2019
LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Amygdala Slide




THURSDAY, JUNE 27

Play Therapy Group Supervision with Eliana Gil
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
(Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)

1.  List 3 dimensions of observation that play therapists can utilize to better identify thematic material in children’s play.
2.  Give 2 specific prompts that play therapists can use to encourage children to reflect on their work.
3.  Give 2 examples of self-care and identifying or working with countertransferential responses in play therapy.

Drewes, A. E. & Mullen J. A., (Eds.), (2011). Supervision can be playful: Techniques for child and play therapist supervisors. NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
Heller, S. S. & Gilkerson, L. (2009).  A practical guide to reflective supervision.  ZERO TO THREE: Danvers: MA.
Gil, E., & Rubin, L. (2005) Countertransference play: Informing and enhancing therapist self-awareness through play. International Journal of Play Therapy, 14(2), 87-102.


Integrating Music & Dance in Play with Young Children
Susan Taylor, LCSW-C, CMA, RPT-S
Kimberly Cosgrove, LCSW-C
Carole Norris-Shortle, LCSW-C, LCMFT, RPT-S
(Wellness and Prevention; Human Growth and Development; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)

1. Describe at least 3 methods of integrating music and movement into play therapy with young children.
2. Identify at least 2 "growing edges" that play therapists can develop in their awareness of body messaging in sessions.
3. Name at least 2 in-my-pocket substitution songs for everyday play therapy use. 

Colwell, C., Memmott, J., & Meeker-Miller, A. (2013). Music and sign language to promote infant and toddler communication and enhance parent-child interaction. International Journal of Music Education, 32(3), 333-345. doi: 10.1177/0255761413491214
Fawcett, C., & TunVgenV, B. (2017). Infants’ use of movement synchrony to infer social affiliation in others. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 160, 127-136. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2017.03.014
Mehr, S. A., Song, L. E., & Spelke, E. S. (2016). For 5-month-old infants, melodies are social. Psychological Science, 27(4), 486-501. doi: 10.1177/0956797615626691



Supervision Session: Play Therapy for Sexual Behavior Problems
Jennifer Shaw, PsyD, RPT-S
(Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Human Growth and Development; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)

1. Name 3 factors that differentiate sexual behaviors from sexual behavior problems in play therapy clients.
2. Identify 3 research-informed components of play therapy treatment with children who have sexual behavior problems.
3. Describe 2 formats most useful for children who have sexual behavior problems.

Friedrich, W.N. (2007). Children with sexual behavior problems: Family-based attachment-focused therapy. NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Johnson, T. C., Friedrich, W., Louis, D., …Silovsky, J. F. (2008). "Report of the ATSA task force on children with sexual behavior problems." Child Maltreatment, 13(2), 199-218. 
Gil, E., & Shaw, J. (2013). Working with children with sexual behavior problems. NY: Guilford press


Combining Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with the Arts and Play: An Introduction
Claudia Camargo, LICSW
(Group Dynamics and Counseling; Human Growth and Development; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)

1. Describe the type of play therapy inherent in the Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) approach.
2. Identify the 5 child-centered play therapy skills that are utilized in PCIT.
3. List 2 of the “Don’t" skills that play therapists can apply in PCIT.

Funderburk, B. W., & Eyberg, S. (2011). "Parent–child interaction therapy." In J. C. Norcross, G. R. VandenBos, & D. K. Freedheim (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: Continuity and change (pp. 415-420). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association 
N’zi, A. M. , Lucash, R. E., Clionsky, L.N., & Eyber, S. M. (2016). Enhancing Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Motivational Interviewing Techniques. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice.
Blizzard, A. M., Barroso, N. E., Ramos, F. G., Graziano, P. A., & Bagner, D. M. (2017). Behavioral Parent Training in Infancy: What about Parent-Infant Relationship? Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 1-13.


Mandala-Making for Play Therapists: A Clinical Technique for Expression & Mindful Reflection
Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT
(Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Wellness and Prevention)

1. Identify 2 or more ways that mandala-making can provide a mindful activity that play therapists can use to help children regulate or self-soothe.
2. Name 1 or more aspects of mandala-making that play therapists can build upon to promote creative expression in their work.
3. List 3 language- and metaphor-specific ways that play therapists can encourage reflection, insigh,t and verbal (or nonverbal) communication.

Cunningham, L. B. (2010). The mandala book: Patterns of the universe. NY: Sterling Publishing
Fincher, S. (2010). Creating mandalas for insight, healing, and self-expression. CO: Shambala
Fincher, S. (2009). The mandala workbook: A creative guide for self-expression, balance, and well-being. CO: Shambala

Technology & Play Therapy:  Innovations, Integration & Impact

Rachel Altvater, PsyD, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Describe 2 or more ways that the new world of technology impacts children and influences their participation in play therapy.

2.Identify 2 positive and 2 negative impacts of technology on a child’s play as it relates to the incorporation of technology in play therapy sessions.

3. List 3 technological interventions that can be used in the playroom during a play therapy session.


Delfos, M. F. (2003). "The conquered giant: The use of the computer in play therapy."  In F. J. Maarsse, A. E. Akkerman, A. N. Brand, & L. J. M. Mulder (Eds.), Clinical Assessment, Computerized Methods, and Instrumentation (pp. 53-65).
Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger Seligman, S. (2011). "Effects of new technologies on child psychotherapy: Discussion of clinical papers from the conference," “Where the wired things are: Children and technology in treatment.” Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 10, 422-427. doi: 10.1080/15289168.2011.614190 
Snow, M. S., Winburn, A., Crumrine, L.,Jackson, E., & Killian, T. (2012). "The iPad playroom: A therapeutic technique." Play Therapy, 7(3), 16-19.


