2017
LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Screen watchers



THURSDAY, JUNE 8

RPT-S CLINICAL SUPERVISION
(Assessment; Research and Program Evaluation)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT

Objectives:
1. Discuss 2 or more clinical challenges in play therapy and family therapy. 
2. Identify 2 or more ways of advancing therapy goals by offering directive and non-directive play therapy approaches. 
3. Offer play and family therapists at least 2 ways to incorporate play therapy principles and techniques during supervision.

Drewes, A. E. & Mullen J. A., (Eds.), (2011). Supervision can be playful: Techniques for child and play therapist supervisors. NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.


SYMBOLS IN THE SAND: AN INTERACTIVE EXPLORATION FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, PhD


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 types of theoretical approaches to understand and respond to a client’s sand scene. 
2. Describe the role of the therapist as witness, boundary-keeper, and facilitator in the play therapy room when using sand. 
3. Explain the principles of non-interference, non-judgment, and Voice in the ethical practice of sandplay in play therapy and psychotherapy.

Bradway, K. (1991). "Transference and countertransference in sandplay therapy." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 1, 25-43.


FRIDAY, JUNE 9

PARTNERS IN PLAY: AN OVERVIEW OF ADLERIAN PLAY THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Terry Kottman, PhD, NCC, RPT-S, LMHC


Objectives:
1. Describe 1 strategy for building a relationship with the child in Adlerian play therapy.
2. Describe 1 strategy for exploring the child's lifestyle in Adlerian play therapy.
3. Describe 1 strategy for helping the child gain insight into his/her lifestyle in Adlerian play therapy.
4. Describe 1 strategy for reorientation/reeducation of the child in Adlerian play therapy.

Kottman, T., & Meany-Walen, K. (2016). Partners in play: An Adlerian approach to play therapy (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
Meany-Walen, K., & Kottman, T. (2016). "Adlerian play therapy for children with externalizing behaviors." In A. Drewes & C. Schaefer (Eds.), Play therapy in middle childhood. Washington, DC: American Psychology Association.
Kottman, T., & Meany-Walen, K. (2015). "Adlerian family play therapy." In E. Green, J. Baggerly, & A. Myrick (Eds.), Counseling families: Play-based treatment (pp. 71-87). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.


MAKING ALTERED BOOKS IN PLAY & EXPRESSIVE THERAPY WITH PEOPLE OF ALL AGES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Katerina Evans, ATR, LCPC

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 safety considerations and ways to support containment through altered books..
2. List 3 or more themes related to identity development that can be explored through altered book making in clinical work and education..
3. Practice 3 techniques in an altered book which can be used with adults and adolescents.

Chilton, G (2007). "Altered books in art therapy with adolescents." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association 24(2): 59–63, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07421656.2007.10129588
Scotti, V. & Prentice, A., (2016). "Altered Coffee Table Books as an Inquiry into Transitioning to Motherhood: A Visual Comment." Studies in the Maternal. 8(1), p.7. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/sim.211
Van Lith, T (2015). "Art Making as a Mental Health Recovery Tool for Change and Coping." Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association 32(1): 5-12, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07421656.2015.992826


CHOOSING AN EFFECTIVE PLAY THERAPY MODEL: UNDERSTANDING THEIR STRENGTHS & DIFFERENCES

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Research and Program Evaluation)
Jennifer Lefebre-McGevna, PsyD, RPT-S
Jodi Cobb, MS, MFT, LGMFT
Jennifer Shaw, PsyD
Andrea Driggs McLeod, LCSW, RPT-S
Heather Bryan, LPC, RPT


Objectives: 
1. Identify 3 practical methods for working with countertransference in play therapy. (Lefebre-McGevna)
2. Name at least 4 internal disciplines of the reflective play therapist to help keep the passion for the work alive. (Lefebre-McGevna)
3. Name 3 key approaches to coping with work stressors in order to avoid burnout in play therapy practices. (Lefebre-McGevna)
4. Describe the 4 dimensions of Theraplay. (Cobb)
5. Name at least 1 activity that can be used to facilitate the goals of each of the 4 of the Theraplay dimensions. (Cobb)
6. Name at least 1 child-oriented and one parent-oriented goal related to Theraplay treatment. (Cobb)
7. Define integrative play therapy. (Shaw)
8. Describe 3 components of an integrative play therapy treatment plan. (Shaw)
9. Name 2 play therapy approaches that can be integrated for treatment of a child with complex trauma. (Shaw)
10. Discuss a rationale for utilizing child-centered play therapy. (Driggs McLeod)
11. List 3 of Axline’s 8 Basic Principles.  (Driggs McLeod)
12. List 2 ways in which children may feel comfortable showing their feelings. (Driggs McLeod)

