Schedule of events


(Subject to Change)

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    • Wednesday, September 28, 2016
    •  
      8:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
      General Registration  (Imperial Ballroom Foyer)
      The registration desk will open starting at 8am for all attendees. Please come by and check in prior to attending any of the educational sessions. We have your name tag, which is required to attend the sessions, and a great "goody bag" for you.
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      A Secure Campus, By Design: Gensler Roundtable Discussion & Case Studies  (Arboretum 1)
      As facility development at Texas institutions of higher education expands, Gensler, a research‐based design firm, broadens our understanding of the many ways legislative policy, current events and environmental design shape campus security measures. Prompted by authorization of the ‘Campus Carry Law,’ which allows carrying concealed handguns on higher education campuses, operational strategies are being reconsidered in advance of August 1, 2016, when Senate Bill 11 comes into effect. Presentation information will be based on roundtable discussion, survey data and points of view emerging from dialogue among campus facilities and safety management staff.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Balancing Progressive Sustainable MEP with Institutional Standards  (Arboretum 3-4)
      When a university has goals for highly progressive sustainable MEP systems, but also wants to avoid enduring any painful learning curve to maintain those new systems, the design team has a real challenge before them. Learn how the team for UT Dallas’ new Davidson‐Gundy Alumni Center worked together to generate a high‐performance building that would be well‐received by maintenance teams, what challenges the group overcame, and what led to—for UT Dallas—an overall more sustainable building solution in the long run.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Life in our World: Designing for Mellennial Students and Faculty  (Arboretum 5)
      The Millennials generation has dramatically impacted the facilities we design. But is it about Millennials? Or more about the rapid change of the educational process? And will our buildings evolve fast enough to keep up? This presentation will focus on Millennial inspired changes and the influence on the faculty who will teach and the students who will learn ‐ in fact, many of the younger faculty are members of the Millennials. Changes in the built environment, including specific modifications in both new and existing facilities, will be evaluated in terms of affordability, advisability and return on investment. A practical guide on how to ready faculty and staff to teach in the new environment will lead to a better understanding of how to make our facilities perform as imagined during the design process and how to flex as learning styles continue to evolve. Recent projects, including the TAMU College of Veterinary Medicine, will be used to demonstrate the various concepts.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Planning for Interdisciplinary Research: The Way of the Future  (Regency)
      Campus facilities are a tool for delivering the educational mission, vision, values and pedagogy of any institution. They form the physical home base for all campus activities and traditions. Most academia buildings are designed around the needs of a single college or set of departments such as a nursing building or a business building. Creating an interdisciplinary research building where scholars across multiple disciplines are able to collaborate is often talked about but rarely achieved. At The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), president Dr. Diana Natalicio has a vision for a building where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. A synergistic research building would provide superior spaces to collaborate, extending the reach and prominence of UTEP within the research community. Because her vision involves experts who have not yet been identified, conducting research that has not yet been defined, planning a facility of this magnitude has several levels of challenges.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Revitalizing a campus icon for the next generation  (Window Box)
      Texas A&M University is steeped in longstanding tradition, none more significant than the Corps of Cadets. With 2,600 cadets living “on the Quad”, the Corps dorms are a vital and thriving part of campus life. Built in the 30’s, the Aggie Corps of Cadets housing needed an aesthetic reboot and modernization to welcome a new generation of students. Together, Kirksey Architecture and SpawGlass worked with Texas A&M University to revitalize and preserve the spirit of the Corps, bringing one of the most central pieces of Aggie history back into visual prominence.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Utility Master Planning and its Role in the Campus Planning Process  (Arboretum 2)
      Master planning efforts typically focus on fulfilling the vision and mission statements of the campus (rightly so). However, the process also presents an excellent opportunity to examine the health and envision the future of a campus’s utility infrastructure. If utilities are overlooked there can be long term detrimental effects, eventually leading to higher than necessary operating costs (emergency repairs) and energy costs (inefficient systems). The resulting reliability issues are a concern, particularly in research institutions. Utility master planning must be considered alongside physical spaces to fully understand the life cycle costs of campus expansion and renewal. Examining the interdependent energy and water utilities simultaneously allows conservation opportunities to emerge that may otherwise not be evident. In 2014 Texas State University began development of a comprehensive utility master plan for the campus. This process will be presented as a case study.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:10 PM  -  3:10 PM