Play as Therapy with Refugee Children: Creative Interventions for Posttraumatic Dissociation
Mary DeRaedt, PhD, LPC, NCC

1. Identify the 5 most prevalent dissociative patterns among traumatized children that can be observed by play therapists and their colleagues.

2.List at least 3 effective play interventions that can support traumatized children in play therapy and individual treatment settings.

3. Describe 2 or more implications and outcomes of using sandtray therapy as a primary play modality for treating traumatized children and adolescents.


Pearce, J., Simpson, J., Berry, K., Bucci, S., Moskowitz, A., & Varese, F. (2017) Attachment and dissociation as mediators of the link between childhood trauma and psychotic experiences. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 24(6), 1304-1312. 
https:do.org/10.1002/cpp.2100.
Ross, C. A., Keyes, B. B., Yan, H., Wang, Z., Zou, Z., Xu, Y., . . . Xiao, Z. (2008). "A cross-cultural test of the trauma model of dissociation." Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 9(1), 35-49. doi:10.1080/15299730802073635
MacMillan, K. K., Ohan, J., Cherian, S., & Mutch, R. C. (2015). "Refugee children’s play: Before and after migration to Australia." Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51(8), 771-777. doi:10.1111/jpc.12849.

FRIDAY, JUNE 28

How Neurobiology Guides Play Therapy with Traumatized Children

Rick Gaskill, EdD, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)


1. List and describe 2 or more key neurodevelopmental brain regions and functions.

2. Identify 1 or more appropriate developmental play activities mediated by these specific brain regions.

3. Structure 2 or more developmental play activities into a play therapy treatment design.


Perry, B. D. (2013). Applications of a developmentally sensitive and neurobiologically-informed approach to clinical problem solving: The Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) in young maltreated children. In K. Brandt, B. D. Perry, S. Seligman, & E. Tronick (Eds.) Infant and early childhood mental health. American Psychiatric Press.
Perry, B. D. (2012). Application of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) in maltreated children. Manuscript submitted for publication. In J. Ford & C. Courtous (Eds.) Treating complex traumatic stress disorders in children and adolescents. Guildford Press.
Perry, B. D. (1998). Homeostasis, stress, trauma and adaption: A neurodevelopmental view of childhood trauma. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 7 (1), 33-51.


Auto-Regulation and Play Interventions: Healing the Body

Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)


1. Define the 3 layers of the dysregulation > co-regulation > auto-regulation trajectory as they pertain to the practice of play therapy.

2. Describe 3 of the key dysregulation symptoms in play therapy clients that affect their physical and emotional well-being. 

3. State 3 or more movement patterns, gestures, or non-verbal cues that can indicate a child’s psychological experience.

4. Identify how to decrease symptoms related to trauma in children and adolescents through at least 3 embodied play techniques.  

5. Articulate 3 play therapy strategies that improve regulation and foster resilience in children.


Elias, C. L., & Berk, L. E. (2002). "Self-regulation in young children: Is there a role for sociodramatic play?" Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 17(2), 216-238.
Berk, L. E., Mann, T. D., & Ogan, A. T. (2006). "Make-believe play: Wellspring for development of self-regulation." Play= learning: How play motivates and enhances children’s cognitive and social-emotional growth, 74-100.
Whitebread, D., Coltman, P., Jameson, H., & Lander, R. (2009). "Play, cognition and self-regulation: What exactly are children learning when they learn through play?" Educational and Child Psychology, 26(2), 40.


Theraplay Up Close: Advantages & Challenges When Treating Complex Trauma

Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice)


1. List 3 core elements of trauma healing that can be addressed through Theraplay or other play therapy approaches.

2. List 3 Theraplay or play therapy interventions that can help children increase emotional regulation.

3. State 3 ways that play therapists can increase client safety of traumatized children and families during Theraplay sessions.

4. Name 2 examples of how play therapists can address client ambivalence during Theraplay sessions.

5. Identify 2 behavioral effects of complex training, assessed by using the Theraplay approach.

Booth, P., & Jenberg, A. (2010). Theraplay: Helping parents and children build better relationships through attachment-based play. Jossey-Bass.
Drewes, A. (Ed.), (2011). Supervision can be playful: Techniques for child and Play therapy supervisors. NY: Jason Aronson
 Heller, S. S. & Gilkerson, L. (2009). A practical guide to reflective supervision. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.



Adlerian Play Therapy with African American Children:  Disrupting the Preschool to Prison Pipeline

April D. Duncan, MSW, LCSW, RPT

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Human Growth and Development)


1. List 5 symptoms of traumatic stress that can manifest in the play therapy room with African American clients. 

2. Identify 4 or more contributing factors to the School-to-Prison Pipeline phenomenon in the African American community. 

3. Name 2 or more African American cultural concepts that play therapists need to incorporate into their clinical work for effective treatment of traumatized clients.

4. Cite 5 play therapy techniques that enhance efficacy when working with young African American clients.

5. List 3 or more ways to engage African American children in play therapy in order to facilitate healthy social, emotional and cognitive development.

Kottman, T., & Meany-Walen, K. (2016). Partners in play: an Adlerian approach to play therapy. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
Ferguson, A. A. (2003). Bad boys: public schools in the making of black masculinity. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Harper, S. R., & Wood, J. L. (2016). Advancing Black male student success from preschool through Ph. D. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.



Reflective Practice in Play Therapy with Young Children & Families

Susan Taylor, LCSW-C, CMA, RPT-S

Kimberly Cosgrove, LCSW-C

Carole Norris-Shortle, LCSW-C, LCMFT, RPT-S 

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)


1. Define a 3-step template for structuring reflective sessions for play therapists and clients or client families.

2. Identify at least 2 "growing edges" that play therapists can develop in regard to their own reflective presence.

3. Name 2 mindful self-regulation techniques that support the parallel process of reflection in play therapy and other therapeutic modalities.