Drewes, A. A., Bratton, S. C., & Schaefer, C. E. (Eds.). (2011). Integrative play therapy. NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A.E., & Sniscak, C.C. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy. New York , NY: Guilford Press.
Booth, P. B., & Jernberg, A. M. (2009). Theraplay: Helping parents and children build better relationships through attachment-based play. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.
Munns, E. (2000). Theraplay: Innovations in attachment-enhancing play therapy: Jason Aronson, Incorporated
Weir, K. N., Lee, S., Canosa, P., Rodrigues, N., McWilliams, M., & Parker, L. (2013). "Whole family Theraplay: Integrating family systems theory and Theraplay to treat adoptive families." Adoption Quarterly, 16(3-4), 175-200.
Drewes, A. A. (Ed.). (2009). Blending play therapy with cognitive behavioral therapy: Evidence-based and other effective treatments and techniques. John Wiley & Sons.
Drewes, A. A., & Cavett, A. M. (2012). Play applications and skills components. Trauma-focused CBT for children and adolescents: Treatment applications, 105-123.
Knell, S. M. (1998). "Cognitive-behavioral play therapy." Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27(1), 28-33.


POST-TRAUMATIC PLAY THERAPY: CO-CREATING FAMILY NARRATIVES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT


Objectives:
1. Define and describe 2 types of post-traumatic play. 
2. List 3 characteristics of post-trauma play. 
3. List the 3 stages of post-trauma play. 
4. List 2 benefits of co-created familial narratives.

Shelby, J. S. (2000).  "Brief therapy with traumatized children: A developmental perspective. " In H. Kaduson & C. Schaefer (Eds.), Short-term play interventions (pp.69-104).  New York:  Guilford Press.
Reyes, C. J. & Asbrand, J. P. (2005).  "A longitudinal study assessing trauma symptoms in sexually abused children engaged in play therapy. " International Journal of Play Therapy, 14(2), pp. 25-47. 

 

ESSENTIALS OF ADLERIAN PLAY THERAPY: CONCEPTUALIZING FOR SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Terry Kottman, PhD, NCC, RPT-S, LMHC


Objectives:
1. Identify the 4 Crucial Cs as described in Adlerian play therapy.
2. Describe the 4 personality priorities that are part of the Adlerian approach to play therapy.
3. Name and describe the 4 goals of misbehavior as they are described in Adlerian play therapy.

Kottman, T., & Meany-Walen, K. (2016). Partners in play: An Adlerian approach to play therapy (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
Meany-Walen, K., & Kottman, T. (2015). "Adlerian play therapy with children affected by externalizing behavioral disorders." In E. Green & Amie Myrick (Eds.), Play therapy with vulnerable populations: No child forgotten (pp. 177-194). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
Kottman, T., & Ashby, J. (2015). "Adlerian play therapy." In D. Crenshaw & A. Stewart (Eds.), Play therapy: A comprehensive guide to theory and practice (pp. 32-47). New York, NY: Guilford.


SAND THERAPY COMPETENCIES: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND COLLEAGUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD


Objectives:
1. Describe 3 theoretical approaches to work with sand therapy and the implications for client process.
2. Identify 3 principles for clinician competency and the ethical use of sand therapy in the context of play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy.
3. Explain 3 guiding principles relevant to culture, identity, and trauma that impact sand therapy work, and their implications for the practice of play therapy and expressive arts therapy.

Bradway, K. (1997). Sandplay: Silent workshop of the psyche. New York, NY: Routledge.


SENSORY GARDENS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN AND OTHERS IN TREATMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Kelvin Ramirez, PhD, LCAT, ATR-BC
Anne Meore, LMSW, HTR
Elizabeth Youngs, ATR-BC
Erika Mayer, LCAT, ATR-BC
Rebecca Hervieux


Objectives:
1. Understand the general history of horticultural therapy, define its contemporary functions, and identify 2 benefits of therapeutically engaging the senses. 
2. Identify and Integrate 3 convergent and 3 divergent theoretical foundations among the expressive arts therapies, play therapy, and horticultural therapy. 
3. Demonstrate through workshop experientials and discussions 3 benefits of integrating the expressive arts therapies and/or play therapy within the therapeutic framework of sensory gardens/horticultural therapy.

Hussein, H. (2011). "The Influence of Sensory Gardens on the Behavior of Children with Special Education Needs." Asian Journal of Environment-Behavior Studies, 2(4), 77-93.
Kaplan, S. (1995).  "The Restorative Benefits of Nature:  Toward an Integrative Framework."  The Journal of Environmental Psychology, 15 169-182.
Cooper Marcus, C. & Barnes, M. (1999). Healing Gardens:  Therapeutic Benefits & Design Recommendations. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.


