2018
LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Amygdala Slide




THURSDAY, JUNE 28

ART & DRAMA CONSULTATION FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Judy Rubin, PhD, ATR-BC, HLM
Ellie Irwin, PhD, RDT, TEP
 
Objectives:

1. List 2 similarities or 2 differences between art or drama therapy and play therapy with children.
2. Describe 2 or more techniques for engaging reluctant young clients in creative activities in play therapy or other types of counseling or therapy sessions.
3. Identify 3 reasons for integrating creative arts techniques into play therapy, counseling, or psychotherapy sessions with children and teens.

Weber, A.M. & Haen, C., (Eds.), (2004). Clinical Applications of Drama Therapy in Child and Adolescent Treatment, 1st Edition. NY: Routledge.
Rubin, J.A., (2011). The Art of Art Therapy: What Every Art Therapist Needs to Know, 2nd Edition. NY: Routledge.
Rubin, J.A., (2005). Child Art Therapy, 3rd Edition. Wiley.

PLAY THERAPY GROUP SUPERVISION
(Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 2 essential reasons for using play therapy approaches and techniques with traumatized children. 
2. Identify 2 or more ways of advancing therapy goals by offering directive and non-directive play therapy approaches.
3. List 2 play therapy techniques that can be used to process countertransference with child clients.
 
Drewes, A. E. & Mullen J. A., (Eds.), (2011). Supervision can be playful: Techniques for child and play therapist supervisors. NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 
 
Heller, S. S. & Gilkerson, L. (2009).  A practical guide to reflective supervision.  ZERO TO THREE: Danvers: MA.

Gil, E., & Rubin, L. (2005) Countertransference play: Informing and enhancing therapist self-awareness through play. International Journal of Play Therapy, 14(2), 87-102.

 
METAPHOR, ANALOGY & MYTH, OH MY! THE HEALING POWERS OF OZ IN PLAY THERAPY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)
Lisa Saldaña, MS
 
Objectives:
 
1. Give 2 examples of how using therapeutic metaphors in play therapy can positively affect the level of empathic understanding. 
2. Describe 2 examples of how play therapy clients use metaphors in therapy sessions. 
3. Name 2 non-Oz examples of the "Hero's Journey" saga, describing this archetypal narrative's potential use in play therapy.
 
Bergen, B. (2012). Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning. New York: Basic Books. 
 
Cozolino, L. (2016). Why Therapy Works: Using our Minds to Change our Brains. New York: W.W. Norton & Company 
 
Lakoff, G. & Johnson, M. (1980) Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of Chicago Press
 
SYMBOLS IN THE SAND: AN INTERACTIVE EXPLORATION FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 theoretical approaches that enable play therapists to understand and respond to a client's sand scene in play therapy sessions. 
2. Describe the role of the therapist as witness, boundary-keeper, and facilitator in the play therapy room when using sand. 
3. Explain the principles of non-interference, non-judgment, and Voice in the ethical practice of Sand Therapy in play therapy and psychotherapy.
 
Bradway, K. (1991). “Transference and countertransference in sandplay therapy.” Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 1, 25-43. 
 
Chodorow, J. (Ed.) (1997). Encountering Jung: On active imagination. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 
 
Turner, B. A. (1993). "Symbolic process and the role of the therapist in sandplay." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 3, 85-95.
 
TERMINATION ISSUES IN PLAY THERAPY
Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Human Growth and Development)
David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 2 reasons why open-ended terminations in play therapy are developmentally sensitive. 
2. Describe 2 practical tools for addressing countertransference issues in the play therapist when therapy ends abruptly.
3. List 2 play therapy techniques that can be used to address termination in play therapy.
 
Deakin, E., Marina, G., & Nunes, M. L. (2012). "Child Psychotherapy dropout: An empirical research review." Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 38(2), 199-209. 
 
Delgado, S. V., & Stawn, J. R. (2012).  "Termination of psychodynamic psychotherapy with adolescents: A review and contemporary perspective." Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 76(1). 21-52. 
 
Cohen, J. A., Mannarino, A.P., & Murray, L.K. (2011). "Trauma-focused CBT for youth who experience ongoing traumas." Child Abuse and Neglect, 35, 637-646.




FRIDAY, JUNE 29

FRIDAY MORNING PLENARY
 
ANIMALS IN THE CULTURE OF CHILDHOOD: WHAT PLAY THERAPISTS NEED TO KNOW
(Human Growth and Development; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 distinct ways in which animals play a role in the culture of childhood that might be reflected in play therapy. 
2. Describe at least 3 techniques involving animal images that therapists can use to further child treatment goals. 
3. Define at least 4 of the therapist and animal competencies required when conducting Animal Assisted Play Therapy™.
 
Melson, G. F. (2001). Why the wild things are: Animals in the lives of children. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 
 
Melson, G.F., & Fine, A.H. (2015). "Animals in the lives of children." In A.H. Fine (Ed.), Handbook on animal-assisted therapy: Foundations and guidelines for animal-assisted interventions (4th ed., pp. 179-194). San Diego, CA: Academic Press. 
 
VanFleet, R., & Faa-Thompson, T. Animal Assisted Play Therapy. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press.
 

FRIDAY MASTER CLASSES
 
HEALING THEIR FURY: RESEARCH-INFORMED PLAY THERAPY WITH AGGRESSIVE CHILDREN
(Human Growth and DevelopmentClinical Interventions and Evidence-based PracticePsychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)
David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 practical methods for monitoring and working therapeutically with countertransference feelings in play therapy with aggressive children. 
2. Name 3 common-sense safety precautions when working in play therapy with aggressive youngsters. 
3. Describe the 3 elements of therapeutic presence in play therapy.
4. Name 3 examples of affect-porous symbols in play therapy. 
5. Give 3 indicators of exceeding the windows of affect tolerance in play therapy with aggressive children.
 