4. Describe the use of the FAN (Facilitated Attuned Interaction) in play therapy, using at least 2 examples of reflective practice embedded in this model.

5. Identify, by using 3 words, a process of play therapy integration for client families.

Allen, V. B., Folger, W. A., & Pehrsson, D-E. (2007). "Reflective process in play therapy: A practical model for supervising counseling students." Education, 127(4), 472-479.
Gilkerson, L. (2004). "Irving B. Harris distinguished lecture: Reflective supervision in infant-family programs: Adding clinical process to non-clinical settings." Infant Mental Health Journal, 25(5), 424-439.
Gilkerson, L., Hofherr, J., Steiner, A., Cook, A., Arbel, A., Heffron, M. C., & Paul, J.  (2012).  "Implementing the Fussy Baby Network approach."  Zero to Three, 33(2), 59-65.



Beat the Odds®: Social-Emotional Skill Building Through Drumming in Play Therapy

Ping Ho, MA, MPH

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)


1. Describe 3 ways that rhythmic activities can be useful to play therapists in working with traumatized youth. 

2. Identify at least 2 nonverbal ways in which play therapists can facilitate empathy and connection through rhythmic activities. 

3. Name at least 2 strategies that play therapists can use to facilitate participation among children who are shy, or who are reluctant to share verbally or play the drum. 

4. State 2 rhythmic activities that can be used in play therapy groups to build self-disclosure skills. 

5. List at least 3 overall strategies in adapting the Beat the Odds® curriculum for older children in play therapy.



Ho P, Tsao JCI, Bloch L, Zeltzer L. "The Impact of Group Drumming on Social-emotional Behavior in Low-income Children. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine." 2011;Article ID 250708, 14 pages, doi: 10.1093/ecam/neq072. 
Kokal I, Engel A, Kirschner S. "Synchronized drumming enhances activity in the caudate and facilitates prosocial commitment – if the rhythm comes easily." PLoS One. 2011. 6(11): e27272. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027272. 
Sebastian Kirschner and Michael Tomasello. "Joint Drumming: Social Context Facilitates Synchronization in Preschool Children." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2009; Vol. 102, No. 3: pp 299–314.

Neuroscience-Informed Play Therapy Interventions with Traumatized Children for Enhanced Efficacy

Rick Gaskill, EdD, LCPC, RPT-S 

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)


1. Name the key neural developmental concepts critical to trauma treatment.

2. List 2 or more psychosocial trauma symptoms specific to each major brain region.

3. Describe functional neural disorganization in traumatized children as it pertains to counseling and play therapy.

4. Identify at least 2 brain region play activities that can be integrated into play therapy treatment design.

5. Describe a play therapy protocol listing dosing, social ratios, and play activities appropriate for therapists, family, or community partners.

LeDoux, J. E. (1996). The emotional brain:  The mysterious underpinnings of emotional life. New York, NY:  Simon & Schuster.
Ludy-Dobson, C. R., & Perry, B. D. (2010). The role of healthy interaction in buffering the impact of childhood trauma.  In E. Gil (Ed), Working to heal interpersonal trauma, the power of play (pp. 26-43). New York, NY:  Guildford Press
Perry, B. (2006). Applying principles of neurodevelopment to clinical work with maltreated and traumatized children. In N. B. Webb (Ed), Working with traumatized youth in child welfare. New York:  Guilford Press.




Sand Therapy Competencies: Principles & Practices for Play Therapists and Colleagues

Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)


1. Describe 3 theoretical approaches to working with sand therapy that are relevant for play therapists. 

2. Identify 3 principles for clinician competency when using sand and symbols in the context of play therapy, counseling, and psychotherapy. 

3. State 3 manifestations of culture and identity in sand therapy and their implications for play therapy. 

4. Define 3 ethical principles to guide clinician competency that are essential for the practice of play therapy and sand therapy. 

5. Name 3 "best practices" that anchor clinician competency in play therapy and sand therapy.

Bradway, K. (1997). Sandplay: Silent workshop of the psyche. New York, NY: Routledge.
Weinrib, E.L. (1983). Images of the self.  Boston: Sego Press.
Boik, B. L. & Goodwin. E. A. (2000). Sandplay Therapy: A step-by-step manual for psychotherapists of diverse orientations. New York: Norton and Company.



Assessing Children Using Play Therapy & Art-Based Techniques

Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT

(Assessment; Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)


1. List 3 art-based assessment tools that play therapists can use to encourage children’s expression.

2. Describe 3 dimensions of observation that play therapists can use to better identify thematic material in children’s play.

3. Explain the term “amplifying metaphors” as it pertains to play and art-based assessment (hint: it does not mean having children explain their art or play creations).

4. Name 2 specific prompts that play therapists can use to encourage children to reflect on their creative work.

5. Identify 2 ways that play therapists can describe children’s art and/or play activities using “defensive language."

Malchiodi, C. (1998, 2nd Ed.). Creative interventions with traumatized children.  NY: Guilford Press
Oster, C. D., & Crone, P. G. (2004, 2nd Ed.).  Using drawings in assessment and therapy: A guide for mental health professionals.  NY: Brunner-Routledge
Malchiodi, C. (1998). Understanding children’s drawings.  NY: Guilford Press

 

Friday Evening Sessions

Therapeutic Clown Play: Facilitating Communication, Expression & Wellbeing

Teresa Dias, LMHC

Jason Jedrusiak, CYT

(Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences; Wellness and Prevention)

1. Name 2 ways that using the clown nose can help enhance a young client’s affect expression in play therapy.

2. State 3 warm-up activities that can help young clients in therapeutic clown play find a clown character.

3. Describe 2 ways that clowning can be used in tandem with directive play therapy approaches for encouraging young clients to explore their feelings and/or previously problematic material.