ENGAGING THE LGBTQIA CLIENT EFFECTIVELY IN TREATMENT: WHAT PLAY AND ARTS THERAPISTS NEED TO KNOW
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Daniel Blausey, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT


Objectives:
1. Identify 1 or more distinctions between each of these terms: sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression. 
2. Describe 2 or more ways that the unconscious bias of the therapist can impact the nature of the relationship or outcome of treatment when working with LGBTQ families and children. 
3. List 3 arts and/or play based therapy interventions for nurturing a positive and empowered sense of identity for use with clients and families within the LGBTQIA community.

Moon, B.L., (2006). Ethical issues in art therapy (2nd ed.). Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas Publisher, LTD.
Talwar, S., (2015) "Culture, Diversity, and Identity: From Margins to Center," Art Therapy, 32(3), 100-103, DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2015.1060563
Waller, D., (1999). Forward. In J. Campbell, M. Lieberman, J. Jones, & C. Ward (Eds.) Art therapy, race, and culture. London: Jessica Kingsley.


COMPLICATED GRIEF, COLLAGE & TRAUMA THEORY: AN ARTFUL INTEGRATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Sharon Strouse, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT


Objectives:
1. Describe 4 ways the creative process of collage can help the bereaved re-vision narratives of loss and create meaning to enhance their work in treatment and in their daily lives.
2. Identify 3 features of complicated grief as a form of complex trauma.
3. Describe 3 tenets of grief and bereavement theory that can be applied to work in counseling, expressive arts, and play therapy.

Thompson, Barbara E., and Robert A. Neimeyer. Grief and the Expressive Arts: Practices for Creating Meaning.  2014. Print.
Attig, T., (2001). in Neimeyer, R.A. Meaning Reconstruction & the Experience of Loss. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Frederickson, J., (2013).  Co-Creating Change:  Effective Dynamic Therapy Techniques.  Kansas City: Seven Leaves Press.


MUSIC, MOVEMENT, AND MINDFUL PLAY WITH HIGH-RISK CHILDREN & THEIR PARENTS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Susan Taylor, CMA, LCSW-C
Carole Norris-Shortle, LCSW-C, RPT-S
Kim Cosgrove, LCSW-C


Objectives:
1. Learn 2 ways to incorporate mindfulness into clinical self-awareness and work with young children and their parents in child and play therapy.
2. Describe 2 mindful meditations that can be incorporated into child and play therapy sessions.
3. Learn 3 strategies to help parents mindfully follow their child’s lead in play.
4. Learn 2 body awareness strategies that counselors and child and play therapists introduce to enhance parent-child interaction and clinical self-awareness. 
5. Learn 2 strategies to incorporate body and sound exploration into attachment-based dyadic play that can be used in child and play therapy sessions, as well as at home.

Hill, C.L.M., & Updegraff, J.A. (2012). "Mindfulness and its relationship to emotional regulation." Emotion, 12(1), 81-90.
Mehr, S.A., Song, L.A., & Spelke, E. S. (2016). "For 5-month-old infants, melodies are social."  Psychological Science, 27(4) 1-16. doi:10.1177/0956797615626691
Trehub, S.E., Ghazban, N., & `eve Corbeil, M. (2015).  "Musical affect regulation in infancy." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1337 (2015), 186-192. doi:10.1111/nyas.12622


BIBLIOTHERAPY & PLAY THERAPY: STORIES FOR HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tammi Van Hollander, RPT, LCSW


Objectives:
1. Learn 2 key tenets of using bibliotherapy with children in play therapy and in combination with other clinical/educational approaches.
2. List 3 or more types of developmentally appropriate books that will enhance behavioral and clinical goals in play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy with young people.
3. Describe 4 creative bibliotherapy/play therapy interventions that can be used with young clients in clinical and other other settings.

Cattanach, A. (1997). Children's Stories in Play Therapy. UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Schechtman, Z. (2008). Treating Child and Adolescent Aggression Through Bibliotherapy. NYC: Springer.
Pardeck, J. (1993). Bibliotherapy: A Clinical Approach for Helping Children. UK: Routledge.


DIGITAL DANGERS & OPPORTUNITIES: GUIDING KIDS AND PARENTS REGARDING ONLINE PLAY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Heather Bryan, LPC, RPT
Terry Kottman, PhD, NCC, RPT-S, LMHC


Objectives:
1. Identify 7 psychological/emotional outcomes that will inform play therapists in their work with children who have experienced cyberbullying. (Bryan)
2. Explore at least 3 or more play therapy/expressive arts-based assessment and intervention techniques for working with youth coping with technology concerns. (Bryan)
3. Identify at least 4 or more resources that can help play therapists, parents, and others to assist young people in avoiding or coping with cyberbullying. (Bryan)
4. Cite 2 reasons that child and play therapists should know about video game vocabulary. (Kottman) 
5. List 4 video game vocabulary words that counselors, play therapists, and others could use to connect with their clients who play video games. (Kottman)
6. Describe 1 play therapy intervention that uses video game characters or concepts. (Kottman)

