Click the title of the program to read its description.

  Agenda is subject to change.

Agenda

  • Thursday, October 5, 2017
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  12:45 PM
    Doors Open
    Hallway
    12:45 PM  -  12:50 PM
    Welcome, Samantha Balbier, Executive Director, GPNP
    Mainstage
    12:50 PM  -  1:10 PM
    Summit Kickoff, Grant Oliphant, President, The Heinz Endowments
    Mainstage
    1:10 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Keynote Address: Creating Space for Creativity & Innovation
    Mainstage
    How do we open up enough space in the way we think, the environments we build, the teams we nurture, and the projects we produce for creativity and innovation to flourish? Mickey will discuss ways to invest and nurture to drive change. He shares insights from his decades long studies into creative environments, the design and psychology of high-performance teams, and the ways In which spaces shape curiosity and creativity.
    Speakers:
    2:00 PM  -  3:15 PM
    #1 Breakout Session
    Big Data: Uses in Other Fields, Application in Nonprofit
    Room 310

    Ever wanted the power of a big corporate data analytics team for your work? This session is designed for nonprofits, elected officials, and their staff. This session will explore how big companies think about data and how you can adapt these ideas to suit your organization and policy development work - no data experts required. On top of that BlastPoint will produce a data visualization that you can use for your presentations and proposals - all in a matter of minutes saving your organization hours of time and you personally a great deal of stress.

    This session will cover concepts like indexing, segmentation, and forecasting, and show how real examples from the world of marketing and analytics are within reach of anyone with the right tools. This session will also take a deep dive into thinking about data geographically. Included will be an introduction to sources of free data and access to a free iPython notebook for the technically inclined.

    Speakers:
    Building Boards of Value: Recruiting Experts and Elevating Engagement
    Room 405

    The saying goes, “when you have worked with one board of directors, you have worked with one board of directors”. The integrity of the nonprofit and corporate sectors relies upon an ability to build and maintain good governance. This is why building a “board of value” is a very intentional and an ongoing task for each sector. The uniqueness of our organizations dictate our need for knowledgeable and engaged board members. Yet, time commitment, extent of community engagement, and expertise are persistent themes that every organization must strive to address when recruiting new board members. During this session, you will be provided with an overall framework for making important decisions about developing the composition of your board of directors. You will also hear what recruitment techniques work and don’t work based on the experience of this distinguished panel.

    Presentation: Building Boards of Value

    Census 2020: We All Have a Role. Government, Business, Nonprofits
    Room 305

    The United States Constitution requires that a census be taken every ten years. The next census takes place in 2020 and the time to start preparing for it is now. Everything from tax apportionment, political representation, and policy and program development for the next ten years will be based on the results of this census. Reaching hard-to-reach populations becomes even more critical and remains extraordinarily difficult. The proverbial “brick wall” is that the census process is undercapitalized and the implementation strategy makes it challenging to reach marginalized populations or transients. Its importance of recognizing and addressing these structural issues has recently been underscored by many. During this session, you will learn about the importance of the census, the challenges it faces for 2020, and how you as a government official, nonprofit, foundation leader, and business person can be involved.

    Presentation: Census 2020

    Speakers:
    Common Outcomes: How to Level the Playing Field for the Social Impact Sector
    Room 304

    Public companies are only required to submit one annual report to all of their investors. Nonprofit programs only create one amount of impact each year, so why do they have to report and describe their impact in different ways to different funders? Speaking with more than 20 years of experience, Jason Saul, CEO of Mission Measurement, a social impact data and consulting firm, will explore and define the challenges in standardizing data in the sector, impact measurement across nonprofits, foundations and governments and what this means for grant reporting. Jason will walk attendees through the Impact Genome Project®, a universal evidence base on all social impact sectors and how to use evidence to create better “success equations” and conduct an “outcomes inventory” for attendees’ specific program(s).