Jones, P. (2010) Drama as therapy, Vol 2:  Clinical work and research into practice. NY: Routledge. 
Gil, E. & Dias, T. (2014).  “The Integration of Drama Therapy and Play Therapy in Attachment Work with Traumatized Children,” In C. A. Malchiodi & D. A. Crenshaw, Creative arts and play therapy for attachment problems, 100-118, NY: Guilford Press. 
Post, P. B. & Jernberg, A. M. (2009).  Theraplay:  Helping parents and children build better relationships through attachment-based play, 3rd Ed., NY: Guilford Press.


Engaging Resistant Adolescents by Adapting Child-Centered Play Therapy

Justin Barrasso, MS, LPC, NCC

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)

1. Identify the 4 "common factors" that make counseling and therapyincluding play therapy—successful, regardless of theoretical approach.

2. Describe 2 reasons why a child-centered play therapy approach adjusted for adolescents can work effectively with resistant teens.

3. List 3 ways in which a child-centered play therapy approach adjusted for adolescents can facilitate motivation and inspire change in adolescents.

Elkins, D.N. (2016). The human elements of psychotherapy: A nonmedical model of emotional healing.  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Haen, C. (2011). Engaging boys in therapy: Creative approaches to the therapy process. New York, NY: Routledge.
Landreth, G.L. (2012). Play therapy: The art of the relationship. New York, NY: Routledge.



Stressbusting: Using Your Pen with Your Brain in Mind

Deborah Ross, LPC, CJT 

(Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences; Media and Materials in Treatment;Wellness and Prevention)

1. Identify 1 or more ways that expressive writing can be used by play therapists for improved stress management and could be taught to their clients, as well. 

2. Discuss 5 linked writing processes designed to identify, explore, and shift a specific stress response in play therapy and other forms of clinical self-care and treatment.

3. Use 2 or more writing interventions as stress management devices for use by counselors and play therapists with their clients, students, and groups.

Adams, Kathleen, Ed. 2013. Expressive Writing: Foundations of Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.
Pennebaker, James W. 2013 . Writing to Heal: A Guided Journal for Writing about Trauma and Emotional Upheaval. Wheat Ridge CO: Center for Journal Therapy.
Ross, Deborah and Kathleen Adams. 2016. Your Brain on Ink: A Workbook on Neuroplasticity and the Journal Ladder. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group.

Books that Come Alive Through Play Therapy

Cindy Bridgman, LCSW

Deanne Ginns-Gruenberg, MA, LPC, BSN, RPT-S      

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)

1. Describe the role of children’s literature in psychoeducation for play therapists, counselors, and play therapy clients of all ages

2. Identify a minimum of 3 literature resources available to play therapists and other clinicians for addressing a variety of therapeutic needs.

3. List 3 or more therapeutic activities that play therapists and other clinicians can use to enhance the message found in children’s literature.

Amer, K. (1999). “Bibliotherapy: Using fiction to help children in two populations discuss feelings.” Pediatric Nursing. 25 (1): 91.
Berns, C.F. (2004). “Bibliotherapy: Using books to help bereaved children.” OMEGA – Journal of Death and Dying. 48 (4): 321-336.
Pardeck, J. T. (1991). “Using books in clinical practice.” Psychotherapy in Private Practice. 9 (3): 105-119.

Theraplay Supervision: Enhancing Skills Through Case Presentations & Collaborative Learning

Myriam Goldin, LCSW, RPT-S

(Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice;  Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice )


1. List 3 core elements of trauma healing that can be addressed through Theraplay or other play therapy approaches.

2. Identify 3 Theraplay or play therapy interventions that can help children increase emotional regulation.

3. Name 3 ways that play therapists can increase client safety for traumatized children and families during Theraplay sessions.

Booth, P., & Jenberg, A. (2010). Theraplay: Helping parents and children build better relationships through attachment-based play. Jossey-Bass.
Drewes, A. (Ed.), (2011). Supervision can be playful: Techniques for child and Play therapy supervisors. NY: Jason Aronson
Heller, S. S. & Gilkerson, L. (2009). A practical guide to reflective supervision. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.


SATURDAY, JUNE 29

Creative Expression at Home: Helping Parents Unlock Art’s Potential to Connect & Heal

Erica Curtis, LMFT, ATR-BC

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)

1. Identify 3 practical art therapy interventions parents can use at home to promote connection and regulation during children’s expression of emotional turmoil.

2. Describe at least 2 arts-based practices that play therapists can teach parents to use at home to promote healthy connection and communication with their children.

3. Name 2 creative approaches that play therapists can teach parents to help them overcome feelings of hopelessness, aggravation, fear, or burnout in order to access their parenting skills and internal resources.

Brouillette, L. and W. Fitzgerald. (2009). Arts-Based Experiences as Preparation for Future Learning. Arts & Learning Research Journal 25, 68-86.
Dingfelder, S. 2010. How Artists See. American Psychological Association 4, 40.
Felitti, V. J., Anda, R. F., Nordenberg, D., Williamson, D. F., Spitz, A. M., Edwards, V., Koss, M. P., and J. S. Marks. 1998. Relationship of Childhood Abuse and Household Dysfunction to Many of the Leading Causes of Death in Adults: The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 14, 245-258.

