You can download the 2018 Agenda at a Glance at your convenience.


Schedule of events


(Subject to Change)

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    • Friday, September 21, 2018
    •  

      Education Sessions

      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      A New Era of Sustainability Planning: From Vision to Implementation
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      Texas A&M’s 2018 Sustainability Plan integrates social equity objectives with environmental and economic efforts while balancing the need for long‐term vision with action and accountability. Through nine themes that address the physical environment, social sustainability, waste management, and institutional efforts, sustainability initiatives at Texas A&M have been transformed from an environment‐heavy focus to a woven approach that places equal emphasis on all three elements of sustainability’s triple bottom line. Concurrent to developing the University’s Sustainability Master Plan, Texas A&M’s Department of Residence Life sought ways to evaluate its contribution to institution‐wide sustainability efforts and prioritize future endeavors. The Residence Life Sustainability Plan seeks to advance the department’s capacity to operate sustainable facilities, support sustainable life skills education, and leverage competitive advantage in the local student housing market.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Beyond Simulation: A New Paradigm for Allied Health Education
      Seguin A/B
      The benefits of using simulation as a teaching tool for nursing education program have been well‐documented. However, the new building on HCC’s Coleman Campus takes this to another level – with entire floors designed to simulate floors that closely resemble the hospitals and medical centers nearby. The result is a more immersive experience that better prepares students for a range of careers in Allied Health. This session will explore the new building from multiple vantage points – including (1) the role it plays in the future directions for Coleman Campus and Houston Community College as a whole; (2) its strategic position in the middle of the Texas Medical Center and how the design will help HCC interface with the larger medical community, and (3) the different labs and learning spaces that will help facilitate new curricular objectives including a larger focus interdisciplinary teaming and care.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Now You Can Afford to Make the Right Decision
      Republic A
      Aging buildings. Antiquated learning environments. Rising operating costs. Astronomical deferred maintenance. Sounds like the perfect time to build a new campus and make a fresh start…If only you could afford it! Using a 10‐year master planning process paired with very innovative financing strategies, DCCCD’s El Centro College made the decision to relocate their downtown campus and transform the learning experience for their students, faculty, and staff. Come explore the preparation and planning that led to El Centro’s monumental decision and discover the processes used to pursue and acquire funding at a time when capital is dwindling and schools are forced to prioritize. El Centro is pioneering the use of public‐private partnerships to create qualified projects for tax credit allocations such as New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC), Low‐Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and public incentives. By capitalizing on the P3 opportunity presented under Texas State.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      Preserving Unique Campus Resources - The UT Austin Experience
      Crocket C/D
      The University of Texas at Austin has a variety of unique historic resources on its campus. Everyone is familiar with the core '40 acres' so beautifully shaped by early architects - Cass Gilbert and later by Paul Cree. There are many other unique resources, however, that contribute to the special character of the University. Structures such as the original Santa Rita Oil Rig which represents the beginning of the great wealth the school has attained, to ancient dinosaur tracks housed in a small pavilion or the building that housed the headquarters of General Armstrong Custer during the Reconstruction Period are such examples. This paper will look at the preservation, restoration and continued academic use of several of these landmarks. In particular, the Arno Nowotny Building (prior Custer headquarters) and the 19th century complex of buildings known as the Winedale Historical Complex in Fayette County."
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      TAMU-SA Master Plan: Transforming Education & Campus Experience
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      In 2000, 126 students started classes at Palo Alto College as a part of Texas A&M University System Center in San Antonio. Focused on upper‐class academics only, enrollment grew steadily and by 2010 the Board of Regents acquired land to build a campus in south San Antonio. The University was not only academically divided between the Main Campus and space they leased at Brooks City Base, but neither campus provided student activities. To resolve this issue the University leadership made 3 major decisions which impacted the Master Plan’s implementation strategies as these changes were all scheduled to start in the Fall of 2016: 1.Consolidate 2 campuses: Main Campus population doubles instantly, 2.Academic Downward Expansion: Adds 600+ freshman students/year for next 2 years, 3.Create a residential campus: build first residence hall Today, TAMU‐SA’s enrollment is 6,500+ students and has implemented over 13 projects in the past 3 years, transforming the education and student experience.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      1:00 PM  -  2:00 PM
      UT Austin Space Allocation: Enhancing the Core; Maximizing Efficiency
      Crocket A/B