    Presentation: Common Outcomes

    Corporate Structures and Greater Good (Nonprofit & Private Sector). Sponsored by The Forbes Funds
    Room 302

    There is growing enthusiasm and an emerging class of “social entrepreneurs” who are creating organizations that are devoted to a social purpose, creating long term, sustainable value, and realizing profits. During this session participants from the nonprofit, private and public sectors will examine the myriad of corporate structures available to pursue mission-driven work and achieve greater good in our communities. Each corporate structure will address the regulatory and compliance framework that defines tax exempt status and unrelated taxable income. Further, this session will address the range of options provided by the Internal Revenue Service for nonprofits in charity, advocacy, and lobbying work with an emphasis on distinguishing the 501.c3 structure required of a nonpartisan nonprofit vs. the other options provided by the IRS to engage in politically partisan activities.

    Presentation: Corporate Structures and Greater Good,  Handout_Corp Structures

    Speakers:
    Innovations in Data Analytics & Reporting: Understanding Human Services
    Room 403

    This session will demonstrate the latest data and analytical innovations available to human services providers in Allegheny County and offer a provider’s perspective on how these tools can be used to improve practice. By accessing the Client View application, providers can assess a client’s social services history, including services provided, needs and strengths assessments along with service plans. Tools such as the Allegheny County Analytics website and publicly accessible, self-service tools such as Quick Count and the Outcomes Tool will be featured. By attending this session, participants will better understand the service utilization, service system cross-over, and outcomes of Allegheny County’s vulnerable populations. Dr. Shannah Tharp-Gilliam, Director, Office of Research & Evaluation at the Homewood Children’s Village will illustrate how providers and the Department of Human Services can partner to develop a common client-based data system for the collection and storage of case management data. Providers can learn to simplify the data entry and submission processes for DHS’s required reporting and understand how DHS can provide aggregate, summary-level management reports back to service providers that display a more comprehensive perspective on the service involvement of their clients.

    Presentation: Innovations in Data Analytics

    Mindfulness Training, Stress Reduction, and Health
    Room 311

    Mindfulness training programs are popular and widely used for their stress reduction and health benefits. This talk will describe some of the initial well-controlled studies of mindfulness training programs and explore how these programs facilitate brain stress resilience and health benefits.

    Presentation: Mindfulness and Stress Reduction

    Planned Giving: You Don’t Have to Be an Expert, Just Know One.Sponsored by The Pittsburgh Foundation
    Room 303

    One of the complexities that nonprofits face every day is how to deliver services in the community while also allocating time to raise charitable dollars from the community. A range of fundraising methods are often employed with varying degrees of success. Though, developing a well-thought out planned giving strategy tends to be one such method often avoided. This interactive session highlights traditional and current opportunities in planned giving that are designed for teams and organizations that do not have a dedicated planned giving professional.

    Presentation: Planned Giving 

    Small Decisions Can Reap Big Returns: Planning for a Secure Future. Sponsored by PNC
    Room 301

    We all know that we need to be smart about our financial future and the earlier we start the better. What often eludes us is knowing how much we actually have to save and actually how to get started when faced with car payments, college loans, rising cost of just living, and the “surprises” that come up. PNC Community Development Banking and PNC Investments is partnering with The Forbes Funds to give individuals of all ages working knowledge and greater understanding of: how much money you will need for retirement; the consequences of selected choices: college loans, cars, apartments, and social life; your total compensation that you can use in weighing new job offers and negotiating salary increases; how to establish a regular savings plan to reach your financial goals; how to take advantage of long term savings to be able to retire early. Participants will leave this session: knowing how to calculate “what your number is”- the savings you will need to retire; an expense tracker; and 10 ways to discover pockets of savings.

    Presentation: Small Decisions

    Standards for Excellence for Nonprofit Organizations
    Room 404

    During this session, nonprofit organizations can learn how to participate in PANO’s Standards for Excellence, which offers tools and resources to empower Community Benefit Organizations (nonprofits) to meet the highest standards of nonprofit governance, management and operations. This session will provide an overview of the program including an ethics and accountability code consisting of 6 Guiding Principles covering 27 topic areas that outline best practices and legal components of nonprofit operations, educational resources, training, and its two structured implementation programs: the Basics and a voluntary accreditation program.