Decety, J., Chen, C., Harenki, C., & Kiehl, K. A. (2013). "An fMRI study of affective perspective taking in individuals with psychopathy: Imaging another in pain does not evoke empathy." Frontiers of Human Neurosciences, 7(1), 489. 
 
Freyd, J. J., & Birrell, P. (2013). Blind to betrayal. New York: Wiley. 
 
Ray, D., Blanco, P.J., Sullivan, J. M., & Holiman, R. (2009). "An exploratory study of child-centered play therapy with aggressive children." International Journal of Play Therapy, 18 (3), 162-175.
 
ALTERED BOOKS WITH ORIGAMI FOR ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Mindy Jacobson-Levy, MCAT, ATR-BC, LPC, DVATA HLM
Laura Bauder
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define 2 aspects of art therapy and play therapy that are similar, and two aspects that differ.  
2. Identify 3 clinical goals that can be met in play therapy or art therapy that incorporate art and origami materials.  
3. Identify 2 ways that working with origami and altered books therapeutically can foster relationship-building in art therapy and play therapy. 
4. Identify 2 symptoms that may decrease when clients are engaged in therapeutic origami activities and/or creating altered books in play therapy or art therapy.
5. List 2 origami folding methods and 2 altered book techniques that can promote cognitive problem solving and self-expression in play and art therapy.
 
Boruga, A. (2011). "Origami art as a means of facilitating learning." Procedia -Social and Behavioral Sciences, 11, 32-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.01.028 
 
Taylor, H. A., & Tenbrink, T. (2013). "The spatial thinking of origami: evidence from think-aloud protocols." Cognitive Processing, 14(2), 189-191. doi:10.1007/s10339-013-0540-x  
 
Lang, R. J. (1988). The Complete Book of Origami. Step by step Instructions in Over 1000 Diagrams. New York: Dover Publications Inc.
 
THE EXTENDED PLAY-BASED DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT (EPBDA) WITH CHILDREN & THEIR FAMILIES
(Assessment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Jennifer Shaw, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify the 4 primary elements of the EPBDA.
2. List 4 play therapy activities that are used in administering the EPBDA. 
3. List 2 reasons why thematic material in the child’s play therapy should always be chronicled. 
4. List 2 ways in which the EPBDA can set the context for future treatment in play therapy.
5. List 2 reasons why play therapy can be effective, especially when child clients are hesitant to talk in treatment.
 
Greenspan, S. I. (1997). Developmentally Based Psychotherapy. Madison, CT: International Universities Press. 
 
Greenspan, S. I. (1981).  The clinical interview of the child. NY: McGraw-Hill. 
 
Lieberman, A. F., Van Horn, P. (2008). Psychotherapy with infants and young children: Repairing the effects of stress and trauma on early attachment: NY: The Guilford Press.
 
FAMILY RELATIONSHIP APPROACHES IN PLAY THERAPY FOR CHILDREN: SIMILARITIES & DIFFERENCES FOR CLINICAL APPLICATION
(Human Growth and Development; Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 different models used for including parents in play therapy with children. 
2. Define at least 2 differences between solution-focused and process-oriented parent-child interventions in play therapy practice. 
3. Define all of the "essential features" of Filial Therapy. 
4. State at least 2 ways in which Filial Therapy and Child-Parent Relationship Therapy are similar to each other. 
5. Describe at least 2 ways in which FT and CPRT are different from each other.
 
VanFleet, R. (2014). Filial Therapy: Strengthening parent-child relationships through play, 3rd ed. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press.
 
Landreth, G.L. (2012). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. 
 
Eyberg, S.M., Funderburk, B.W., Hembree-Kigin, T.L., McNeil, C.B., Querido, J.G., & Hood, K.K. (2001). "Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with behavior problem children: One and two year maintenance of treatment effects in the family." Child and Family Behavior Therapy, 23 (4), 1-20.
 
INTEGRATING SOMATIC & SENSORY THERAPIES WITH PLAY FOR COMPLEX TRAUMA
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 or more movement patterns involved in the fight-or-flight response in children. 
2. Learn 2 or more playful ways to teach children about the brain-body relationship. 
3. Identify 3 or more embodied play therapy techniques for working with trauma-related symptoms in children, adolescents, and adults. 
4. List 2 or more strategies to improve affect regulation and foster resilience in people with complex trauma. 
5. Name 3 or more gestures or non-verbal cues that can be observed in play therapy and can indicate a child’s psychological experience.
 
Ogden, P., & Fisher, J. (2015). Sensorimotor psychotherapy: Interventions for trauma and attachment. WW Norton & Company. 
 
van der Kolk, B.  (2014).  The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.  New York, NY:  Viking Press. 
 
Langmuir, J. I., Kirsh, S. G., & Classen, C. C. (2012). "A pilot study of body-oriented group psychotherapy: Adapting sensorimotor psychotherapy for the group treatment of trauma." Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 4(2), 214.
 
SAND THERAPY COMPETENCIES: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND COLLEAGUES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 theoretical approaches to working with Sand Therapy. 
2. Identify 3 principles for clinician competency when using sand and symbols in the context of play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy. 
3. State 3 manifestations of culture and identity in sand therapy and their implications for play therapy. 
4. Define 3 ethical principles to guide clinician competency that are essential for the practice of play therapy and Sand Therapy. 
5. Name 3 "best practices" that anchor clinician competency in play therapy and Sand Therapy.
 
Bradway, K. (1997). Sandplay: Silent workshop of the psyche. New York, NY: Routledge. 
 
Weinrib, E.L. (1983). Images of the self.  Boston: Sego Press. 
 
Boik, B. L. & Goodwin. E. A. (2000). Sandplay Therapy: A step-by-step manual for psychotherapists of diverse orientations. New York: Norton and Company.