      With near constant expansion of UT Austin’s academic and research space, one of the University’s most valuable assets is the physical campus. The operations, maintenance, and construction of buildings is expensive, but also critical for the pursuit of excellence. UT Austin began the Space Allocation Study (SAS) in May 2016 with the goal of determining whether current administrative and library space might be allocated to serve the core academic mission, and in doing so, improve operational efficiency. Now on Phase 2 and 3, the SAS has proven fundamental to advancing excellence in education and research by directing repurposing and reinvestment in facilities to create more conducive environments for next‐generation learning, as well as enhanced and interdisciplinary research. Space Standards were also created that are now applied to all new construction and renovation projects. Cost savings was also an aim of the project and the savings of this undertaking are very significant.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:10 PM  -  3:10 PM
      An Instigator and Path to Crafting a Campus Plan
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      Campus master plans, both aspirational in vision and realistic in implementation, seek to guide the long‐term physical development of institutions in alignment with their vision, mission and goals. The session will evaluate and illustrate conditions supporting the need for a campus master plan, what to incorporate into the effort and how to adopt a continuum of planning on campus. Texas A&M University’s 2017 Campus Master Plan will serve as a case study, guiding attendees through the process of determining when a plan is needed, where to focus your efforts, what elements might be included, who to engage in the process, how the proposed transformations have impacted the campus experience and why to outline future supporting planning efforts for continuous improvement. Attendees will develop and refine skills to critically analyze past and current planning efforts to identify potential process adjustments leading to increased planning impacts on your campus.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:10 PM  -  3:10 PM
      K-20: The Early College High School and the Community College
      Republic A
      The educational model is changing. What has traditionally been siloed by grade levels and age is evolving due to an increase in demand for a highly‐educated job market at a faster pace. Population growth and a fluctuating economy has intensified the need for creating collaborations between the school districts, community college and higher education institutions. This results in “blended” environments, creating seamless transitions from primary to secondary to four‐year education. What challenges does this bring for the institutions and how do we accommodate for this evolution? During this session, we will examine curricular alignment, articulation and the considerations involved to create flexible, seamless solutions from kindergarten through post‐graduate education.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:10 PM  -  3:10 PM
      Ranch to Campus to New Urban Center - ACC's New San Gabriel Campus
      Seguin A/B
      Recognizing the current and future education needs in the growth North of Austin, Austin Community College has partnered with the City of Leander, the Leander School District, Capital Metro and the YMCA of Austin to develop a one of a kind campus at the heart of the city. The result is ACC’s newest campus, the San Gabriel Campus. This presentation will describe the process of transforming what is now ranchland into an urban campus, based on a form‐based code, at the epicenter of an emerging transit‐oriented development in Leander, Texas. Discussed will be issues of community connections, alternative transportation, planning for multi‐generation users, sustainable land use, early college high school education, storm water management, the campus environment within a form based code, and how the DNA of a city rooted in ranching and the railroad can be manifest in modern architectural character.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:10 PM  -  3:10 PM
      St. Philip's College New Campus Gateway: A Connected Campus and Community
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      The St. Philip’s College has a long‐standing history of serving the community and San Antonio region with over 70 different academic and technical disciplines offered. The campus has developed a cohesive identity that is connected by landscaped courtyards and covered walkways with an inward focus. With its award‐winning Culinary Arts Program, the school’s Department of Tourism, Hospitality, and Culinary Arts will move into its new building providing a café, classrooms, meeting spaces, pastry shop, kitchens and indoor/outdoor dining. The new location of the building expands the campus to the north, and will be flanked by a new Student Wellness Recreation Center – creating a transformative new campus gateway with an activated plaza that opens up to the neighboring park, offering programs that will shape how the campus engages students and the neighboring community. This gateway will create a more visible, open, activated environment enhancing student and community wellness and success.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:10 PM  -  3:45 PM
      Break Sponsored by Kimley Horn
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Community College Roundtable Discussion
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Health Science Center Roundtable Discussion
      Crocket C/D
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Private University Roundtable Discussion
      Crocket A/B
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Public University Roundtable Discussion
      Seguin A/B
      4:45 PM  -  6:30 PM
      Exhibit Hall Grand Opening
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      Exhibit Hall Opening and Prize Giveaway
      7:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
      Opening Night Dinner Sponsored by Jacobs
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      Keynote Speaker:
      8:00 PM  -  9:00 PM
      Keynote Speaker
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      Keynote Speaker:
       