    Presentation: Standards for Excellence

    Speakers:
    The Power of a Community's Voice: Hear it. Inspire It.
    Room 307

    Nonprofits, politicians, and businesses all use the word “community”. We use the word to describe a place, a district, a set of socio-economic and demographic characteristics that define a market. And when we use the word well, we emphasize that communities are dynamic, living, breathing, unique, and complex places filled with people who want their interests fairly represented. Unless a community and the people within it are engaged and they have their voices heard and their votes counted, the success and positive impact of programs, policies, products or services becomes questionable. Nonprofit VOTE and Jackson / Clark will address two main subjects in this session: 1) How and why nonprofits should engage voters in communities and, 2) Jackson / Clark will show you how planned and intentional community engagement efforts lead to community empowerment and active civic participation. Together these presenters will demonstrate that people within communities must and can be heard, inspired, and involved!

    Presentation: Power of Community Voice

    Values and Practices in Pittsburgh Philanthropy: Are We Practicing What We Preach?
    Room 306

    There are many people and organizations doing great work to strengthen our region, and there are numerous ways that grantmakers can structure their grants to support their work. What approaches does our community (both funders and nonprofits) believe make grants the most helpful and effective? What approaches are perceived as the ones most often used? Where do those beliefs and practices align? In late 2015, Grantmakers of Western PA asked both local funders and local nonprofits to tell them how they defined excellence in philanthropy, looking for where grantmakers and grantseekers agreed (and didn’t). In summer 2017, GWP is re-conducting its “Defining Excellence in Philanthropy” surveys and in this session the results will be shared. Those data will be the basis for a dialogue about which approaches to grantmaking in this community are most preferred – and which are most practiced.

    Presentation: Values and Practices in Pittsburgh Philanthropy

    Speakers:
    3:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    #2 Breakout Session
    Advancing Equity and Accessibility in the Arts Sector
    Room 311

    As the area’s arts service organization, the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (GPAC) has pri¬oritized both racial equity and accessibility. GPAC is a national model for increasing access to the arts among patrons, volunteers, employees, and artists with disabilities. They also seek to establish diversity, equity, and inclusion in the arts. Their strategies range from professional development workshops, networking, and micro grants, to policy research, convenings, and advocacy. In addition to GPAC staff, individuals with extensive, direct ex¬perience in racial equity and accessibility work will participate in the panel. The outcomes for session attendees will include learning how GPAC strategies, as well as partnerships throughout the non-profit sector, can advance goals in both racial equity and accessibility.

    Presentation: Advancing Equity and Accessibility

    Become Conversant in Investment Planning: It’s Like Learning a New Language
    Room 301

    Investment planning has its own language. Often it seems it is governed by an equally foreign and opaque set of policies. When on earth do you have time to learn how to speak and modestly interpret this lingo and the rules of this field? There is so much to think about every day. Often time is spent putting out fires, attending to programmatic design and delivery, writing and reporting on grants, and managing organizations’ operations. For many executives, the decisions that are required to manage retirement accounts and en¬dowments (if they exsist) is too unfamiliar a subject to know where to start or even to have an informed conversation with the Treasurer of our Board of Directors. Paul Brahim, CEO of BPU Investments is adept at helping nonprofit executives, regardless of their organization’s size, understand the language and concepts of the investment arena. Participants will leave this session conversant in investment planning and better informed to have these discussions with your board.

    Presentation: Becoming Conversant

    Speakers:
    Big Data: Uses in Other Fields, Application in Nonprofit
    Room 310
    Ever wanted the power of a big corporate data analytics team for your work? This session is designed for nonprofits, elected officials, and their staff. This session will explore how big companies think about data and how you can adapt these ideas to suit your organization and policy development work - no data experts required. On top of that BlastPoint will produce a data visualization that you can use for your presentations and proposals - all in a matter of minutes saving your organization hours of time and you personally a great deal of stress.