Thinking Outside the Sand Tray: The Clinical Use of Miniatures & Metaphors in Play Therapy

Eliana Gil, PhD, LMFT, ATR, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. List 3 play therapy techniques that only require commonplace everyday symbolic objects (such as buttons, rocks, seeds, etc.) 

2. Name 3 ways of integrating metaphor work into play therapy practice. 

3. List 3 play therapy techniques to transform metaphors from abstract to concrete for use in play therapy treatment.

4. List 2 techniques that don’t require expensive toys that can be easily implemented by play therapists.

5. Define the term "amplification" to be used in directive play therapy work.


Törneke, N. (2017). Metaphor in practice: A professional’s guide to using the science of language in psycho-therapy. Oakland, CA: Context Press (New Harbinger)
Lankton, C. & Lankton, R. (1989). Tales of enchantment: Goal-oriented metaphors for adults and children in therapy. NY: Brunner/Mazel
Mills, J. and Crawley, R. (2001) Therapeutic metaphors for children and the child within. NY: Routledge

Narrative Sand Therapy©: Into the Heart of Healing with Children & Teens

Dee Preston-Dillon, MA, PhD

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Name 4 key principles that align Narrative Sand Therapy with Child-Centered play therapy.

2. Identify 3 differences in theory and practice by comparing sandtray, sandplay, and Narrative Sand Therapy as practiced by play therapists.

3. Describe 1 or more ways to validate a young client's experience using the "poetics and letters" technique within the context of play therapy. 

4. Define therapeutic amplification as it pertains to fostering depth in play therapy work using symbols.

5. List 3 ethical principles that enhance safety, trust, and boundaries in play therapy and Narrative Sand Therapy. 


Bradway, K. & McCord, B. (1999). "Sandplay and active imagination." Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 13, 9-12.
McClary, R. (2007). "Healing the psyche through music, myth, and ritual." Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 1(3), pp. 155–159. doi: 10.1037/1931-3896.1.3.155
Cameron, J. (1996). The vein of gold: A journey to your creative heart. A Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam Books: NY 

Helping Kids to Open Up and Engage in a Therapeutic Conversation

Steven Baron, PsyD

David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)

1. State 3 or more reasons why children and adolescents have difficulty communicating in play therapy and other treatment sessions. 

2. Identify 3 or more verbally-based techniques to reduce a therapeutic stalemate between a play therapist and child.  

3. Identify 3 or more nonverbal strategies that children or adolescents can use to facilitate communication in play therapy and other types of clinical treatment.

4. Describe how the alliance between child and therapist works to facilitate progress in play therapy.

5. List 1 or more situations in which the use of these specific communication-facilitating strategies might not be appropriate in play therapy or other clinical circumstances.


Crenshaw, D.A (2006). Evocative Strategies in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. New York: Aronson
Oaklander, V. Windows To Our Children: A Gestalt Therapy Approach To Children And Adolescents (1988).  Gouldsboro, ME: Gestalt Journal Press
Hall, T, Kaudson, H, & Schaefer, C. Fifteen Effective Play Therapy Techniques. Professional Psychology:Research & Practice 33(6).pp 515-522

Shadow Play: Working with Darker Metaphors in Play Therapy

Jennifer Lefebre, PsyD, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Articulate at least 2 play therapy themes using Jungian theory and archetypes.

2. Describe 3 symbols or metaphors typically observed in posttraumatic play therapy activity.

3. State 2 or more play therapy techniques to move children through trauma symbolization and metaphors.

4. Discover how to decrease the physiological arousal common in posttraumatic play through at least 3 sensory-based play therapy strategies.

5. Name 2 or more types of play therapy materials that can be used to process issues like enuresis, encopresis, hygiene challenges, self-harm, hyper-sexuality, suicidal/homicidal ideation, and other shadow themes.


Gil, E. & Shaw, J. A. (2014). Working with children with sexual behavior problems. Guilford Press: NY.
Mila, D. (2000). Self-mutilation and art therapy. Jessica Kingsley Publishers: London.
Gil, E. & Johnson, T. C. (1993). Sexualized children: Assessment and treatment of sexualized children and children who molest. Launch Press.

Introduction to the Child Diagnostic Drawing Series (CDDS)

Anne Mills, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT

(Assessment; Media and Materials in Treatment; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice))

1. Name 2 effective techniques to process CDDS art and gather further information with children for individual and family play therapy sessions.

2. Describe 2 observable criteria in a CDDS drawing assessment resulting from the impact of trauma, abuse, or neglect in a child’s artwork and creative development that can help play therapists in treatment planning.

3. List 2 ways that the child’s art, which can enrich the therapeutic dialogue from the first meeting, can enhance treatment planning in play therapy.

4. Identify 2 benefits to the play therapist of incorporating art in assessment with child clients.

5. State 2 child or adolescent populations that have been researched using the CDDS that could be beneficial for play therapists to know about.


de Jong, T. (2017). A new way to diagnose autism [Dutch]. Leeuwarden Stenden Hogeschool Creatieve Therapie.
Radstake, N. (2012). Dus een Boom: Een inventariserend onderzoek naar de meerqaarde van de DDS in het diagnosticeren van NLD. [A survey on the value of the Diagnostic Drawing Series in diagnosing Non-Verbal Learning Disorder (NLD)]. Assisted by Madelon Eelderink. Paper prepared for the University of Arnhem and Nijmegen.
Ritnour, M. M., Bovington, M., Knutsen, C., Roy, A., Hoshino, J., & Johnson, K. (2015). An examination of differences between adult and adolescent controls using the Diagnostic Drawing Series. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 42, 63-74.