      THECB Presentation on Current Events  (Regency)
      This session will review the current state of affairs in relation to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s role in the facilities planning process. Discussion items will include progress reports and any recent changes or developments that have taken place during the negotiated rule-making process, as well as any procedural changes related to reporting for institutions of higher education.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:10 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Break - Sponsored by Walker Parking Consultants  (Aboretum & Regency Foyers)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Community College Roundtable Discussion  (Arboretum 1)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Health Science Center Roundtable Discussion  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Private University Roundtable Discussion  (Arboretum 5)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Public University Roundtable Discussion  (Regency)
      4:45 PM  -  6:30 PM
      Exhibit Hall Grand Opening and Prize Giveaway  (Imperial Ballroom)
      Join us for the opening of the our exhibit hall and networking with your peers and sponsors. We'll have refreshments, bar, snacks and a traveling magician for your entertainment. We'll also have great prizes for those who attend.
      7:00 PM  -  9:00 PM
      Dinner and Entertainment  (Marketplace)
      Immediately following our opening reception, join us for a sit down dinner! While you dine you'll be entertained with a stage show by Curt Miller a renowned magician and entertainer.
      9:30 PM  -  11:30 PM
      (Thursday, September 29, 2016)
      Casino Night Sponsored by HOK  (Marketplace)
      Join us for this tremendously successful and popular gaming event. We'll provide the play money - you provide and cunning and poker face! Great prizes will be given at the end. Good luck!
    • Thursday, September 29, 2016
    •  
      7:15 AM  -  8:15 AM
      Breakfast and Welcome Address  (Marketplace)
      7:30 AM  -  10:30 AM
      General Registration  (Imperial Ballroom Foyer)
      8:15 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Keynote Address - Sponsored by Entegral Solutions  (Marketplace)
      Keynote Speakers:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Data-Driven Design: Space Planning to Meet Goals  (Arboretum 1)
      Operations Division Planning & Administration (ODPA) at Texas Tech University is responsible for maintaining a 10 million SF and 250+ building inventory. A proactive approach to maintaining the facilities data, and communicating its value, has been pivotal in chasing our institutional goals. Space planning and programming processes rely heavily on the fidelity of the facilities inventory data. This data, along with web‐based systems, internal processes, and collaborative efforts have provided a framework for solving space planning and programming issues while keeping both the department level and institutional goals in sight. This presentation aims to communicate successful methods for managing the ever‐fluid facilities inventory with the intent of making informed, strategic decisions in TTU facilities.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Designing for the Millennials: Live, Learn, Play  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      Panelists from University Division of Student Life Departments will reflect on the top 10 issues of importance to millennial students on their campuses with regards to student life beyond academics. What are essential programs and services that create strong campus communities, student engagement, recruitment, retention and fun? Our panel will reflect on their career experiences regarding services, programs, amenities and trends that affect the way facilities are planned, designed and managed for this generation of students. Finally, examples and features of facilities that inspire the best in Student Life will be discussed during this comfortable, fireside chat.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Dynamic Program Growth/New Generation of Facilities/Improved Outcomes  (Arboretum 5)
      The need for engineering graduates continues to grow. It is estimated that there will be 180,000 engineering jobs available annually through 2020, but Universities will award only 110,000 bachelor’s degrees in related fields. Programs must grow, recruit more students, increase graduation rates and add facilities. This requires a new way of planning academic science facilities and challenging old preconceptions: curriculums limiting early student participation in engineering specific courses; mixing core facilities, research laboratories, classrooms and instructional laboratories within the same facility; integrating project development space for experiential learning through multi‐disciplinary activities; and providing spaces to encourage peer/peer and peer/faculty interactions. This session will demonstrate how Texas A&M University and The University of Kansas are addressing these challenges, growing their engineering programs and taking a fresh look at how to plan new facilities.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Energy Mgmt.: Creativity, Collaboration, Technology, & Taking Risks  (Regency)