    This session will cover concepts like indexing, segmentation, and forecasting, and show how real examples from the world of marketing and analytics are within reach of anyone with the right tools. This session will also take a deep dive into thinking about data geographically. Included will be an introduction to sources of free data and access to a free iPython notebook for the technically inclined.
    Speakers:
    Census 2020: We All Have a Role. Government, Business, Nonprofits
    Room 305

    The United States Constitution requires that a census be taken every ten years. The next census takes place in 2020 and the time to start preparing for it is now. Everything from tax apportionment, political representation, and policy and program development for the next ten years will be based on the results of this census. Reaching hard-to-reach populations becomes even more critical and remains extraordinarily difficult. The proverbial “brick wall” is that the census process is undercapitalized and the implementation strategy makes it challenging to reach marginalized populations or transients. Its importance of recognizing and addressing these structural issues has recently been underscored by many. During this session, you will learn about the importance of the census, the challenges it faces for 2020, and how you as a government official, nonprofit, foundation leader, and business person can be involved.

    Presentations: Census 2020

    Speakers:
    Champagne Communications on a Beer Budget
    Room 404

    Don’t wait to hire a communications director to market your business or nonprofit online! This dynamic, interactive workshop, led by a talented team of communicators and multimedia producers, will arm participants with the skills needed to launch a successful social media campaign. You will learn how to: select and leverage social media networks, create content that stands out from the competition, build and engaged online community, produce professional photos and graphics (without being a professional). According to Pew Research Center, seven-in-ten Americans use social media to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves. Participants will leave this session with an action plan and low- to no-cost marketing tools to reach them.

    Presentation: Champagne Communications

    Speakers:
    Common Outcomes: How to Level the Playing Field for the Social Impact Sector
    Room 304

    Public companies are only required to submit one annual report to all of their investors. Nonprofit programs only create one amount of impact each year, so why do they have to report and describe their impact in different ways to different funders? Speaking with more than 20 years of experience, Jason Saul, CEO of Mission Measurement, a social impact data and consulting firm, will explore and define the challenges in standardizing data in the sector, impact measurement across nonprofits, foundations and governments and what this means for grant reporting. Jason will walk attendees through the Impact Genome Project®, a universal evidence base on all social impact sectors and how to use evidence to create better “success equations” and conduct an “outcomes inventory” for attendees’ specific program(s).

    Presentation: Common Outcomes

    Cultural Curation in 2017: A Conversation with Millennial Pittsburgh
    Room 303
    Pittsburgh is changing, from the look of our urban neighborhoods to the look of our people. That old “steel town” is on the verge of becoming a technological and millennial breeding ground not seen on this side of the entire United States. But does that story of millennial feel that way for our entire region, or just a select few? This panel will analyze and discuss how to both engage this highly influential group and what they believe the community at large can do to build on this story to make our region better for not only every adult, but every child as well.
    Demystifying “High Performance”
    Room 403

    Well-meaning good works are no longer sufficient laurels for a nonprofit to exist. The increasingly competitive world in which nonprofits provide services and vie for contracts requires they develop the internal wherewithal to sustain performance and drive “measurable” social impact. But what does that mean? Come join in a discussion led by representatives from The LEAP Ambassadors Community- a network of over 150 national nonprofit thought leaders, leader practitioners, progressive funders, policy makers, and instigators who focus on creating a field of practice relative to building high performing organizations. Participants will leave with a better understanding of what it means to be a high performing organization unbundled from academic language. But there is more! The Forbes Funds will announce the launching of a cohort which is designed for community based nonprofits to improve their capacity to continually improve their operations and results “within their means”. Participating organizations will have benefit of guidance from local peers, national ambassadors, and The Forbes Funds Executive in Residence Program.

    Presentation: Demystifying High Performance

    Financial Bench Strength on Your Board of Directors
    Room 405

    Developing your leadership pipeline for your board of directors is an ongoing challenge that all organizations must address. Grappling with how to do this to attract the right mix of skills and expertise to your board can be a tricky task. Assuring that your governing board has and utilizes adequate financial bench strength is especially important. During this session, you will learn why it is necessary to have experts on the board who can fill the role of Treasurer and how to best utilize this expertise in a systematic manner. Board by-laws typically outline the role of Treasurer to include financial oversight of the budget, filing of reports, assuring appropriate internal financial record management and policies are developed and being implemented, acting as a liaison to communicate with investment firms, auditors, and the full board. By developing a pipeline of this expertise while also establishing a working relationship with the Treasurer, the organization not only builds trust with regulatory and funding agencies, the organization positions itself to head off financial crisis long before it happens and proactively identify opportunities that will financially benefit the organization and the fulfillment of its mission.