Cowie, Helen (2013). "Cyberbullying and its impact on young people’s emotional health and well-being." Bjpsych Bulletin, 37: 167-176.
Friedman Lauri (2010). Cyberbullying. San Diego: Greenhaven press.
Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J.W. (2007). "Offline consequences of online victimization: School violence and delinquency." Journal of School Violence, 6(3),89-112.
Kowert, R., & Quardt (T). (Eds.).  (2016). The video game debate: Unraveling the physical, social, and psychological effects of digital games. New York, NY: Routledge.
Madigan, J. (2016). Getting gamers: The psychology of video games and their impact on the people who play them. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
Gold, J. (2015). Screen-smart parenting: How to find balance and benefit in your child's use of social media, apps, and digital devices. New York: Guilford.


SATURDAY, JUNE 10

DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment)
Anne Mills, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT
Barry M. Cohen, MA, ATR-BC


Objectives:
1. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations. 
2. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice. 
3. Report results from at least 3 normative DDS studies of psychiatric diagnostic groups.


Mills, A., Cohen, B. M., & Meneses, J. Z. (1993). "Reliability and validity tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 20(1), 83-88.


SOUNDS LIKE FUN! PLAY THERAPY WITH TWEENS AND PRE-TEENS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Jeffrey Ashby, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 primary issues and challenges of working with latency and adolescent age clients in play therapy. 
2. Use 3 selected play therapy techniques with pre-adolescent and adolescent clients. 
3. Use 2 selected art and expressive arts techniques with pre-adolescent and adolescent clients.


Cochran, J.L, Fauth, D.J., Cochran, N.H. Spurgeon, S.L., & Pierce, L.M. (2010).  "Growing play therapy up: Extending child-centered play therapy to highly aggressive teenage boys."  Person-Centered & Experiential Psychotherapies, 9, 290-301.
Fazio-Griffith, L.J., & Marino, R. (2017).  "A cognitive-behavioral play therapy (CBPT) approach for adolescents’ pro-social skills development in the school setting."  In R.L. Steen (ed.),  Emerging Research in Play Therapy, Child Counseling and Consultation, IGI Global: Hershey, PA.
Underwood, L.A. & Dailey, F.L. (2016).  Counseling adolescents competently. Sage Publications: Thousand Oaks, CA.



WORKING WITH AGGRESSION IN PLAY THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jeffrey Ashby, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 underlying dynamics of children who present with angry, defiant, and aggressive behavior. 
2. Describe 2 expressive art techniques that can be used effectively with angry and defiant play therapy clients. 
3. List 2 or more experiential play therapy techniques that can be use with angry and defiant clients in child and play therapy.


Ezpeleta , L., Granero, R., de la Osa, N., Trepat, E., & Domènech, J. D. (2016). "Trajectories of Oppositional Defiant Disorder irritability symptoms in preschool children."  Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 44, 115-128
Meany-Walen, K.K., Bratton, S.C., & Kottman, T. (2014).  "Effects of play therapy on reducing students’ disruptive behaviors."  Journal of Counseling and Development, 92, 47-51.
Sukhodolsky, D. G., Smith, S. D., McCauley, S. A., Ibrahim, K., & Piasecka, J. B. (2012). "Behavioral interventions for anger, irritability, and aggression in children and adolescents."  Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 42, 116-125.


THERAPEUTIC PUPPETRY APPROACHES FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Matthew Bernier, MCAT, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. Identify and define 3 psychological principles of therapeutic puppetry. 
2. State the construction techniques of 3 simple puppets that can be used in counseling, play therapy and psychotherapy. 
3. Name 3 interactive therapeutic puppetry techniques that can be used in play therapy, counseling, and other clinical interventions. 

Aronoff, M. (2005). "Puppetry as a therapeutic medium: An introduction." In Bernier, M. & O’Hare, J. (Eds.) (2005).  Puppetry in education and therapy: Unlocking doors to the mind and heart. Bloomington, IN: Authorhouse.


ASSESSMENT OF PARENTS & CHILDREN USING PLAY AND THERAPLAY
(Human Growth and Development; Assessment)
Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Identify 4 domains of functioning when assessing children and families in child or play therapy.
2. Name at least 4 play-based techniques that can enhance the understanding of child/family functioning. 
3. Name at least 3 key approaches for assessing strengths and areas of weakness in a parent-child relationship that can be used by counselors, play therapists, and psychotherapists.


Booth, P. and Jernberg. A. ( 2010). Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Relationships Through Attachment-Based Play. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Gil, E. (2015). Play in Family Therapy. The Guildford Press. New York.