      General Informaton

      8:00 AM  -  5:00 PM
      General Registration
      Texas Ballroom Foyer (4th Floor)
    • Saturday, September 22, 2018
    •  

      Education Sessions

      7:15 AM  -  8:00 AM
      Breakfast
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      8:00 AM  -  8:15 AM
      Welcome Address
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      8:15 AM  -  9:45 AM
      Keynote Address
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      Keynote Speaker:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Biology to Bedside and Chemistry to Clinic: Simulation-Based Learning
      Crocket A/B
      A growing national trend is a paradigm shift toward linking STEM and Health Sciences, using simulation‐based learning in higher education, often with transparency to put cutting‐edge learning on display as a primary design objective. This dynamic session explores facilities that create synergy and strategic overlap, allowing institutions to expose students to sciences as a whole, and encourage new collaborations and career interests. Presenters will discuss several projects, including the University of St. Thomas’ newly opened Center for Science & Health Professions, part of a master plan to create a liberal arts science quadrangle. This campus focal point combines previously separated departments into space that allows resource sharing for elevated cross‐discipline, hands‐on learning. Experts will reveal research‐based findings from surveys that test whether proximity and visibility increase interprofessional activity and career interests and discuss post‐occupancy perceptions.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Leveraging Data and Strategic Alignment for Facility Renewal Planning
      Seguin A/B
      The Facility Renewal Program (FRP) was created to prioritize infrastructure and aesthetic conditions needs for strategic renewal and replacement. The FRP was designed to capitalize on the knowledge base of in‐house facilities staff and the expertise of our Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) consultant. This program includes identification of existing and anticipated lifecycle infrastructure deficiencies in addition to aesthetic renewal projects. The consolidation of information from various sources into a single program has allowed the facilities division to make improved decisions on project prioritization and resource allocations. It will also provide a platform to substantiate future infrastructure requirements and funding needs. An effective program will not only operationally extend the life of MD Anderson Cancer Center facilities but also minimize disruption in space utilization and equipment downtime.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      TAMUG Academic Building Complex: A Collaboration to Redefine a Campus
      Republic A
      Redefining a college campus is a major undertaking for any project. For Texas A&M Galveston, the Academic Building Complex offered the first opportunity in decades to change the campus image and establish a new design criterion for future projects. In addition, the team was challenged to meet a compressed delivery schedule ‐ with initial design meetings starting in January 2014 and first day of classes scheduled for August 2016. Fortunately, the Texas A&M University System had the foresight to have both the Design team and the CMAR team on board early, creating a collaborative project environment. This collaboration with Owner/Architect/Contractor established an atmosphere of cooperation from the beginning and enabled the team to develop a framework for decision making that kept the project on schedule.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      The Importance of Designing Your Campus Around Student Experience
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      The role of community college is changing rapidly: it is no longer a path for vocational trades only, but an intersection between K‐12 education, higher education, and workforce. In addition, community colleges have become a microcosm of everything you see in a society ‐ diversity, age, culture and professions ‐ from ages 15 to 50 years. In order to determine how we design for the future, we need to discover how we design around these multi‐generational users. The students of tomorrow believe in the power to choose and customize their experience, and insist on authentic and multi‐disciplinary collaboration. Join us as we discuss how and why we designed Greenfield campus for Collin College around student experience rather than traditional departments, and how bridging the gap between K‐12 and higher education will transform the future of education.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Transforming Annual and Capital Financial Planning Using Data
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      It’s that time of year again. Time to submit the annual budget for facilities to the finance director. This is a struggle every year for facilities managers because it can often be a shot in the dark. Capital planning for the facilities inventory is also a decision that many facility and construction directors are involved in; serving as the trusted advisor for their enterprise. But where do we begin? What factors drive our financial decisions for annual and capital planning of the physical space? Can moving from a subjective to an objective position help? Using a data‐driven method to facilities management and planning provides a defensible approach to making the case for annual needs and capital financial decisions. In this presentation, Alamo Colleges will share the story of how harnessing the data about their facilities has led to a threefold increase in their annual preventive maintenance budget over the past five years and the passage of a $450 million Bond Program in 2017.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Transforming Higher Education in the Northwest Texas Panhandle