    Presentation: Financial Bench Strength

    Making Change in Today's Environment: The Carnegie Bosch Institute. Sponsored by The Forbes Funds
    Room 306

    In today’s volatile policy environment, nonprofit organizations are under more pressure than ever to think creatively and decisively about how to efficiently and effectively deliver services. For some, this may mean program integration, lean management, affiliations, and even mergers or acquisitions. The extent of required change doesn’t necessarily correlate with community demand. In fact, all too often we see demand for services increase while funding disappears. A nimble nonprofit must respond accordingly by examining program types, the diversity of revenue streams, overhead, eliminations of duplication, and geographic need. But change does not come easy even when the need for it is apparent. Sometimes, organizational culture and history have not been adequately addressed as a starting point for discussing and planning for change. This session will examine change management from all angles. It will begin with organizational culture, how to gain consumer input, and then dive into the practical application of shifting management models.

    Presentation: Making Change in Today's Environment

    The Power of a Community's Voice: Hear it. Inspire It.
    Room 307

    Nonprofits, politicians, and businesses all use the word “community”. We use the word to describe a place, a district, a set of socio-economic and demographic characteristics that define a market. And when we use the word well, we emphasize that communities are dynamic, living, breathing, unique, and complex places filled with people who want their interests fairly represented. Unless a community and the people within it are engaged and they have their voices heard and their votes counted, the success and positive impact of programs, policies, products or services becomes questionable. Nonprofit VOTE and Jackson / Clark will address two main subjects in this session: 1) How and why nonprofits should engage voters in communities and, 2) Jackson / Clark will show you how planned and intentional community engagement efforts lead to community empowerment and active civic participation. Together these presenters will demonstrate that people within communities must and can be heard, inspired, and involved!

    Presentation: Power of Community Voice

    Unit Cost Analysis: How to Show Return on Investment. Sponsored by The Forbes Funds
    Room 302

    The standard practice of basing a nonprofit budget on a good understanding of projected revenue and an estimation of annual expenses seems practical. Yet, the simplicity of this all too often basic practice can create administrative problems for a nonprofit organization and it has the potential to steer the organization off course. Organizations need to get much better at understanding the cost drivers in their budget. Not doing so can cause an executive to make decisions based on the expertise of existing staff, funder’s preferences for initiatives and programming, and trends in the community. Good strategic decisions rest in positive return on investment. And, to get to that understanding, an organization must examine its direct and indirect costs of doing business by unit. The process seems daunting but done in an incremental manner, “costing out” a service creates an opportunity to truly examine the value of programming.

    Presentation: Unit Cost Analysis

    5:00 PM  -  5:30 PM
    UpPrize Social Innovation. Sponsored by BNY Mellon
    Mainstage
    UpPrize is focused on building an innovation engine for the social sector in southwestern PA by creating a pipeline of solutions designed to meet the needs of the nonprofit sector and improve service to our most vulnerable populations. Learn more about the challenge, the impact of past winners, and tools that may be of good use to your organization.
    5:30 PM  -  6:00 PM
    Keynote Address: Creating and Sustaining Healthy Communities & Our Collective Responsibility
    Mainstage

    Our collective mandate is to work collaboratively and act responsibly to foster the health and welfare of our citizens, our communities, and our global society. Our Pittsburgh region serves as a role model for effective thought leadership and collaboration among all our public, private, and nonprofit sector partners. As in the past, Pittsburgh will continue to shine as a global beacon of hope, health, and responsible stewardship. This Summit is our time for celebration and reflection for all that we have accomplished as we recommit our collective talents and energies to overcoming the challenges that we must still address and seizing upon the exciting opportunities that we will pursue together. The Greater Pittsburgh Region remains the City of Champions for all of us.