Play Therapy for Sexual & Gender Identity Development and Exploration

Quinn K. Smelser, MA, NCC, LPC, RPT

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)

1. List 2 myths that play therapists may believe about gender and sexual identity development and exploration in therapy.

2. Describe 3 experiential play therapy activities for children and families related to issues of gender.

3. Provide 2 reasons explaining the importance from a play therapist’s perspective of supervision, continuing education, and advocating for children who are gender-non-conforming.

4. Define at least 2 constructs of gender and sexual identity development for play therapists to consider.

5. Give 2 examples of how play therapy and gender and sexuality exploration can be viewed as compatible by play therapists.


Biloudeau, B.L. & Renn, K.A. (2005). Analysis of LGBT identity development models and implications for practice. New Direction for Student Services, 111, 25-39.
Holmberg, J. R., Benedict, H. E., & Hynan, L. S. (1998). Gender differences in children’s play therapy themes: Comparisons of children with a history of attachment disturbance or exposure to violence. International Journal of Play Therapy, 7(2), 67-92.
Meir, C., & Harris, J. Fact Sheet: Gender Diversity and Transgender Identity in Children. Retrieved from: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-44/resources/advocacy/transgender-children.pdf 

Managing Big Behaviors in Kids & Teens Through Art

Erica Curtis, LMFT, ATR-BC

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)

1. Describe 2 or more arts-based approaches for containing and debriefing a challenging behavior exhibited by a child or adolescent in play therapy.

2. Develop a play therapy intervention plan featuring 2 or more arts-based interventions for promoting creative problem solving in young people who exhibit challenging behaviors.

3. List 3 or more art-based approaches that play therapists can teach parents to use at home to promote connection and contain challenging behaviors.

4. Identify 2 or more arts-based tools play therapists can use themselves for deepening understanding of client needs and goals.

5. Describe 2 or more sensory-based art activities that can be used by play therapists for regulating the nervous system in dysregulated clients.


Geary, J. 2011. I As an Other: The Secret Life of Metaphor and How It Shapes the Way We See the World. New York: Harper Collins.
Ji, J., Heyes, S.B., MacLeod, C., and E. Holmes. 2016. “Emotional Mental Imagery as Simulation of Reality: Fear and Beyond.” Behavior Therapy 47(5): 702-719.
Rosal, M., McCulloch-Vislisel, S., and S. Neece. (1997). "Keeping Students in School: An Art Therapy Program to Benefit Ninth-Grade Students." Art Therapy, 14(1): 30-36. 

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) in Play Therapy - Day 1 of 2

Amy Hoch, PsyD

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)

1. Name 2 ways to provide psychoeducation to children/adolescents in play therapy regarding trauma/abuse.

2. Name 2 adaptations for TFCBT play therapist should be prepared tp make for young children.

3. Name 2 ways to teach relaxation skills to children in play therapy.

4. Identify 2 ways to teach cognitive coping in play therapy.

5. Identify 2 ways a play therapist will know when a child is ready to transition to exposure work.


Cohen, J., Mannarino, A., & Deblinger, E. (2006). Treating Trauma and Traumatic Grief in Children and Adolescents. New York: The Guilford Press.
Briggs, K. M., Runyon, M. K., & Deblinger, E. (2011). The use of play in trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy. In S. W. Russ & L. N. Niece (Eds.), Play in clinical practice: Evidence-based approaces (pp. 168-200). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.
Konanur, S. Muller, R.T., Cinamon, J.S., Thornback, K., & Zorzella, P.M. (2015). Effectiveness of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in a community-based program. Child Abuse & Neglect, 50, 159-170. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.07.01

Coordinating Clinical Care with School Personnel: An Ecosystemic Approach to Play Therapy & the Arts

Lyla Tyler, LMFT, RPT-S

Kim Hutson

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Human Growth and Development)

1. List 3 or more ways that developmental deficits seen at home and in play therapy settings can affect learning in school.

2. Describe 2 or more ways to coordinate information and effective clinical care between play therapists and school personnel.

3. Identify 3 or more tenets of the strength-based Nurtured Heart Approach® that can be incorporated into play therapy sessions and in the classroom.

4. Name at least 2 play therapy and 2 school-based interventions that can be used in both settings to address affect regulation and behavioral issues.

5. List 2 or more legal/ethical considerations related to sharing clinical information between play therapy and school settings.


Brock, Annie and Hundley, Heather, (2016). The Growth Mindset Coach. Ulysses Press.
Ebrahim, Christine; Steen, Rheta LeAnne; Paradise, Louis (2012) Overcoming School Counselors’ Barriers to Play Therapy. International Journal of Play Therapy, Vol 21, No. 4, 202-214.
Forbes, Heather (2012). Help for Billy. Beyond Consequences Institute, LLC.

Complicated Grief, Collage & Trauma Theory: An Artful Integration

Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT

Sharon Strouse, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment; Human Growth and Development)

1. Identify 4 features of complicated grief as a form of PTSD/trauma and how play therapists can identify these in the art, play, and behaviors of children and families.  

2. Name 4 ways that complicated grief impacts neurodevelopment and attachment as observed in art and play therapy. 

3. Describe 3 ways the creative process of collage can help the bereaved express “revision narratives” of loss and advance play therapy goal 4. Explain 4 ways that trauma and grief work support the effectiveness of using collage making and play therapy interventions in addressing somatic, attachment, and neurobiological impact on clients. 

5. Describe 6 collage directives that play therapists and other mental health professionals can use to effectively address and process complicated grief in treatment.