 
FRIDAY LUNCH & LEARNS
 
NATURE AS CO-THERAPIST IN ECO-PLAY THERAPY
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Wellness and Prevention)
Janet Courtney, PhD, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 elements of nature that can be used therapeutically in play therapy sessions with children. 
2. State at least 3 precautions to consider when using stones and other natural objects in play therapy sessions.  
3. Describe the 5-step process of how to create a therapeutic nature-based activity that can be used during a play therapy session.
 
Kopytin, A. & Rugh, M. (Eds.). Environmental Expressive Therapies: Nature-Assisted Theory and Practice. New York, NY: Routledge.    
 
Swank, J. M., & Shin, S. (2015). "Nature-based child-centered play therapy: An innovative counseling approach." International Journal of Play Therapy, 24(3), 151-161.  
 
Louv, R. (2012). The nature principle: Reconnecting with life in a virtual age. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books.
 
PLAY THERAPISTS IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Andrea Driggs McLeod, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 benefits of integrating play therapy into school settings. 
2. Describe 2 approaches to explaining the therapeutic powers of play to non-mental health professionals and parents. 
3. Name 2 ways to set a therapeutic limit in the context of navigating multiple roles as a school-based play therapist.
 
Ray, D. C., & Landreth, G. L. (2015). "Child-centered play therapy." In D. A. Crenshaw & A. L. Stewart (Eds.), Play therapy: A comprehensive guide to theory and practice (pp. 3–16). New York: Guilford Press.  
 
Gil, E. (2006). Helping abused and traumatized children: Integrating directive and nondirective approaches. New York: Guilford Press.
 
FRIDAY EVENING SESSIONS
 
EXPRESSIVE WRITING AND JOURNALING FOR SELF-CARE FOR PLAY THERAPISTS AND OTHERS
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences; Wellness and Prevention)
Deborah Ross, CJT, LPC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 4 components of well-being whose circuitry demonstrates neuroplasticity and how that relates to writing for play therapist self-care.  
2. Identify 2 ways that the brain's velcro/teflon bias can manifest in writing and 2 techniques that play therapists can use to transform that bias.  
3. Name 2 ways that play therapists can use a Reflection Write that puts the author in relationship with her writing and at least 1 way to use that knowledge when writing for self-supervision and self-care.
 
Adams, K. (2013). "Expression and reflection: Toward a new paradigm in expressive writing." In Expressive writing: Foundations of practice, K. Adams, ed. Latham MD:  Rowman and Littlefield Education. 1-29.    
 
Siegel, D.J. (2012) The pocket guide to interpersonal neurobiology: An integrative handbook of the mind.   New York: W.W. Norton.
 
Thompson, K. (2011) Therapeutic Journal Writing. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 
PLAY THERAPY FOR SEXUAL AND GENDER IDENTITY EXPLORATION
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)
Quinn K. Smelser, MA, NCC, LPC, RPT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define 2 constructs of gender identity versus sexual identity as it applies to children and families in play therapy.  
2. Name at least 3 activities to use in play therapy with families whose children have sexual or gender identity issues.  
3. Identify 3 methods for advocating as a play therapist for gender-expansive children.
 
Perrin, E., E. Menvielle, & C. Tuerk. (2007). “To the Beat of a Different Drummer: The Gender Variant Child.” Contemporary Pediatrics. 
 
Meir, C., & Harris, J. Fact Sheet: Gender Diversity and Transgender Identity in Children. Retrieved from: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-44/resources/advocacy/transgender-children.pdf 
 
Ehrensa , D. (2011). Gender born, gender made: Raising healthy gender- nonconforming children. New York, NY: e Experiment.
 
PLAY THERAPY SUPERVISION: ADDRESSING PARENT AND CAREGIVER ISSUES
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Robert Grant, EdD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
1. Name at least 2 challenging areas when working with parents/caregivers in play therapy. 
2. Identify at least 2 resources or tools for working with parents/caregivers in play therapy.  
3. Define 2 or more typical successful outcomes from working and interacting with parents/caregivers in play therapy.
 
Killough-McGuire, D. & McGuire, D. E. (2001). Linking parents to play therapy: A practical guide with applications, interventions, and case studies. Philadelphia, PA: Routledge.  
 
Crane, J. (2001). "The parents’ part in the play therapy process." In Landreth, G. (Ed), Innovations in play therapy: issues, process, and special populations (pp. 83-95). Philadelphia, PA: Routledge.  
 
VanFleet, R. (2014). Filial Therapy: strengthening parent-child relationships through play (3rd Edition). Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press.
 
SUICIDE PREVENTION & RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT PLAY THERAPISTS NEED TO KNOW
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Assessment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Leslie Baker, MA, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, MS, MFT, NCC, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 3 risk assessment factors to identify potential suicidal behavior in children and teens in play therapy. 
2. Identify at least 3 warning signs to identify potential suicidal behavior in children and teens in play therapy.  
3. Identify at least 3 protective factors that may reduce the risk of suicidal behavior in children and teens in play therapy.
 
National Center for Health Statistics. (2017, March 17). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/suicide.htm 
 
Gateway to Health Communication & Social Marketing Practice. (2017, September 15). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/toolstemplates/entertainmented/tips/suicideyouth.html 
 
CDC Features. (2017, August 09). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from    http://www.cdc.gov/Features/PreventingSuicide/ index.html.
 
TECHNOLOGY & PLAY THERAPY: INNOVATIONS, INTEGRATION & IMPACT
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Social and Cultural Foundations)
Rachel A. Altvater, PsyD, LCPC, RPT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 2 or more ways that the new world of technology impacts children and influences their participation in play therapy.  
2. Identify 2 positive and 2 negative impacts of technology on a child’s play as it relates to the incorporation of technology in play therapy sessions. 
3. List 3 technological interventions that can be used in the playroom during a play therapy session.
 