Gil, E. (2011)."The Extended Play-Based Development Assessment (EPBDA)." Retrieved from http://www.gilinstitute.com/services/assessment/epbda.php


INTEGRATING SANDPLAY WITH PLAY THERAPY: CONSULTATION & PRACTICE

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Rosalind Heiko, PhD, ISST
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT

Objectives:

1. List 2 sand therapy techniques that can be integrated easily with play therapy. 
2. Name 2 directive and nondirective uses of sand therapy. 
3. Name 2 ways in which the goals of sand and play therapies are the same. 
4. List 2 variables that contribute to cultural competency in sandwork approaches.

Cunningham, L. (2013). Sandplay and the clinical relationship. CA: Sempervirens Press.
Gil, E. and Crenshaw, D. (2015). Termination Challenges in Child Psychotherapy. NY: The Guilford Press.
Friedman, H. and Mitchell, R. (2007). Supervision of Sandplay Therapy. UK: Routledge.

CREATIVITY & RESILIENCE: A GUIDE TO USING MUSIC, MOVEMENT & ART FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Flossie Ierardi, MM, MT-BC, LPC
Dawn Morningstar, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC
Michele Rattigan MA, ATR-BC, NCC, LPC

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 expressive arts-based experiences for establishing safety in the therapeutic relationship. 
2. Describe 2 art, music, or movement experiences that access client strengths and can be used by counselors and child and play therapists. 
3. Develop one arts-based strategy that clinicians can use for engaging in self-care.


Metzl, E.S. & Morrell, M.A. (2008). "The role of creativity in models of resilience: Theoretical exploration and practical applications. " Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, vol. 3(3), pp. 303-318.

Gude, O. (2010). Playing, creativity, possibility. Art Education, 63 (2). Retrieved from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20694822

Harvey, S. (1990). "Dynamic play therapy: An integrative expressive art approach to family therapy of young children." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 17, 239-246

USE OF ART IN PLAY THERAPY WITH TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, ATR-BC, LCPAT

Objectives:
1. Identify 4 or more ways trauma impacts the development of young children, including neurodevelopment, physiological, emotional, and physical domains. 
2. List 4 or more trauma-focused multi-sensory art interventions that address specific treatment goals and trauma stages for child and play therapy. 
3. Name 4 or more ways art therapy integrates the trauma treatment models of  Perry, Siegel and van der Kolk, that can be integrated into the work of play therapists and others.

Perry, B.D.(2008). "Child maltreatment in the role of abuse and neglect in developmental psychopathology." Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. (Eds.Beauchaine and Hinshaw). Wiley. NY. pp.93-128.
Daniel J. Siegel, Tina Payne Bryson.(2011) The Whole Brain Child. Random House.
Chapman, Linda (2015). Neurobiologicallly Informed Trauma Therapy with Children and Adolescents. Norton. NY.


PLAYING WITH PLAYBACK THEATRE: EMPOWERING CHILDREN WITH THEIR OWN STORIES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Jennie Kristel, MA, REAT, APTT, RMT
Jason Jedrusiak, CYT

Objectives:
1. Identify 2 core theories and practices of Playback Theatre that can be used by counselors, play therapists, and others in daily clinical work.
2. List 3 uses of Sociometry and Playback Theatre in clinical uses with children. 
3. Describe 3 Playback Theatre forms that can be used as a method to develop agency and increase self esteem in working with children in counseling, play therapy, and psychotherapy.


Fox, Jonathan. Acts of Service: Spontaneity, Commitment, Tradition in the Nonscripted Theatre. New Paltz, NY: Tusitala Pub., 1994. Print. 


TF-CBT, EMDR, CPP IN PLAY THERAPY & TRAUMA TREATMENT
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Jennifer Lefebre-McGevna, PsyD, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Define the 6 core components of trauma-informed therapies that can be used by counselors, play therapists, and psychotherapists in treatment. 
2. Identify 5 or more sensory and play-based activities that can be used by child and play therapists in daily trauma-informed practice.
3. Name and describe 3 of most prevalent diagnostic categories related to children with histories of complex trauma.


van der Kolk, B.  (2014).  The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.  New York, NY:  Viking Press.


NEUROBIOLOGY OF PLAY THERAPY: NEUROSENSORY PLAY INTERACTIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Ken Schwartzenberger, LCSW, RPT-S, EPT-D

Objectives:
1. Name the 7 sensory systems and 3 or more elements of a child’s sensory profile for working with children in play therapy who have sensory integration/modulation difficulties. 
2. List 3 sensory-based activities that target specific areas of the brain impacted by trauma to calm/soothe a child’s central nervous system and regulate accompanying emotional and behavioral reactions. 
3. Use 5 sensory-based play interventions to increase self-regulation and self-soothing skills, improve social emotional functioning, and support resilience for children with trauma histories.