      This presentation will showcase how two unique Energy conservation projects at MD Anderson Cancer Center applied new technology, new concepts, & new processes to improve the efficiency of the campus. We will discuss how the key ingredients of creativity, collaboration, technology, taking risk for the OR suite unoccupied setback project & Heat Recovery Chiller project produced the following step changes in MD Anderson facilities:

      • Significantly reduce energy consumption on the campus
      • Outline a new direction for the future of the campus
      • Demonstrate that new technology can be safe & seamless to the patient experience
      • Enhance trust and collaboration between facilities and clinical teams
      • Illustrate how empowerment and creativity are the engines of progress
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Starting From Scratch-Building a GIS Network For The Alamo Colleges  (Window Box)
      There are several pathways to developing and implementing an enterprise GIS. The chosen method depends on the current state of the organization in terms of the complexity of the existing system as well as the current and future needs of the Northeast Lake View campus and those of ACCD as a whole. This session will discuss the critical steps toward establishing an Enterprise‐Wide GIS network including, GIS funding plan alternatives, Comparison to campus peers and industry best practices and how to develop short‐ and long‐term needs identified from full needs analysis and stakeholder input.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Texas Tech's Approach to Increasing On-Campus Housing Participation  (Arboretum 2)
      Increasing upperclassmen on‐campus housing participation enhances retention and graduation rates. By creating choices responsive to Millennial and emerging Generation Z expectations, Texas Tech University has expanded on‐campus housing choices. Utilizing a fast track design‐build delivery method (16 months from programming to ribbon cutting), the recently completed West Campus Village directly competes with the private marketplace for upperclassmen and graduate students. While cost competitive, the project is constructed to institutional standards, includes exterior design reflective of the University's distinctive Spanish Renaissance architecture, and offers Texas Tech's students a competitive and relevant community of choice. This session will offer insights on the institution's unique approach to residence life, lessons learned and trends in student life programming, planning, and design process, and fundamentals of successful fast track project delivery.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Bringing Efficiencies to the Industry – Millennial Style  (Arboretum 1)
      Millennials bring new skill sets to the AEC industry that can, with proper leadership, accelerate and improve project delivery. This presentation will explore how three generational characteristics (Collaboration, Entrepreneurship, and Digital Fluency) have improved the delivery process for a major research building at the University of Houston. Project leaders from the University, Building Design team, and General Contractor will share specific examples of how Millennials have brought efficiencies to the design process, from using digital optimization tools to reduce construction costs by right‐sizing façade components to using mobile technologies to address “real time” issues in the field. These and other examples will demonstrate how Millennials will continue to contribute to the project delivery process.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Case Study for the Design of a Successful Millennial Residence Hall  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      Millennials Come Out! Come Out! Wherever You Are! The new LEED Gold 500 bed $30M Rawlins Honors Residence Hall on UNT’s Denton Campus opened in the fall of 2015 to accolades from Staff and Residents alike. Rawlins is a paradigm case study on how to successfully design a collaborative Living/Learning Center that prevents Millennial cocooning! Based on selected ACUHO‐i 21st Century design concepts, this highly collaborative LLC minimized living unit size in favor of multiple community, study, recreation, living/learning, music practice and Faculty‐in Residence spaces promoting community among residents. Attendees will hear from UNT System’s FD&C Senior PM, Janna Morgan, and the Design Team regarding the programmatic, design and scheduling challenges of this beautiful new facility and how those were balanced with the Honors Dean’s requirements. Interviews with Residence Life Staff and residents on how the new LLC meets their social, educational and personal goals will be provided.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Millennial Athletes-Creating Culturally-Rich Facilities for the Future  (Arboretum 5)