Delfos, M. F. (2003). "The conquered giant: The use of the computer in play therapy."  In F. J. Maarsse, A. E. Akkerman, A. N. Brand, & L. J. M. Mulder (Eds.), Clinical Assessment, Computerized Methods, and Instrumentation (pp. 53-65). Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger. 
 
Seligman, S. (2011). "Effects of new technologies on child psychotherapy: Discussion of clinical papers from the conference," “Where the wired things are: Children and technology in treatment.” Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 10, 422-427. doi: 10.1080/15289168.2011.614190 
 
Snow, M. S., Winburn, A., Crumrine, L., Jackson, E., & Killian, T. (2012). "The iPad playroom: A therapeutic technique." Play Therapy, 7(3), 16-19.

SATURDAY, JUNE 30

SATURDAY MORNING PLENARY

CREATING SAFE CIRCLES: HELPING PLAY THERAPISTS HOLD "HARD STORIES" FROM TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Paris Goodyear-Brown, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 roles that play therapists can take to support caregivers to help enhance their attachments with the children in their care. 
2. List 6 co-regulation strategies, encoded in the acronym SOOTHE, that play therapists can offer to the caregivers of vulnerable children. 
3. Name 4 play therapy materials that can be used to help caregivers hold the extra-linguistic aspects of a child’s story.
 
Powell, B., Cooper, G., Hoffman, K., & Marvin, B. (2013). The circle of security intervention: Enhancing attachment in early parent-child relationships. Guilford Publications. 
 
Pernicano, P. (2014). Using trauma-focused therapy stories: Interventions for therapists, children, and their caregivers. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, New York, NY. 
 
Goodyear-Brown, P. (2009). Play Therapy with Traumatized Children: A Prescriptive Approach. New Jersey: Wiley & Sons.
 
SATURDAY MASTER CLASSES
 
AUTO-REGULATION AND PLAY THERAPY: HEALING THE BODY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define the 3 layers of the dysregulation > co-regulation > auto-regulation trajectory that play therapists can work toward when treating traumatized children. 
2. Identify 2 or more key dysregulation symptoms that can be observed in the play therapy activity of young clients that affect their physical and emotional well-being.  
3. Describe 3 or more movement patterns, gestures or non-verbal cues in play therapy that indicate a child’s psychological experience. 
4. List 4-6 play therapy interventions that can help to reduce "melt-downs" and improve auto-regulation in child clients. 
5. Describe the 2 states or levels of arousal, and name play therapy strategies for working with each.
 
Drewes, A. A., Bratton, S. C., & Schaefer, C. E. (2011). Integrative play therapy. John Wiley & Sons. 
 
Elias, C. L., & Berk, L. E. (2002). "Self-regulation in young children: Is there a role for sociodramatic play?" Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 17(2), 216-238. 
 
Berk, L. E., Mann, T. D., & Ogan, A. T. (2006). "Make-believe play: Wellspring for development of self-regulation." Play= learning: How play motivates and enhances children’s cognitive and social-emotional growth, 74-100.
 
PLAY THERAPY WITH ADHD CHILDREN
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Heidi G. Kaduson, PhD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 3 play therapy techniques to enhance verbalization of feelings in play therapy session. 
2. Name 2 characteristics that are necessary for a play therapist treating children with ADHD.  
3. Identify 4 therapeutic powers of play therapy that facilitate the child’s healing process. 
4. Identify which play techniques can be used in the intake with a child who has ADHD. 
5. What is the key component to successful treatment with play therapy for ADHD children. 
 
Barkley, R.A. (2013).  Taking charge of ADHD: The Complete Authoritative Guide for Parents.  New York: Guilford. 
 
Crenshaw, D.A. & Stewart, A.L. (2016).  Play Therapy: A Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice. New York: Guilford. 
 
Schaefer, C.E. & Drewes, A.A. (2013).  The Therapeutic Powers of Play: 20 Core Agents of Change.  New York: Guilford.
 
AUTPLAY® WITH CHILDREN ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM

(Human Growth and Development; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Robert Grant, EdD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 2 or more symptoms of autism and state their implications for working in play therapy.       
2. Identify the basic components of AutPlay® Therapy, including phases of treatment and primary/secondary target areas.
3. Define 2 or more key theoretical underpinnings of AutPlay® as influenced by play therapy approaches and behavioral therapy. 
4. List at least 5 play therapy interventions that can be used with children who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.  
5. List 2 or more play-based strategies for incorporating parents into the AutPlay® protocol.
 
Grant, R. J. (2016). AutPlay® therapy for children and adolescents on the autism spectrum: a behavioral play-based approach. New York, NY: Routledge.  
 
Parker, N., & O’Brien, P. (2011). "Play therapy reaching the child with autism," International Journal of Special Education, 26, 80-87. 
 
Rubin, L. (2012). "Playing in the autism spectrum." In Gallo-Lopez, L., & Rubin, L. C. (Eds.), Play based interventions for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (19- 35). NY: Routledge.
 
BEAT THE ODDS®: SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL SKILL BUILDING THROUGH DRUMMING IN PLAY THERAPY
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development; Group Dynamics and Counseling; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Ping Ho, MA, MPH
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT (Discussant)
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 ways that rhythmic activities can be useful to play therapists in working with traumatized youngsters. 
2. Identify at least 2 nonverbal ways in which play therapists can facilitate empathy and connection through rhythmic activities. 
3. Name at least 2 strategies that play therapists can use to facilitate participation among children who are shy, reluctant to share verbally, or play the drum. 
4. State 2 rhythmic activities that can be used in play therapy groups to build self-disclosure skills. 
5. List at least 3 overall strategies in adapting the Beat the Odds® curriculum for older children in play therapy.
 