Kestly, Theresa A. (2014). The interpersonal biology of play: Brain-building interventions for emotional well-being. NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.
Lillas, C. & Turnbull, J. (2009).  Infant/Child Mental Health, Early Intervention, and Relationship-Based Therapies: A Neurorelationship Framework for Interdisciplinary ​Practice. NY: Norton & Company, Inc.
Perry, B. D.(2008).  "Applying Principles of Neurodevelopment to Clinical Work with Maltreated and Traumatized Children" in: Working with Traumatized Youth in Child Welfare. (Ed. Nancy Boyd Webb), NY: Guilford Press, pp. 27-52.


JOURNALING, PLAY THERAPY & MINDFULNESS: WALKING A PATH TO RESILIENCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Tammi Van Hollander, RPT, LCSW
Cherie Spehar, CTC-S, RPT-S, LCSW

Objectives:
1. List and describe 4 or more expressive interventions for creating mindfulness that can be used by counselors, play therapists, and psychotherapists in a variety of clinical settings with a variety of clinical populations. 
2. Describe 3 or more clinical benefits of the combined use of journal therapy, play therapy, and mindfulness interventions. 
3. Identify 2 or more steps of the Sensitive Reflection Process, as they pertain to enhancing the outcomes of play-based journal therapy interventions.


Artress, Lauren. Walking a Sacred Path: Rediscovering the Labyrinth as a Spiritual Practice. New York: Riverhead, 2006.
Crenshaw, David A., Robert B. Brooks, and Sam Goldstein. Play Therapy Interventions to Enhance Resilience. New York: Guilford, 2015.
Hayes, Louise L., and Joseph Ciarrochi. The Thriving Adolescent: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Positive Psychology to Help Teens Manage Emotions, Achieve Goals, and Build Connection. Oakland, CA: Context, 2015.


SATURDAY EVENING PLAY THERAPY SUPERVISION: EXPLORING DIFFICULT CASES
(Assessment; Research and Program Evaluation)
David Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S

Objectives:

1. Identify 3 practical methods for working with countertransference in play therapy. 
2. Name 2 or more internal disciplines that the reflective play therapist can draw upon in order to deal with the emotional toll of difficult play therapy cases. 
3. Name 2 key approaches to self-monitoring and self-supervision when working with challenging cases in play therapy.

Seymour, J. W., & Crenshaw, D. A. (2015). "Reflective practice in play therapy and supervision." In D. A. Crenshaw &  A. L. Stewart (Eds.), Play Therapy: A comprehensive guide to theory and practice (pp. 483-495). New York: Guilford Press.
Ronnestad, M. H., & Skovholt, T. M. (2013). The developing practitioner: Growth and stagnation of therapists and counselors. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis.
Drewes, A.A., & Bratton, S. C., & Schaefer, C. E. (2011). Integrative play therapy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

SUNDAY, JUNE 11

COURAGEOUS KIDZ: PLAY THERAPY FOR THE ANXIETY DISORDERS
(Human Growth and Development; Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Scott Riviere, MS, LPC, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 factors that contribute to anxiety in children. 
2. List 4 anxiety disorders common to childhood that are often seen in the play therapy office and other clinical settings.
3. List 5 play-based interventions to reduce/manage anxiety that can be used by play therapists, counselors, and psychotherapists in daily clinical practice.


Zelinger, L. and Zelinger, J. (2014).  Please Explain Anxiety to Me! Simple Biology and Solutions for Children and Parents, 2nd Edition. Loving Healing Press, Ann Arbor, MI.
Huebner, D. and Matthews, B. (2005).  What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid's Guide to Overcoming Anxiety.  Magination Press, Washington, D.C.
March, J. and Mulle Friesen, K. (1998).  OCD in Children and Adolescents: A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Model. Guilford Press, New York, NY.



SOULCOLLAGE® FOR PARTS WORK: HARNESSING THE POWER OF ARCHETYPAL IMAGERY & COLLAGE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Katerina Evans, ATR, LCPC


Objectives:
1. Learn 1 or more ways to incorporate SoulCollage® in therapeutic and educational settings with people of various ages and issues. 
2. Learn 3 or more principles of SoulCollage® as it pertains to human development and personality.
3. List 3 strategies for facilitating psychological containment and safety while using the SoulCollage® process.


Holmes, T., Holmes, L., & Eckstein, S. (2007). Parts work: an illustrated guide to your inner life. Kalamazoo, MI: Winged Heart Press.
Parisian, K. (2015). "Identity Formation: Art Therapy and an Adolescent's Search for Self and Belonging," Art Therapy Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 32:3, 130-135, DOI: 10.1080/07421656.2015.1061257
Weiss, N., & Raphael, J. (2013). How to make MeCards4Kids: creative expression for children and the grown-ups in their lives. Santa Cruz, California USA: Hanford Mead , Inc.