Thompson, B.E. & Neimeyer. R.A. (Eds). (2014). Grief and the expressive arts: Practices for creating meaning. New York: Routledge. 
Neimeyer, R. (Eds). (2012). Techniques of Grief therapy: Creative practices for counseling the bereaved. New York: Routledge.
MacWilliams, B. (2017). Complicated grief, attachment & art therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 30

Treating Traumatized Children Through Play Therapy: Flexibility, Consensus, Integration

Eliana Gil, PhD, ATR, RPT-S, LMFT

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Assessment; Human Growth and Development)

1. List 3 consensus areas for treating trauma impact in children through play therapy.

2. List 3 play therapy activities that can be used with traumatized children to assess traumatic impact.

3. List 2 play therapy approaches that are effective in treating traumatized children.


Badenoch, B.(2008). Being a brain-wise therapist: A practical guide to interpersonal biology. NY: W.W. Norton
Perry, B.(2017, 3rd Ed.). The boy who was raised as a dog: And other stories from a child psychiatrist’s notebook – What traumatized children can teach us about loss, love, and healing. NY: Basic Books
van der Kolk, B.(2015). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma. NY: Penguin Book


Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Principles for Enhancing Safety, Connection & Meaning

Dafna Lender, LCSW

(Group Dynamics and Counseling; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice)

1. List 1 or more ways to implement voice, rhythm, facial expressions, or touch to elicit openness and a sense of calm with play therapy clients.

2. Apply 3 methods for sending safety messages to the brains of deeply mistrusting clients and improving their therapeutic engagement in play therapy sessions.

3. Name 2 or more techniques to surprise the brain of a guarded client with novel responses that will interrupt their automatic defensiveness, and generate curiosity for enhanced effectiveness in play therapy.

4. Articulate 2 or more exercises and activities to help angry clients feel more relaxed, open and ready to connect in the play room or another clinical setting. 

5. Define the four DDP attitudes of Playful Accepting Curious and Empathic as they might be used by play therapists and other clinicians.


Baylin, J. & Hughes, D. A. (2016) The Neurobiology of Attachment-Focused Therapy: Enhancing Connection & Trust in the Treatment of Children & Adolescents (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology). New York: W.W. Norton
Bomber, L. M. & Hughes, D. A. (2013) Settling to learn. Settling troubled pupils to learn: why relationshipsmatter in school. London: Worth Publishing Ltd.
Hughes, D.A. (2007). Attachment-focused family therapy. New York: WW Norton

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) in Play Therapy - Day 2 of 2

Amy Hoch, PsyD

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)

1. Identify 4 examples of how to do exposure work with children in play therapy other than creating a trauma narrative.

2. Name 3 ways to process dysfunctional/unhelpful beliefs with young clients in play therapy.

3. Identify 3 goals for teaching personal safety skills in a play therapy practice.

4. List 3 goals for conducting joint sessions with children and caregivers in a play therapy practice.

5. Identify 3 ways for a play therapist to assess if a child is ready for termination of treatment.


Cohen, J., Mannarino, A., & Deblinger, E. (2006). Treating Trauma and Traumatic Grief in Children and Adolescents. New York: The Guilford Press.
Briggs, K. M., Runyon, M. K., & Deblinger, E. (2011). The use of play in trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy. In S. W. Russ & L. N. Niece (Eds.), Play in clinical practice: Evidence-based approaces (pp. 168-200). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.<
Konanur, S. Muller, R.T., Cinamon, J.S., Thornback, K., & Zorzella, P.M. (2015). Effectiveness of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in a community-based program. Child Abuse & Neglect, 50, 159-170. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.07.01

Approaches to Sandtray Therapy for Enhancing Therapeutic Attunement

Marshall Lyles, LPC-S, LMFT-S, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Describe the attunement possibilities for play therapists as found in the 6 steps of the sandtray protocol.

2. Identify 2 or more person-of-the-therapist themes to monitor in attunement-focused sandtray work in play therapy.

3. Describe 3 creative options for play therapists to use when delivering sandtray prompts with diverse client populations.

4. Describe the interpersonal neurobiology of attunement and its application to the narrative processing by the play therapist of created sandtray worlds.

5. List 2 mindful options for closing a sandtray session in play therapy treatment.


Homeyer, L. & Sweeney, D. (2017). Sandtray therapy: A practical manual. Royal Oak, MI: Self Esteem Shop.
Badenoch, B. (2008). Being a brain-wise therapist. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company.
Lakoff, G. (2014). "Mapping the brain’s metaphor circuitry: Metaphorical thought in everyday reason." Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8. doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00958

Effective & Innovative Play Therapy Techniques: A Panel Presentation

(Altvater, Bryan, DeRaedt, McLeod, Gil, Smelser)

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. List 3 techniques effective in decreasing emotional dysregulation in play therapy.

2. Name 3 techniques effective in helping children express their thoughts/feelings in play therapy.

3. List 2 ways that play therapists can encourage their own creativity in developing appropriate, therapy-informed techniques that promote treatment goals.

4. Describe 1 way to train yourself to “think play.”

5. Define what it means for play therapists to “listen for metaphors.”


Kaduson, H. G., & Schaefer, C. E. (2010). 101 More play therapy techniques. NY: Jason Aronson.
Lowenstein, L. (2010). Creative family therapy techniques: Play, art, and expressive activities to engage children in family sessions. Champion Press: Ontario, Toronto, Canada. 
Törneke, N. (2017). Metaphor in practice: A professional’s guide to using the science of language in psychotherapy. Context Press(New Harbinger): Oakland, CA.