Ho P, Tsao JCI, Bloch L, Zeltzer L. "The Impact of Group Drumming on Social-emotional Behavior in Low-income Children. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine." 2011;Article ID 250708, 14 pages, doi: 10.1093/ecam/neq072. 
 
Kokal I, Engel A, Kirschner S. "Synchronized drumming enhances activity in the caudate and facilitates prosocial commitment – if the rhythm comes easily." PLoS One. 2011. 6(11): e27272. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027272. 
 
Sebastian Kirschner and Michael Tomasello. "Joint Drumming: Social Context Facilitates Synchronization in Preschool Children." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2009; Vol. 102, No. 3: pp 299–314.
 
HEALING ATTACHMENT & TRAUMA THROUGH FIRSTPLAY KINESTHETIC STORYTELLING®
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)
Janet Courtney, PhD, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. State 3 differences between symbolic play and pre-symbolic play in play therapy settings.
2. List the 5 underlying theoretical models upon which FirstPlay Kinesthetic Storytelling® is based.
3. Name 3 caring touch interactions that play therapists can teach parents to improve their parent-child relationships.  
4. Name the 4 steps for play therapists can use to facilitate an ethical, respectful Kinesthetic Storytelling® session between parents and children. 
5. Describe how to implement the 10 different activities found in the Magic Rainbow Hug story as a therapeutic intervention during play therapy sessions.
 
Schore, A. N. & Schore, J. R. (2012). "Modern attachment theory: The central role of affect
 regulation in development and treatment." In A. N. Schore (Ed.), The science of the art of psychotherapy (pp. 27-51). New York, NY: Norton.
 
Mills, J. C., & Crowley, R. J. (2014). Therapeutic metaphors for children and the child within (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. 
 
Field, T. (2011). "Massage therapy: A review of the recent research." In M. J. Hertenstein & S. J. Weiss (Eds.), The handbook of touch: Neuroscience: Behavioral and health perspectives (pp. 455-468). New York, NY: Springer.
 
A NEUROSEQUENTIAL ART APPROACH FOR WORKING WITH KIDS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 6-8 art and play therapy interventions that follow the Neurosequential Model. 
2. Identify 6-8 stages of art development that will help play therapists understand how to structure age-appropriate creative play interventions. 
3. Name 4 benefits of using bilateral scribbling in trauma-focused play therapy.
4. Name 4 trauma response behaviors observed in play therapy that help identify client’s stage of neurodevelopment.  
5. List the 4 ways that The Squiggle Story follows the neurosequential stages of brain hierarchy, thus supporting the practice of trauma-informed play therapy.
 
Chapman, L. (2014). Neurobiologically informed trauma therapy with children and adolescents: Understanding mechanisms of change. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. 
 
King, J. (2016). Art therapy, trauma and neuroscience. NewYork: Routledge. 
 
Perry, B. (2009). “Examining child maltreatment through the neurodevelopmental lens: Clinical application of the neurosequential model of therapeutics.” Journal of Loss and Trauma.14:240-255, DOI: 10.1080/15325020903004350. Routledge.
 
TECH GONE WILD: MANAGING CYBERBULLYING, SEXTING & PORN THROUGH PLAY THERAPY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Social and Cultural Foundations)
Leslie Baker, MA, MFT, NCC
Mary Ruth Cross, MS, MFT, NCC, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify at least 3 dangers of sexting, porn & cyberbullying facing youth and their families that can be addressed in play therapy. 
2. Describe 2 key research study findings regarding information communication technology (ICT) and its effects on families or youth that can impact the work of a play therapist. 
3. Identify 2 strategies that play therapists can teach to parents/caregivers in addressing overuse of technology and assist their family/group in more healthy approaches to technology.  
4. List 2 or more family-centric creative art-based assessment techniques that play therapists can use to identify unhealthy technology use with youth and families. 
5. List 2 or more play therapy-based interventions for working with families on developing healthy technology use.
 
Ahlfors, R. (2010). "Many sources, one theme: Analysis of cyberbullying prevention and intervention websites". Journal Of Social Sciences, 6(4), 513-520. 
 
D’Antona, R., Kevokian, M., & Russom, A. (2010). "Sexting, Texting, Cyberbullying & Keeping Youth Safe Online." Journal of Social Sciences (1549652), 6 (4) 521-526. 
 
Sampasa-Kanyinga, H. & Lewis, R. F. (2015). "Frequent Use of Social Networking Sites Is Associated with Poor Psychological Functioning Among Children & Adolescents." Cyberpsychology Behavior, 18(70, 380-385. Doi:10.1089/cyber.2015.005
 
THERAPLAY TO PROMOTE ATTACHMENT WITH FAMILIES AND GROUPS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 4 domains of functioning when assessing children and families in play therapy. 
2. Identify 3 key elements that increase family connection in play therapy and at home. 
3. Name 5 or more activities that foster attunement in family and group settings.  
4. List at least 2 family/group principles that were evident in the video Theraplay sessions shown in this master class.  
5. List 3 potential outcomes of using Theraplay with groups and families.
 
Booth, P. and Jernberg. A. ( 2010).Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Relationships Through Attachment-Based Play. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
 
Booth, P.; Lerner, D., and Wedel, J. (2016). Theraplay Parenting for Adoptive and Foster Families Trainer Manual. The Theraplay Institute, Evanston, IL. 
 
Geller, S. and Porges, S. (2014). "Therapeutic Presence: Neurophysiological Mechanisms Mediating Feeling Safe in Therapeutic Relationships." Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, Vol 24, Number 3, 178-192.
 
TITRATION OF TRAUMA NARRATIVE WORK IN PLAY THERAPY: RESPECTING THE DANCE
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Media and Materials in Treatment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Paris Goodyear-Brown, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define self-titration as it refers to a play therapist’s understanding of the playroom. 
2. Name 5 mitigators that are available to the play therapist during trauma narrative work. 
3. List 3 play-based interventions that augment somatosensory integration of trauma narrative work with children. 
4. List 3 play therapy mediums for “extra-linguistic” trauma narrative work. 
5. Name the 2 primary goals that play therapists are targeting during titrated trauma narrative work.
 