    Presentation: Holder Presentation

    Speakers:
    6:00 PM  -  7:00 PM
    Cocktails and Conversation
  • Friday, October 6, 2017
  •  
    7:45 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Doors Open
    Hallway
    8:30 AM  -  8:35 AM
    Welcome, Bobbi Watt Geer, Chair, GPNP Advisory Team Regional Vice President, United Way of SWPA
    Mainstage
    8:35 AM  -  8:45 AM
    Collaborative Leadership, Samantha Balbier, Executive Director, GPNP
    Mainstage
    8:45 AM  -  9:00 AM
    100% Pittsburgh, Maxwell King, President and CEO, The Pittsburgh Foundation
    Mainstage
    9:00 AM  -  9:45 AM
    Keynote Address: Six Disruptive Demographics That Will Change the U.S. Forever
    Mainstage

    Our nation is in the midst of an unprecedented demographic transformation—a set of changes that will drive U.S. competitiveness in the foreseeable future. Mutually beneficial strategic alliance building across the nonprofit, private, and public sectors is required to effectively respond to six specific disruptive demographic trends that will dramatically transform the U.S. workforce, workplaces, consumer markets, and communities.

    Presentation: Dr. Johnson Presentation

    Speakers:
    10:00 AM  -  12:00 PM
    #1 Community Dialogue
     

    Economic Equity

    Building Assets and Wealth for the Region: Leveraging Data and Best Practices to Expand Prosperity
    Room 404-405

    This session will begin by presenting the most current data on the state of financial inclusion, economic security, and asset ownership provided by the 2017 Prosperity Now Scorecard, the nation’s most comprehensive benchmarking tool on how well states and communities build and protect the assets of their residents. This analysis will be followed by an overview of program and policy solutions with proven track records for building assets and wealth, identifying which of these solutions are already in operation in the region and can be expanded and which new solutions could address unmet meets in the community. The goal of the session will be to provide participants with the data and information to inform the selection of concrete action steps designed to advance both equity and innovation in the region.

    Presentation: Building Wealth and Assets for the Region

    The Future of Work: Three Perspectives
    Room 310

    The global economy has undergone substantial change over the past three decades, and the effects have been felt keenly in our own region. Today, the Pittsburgh region is undergoing something of a post-industrial renaissance, but not all communities are sharing equally in the new growth. The new technologies being developed at Carnegie Mellon University and in the startups it has spawned promise to bring further disruption to labor markets, in our region and across the nation. At the same time, longstanding goals of gender and racial equity have yet to be achieved. How can we ensure that the benefits of innovation-driven growth are shared in a more equitable way. Three experts offer three different perspectives on possible paths forward.

    Presentation: Future of Work

     

    Education Equity. Sponsored by Grable Foundation

    Equity in Public Education Financing
    Room 306-307

    Inequity continues to plague the distribution of educational resources across our Commonwealth. Participants will join the speakers in in addressing this complicated and politically charged conversation to determine how our communities can better support a system that creates a level playing field so all children can thrive and be prepared for tomorrow’s workforce. In this session, participants will hear how school funding currently works in Pennsylvania and how we arrived in this situation. Participants will hear firsthand from you and regional leaders how this impacts school districts and what this means for the economic future of Pennsylvania. The goal of this session is to build a region in southwestern PA that not just understands the problems, but leads in developing solutions.

    Presentation: Equity in Public Ed Financing

    Strengthening Collective Leadership
    Room 305
    A dialogue based session on addressing equity in leadership development across sectors and its importance for community impact. Participants will build their network as they learn from and share ideas and experiences with participants from the public, business and nonprofit sectors.
     

    Health Equity

    How to Address Diversity in Service Delivery. Sponsored by The Forbes Funds
    Room 403

    Have you and your staff been trained to understand how to be sensitive, affirming, and welcoming to all those with whom your organization may come into contact? Meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse workforce and client-base should be a priority no matter your organization’s mission. Leaders need to set the bar for inclusiveness starting within their own organizations making sure they can interact with everyone – colleagues, clients, board members, partners, and others – appropriately. Led by Lucy Powell and Katrina Keane from Adagio Health, this session will provide attendees with the opportunity to ask questions, debunk stereotypes, and learn inclusive language. Participants will gain an enhanced understanding of the following topics: differences between sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expressions; LGBTQIA+ terminology; cultural sensitive and inclusivity of the LGBTQIA+ community, including employees, patients, clients, and community partners; the transgender umbrella and appropriate pronoun use; stigma and discrimination associated with being a sexual and gender minority; how policies and laws both statewide and federally impact the lives of LGBTQIA+ people; health disparities among the LGBTQIA+ community and how providers can positively impact health outcomes. The session will also include templates for a variety of forms and policies that can be adapted for your organization including intake forms, HR forms (ex: language for inclusive job descriptions), and signage.