      How are millennial athletes changing the way we plan and design our athletic facilities? Millennial athletes are motivated, goal‐oriented and expect the universities they attend to launch them into greatness. With high levels of optimism, they feel connected to their family, friends and the university’s they attend. They expect a variety of options for living, playing, eating all with socially engaging student and athletic activities. Millennial athletes presume that their facilities will be designed to encourage these interactions and allow them to participate in a culturally‐rich, interactive athletic environment. TAMU‐Corpus Christi will identify the mind‐set of millennial athletes and provide ways that other institutions will be able to design and build facilities that attract and retain these students. We will discuss the effects of long‐range planning and provide examples that our University has built and plans to build in order to achieve such a socially‐rich environment.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Six Reasons Why Your Academic Space is Not Equipped for the Future  (Regency)
      Most decision about academic space are made with centuries of historical reference. But this pattern of looking back ignores a huge change that is affecting higher education. Faculty are experimenting with new teaching modalities, most significantly incorporating asynchronous content. There is a dramatic shift away from using class time for lecture‐based content, focusing instead on team‐based problem solving. Software for higher education is advancing exponentially. Devices are becoming more sophisticated, and the ability to connect is increasing, providing greater access. And perhaps most significantly, there is an attitude among millennials that their education should be incorporated into their digital lifestyles, as is every other aspect of their lives. Each of these “influencers” have a dramatic impact on the type, size, and configuration of teaching space on campus.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      The Millennials Have Spoken: Log On, Plug In, and Chill Out  (Window Box)
      The Millennials at the University of North Texas wanted a new student union facility. They drove the programming and design process for their new Union, working closely with university administrators, UNT System Facilities staff and the design team. They participated in awareness campaigns and won a successful student referendum. The result is – as the kids say – “Full House Reboot!” Together, our team created a new 300,000 SF, $90 million, LEED Platinum edifice. Our presentation will demonstrate how an inclusive planning process, and intense design and construction efforts, yielded a remarkable 21st Century Union, striking the right balance to serve a 21st Century student body, informed by the unique expectations of Millennials. We will also explore the transformation of a confusing 1970s complex, comprised of a 1964 building wrapped in multiple additions and renovations, into one of the most dynamic student unions in the country.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      The Millennials' Tools for Construction Communication and Coordination  (Arboretum 2)
      Many Millennials are driven by technology, software and other digital tools; and the AEC industry is following suit. This presentation will cover how the Sam Houston State University South Residence Complex team is using new technology, software and other digital tools, including Bluebeam Revu, for efficient and concise communication. From constructability reviews, document control and closeout deliverables, the owner, architect, engineers and subcontractors all are able to use these tools to easily keep up with the most current documents, view comments, make real time mark‐ups and, ultimately, ensure prompt coordination and document review. Once the project is complete, maintenance personnel will have the ability to quickly access the Digital Inspection Log and view pertinent information.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      12:15 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Lunch with the Sponsors and Networking  (Imperial Ballroom)
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      A Bright Opportunity: Is LED lighting here or hype?  (Arboretum 1)
      The promise of using LED lighting to reduce campus maintenance and operation costs has been just over the horizon for years. At long last, lingering technical issues seem to have been overcome as unit pricing has decreased. We will look at the array of legacy lighting systems, compare them with some of the newest LED options, and suggest when and where each alternative makes the most sense. Multiple funding options available to HE institutions will be explored in a business case format so that attendees can see the true environmental, social, and financial paybacks that can reasonably be expected from an LED retrofit. Actual examples and results from a major retrofit at the Houston Community College System, as well as twelve LEED projects now being constructed by the system will be shared. Attendees will hear from their peers that have installed LED technology in their facilities, and be given the opportunity to ask questions to determine for themselves if LED is “Here or Hype”.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      A New Music & Theater Building at Texas State - Non-STEM for Millennials  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      Research has shown music and drama rank high in Millennial's preferences. Witness the proliferation of music streaming services and Netflix. A new building in San Marcos is designed with two intimate performance spaces that offer high‐quality acoustics and theatrical intimacy. The overall facility is designed for theater and music students to gain real‐world experience as preparation for satisfying and productive careers in the performing arts. This new performing arts facility is focused on the non‐STEM rehearsal and performance needs of millennial students and emerging young performing arts faculty members.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Graduate Student Housing vs. Housing Graduate Students  (Arboretum 5)