Gil, E. (2017). Post-traumatic Play: What Clinicians Needs to Know. New York: Guilford Press. 
 
Green, E.J. & Myrick, A.C. (2014). "Treating Complex Trauma in Adolescents: A Phase-Based, Integrative Approach for Play Therapists." International Journal of Play Therapy, 23(3), 131-145.  
 
Malchiodi, C. (2015). Creative Interventions with Traumatized Children (2nd Ed). New York: Guilford Press.
 
DOLLMAKING IN ART & PLAY THERAPIES TO HELP CHILDREN AND TEENS PROCESS GRIEF 
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence)
Sarah Vollmann, MPS, ATR-BC, LICSW
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 6 dimensions of grief, or ways that one might be impacted by loss, which may inform one’s play therapy approach and practice with bereaved patients.  
2. Describe the 6 developmental stages of grief for children and adolescents that can inform art and play therapy practice with bereaved children and teens.  
3. Define 3 or more potential therapeutic benefits of the creation of a doll and subsequent play therapy as a part of grief therapy and treatment for children and adolescents. 
4. Identify 3 potential art therapy directives that could be used effectively in conjunction with play therapy to further treatment when working with a bereaved child, adolescent, or family.  
5. Name 3 benefits of a family systems approach for working with bereaved children and adolescents that could be incorporated into a play therapist’s treatment plan.
 
Davies, B. (1999). Shadows in the Sun: The Experiences of Sibling Bereavement in Childhood. Taylor & Francis, USA. 
 
MacWilliam, B. (2017). Complicated Grief, Attachment, and Art Therapy: Theory, Treatment, and 14 Ready-to-Use Protocols. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London & Philadelphia. 
 
Schaefer, C.E., O'Connor, K. J. & Braverman, L.D. (2016). Handbook of Play Therapy (Second Edition). John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken NJ.

 
SATURDAY LUNCH & LEARNS
 
CREATIVE ENGAGEMENT & CONNECTION THROUGH THE ARTS: AN EXPERIENTIAL SESSION
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Group Dynamics and Counseling; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Ping Ho, MA, MPH
 
Objectives:
 
1. State at least 3 unique ways in which the working with the arts can address symptoms of trauma in play therapy. 
2. List 5 key elements in integrating the creative arts with play therapy practices to maximize social-emotional outcomes among group members. 
3. Identify at least 3 specific activities involving movement or sound that play therapists can use to calm stress reactions in their young clients.
 
Malchiodi, C.A.  (2008). Creative interventions for traumatized children.  New York: The Guilford Press. 
 
Goodman, R.F., Chapman, L.M., & Gantt, L. (2009). "Creative arts therapies for children."  In E. B. Foa, T. M. Keane, M. J. Friedman, & J. A. Cohen (Eds.), Effective treatments for PTSD: Practice guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, New York: Guilford Press, 491-507. 
 
van Westrhenen, N. & Fritz, E. (2014) "Creative arts therapy as treatment for child trauma: An overview."  The Arts in Psychotherapy, 41(5):527-534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2014.10.004




SUNDAY, JULY 1

SUNDAY MORNING PLENARY

PLAY THERAPY & EXPRESSIVE ARTS PRINCIPLES FOR WORKING WITH GRIEF & LOSS
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development; Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
 
Objectives:
 
1.  List 2 behavioral symptoms commonly associated with grief
2.  Identify 2 ways that play therapy is effective in treating grief and loss
3.  Name 2 expressive therapies principles that are uniquely suited to working with grief and loss
 
Marks-Tarlow, T., Solomon, M. and Siegel, D. J. (2018). Play and creativity in psychotherapy.
NY:  W.W. Norton. 
 
Cohen, B. M. & Barnes, M. M. & Rankin, A. M. (1995).  Managing traumatic stress through art: Drawing from the center.  Sidran Press.
 
SUNDAY MASTER CLASSES
 
ATTACHMENT-BASED PLAY THERAPY WITH VERY YOUNG CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
(Human Growth and Development; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Susan Taylor, CMA, LCSW-C, RPT-S
Carole Norris-Shortle, LCSW-C, LCMFT, RPT-S
Kim Cosgrove, LCSW-C
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 relationship-based play therapy models that incorporate dyadic work. 
2. List 2 techniques that incorporate mindfulness with play therapy approaches. 
3. List 3 play therapy interventions that demonstrate respect for a family's trama history.
4. Identify 3 strategies that play therapists can use to support parents’ capacity to follow their child’s lead in play.  
5. Name 3 strategies to incorporate music and movement into attachment-based play therapy practice.
 
Connelly, A. B., Cosgrove, K., Norris-Shortle, C., & Taylor, S. (2011). "Mindful awareness play." Play Therapy, 6(4), 10-15. 
 
Gil, E. (1994).  Play in family therapy. New York: The Guilford Press. 
 
Newton, R. P. (2008).  "Dyadic play therapy for homeless parents and their children." In Schaefer, C. E., Kelly-Zion, S., McCormick, J., & Ohnogi, A. (Eds.).  Play therapy for very young children (339-365).  Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson.
 
BEAD MAKING WITH TEENS & ADULTS FOR MANAGING ANXIETY, SUBSTANCE ABUSE, AND MORE
(Media and Materials in Treatment; Client Populations and Multicultural Competence; Group Dynamics and Counseling)
Sarah Pitkin, LCPAT, ATR-BC, MAC, CSAC
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe 3 types of anxiety disorders that restrict young clients from leading fully productive and satisfying lives and that can be treated through skilled play therapy and creative arts therapies intervention.
2. List 3 ways that play therapists can address unmanaged anxiety to prevent substance abuse in children and youth.
3. List 3 beading directives that play therapists can use with young children and adolescents experiencing stress and anxiety that incorporate mindfulness principles.
4. Describe 3 ways in which using beading projects in play therapy can facilitate connection with others in a non-threatening way.
5. Explain the "low risk for failure" concept as it relates to the principles of play therapy and the therapeutic use of bead making activities.
 