    Presentation: How to Address Diversity in Service Delivery

    Speakers:
    Women on Behalf of Women: Examining Women’s Health Equity in Pittsburgh
    Room 311
    What does women’s health equity mean, and what needs to be addressed for our region to attain it? Equity has many components. Inequities and disparities in healthcare access, research trials, salary, board representation, and even roles within the care team are some of the contributing factors. Throwing open the issue and engaging in an honest dialogue is an important step in moving towards an equitable future. A panel of experts from both the private and public sectors will discuss their vision for attaining health equity. Panelists will identify the challenges and barriers they see to access, promising current practices, potential workforce solutions, policy needs and opportunities, and ways to engage in meaningful cross-sectional collaboration.

    Attendees are invited to contribute and engage in this important community dialogue about identifying ways the region can move the needle on women’s health equity and identify action steps for attaining it.
     

    Equity in Community

    Redistricting Reform: Choosing Who Represents You. Sponsored by The Pittsburgh Foundation
    Room 303-304

    A key element of democracy is citizens’ ability to choose and replace the government through free and fair elections. When local, state, or federal districts are drawn in a way that is inconsistent with federal or state guidelines (equal population, race & ethnicity, competitive political outcomes, compactness, contiguity), then free and fair elections are no longer possible and you have gerrymandering. Pennsylvania is considered to be a Gerrymandered state. This workshop outlines the ongoing advocacy efforts of non-profits and advocates in Pennsylvania.

    Presentation: Redistricting Reform

    Resiliency: Finding Common Bonds Across the Region
    Room 301-302

    If you listen to news you here a lot of about "urban-rural divides", "fractured politics" or "Red and Blue America", but if you look a little closer is there more that binds us together than spreads us apart?

    The City of Pittsburgh recently completed its first Resilience Strategy as part of the Rockefeller 100 Resilient Cities program. The strategy identifies the key shocks and stresses facing the City and opportunities to address them. Similarly, as we look across the region many of the same challenges are being identified in other communities in the region, just at different scales and, in fact, several communities are taking similar strides as Pittsburgh to build and capture a vision for the future.

    The purpose of the discuss is to convene a set of diverse voices to share these common regional challenges and explore ways to better bind together urban, suburban and rural voices to make a stronger region. 

    http://pittsburghpa.gov/onepgh/index.html

     
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    "The Hallway" Lunch
    Hallway
    1:15 PM  -  3:15 PM
    #2 Community Dialogue
     

    Economic Equity

    Making Impact: Exploring Maker Movement’s Potential to Elevate Underserved Populations
    Room 310
    The Maker Movement receives increasing national attention for its influence on many aspects of modern life from education to manufacturing to recreation. The movement’s growth manifests as Maker Spaces appearing in libraries, 3D printers shaping public school practices, and online platforms democratizing retail for small-batch manufacturers. Western Pennsylvania’s history of manufacturing, persistent post-industrial challenges, and emerging tech sector make the region a prime candidate for the Maker Movement’s ambitious and innovative promises. But what are the prospects for meaningful and lasting social impact from the Maker Movement? How can it elevate underserved populations currently left out of the region’s new economic growth? How can the Maker Movement create opportunities for those struggling with employment and entrepreneurship? The presenters will collaborate with session attendees to explore these questions, and help identify strategies to channel the Maker Movement into economic and social impact that benefits a larger and more diverse citizenry of Western Pennsylvania.
    The State of Tax Credit Programs: What’s in your Neighborhood. Sponsored by UPMC
    Room 306-307

    State tax credits are an important and useful way to enhance economic and community development by fostering public-private partnerships that entice not only businesses and non-profits, but the government as well. During this panel discussion, participants will hear about the state of state tax credits with regard to the Pennsylvania budget and learn about one tax credit in particular that is getting a lot of attention in southwestern PA and in the legislature: the Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP) Tax Credit. The NAP is doing great things for our under-served neighborhoods, engaging our business community and supporting the tax base of our state government. This is not your typical tax credit!