      Graduate student housing is often overlooked or underappreciated in the realm of campus life. These students approach life at a university in a vastly different way than incoming freshmen or even more seasoned juniors and seniors. With a very specific set of goals and a bit more life experience, graduate students want and need stability, longevity, and community. Through a series of campus visits around the country and analysis of a focused student survey, The University of Texas identified how to successfully assimilate new graduate student housing on their Austin campus.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Positive Impact of Insulated Concrete Forms: Sustainable, Economical, Efficient  (Regency)
      Higher education institutions in Texas continually look for ways to improve their facilities’ functional life and operational costs. This session will review the use of insulated concrete forms (ICF) as a flexible, sustainable exterior wall system in institutional construction. Texas Tech University System, in its ongoing eco‐centric effort to cut building costs and increase speed to market encourages the use of innovative building systems such as ICF in their building designs. ICF combines multiple construction systems (structural, envelope and insulation), to eliminate waste and deliver a more cost effective system in a shorter time frame. John Russell and Denise Hostick with Texas Tech University System and Vaughn Construction’s project manager Luke Vaden will share design considerations, construction challenges, and cost metrics encountered while designing and constructing Texas Tech’s Administration Building and its West Village Residence Hall using ICF.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Trinity University: Preserving Campus Character  (Window Box)
      The Skyline Campus of Trinity University, overlooking downtown San Antonio, was planned by renowned Texas architect O’Neil Ford who designed over three‐quarters of the buildings on campus. For the first time since Ford sited his own buildings, Trinity is undertaking an updated master plan which will guide future development on campus. Trinity recognizes the value of preserving the historic Ford buildings which add to the campus cohesion and richness of character. However, it is important to consider updated facilities that meet the university's mission and needs of students today. The first step Trinity will consider is the creation of a historic district. This will serve first as a mechanism to include buildings and landscape that may otherwise be difficult to designate, and secondly will serve as an incentive to reuse historic buildings. This strategy ties directly to Trinity’s vision celebrating the legacy of the Ford campus while adapting facilities to meet competitive expectations
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      When Worlds Collide: Mission, Culture and Learning Environments  (Arboretum 2)
      The past decade has seen more changes in Higher Education than in the previous half century. Consumer expectations, demographic shifts, economic realities and the blurring of lines between education providers are causing institutions to re‐examine how they organize and market themselves in a competitive environment. How will these trends influence the way we look at future learning environments and campus portfolios? Which education market segments are positioned to capitalize on these changes and which will be required to make the biggest adjustments in order to survive? What are the lessons learned from strategic alliances with universities and local industries with workforce needs? Session Moderator Alan Colyer will pose these and many other questions to two of Texas’ top community college leaders in the midst of major building programs at their respective institutions: Dr. Steve Head, Chancellor, Lone Star College System; and, Dr. Mark Escamilla, President, Del Mar College.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:00 PM  -  3:40 PM
      Break - Sponsored by Datum Rios Engineers  (Arboretum & Regency Foyers)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Blowing Off Steam: A Path to Sustainability and Safety  (Arboretum 1)
      This session is a case study of the steam heating system decentralization project at Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas. Faced with a heating system that was outdated, maintenance intensive, and unsafe for University personnel, SRSU embarked upon a replacement and upgrade project for the campus heating system. With the help of EEA and Brandt, a distributed (rather than centralized) heating system was applied to the campus that increased reliability, reduced maintenance, improved safety, and dramatically reduced utility consumption.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Give Me a Laptop I Can Work Anywhere-Next Gen Faculty Influence Design  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      Today’s faculty cohort is made up of Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials, and is transitioning rapidly. The recent wave of capital funding has shown the influence and impact younger generations are having with regards to new facility conception and the critical spaces that define current science building programs. A variety of social and collaborative spaces are expected/desired. “BYOD” (bring your own device) applies not only to students, but also to faculty. “My territory” gives way to lab space that can flex up or down as needed/funded. Core facilities house shared special equipment. A place for students to land is increasingly important. We’ll examine these themes with a case study: A Program of the Plant Pathology Building at Texas A&M in College Station. With the participation of the Associate Facilities Manager for TAMU AgriLife, David De Leon, and Yvonne Bryant, Project Planner with TAMU System Office, we will examine how next gen faculty influences science building design.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Innovation Forum – A Strategic Planning Model  (Arboretum 5)