Keating, Daniel P. (2017), Born Anxious, The Lifelong Impact of Early Life Adversity-and How to Break the Cycle. New York: Saint Martin’s Press. 
 
Rose, Mark, BS, MA (2016), Anxiety Disorders.  Sacramento, CA: NetCE. 
 
Wiley, E., and Shannon, M. O. (2002). A string and a prayer: How to make and use prayer beads. New York: Red Wheel.
 
COMPLICATED GRIEF, COLLAGE & TRAUMA THEORY: AN ARTFUL INTEGRATION
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Sharon Strouse, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Identify 4 features of complicated grief as a form of PTSD/complex trauma and how play therapists can identify these in children and families.  
2. Name 4 ways that complicated grief impacts neurodevelopment as observed in art and play therapy. 
3. Describe 3 ways the creative process of collage can help the bereaved “revision narratives” of loss and advance play therapy goals. 
4. Explain 4 ways that trauma and grief work support the effectiveness of using collage making and play therapy interventions in addressing somatic and neurobiological impact on clients. 
5. Describe 6 collage directives that play therapists and other mental health professionals can use to effectively address and process complicated grief in treatment.
 
Thompson, B.E. & Neimeyer. R.A. (Eds). (2014). Grief and the expressive arts: Practices for creating meaning. New York: Routledge. 
 
Neimeyer, R. (Eds). (2012). Techniques of Grief therapy: Creative practices for counseling the bereaved. New York: Routledge. 
 
MacWilliams, B. (2017). Complicated grief, attachment & art therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley.
 
INTEGRATING PLAY THERAPY WITH ART & DRAMA TO FOSTER RELATIONAL STRENGTH
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
Teresa Dias, MA
 
Objectives:
 
1. List 3 basic principles of play therapy and 3 basic principles of drama therapy that are pertinent to working with relational issues in clients of all ages. 
2. Name 2 drama therapy techniques that play therapists and other mental health professionals can use to promote self-expression in their clients. 
3. Describe 2 art therapy techniques that can be used in tandem with directive play therapy approaches for encouraging young clients to explore their feelings. 
4. Name 2 art therapy techniques that play therapists and others can use to promote self-expression, a sense of well-being, and foster relational strength. 
5. List 3 basic and guiding clinical principles of attachment and relational health that are shared by play therapists, drama therapists, and art therapists.
 
Jones, P. (2010) Drama as therapy, Vol 2:  Clinical work and research into practice. NY: Routledge. 
 
Gil, E. & Dias, T. (2014).  “The Integration of Drama Therapy and Play Therapy in Attachment Work with Traumatized Children,” In C. A. Malchiodi & D. A. Crenshaw, Creative arts and play therapy for attachment problems, 100-118, NY: Guilford Press. 
 
Post, P. B. & Jernberg, A. M. (2009).  Theraplay:  Helping parents and children build better relationships through attachment-based play, 3rd Ed., NY: Guilford Press.
 
INTEGRATIVE ATTACHMENT INFORMED MODEL (I AIM): A TIERED PLAY THERAPY APPROACH
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)
Angela Cavett, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Describe the theoretical foundation of Integrative Attachment-Informed Cognitive Behavioral Play Therapy. 
2. Describe 2 or more key principles of IAI CBPT. 
3. List 2 or more similarities and differences between IAI CBPT and 2 other play therapy models for children. 
4. State how play-based interventions enhance Integrative Attachment-Informed Cognitive Behavioral Play Therapy at each of its 3 tiers. 
5. Identify the components of IAI CBPT and matching play therapy interventions for each component.
 
Gross, J.J. (2015). Handbook of Emotional Regulation, Second Edition New York: Guilford Press. 
 
Uhernik, J.A. (2016). Using Neuroscience in Trauma Therapy: Creative and Compassionate Counseling. New York: Routledge. 
 
Zantkeren, S. & Sharon, Y. (2017). The Flexible Protocol: Emotional Regulation for Children and Their Parents Using Meaning-Focused Therapy and Arts based on the cognitive-behavioral approach. Zantkeren & Sharon.
 
NARRATIVE SAND THERAPY©: INTO THE HEART OF HEALING
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)
Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 4 key principles that align Narrative Sand Therapy with Child-Centered play therapy. 
2. Identify 3 differences in theory and practice by comparing sandtraysandplay, and Narrative Sand Therapy as practiced by play therapists.
3. Describe 1 or more ways to validate a young client's experience using the "poetics and letters" technique within the context of play therapy. 
4. Define therapeutic amplification as it pertains to fostering depth in play therapy work using symbols. 
5. List 3 ethical principles that enhance safety, trust, and boundaries in play therapy and Narrative Sand Therapy.
 
Cameron, J. (1996). The vein of gold: A journey to your creative heart. A Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam Books: NY. 
 
Bradway, K. & McCord, B. (1999). "Sandplay and active imagination." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 13, 9-12. 
 
McClary, R. (2007). "Healing the psyche through music, myth, and ritual." Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 1(3), pp. 155–159. doi: 10.1037/1931-3896.1.3.155
 
PLAY THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH SEXUAL BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)
Jennifer Shaw, PsyD, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 3 factors that differentiate sexual behaviors from sexual behavior problems in play therapy clients. 
2. Identify 3 research-informed components of play therapy treatment with children who have sexual behavior problems. 
3. Describe 3 ways play therapy and expressive arts can advance Boundary Project objectives with children individually. 
4. Describe 3 ways play therapy and expressive arts can advance Boundary Project objectives in parent-child joint sessions. 
5. List 3 reasons an integrative approach that includes play therapy and CBT, such as the Boundary Project, is recommended when working with children with sexual behavior problems.
 