Play Therapy to Assess & Treat Family Anxiety: Highlighting the Metaphor

Amy Romero, LPC, NCC, RPT 

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Wellness and Prevention)

1. Describe 3 characteristics of anxiety in children typically seen in play therapy sessions.

2. List 3 parental behaviors that contribute to childhood anxiety, and that might be seen in play therapy sessions.

3. Demonstrate at least 3 play therapy techniques to assess and treat family anxiety.

4. Identify 1 way the use of the metaphor is useful in working with families in play therapy.

5. Identify 3 characteristics of a healthy parent behaviors and 3 ways these behaviors can benefit the child who is in play therapy.


Booth, P. and Jernberg, A. 2010. Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Better Relationships Through Attachment-Based Play. San Francisco: John Wiley and Sons.
Hoffman, K, Cooper, G., and Powell, B. 2017. Raising A Secure Child: How Circle of Security Parenting can help you nurture your child’s attachment, emotional resilience, and freedom to explore. New York: The Guildford Press.
Powell, B., Cooper, G., Hoffman, K., and Marvin, B. 2014. The Circle of Security Intervention: Enhancing Attachment in Early Parent-Child Relationships. New York: The Guildford Press.

A Neurosequential Art Approach for Working with Kids

Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT 

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. List 6 art and play therapy interventions that follow the Neurosequential Model.

2. Identify 6-8 stages of art development that will help play therapists understand how to structure age-appropriate creative play interventions. 

3. Name 4 benefits of using bilateral scribbling in trauma-focused play therapy for individuals and groups.

4. Describe 4 trauma response behaviors observed in play therapy that help identify client’s stage of neurodevelopment. 

5. State 4 ways that The Squiggle Story follows the Neurosequential stages of brain hierarchy, thus supporting the practice of trauma-informed play therapy.


Chapman, L. (2014). Neurobiologically informed trauma therapy with children and adolescents: Understanding mechanisms of change. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
King, J. (2016). Art therapy, trauma and neuroscience. NewYork: Routledge.
Perry, B. (2009). “Examining child maltreatment through the neurodevelopmental lens: Clinical application of the neurosequential model of therapeutics.” Journal of Loss and Trauma.14:240-255, DOI: 10.1080/15325020903004350. Routledge.

Play Therapy for Aggression & Bullying in Boys: Managing Sorrow, Rage and the Dynamics of Hope

David A. Crenshaw, PhD, ABPP, RPT-S

Alyssa Swan, PhD, LPC, NCC

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences)

1. Identify 3 practical methods for re-channeling client rage in play therapy.

2. Name at least 3 methods of “stealth therapy” that can facilitate enhanced engagement in play therapy.

3. Name at least 3 evidenced-based play therapy approaches.

4. List at least 3 features of Child-Centered Play Therapy that contribute to its effectiveness with the presenting problem of aggression.

5. Name at least 3 approaches to play therapy that can be integrated into effective work with managing aggression.


Ray, D. C., Blanco, P. J., Sullivan, J. M., & Holliman, R. (2009). An exploratory study of child-centered play therapy with aggressive children. International Journal of Play Therapy, 18(3), 162-175.
Ritzi, R.M., Ray, D.C., & Schumann, B.R. (2017). Intensive short-term child-centered play therapy and externalizing behaviors in children. International Journal of Play Therapy, 26(1), 33-46.
Wilson, B. J., & Ray, D. (2018). Child‐centered play therapy: aggression, empathy, and self‐regulation. Journal of Counseling & Development, 96(4), 399–409.

Drumming Strategies for Play Therapists: Strengthening Alliances, Clinical Goals & Affect Regulation

Dan Walsh, MS, MT-BC

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Psychological and Psychotherapeutic Theories and Practice; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Define the iso principle in relation to structuring therapeutic drumming experiences with clients in play therapy and counseling. 

2. Identify 2 or more improvisational techniques that can be used with clients during drumming experiences in play therapy and counseling sessions in order to achieve affect regulation and greater attentional control. 

3. List 2 clinical goals per age group that can be facilitated through improvisational drumming with children, teens and adults in play therapy and other types of clinical sessions.

4. Name the 3 most essential skills that play therapists and other non-specialist clinicians must acquire before using drumming responsibly and effectively in their sessions. 

5. Cite 3 ways play therapists, non-specialist therapists, and counselors can employ drumming experiences within their scope of practice. 


Aigen, K. (2005).  Music centered music therapy. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.
Bruscia, K. E. (1987).  Improvisational models of music therapy. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas Publishers.
Nordoff, P., & Robbins, C., (2007).  Creative music therapy: A guide to fostering clinical musicianship. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.

A Breath of Fresh Air: Promoting Attachment with Nature-Based Play Therapy

Anne Stewart, PhD, RPT-S

(Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Clinical Interventions and Evidence-based Practice; Cross-disciplinary Offering from Behavioral and Social Sciences; Media and Materials in Treatment)

1. Describe how reports regarding the decreased time spent in play, and time spent in nature (and more time with technology) for children across generations is relevant for play therapists to share with parents, teachers, and other health professionals.

2. Name at least one reason for the negative impact of less play and less time in nature on the mental health of children in play therapy, their families, and communities.

3. List 2 or more findings from research indicating how interaction with nature enhances creativity, attention and focus, and an overall physical and mental well-being for child clients in play therapy.

4. List 4 or more hands-on nature-based play therapy activities to promote attachment and regulation.

5. Name 2 nature-based play therapy activities to support children’s opportunities to interact with and in nature.


Jordan, M. (2015). Nature and therapy. New York, NY: Routledge Press.
Louv, R. (2012). Vitamin N. New York, NY: Algonquin Books.
Pont, S., Zaplatosch, J., Lamar, M., Milligan-Toffler, S., Louv, R. & Jordan, C. (2018). Green schoolyards support healthy bodies, minds and communities. Pediatrics, 142.


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