      The Innovation Forum (IF) is a strategic planning model that is designed to integrate the Facilities and Academic Master Plans. The model contributes to the development of the Institutional Plan that considers both of these master plans and how they affect each other. The IF looks at not only the construction costs but also staffing, marketing, supplies and equipment for each initiative. This innovative process places the focus on the Return on Student Investment (R.O.S.I.), the benefit to the organization, and the desires and needs of the stakeholders. Finally, once implemented, it encourages a tradition of continuous improvement by searching for and evaluating ideas based on quantifiable data. A tradition that not only benefits organizational long‐term growth, but one that places Student Success at the forefront of everything we do. The presenters will provide a quick background of the Innovation Forum and then the participants will be led through the development of a DREAM score, Co
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Living in a millennial world: strategies to meet student expectations  (Regency)
      The millennials mark the beginning of a sustained shift in culture for higher education. How do you meet the major shifts in physical, academic, and social needs of students that are redefining what student housing design means? In today’s rapidly changing environment, and in a time of fluctuating enrollment and economic uncertainty, see what other universities are doing to create living communities that attract and retain today’s students, while branding them to their unique missions. This presentation calls upon case studies at Texas A&M University and campuses across the nation to walk you through real‐world solutions and share inventive tips for creating student housing designs with all the amenities and technology in demand today.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Research for the Next Generation: Breathing New Life into Old Labs  (Window Box)

      As institutions’ lab buildings age & high‐caliber faculty with big expectations are recruited, better understanding of how to effectively plan, design & construct an efficient and high‐performing research lab is essential. In the current economic climate, institutions are pushed to do more with less, and retro‐fitting these aging labs often becomes a daunting reality. A successful renovation requires a different mindset than a new build, especially in the realm of science and research. This session focuses on best practices to utilize & integrate existing infrastructure with lab design trends and technologies that will further the overall mission of the facility and institution now & in the future.

      We will:

      • Explore design strategies to capitalize on existing infrastructure
      • Discuss financial & operational impact of code upgrades
      • Determine the best approach to gather appropriate information & avoid re‐work
      • Examine how to set a master plan for cohesive, phased facility renovation
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      UT Tyler’s College of Pharmacy: A New Way Forward  (Arboretum 2)
      The University of Texas at Tyler’s vision of becoming nationally recognized as a destination university for flagship students is realized through a $26.5 million project, funded through a unique combination of tuition and philanthropic donations. Dean Brunner guided the design process which focused on interactive teaching. Instead of a didactic setting, classrooms are designed for the professor to teach from multiple positions. Students are clustered together in groups of six to promote in‐class collaboration, with the expectation they study outside of the classroom for preparation. Group study rooms are clustered together on each floor, overlooking a majestic natural environment. The collaborative classrooms are placed adjacent to the faculty offices to encourage faculty and student interaction. Public spaces, indoor and outdoor, are new destination points for the rest of the campus by creating collaborative learning environments that promote a new way of learning.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      4:45 PM  -  6:00 PM
      Exhibit Hall Networking  (Imperial Ballroom)
      6:00 PM 
      Open Houses / Dinner with Sponsors / Dinner on Your Own
    • Friday, September 30, 2016
    •  
      7:30 AM  -  8:15 AM
      Breakfast with the Sponsors  (Imperial Ballroom)
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      College Campus Buildings of Tomorrow, Today  (Arboretum 1)