DIAGNOSTIC DRAWING SERIES TRAINING: 30 YEARS OF ASSESSMENT THROUGH ART
(Assessment)
Anne Mills, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT
Barry M. Cohen, MA, ATR-BC

Objectives:
1. Identify 5 benefits of using this valid and reliable art interview with varied clinical populations. 
2. Describe 3 opportunities for using the DDS in clinical practice. 
3. Report results from at least 3 normative DDS studies of psychiatric diagnostic groups.

Mills, A., Cohen, B. M., & Meneses, J. Z. (1993). "Reliability and validity tests of the Diagnostic Drawing Series." The Arts in Psychotherapy, 20(1), 83-88.


FROM NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT TO ART & PLAY THERAPY INTERVENTIONS USING THE ETC
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Assessment)
Dawn Burau, ATR, LMHC, SpEd
Daniel Reinstein, PhD


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 or more neuropsychological functions and how they impact art making and play therapy. 
2. Identify 3 strengths and 3 vulnerabilities within a neuropsychological profile and how these strengths and vulnerabilities impact daily functioning.
3. Name 3 levels of the Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC) and relate each level to at least one neuropsychological functional domain to generate meaningful intervention in child or play therapy.


Hinz, L. (2009). Expressive Therapies Continuum: A Framework for Using Art in Therapy. New York, NY: Routledge, Inc.
Misurell, J., Springer, C., Acosta, L. Liotta, L., & Kranzler, A. (2014).  "Game-based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy individual model (GB-CBT-IM) for child sexual abuse: A preliminary outcome study."  Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy. 6(3), 250 - 258.
Riccio, C. A., Sullivan, F. R. & Cohen, M. J. (2010).  Neuropsychological Assessment and Intervention for Childhood and Adolescent Disorders. Hoboken, NJ; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


PLAY THERAPY FOR RELATIONAL TREATMENT OF CHILDREN ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development; Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Jodi Cobb, PhD, LCMFT


Objectives:
1. Describe how 2 or more core deficits of ASD can disrupt the guided participation relationship between parent and child in play therapy.
2. Describe 1 or more ways that having an autism spectrum disorder impacts play and playful engagement with others.
3. Name at least 3 real-world approaches that include play therapy for increasing experience-sharing communication, co-regulation, social reciprocity, mindful engagement, and flexible thinking.

Gutstein, S. E. (2009). The RDI® Book: Forging New Pathways for Autism. Asperger’s and PDD with the Relationship Intervention® Program. Houston, TX: Connections Center Publishing.
Hobson, R. P. (2010). "Explaining autism: Ten reasons to focus on the developing self." Autism, 14(5), 391-407.
Seach, D. (2007). Interactive play for children with autism. New York, NY: Routledge.


THE USE OF TOUCH IN PLAY THERAPY
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Janet Courtney, PhD, LCSW, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. List at least 10 suggested guidelines related to touch in play therapy. 
2. Describe 3 ethical considerations surrounding touch in a play therapy session. 
3. Name 3 strategies children can be taught about personal space boundaries in play therapy and other kinds of clinical sessions. 

Field, T. (2014). Touch (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Gray, S. W., Courtney, J. A., Nolan, R. D. (2017). "Competencies and Recommendations Supporting the Ethics of Touch in Child Counseling and Play Therapy."  In J. A. Courtney & R. D. Nolan (Eds.), Touch in Child Counseling and Play Therapy: An Ethical and Clinical Guide (pp. 217-230). New York, NY: Routledge.
Gil, E., & Shaw, J. A. (2014). Working with children with sexual behavior problems. New York, NY: Guilford Press.


PLAY THERAPY CASES THAT TAUGHT ME THE MOST: PACING & SAFETY, AFFECT & RESILIENCE 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Research and Program Evaluation)
David Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S


Objectives:

1. Identify 5 or more factors that influence the play therapy process other than theory or technique. 
2. Identify 3 features of play therapy that enhance safety and facilitates pacing in traumatized youngsters. 
3. Describe 3 cardinal features of therapeutic presence.

Gil, E., Konrath, E., Shaw, J., Goldin, M., & Bryan, H, (2015). "Integrative approach to play therapy," In D. A. Crenshaw &  A. L. Stewart (Eds.), Play Therapy: A comprehensive guide to theory and practice (pp. 99-113). New York: Guilford Press.
Gaskill, R. L., & Perry, B. D. (2014). "The neurobiological power of play." In C. A. Malchiodi & D. A. Crenshaw (Eds.) Creative arts and play therapy for attachment problems (pp. 178-194). New York: Guilford Press.
Stewart, A. L., & Echterling, L. G. (2014). "Play and the therapeutic relationship."  In C. Schaefer & A. Drewes (Eds.), The therapeutic powers of play (2nd ed., pp. 157-170).  New York: Wiley.