    Presentation: State of Tax Credit Programs.

     

    Education Equity. Sponsored by Grable Foundation

    Addressing Equity through Education Innovation Practices
    Room 305

    Join Remake Learning Network members for an overview of the practices integrating education innovation and equity. Learn about common and useful definitions of “equity,” and an in-depth look at two local educators that have integrated these methods into practice with regional students. The session will end with facilitated table discussions around the opportunities and challenges faced by educators and how the nonprofit sector can support relevant, engaging, and equitable learning throughout the region.

    Presentation: Addressing Equity through Education Innovation

    Education Equity at the Intersections of Race, Gender, Disability and Discipline
    Room 311

    Join the speakers for a conversation on the state of education opportunities, outcomes, and discipline – informed by data, research, policy, and student experiences – as we envision a future that advances racial, gender, and disability equity in education.

    Presentation: Education Equity at Intersections

     

    Health Equity

    Federal and State Health and Human Services Policy and Impact on Communities. Sponsored by UPMC
    Room 301-302
    Changes are inevitable in the delivery of human and community based services. We are witnessing another belabored state budget passage in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Will people in southwestern PA continue to gain access to critical services and will the sustainability of the nonprofit organizations who serve them be at risk? Coupled with emerging and potentially drastic federal policy changes, our communities and nonprofits are sure to feel the impact.

    This session is designed to organize the nonprofit and community-serving organizations in our region to assure that our voices are heard. Change may be in the midst and we need to be sure that we are at the table while new ideas are proposed and as new policies take effect.
    Let’s EngAge: How Aging Impacts All of Us. Sponsored by United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Room 404-405
    Southwestern Pennsylvania is experiencing an unprecedented demographic shift. We all know we already have one of the oldest populations in the country, but in the next two decades, residents ages 65+ will increase by 40 percent. While the topic of getting older may induce anxiety or yawns, the reality is that we have a huge opportunity on our hands. There are certainly challenges ahead, but we have a growing number of people with buying power, professional expertise, lived experience and diverse skill sets and interests that can be harnessed to make our communities stronger than ever. Whether you’re in the business, government or nonprofit sector, chances are you’re already serving and representing people of different generations. This session will equip you with the latest information on programs and policies that support older adults and their loved ones, and show you new ways to engage older people within your programs, fundraising strategy, volunteer base and more.
    Marrying Policy, Practice and Moral Leadership to Prevent Violence: SWPA Says No More
    Room 403

    Domestic and sexual violence affects as many as 1 in 3 women. Over recent decades, advocates have been successful at educating the public, securing important budget allocations and policy gains, and building a network of lifesaving services to assist victims of abuse. These achievements have profoundly changed the way we think and talk about gender-based violence, but our focus shouldn’t stop with helping those who have already been abused. These crimes are 100% preventable. True prevention requires moral leadership from men as well as women, research, changes in policy and practice, and a broad network of stakeholders. Learn about Southwest PA Says No More’s approach as a model for addressing complex social issues.

    Presentation: Marrying Policy and Practice

     

    Equity in Community

    Nonprofits Bringing the Light: Moral Leadership on Race. Sponsored by The Heinz Endowments
    Room 303-304

    This session is a continuation of conversations from The Heinz Endowments grantee meeting focused on moral leadership. Join us for this opportunity to engage with leaders from Alliance For Justice, The Anti-Defamation League and PublicSource to consider what the non-profit community can do to support equity for the clients we serve. Reflections from the grantee meeting will be shared, along with new information about the current climate in the non-profit sector.

    Presentation: Nonprofits Bringing the Light

     
    3:30 PM  -  3:40 PM
    Introduction to Dr. Kerzin, Bill Strickland, President and CEO, Manchester Bidwell Corporation
    Mainstage
    3:45 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Keynote Address
    Mainstage
    Speakers:
    4:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Summit Closing
    Mainstage
    Scott Lammie, The Forbes Funds Chairman of the Board; Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, UPMC Insurance Services Division, UPMC HealthPlan

    Samantha Balbier, Executive Director, GPNP
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