      Facilities are losing knowledge ‐ Per the Sloan Center on Aging and Work more than 50 percent of facilities management personnel are expected to retire in the next 10 years. At the same time millennials are entering facilities both as staff members as well as space occupants. Surveys suggest that Millennials are excited about smart homes and typically have multiple devices connected online. They expect their educational and work facilities to be smart and connected. These trends can become opportunities or challenges depending on how facility managers responds to them. Energy conservation and doing more with less continue to be major challenges for facility managers. This presentation provides a step by step holistic approach that includes focusing on people and existing systems data to solve these challenges. A case study provided by the University of Houston will validate the importance of optimization and commissioning of existing and new facilities on college campuses.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Fusion Facilities for Millennials; Housing That’s Not Just Housing  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      The special, sheltered, confident, conventional, team‐oriented, achieving, pressured millennials have arrived. To attract and retain this generation, student housing needs to respond to this new type of student. They crave community and collaboration ‐ and expect an enriched and engaging life‐style at their fingertips. Universities like Texas A&M and Midwestern State University are responding with housing that provides more: that creates connectivity and builds community. This session will outline millennials’ expectations and provide ways to address them within university housing facilities. Midwestern State University will focus addressing expectations through campus master planning. Texas A&M will discuss meeting these needs and expectations through facility changes. We will discuss fusion facilities and their impact on millennial students and university facilities.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Millennials have landed- optimizing space design for continual change  (Arboretum 5)
      Inter-planetary Millennials are crash landing into our carefully designed inner space requiring continual revolutionizing in their learning environments to meet unknown, evolving future needs at warp speed. Educational programs often grow organically, unexpectedly and by administrative decree resulting in reactionary analysis of space requirements. The customary model of identifying necessary space by programming and benchmarking seldom incorporate the pedagogical and logistical needs on a granular level to respond effectively to the rapidly evolving long-term need. This presentation will present a new and unique model, SEPLO ™, which quantifies program and space design for current and future evolving and often unknown needs.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Recipe for Success: More Than a Dining Hall  (Regency)
      A successful dining hall is no longer simply about dining. A dining facility can be a community center, event space, platform for student congregation, and a teaching tool. What does this mean for academic institutions, and how do universities create a facility that remains viable and multi‐dimensional? There are over 2,000 colleges across the nation and each campus aims to differentiate itself in a variety of ways. When you have a growing student population, how do you create a facility that will support millennials and stay relevant for the next generation? Through strategic planning and collaboration you can create a flexible, dynamic campus amenity that is also a recruiting draw. The purpose of this session is to offer four guidelines, and their practical applications, that can take your potential dining hall from a standard, expensive, or unpopular option to a student inspired facility with staying power.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Shaping the Future: Top Trends that Impact STEM facilities  (Window Box)
      The Millennial generation dominates the population of undergraduate and graduate schools. What are the unique attributes of the Millennial generation? What are the space planning issues for science and engineering facilities that should be considered to respond to this generation of students? How do these attributes differ from previously designed science facilities? This presentation will answer these questions, provide a comparison of several STEM facilities ‐ renovated, expanded, and new STEM buildings; completed projects, projects in design, and in construction. Projects from small liberal arts colleges to large state owned universities will be profiled. The presenters will highlight successful, comfortable, attractive, flexible, collaborative, and multi‐disciplinary learning environments. Metrics will be provided that compare area allocations, and space type ratios.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Structuring Contractor Proposals for the Millennial Generation  (Arboretum 2)
      The construction industry is evolving rapidly; but State of Texas procurement laws for construction manager‐at‐risk and design build services can’t keep up; the laws can only be updated every 2 years, with each legislative session. Owners have to be deliberate in their RFP process to ensure they ask the right questions, in the right manner, so the proposals they receive can be evaluated apples‐to‐apples. This moderated round table discussion will present different perspectives regarding how to best procure fees and general conditions for construction manager‐at‐risk and design‐build services. David Boram, director of project planning for Vaughn Construction, will moderate panelists from Texas State University System, Texas A&M University System, and a former University of Texas System employee, regarding the different approaches these Owners take to get the information they need to clearly and equitably evaluate construction manager‐at‐risk and design build proposals.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      9:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Break - Sponsored by Hoar Construction