PLAY THERAPY FOR CLIENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Christine Frydenborg Dargon, PhD


Objectives:
1. Identify 2 or more play therapy techniques for addressing the underlying issues related to eating disorders including self-esteem, trauma, anxiety, and control. 
2. Identify 1 or more reasons for using directive versus non-directive tasks in play therapy with young people who have eating disorders. 
3. Describe 2 or more ways that play therapy techniques can trigger the limbic system of the brain, particularly in working with young clients who have experienced trauma.


Austin, S. B., Ziyadeh, N. J., Forman, S., Prokop, L.A., Keliher, A., and Jacobs, D. (2008). "Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative." Preventing Chronic Disease, Volume 5(4).
Achenbach, T. M. &Edelbrock, C. (1983). Manual for the Child and Behavior Checklist and Revised Child Behavior Profile.  Burlington, VT: University Associates in Psychiatry.
Bee, H. & Boyd, D. (2004). The Developing Child, 10th Edition. New York: Pearson. 


THERAPLAY TO PROMOTE ATTACHMENT WITH GROUPS & FAMILIES
(Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. Identify 3 key elements that increase family connection in play therapy and at home.
2. Name 5 or more activities that foster attunement in family and group settings. 
3. List at least 2 family/group principles that were observed in the video Theraplay sessions shown.


Booth, P. and Jernberg. A. ( 2010).Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Relationships Through Attachment-Based Play. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.
Booth, P.; Lerner, D., and Wedel, J. (2016). Theraplay Parenting for Adoptive and Foster Families Trainer Manual. The Theraplay Institute, Evanston, IL.
Geller, S. and Porges, S. (2014). "Therapeutic Presence: Neurophysiological Mechanisms Mediating Feeling Safe in Therapeutic Relationships." Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, Vol 24, Number 3, 178-192.



NARRATIVE SAND THERAPY©: INTO THE HEART OF HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD


Objectives:
1. Describe 4 key principles of Narrative Sand Therapy in clinical practice and how they might pertain to its integration with child and play therapy practice. 
2. Distinguish 3 differences in theory and practice among sandtray, Sandplay, and Narrative Sand Therapy. 
3. Explain how to validate and amplify a client’s experience using 2 narrative approaches that could be applied to play therapy situations.


Cameron, J. (1996). The vein of gold: A journey to your creative heart. A Jeremy P. Tarcher/ Putnam Books: NY.

 

BIG BAG-O-TRICKS: CREATIVE PLAY INTERVENTIONS FOR ATTENTION DIFFERENT CHILDREN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development; Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Scott Riviere, MS, LPC, RPT-S


Objectives:
1. Identify 2 other disorders that share symptoms similar to ADHD. 
2. Name two or more reasons that traditional "punishment-based" approaches are ineffective in play therapy.
3. List two benefits of directive and nondirective techniques in play therapy.


Edidin, J. P., Karnik, N. S., Hunter, S. J. and Steiner, H. (2012) "Disruptive Behavior Disorders," in Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition (eds W. M. Klykylo and J. Kay), John Wiley & Sons.
Garner, A.A.,  Gentry, A., Welburn, S.C.,  Fine, P.R., Franklin, C.A., Stavrinos, D.  (2012).  "Symptom Dimensions of Disruptive Behavior Disorders" in Adolescent Drivers.  Journal of Attention Disorders, April.
Hallowell, E.M. and Ratey, J.J. (2011).  Driven to Distraction (Revised): Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder.  Anchor Books, New York, New York.



CROSS RACIAL DYNAMICS IN THE PLAY THERAPY ROOM
(Social and Cultural Foundations; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
Xanthia Johnson, LPC, LCPC, RPT-S

Objectives:
1. Identify 3 key considerations for addressing cross-racial dynamics in play therapy and other clinical settings. 
2. Name at least 3 cross-racial play therapy dynamics that will also inform the work of child therapists and other clinicians. 
3. Name 3 toy recommendations for use in processing cross-racial play therapy dynamics.

Gil, Eliana (Ed); Drewes, Athena A. (Ed). (2005) Cultural issues in play therapy, xxiv 216 pp. New York, NY, US: Guilford Press. 
Brumfield, Kristy Alaine, "African-American Parents' Perceptions of Play, Counseling, and Play therapy" (2006). University of New Orleans theses and Dissertations. Paper 417
Vaughn, Krystal M., "Play therapist's Perspectives on Culturally Sensitive Play therapy" (2012). University of New Orleans theses and Dissertations. Paper 1491.

 

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