanitary Transportation Rule. Countless webinars and articles continue to fall short in properly educating and helping people understand the STR requirements so that complete, effective, defendable compliance can begin. This is because there is often much focus on the letter of the law rather than attention to the practical aspects of sanitary transportation compliance. Interestingly enough, the food safety community is in the best position to move forward in this misunderstood area of FSMA. By utilizing established risk type assessments and building protocols to address these risks, companies do not have to be inadvertently stuck in a non-compliance mode while they try to figure out how the rule applies to their operation. A particular challenge for all parties named in the rule is the lack of data needed to understand the risks specific to food transportation. This one factor alone has caused confusion among much of the food industry and worse, it has created much resistance from food transporters in being willing to comply with FSMA. Many have signed legal documents stating that they have compliance plans in place. Unfortunately, many continue to rely on inadequate, outdated best practices rather than incorporating effective food safety strategies into their operations. Members of both the food and transportation industries are looking for clarity and specificity in understanding what the rule is requiring of them. The good news is that there is a practical, scientific approach to meet FSMA’s requirements. Technology and established food safety protocols are both critical tools in confidently meeting the rule’s expectations, and ultimately, achieving robust, complete FSMA compliance.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:15 PM  -  3:00 PM
    Using Predictive Analysis for Continuous Improvement and Monitoring
    Using Predictive Analysis for Continuous Improvement and Monitoring Speakers: Benjamin L. England, JD and Shub Debgupta, PhD “A food company’s supply chain can be its food safety program’s weakest link.” However, supply chain data is a powerful resource for Continuous Improvement and Monitoring of food safety and security. Using supply chain data and regulatory activity information to predict risk is not just for FDA using PREDICT. Industry is increasingly using predictive risk analysis to focus limited, costly inspection resources at high risk areas to reduce the likelihood of recalls. This risk prediction approach enables risk reduction risk by: •Continuously Improving food safety and security programs by predicting and targeting testing, auditing, qualifying, certification and documentation resources at higher risk targets (shipments, inventory and vendors) where activity data indicate greater risk, •Continuously Monitoring its food safety and security programs by informing and improving vendor qualification, renewal, for-cause audits and investigations. While commercially available supply chain data and regulatory activity can separately reveal anomalies and risk, the ability to predict food safety and security risk is dramatically increased by combining these datasets. Predictive risk models using powerful AI/machine learning analytical tools can help interpret supplier behavior and identify trends and anomalies as potential risk indicators. Similar to FDA’s PREDICT, innovative food companies use targeted approaches to identify and predict which: •Product, inventory or shipments warrant testing; •Vendors should receive priority audits; •Supply chains should receive inquiry or evaluation. This permits smarter resource allocation to demonstrably minimize food safety and security risk. We will show how properly interpreting these datasets can predict real world and well-known food safety recall events months in advance. You will learn how this data can: •Reveal commercial behaviors that coincided with food safety events before food recalls. •Enhance internal food safety and food security practices and supplier risk assessments. •Identify risks and target fraud associated with regulated goods (dietary and ingredients) and •Enhance vendor selection.
     Optional 
     
    3:00 PM  -  3:45 PM
    Blockchain won't solve the food traceability challenge... but Interoperability and Data Standards wi
    "Blockchain won't solve the food traceability challenge... but Interoperability and Data Standards will" End-to-end food traceability is the ability to track food ingredients and products through the supply chain from source to retailer. The North American food industry is moving from a paradigm of 1-up, 1-down to end-to-end traceability, due in part to the current insufficiency to efficiently manage food safety incidents. For example, traceback of potentially contaminated product in the 2018 romaine lettuce outbreaks experienced many setbacks, resulting in expanded recalls and consumer uncertainty. Traceability touches on regulatory compliance, technology adoption, and sector-specific operational aspects. Not coincidentally, effective food traceability systems require unique collaboration among professionals in IT, operations management, food safety and quality, logistics, and regulatory compliance. Because traceability systems are multidisciplinary, novel technologies, such as blockchain, can on their face look like complete solutions. However, to accomplish end-to-end traceability, industry data standardization and interoperable IT architectural guidance are essential to enabling stakeholders to enact schemas and make business investments that share pertinent traceability information to appropriate supply chain actors for effectively addressing food safety use cases. In initiatives like the Produce Traceability Initiative and the Global Dialogue on Seafood Traceability, industry representatives and subject matter experts promulgate voluntary data standards and best practices, so that each partner in the supply chain has the same expectations and protocols with regards to traceability data. By having IT architectural guidance, the standardized data may move alongside the product in and out of a variety of data collecting and sharing technologies, without necessarily requiring the complication or sophistication of entirely new systems. These standards setting processes can influence and inform new regulations, such as rules for the Food Safety Modernization Act, and further spur whole industry adoption of end-to-end traceability. As traceability data becomes more accessible it will transform food safety outbreak investigations by enabling much quicker tracebacks, easier linkage of microbiology results to product, and additional metrics to make epidemiologic conclusions.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    3:45 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Closing Remarks
    Speakers:
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