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Designing for the Net Generation – Reinventing the UT PCL Library  (Arboretum 1)
      Millennials are dramatically changing the way that College and University Libraries are utilized. A shift from a focus on print media to digital collections and information literacy means that the library environment must respond to the needs and expectations of this diverse user group. Today’s students expect their libraries to provide innovative, flexible spaces, a variety of amenities, access to technology, and support for the use of their own personal devices. This type of wholesale transition can be challenging, forcing stakeholders to consider what is possible with limited budgets, time constraints associated with year round operations, and inherent difficulties of increasing access to power and technology in an “old” building. This session will cover how the Perry Castañeda Library is being transformed to provide new tools, spaces, and expertise to the entire campus community, and how other facilities can turn their libraries into environments for inspired learning.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      From 'Dormitory' to a student life oasis  (Arboretum 3 - 4)
      Pfluger provided Master Planning, Project Management, Architectural and Interior services for the renovation of Beauford Jester Center. Jester Commons serves as a central hub for students to learn and socialize. The space houses three retail dining venues, a market, coffee shop/bakery, as well as a large dining facility. Renovations to the space included improvement to all residential floors, ground floor commons, study lounges, lobbies, classrooms, markets and dining facilities.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      How 2 Modern College Facilities Engaged Communities & Helped Students  (Arboretum 5)
      Houston boasts the most populous and culturally diverse city in Texas. Colleges and universities in the greater Houston area have a challenge every school year: How do you meet the needs of an evolving campus community and student population? The University of Houston Student Center and The University of Houston‐Downtown’s Welcome Center are different in size but share interesting stories. As the “front door” to both campuses, the facilities must meet the needs of an ever‐changing student body while enabling them to succeed in many phases of life. This presentation will bring together the design team and facility leaders to share how their approach to rethinking their facilities brought together faculty, students and community leaders to create environments that support student success, engage the changing campus community, and aide recruitment efforts for their institutions.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      One Thing Leads to Another  (Arboretum 2)
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Recreating Underperforming Buildings into Centers for Success  (Regency)
      As aging campus buildings are degraded due to latent problems, deferred maintenance or built‐in physical constraints, we are faced with expensive decisions to continue to prolong using worn out facilities or to fund transformation of underperforming buildings. An important 1918 building on the TAMU campus had been often converted from one use to another. By 2012, numerous inhibiting remodels and band‐aiding of systems had left the ideally sited structure unusable; until a comprehensive overhaul rescued the building. Elements of the original construction covered by decades of remodels were revealed and systems replaced to create a new teaching story for the historic building. The results have been award winning; capturing inspiration and opportunities in the display of new components and technologies, flexible classroom environments, rejuvenation of common spaces, creation of sticky spaces, and the design for learning spaces for today’s and tomorrow’s construction science majors.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      UT Dallas’ New Boundary Busting Engineering Building  (Window Box)
      The center of gravity for UT Dallas’ growing modern campus will shift dramatically with this innovative teaching and research facility. The Engineering Building will be the new home for the campus’ emerging Mechanical Engineering program and will feature next generation research, teaching, and student learning environments, while fostering interdisciplinary collaboration. A mix of high‐bay, wet, & dry labs will support three specialty research areas: Energy, Robotics, & Nano‐Bio, with additional labs for core researchers. Specialized instructional lab spaces will facilitate undergraduate courses along with classrooms ranging from 30 to 300 seats. Faculty and GA office spaces will be distributed throughout the building, located within close proximity to research and instructional areas. Engaging public and collaborative zones throughout the building will activate the edge of the campus’ academic core and establish an engineering precinct with existing adjacent engineering facilities.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Grand Prize Give-Away / Boxed Lunch / Exhibit Hall Networking  (Imperial Ballroom)
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