Friedrich, W.N. (2007). Children with sexual behavior problems: Family-based attachment-focused therapy. NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. 
 
Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Johnson, T. C., Friedrich, W., Louis, D., …Silovsky, J. F. (2008). "Report of the ATSA task force on children with sexual behavior problems." Child Maltreatment, 13(2), 199-218. 
 
Gil, E., & Shaw, J. (2013). Working with children with sexual behavior problems. NY: Guilford press
 
PT 101:  BASIC PRINCIPLES AND THEORIES OF PLAY THERAPY 
(Human Growth and Development; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship)
Andrea Driggs McLeod, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 2 major theories of play therapy.
2. List 4 of Axline’s basic principles of play therapy. 
3. Define play therapy and name 2 ways it differentiates from generic play activity. 
4. List 2 reasons that support the integration of play therapy and other expressive techniques with cognitive behavioral strategies in the treatment of young clients. 
5. List 2 distinctive benefits of play therapy that differentiate this discipline from traditional verbal psychotherapy approaches.

Gil, E. (2006). Helping Abused and Traumatized Children: Integrating Directive and Non Directive Approaches. New York: Guilford Press.  
Gil, E. (2010). Working with Children to Heal Interpersonal Trauma: The Power of Play. New York: Guilford Press. 
Goodyear-Brown, P. (2009). Play Therapy with Traumatized Children: A Prescriptive Approach. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

 
TRAUMA-FOCUSED INTEGRATED PLAY THERAPY
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S
 
Objectives:
 
1. List the 3 phases of play therapy treatment for working with traumatized children. 
2. List 2 key activities that should be used during Phase One of trauma-focused integrated play therapy treatment. 
3. Describe 2 playful directive strategies that play therapists and others can use to help children safely address traumatic material. 
4. Identify 3 characteristics of post-trauma play. 
5. List 2 interventions that can help play therapists address post-traumatic play that is stagnant.
 
Gil, Eliana. (2006). Helping abused and traumatized children: Integrating directive and nondirective approaches. New York: Guilford Press. 
 
Gil, Eliana. (2017). Posttraumatic Play in Children. What clinicians need to know. New York: Guilford Press. 
 
Gil, Eliana. (2010). Working with children to heal interpersonal trauma: the power of play. New York: Guilford Press.
 
USING PLAY THERAPY WITH CHILDREN IN HIGH CONFLICT DIVORCE CASES
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Assessment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)
Heather McTaggart Bryan, LPC, RPT
 
Objectives:
 
1. Name 2 play therapy assessment strategies for children. 
2. Describe 2 play therapy treatment strategies for working with young children under stress. 
3. Name 2 play therapy treatment strategies that would be effective for working with children involved in contentious divorce cases. 
4. Identify 2 ways that play therapists can set clear boundaries with family members engaged in divorce-based conflicts. 
5. Name 3 themes that typically emerge in play therapy with children involved in high conflict divorces.
 
Johnston, J. and Roseby, V. (2009). In the Name of the Child, A Developmental Approach to Understanding and Helping Children of Conflicted and Violent Divorce.  Springer Publishing Company.
 
Lowenstein, L. (2006). Creative Interventions for Children of Divorce. Champion Press.   
 
Gil, E. (1991). The Healing Power of Play: Working with Abused Children. The Guilford Press.
 
SUNDAY LUNCH & LEARNS
 
THE PLAY THERAPIST GOES TO COURT: CLINICAL PREPARATION FOR TESTIFYING
(Professional Issues; Law and/or Ethics that Contribute to Professional Practice)
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT

Objectives:
 
1.  Define the difference between a fact witness and expert witness
2.  State 2 ways to work in the best interest of your client while testifying
3.  List two ways to discuss expressive therapies, including play therapy, in the courtroom

 
Martindale, D. A. (2006).  "Play therapy doesn’t play in court." Journal of Child Custody, Vol. 3: 1 
 
Carmichael, K. D. (2006). "Legal and ethical issues in play therapy." International Journal of Play Therapy, 15(2), 83-99. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0088916

Weinman, D. (2017).  Tips to Testify Successfully: Guidelines for witnesses. https://www.weinmanfamilylaw.com 


REFLECTIVE PRACTICE & SUPERVISION IN PLAY THERAPY: BEING TRULY PRESENT
 
(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Professional Issues; Wellness and Prevention)
Susan Taylor, CMA, LCSW-C, RPT-S
Carole Norris-Shortle, LCSW-C, LCMFT, RPT-S
Kim Cosgrove, LCSW-C
 
Objectives:
 
1. Define a 3-step template for structuring reflective supervision sessions for play therapists. 
2. Identify at least 2 "growing edges" that play therapists can develop in regard to their own reflective presence. 
3. Name 2 mindful self-regulation techniques that support the parallel process of reflection between supervisor and supervisee in play therapy and other therapeutic modalities.
 
Allen, V. B., Folger, W. A., & Pehrsson, D-E. (2007). "Reflective process in play therapy: A practical model for supervising counseling students." Education, 127(4), 472-479. 
 
Gilkerson, L. (2004). "Irving B. Harris distinguished lecture: Reflective supervision in infant-family programs: Adding clinical process to non-clinical settings." Infant Mental Health Journal, 25(5), 424-439. 
 
Gilkerson, L., Hofherr, J., Steiner, A., Cook, A., Arbel, A., Heffron, M. C., & Paul, J.  (2012).  "Implementing the Fussy Baby Network approach."  Zero to Three, 33(2), 59-65.





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