      Crocket C/D
      In 2015, former Dalhart Mayor Gene Rahll approached area leaders and Frank Phillips College (FPC) with the noble intent to donate funds towards a new campus for FPC in the Dallam and Hartley County region. Regional workforce needs were analyzed to tailor course offerings to specific skills training needs, followed by a 58,600 GSF master plan for the campus based upon identified needs. That plan and strong local support culminated in a successful maintenance tax referendum in late 2016 to fund campus operations. Master plan implementation began in early 2017 with the design and construction of a first‐phase student services, general education, and health sciences facility, followed by a CTE‐focused Career Training Center. This presentation explores the planning, design, and construction of what opens in summer 2018 as the Louise & Gene Rahll Education Center – ensuring higher education resources are available to the people of the Northwest Texas Panhandle for decades to come.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Creating a Gateway for Military Personnel Pursuing Higher Education
      Republic A
      Colleges and universities have experienced a surge in enrollment by active and retired military personnel. But many campuses do not have a dedicated facility for them. San Antonio College recently opened Victory Center, a 20,000 SF, two‐story facility to support this segment of students. Although the space was small, it needed to feel spacious, open, and create a sense of comfort. As typical of most projects, the expectations and program requirements far surpassed available funding. Even after undergoing several cost reduction exercises, the project was still $2.5 million over budget. The team developed a unique approach to phasing the buy‐out and identifying alternates so they could start construction while the campus continued to raise funds for the project. Mitch Wilson with Alamo Colleges, Mike Lanford with Alamo Architects, and Kirt Bailey with Vaughn Construction will highlight their solutions to the design and budget challenges of this unique project.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Enterprise Planning: A Case for Moving Beyond a Traditional Master Plan
      Crocket C/D
      Differing from a traditional master plan which focuses solely on the built environment, Enterprise Planning touches all areas of an institution to guide strategic direction. The outcome is a shared vision which becomes the framework for policies, programs and physical space. Through a highly collaborative process involving hundreds of stakeholders, a series of charrettes acted as the primary tool for discovering, analysis and facilitating dialogue. The activities sought to create a collective understanding of key concepts, establish big‐picture priorities and discuss stakeholder’s ideas for the near‐term and long‐term. These workshops created a venue to discover and analyze challenges, craft potential solutions, and define the future ‐ all in tangent. The outcome was the establishment of three overarching goals and a set of eight principles that together serve as the pillars of the College’s vision and the framework for the future.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Fabrication Center: From Student Idea to State-of-the-Art Facility
      Seguin A/B
      Student‐led initiatives often foster better educational environments; when their vision includes a state‐of‐the‐art maker space, how does that vision become a reality? This presentation will take you from concept to completion of a new Fabrication Center at Prairie View University, where students envisioned a new way to learn, and the university helped see that vision through to realization. The result is one of the largest maker spaces in the nation. Housing a variety of high tech equipment, the space is designed for flexibility, adaptability, safety, and security. All components, including furniture and equipment, were designed to help support goals of the facility. Detailed coordination during early phases of design through the use of Building Information Modeling and Virtual Reality ensured project success.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      From Old to New-Bringing New Life to the Heart of a Campus
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      Student experience is a major driver for modern colleges and universities across the state, and many are facing the challenges of reworking their current facilities to keep up. St. Philip’s College, part of the Alamo Colleges District, has gone through this journey, and the result is a new hub for student life, right in the heart of the campus. This presentation describes the journey the College took transforming a 1940’s performing arts center into a state‐of‐the‐art student union that has already built a strong sense of community and pride within the college. Attendees will hear from Alamo Colleges’ Associate Vice‐Chancellor of Facilities Operations and Construction Management, John Strybos, and the design team regarding the programmatic, design, construction and financial challenges they faced in transforming this uninspiring and underutilized facility into the most vibrant building on Campus.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      From Shopping Mall to Education and Research Campus
      Crocket A/B
      Recognizing current and future education needs, Austin Community College (ACC) purchased a failing 1980’s shopping mall in the heart city and partnered with public and private entities to transform the mall into a college campus and new urban based multi‐use development. Inside this “new” campus, ACC has partnered with pharmaceutical and bioscience research companies to develop a state‐of‐the‐art facilities, like the Bioscience Incubator. These companies will lease new lab and support spaces from ACC, and they will conduct their research and development in these new labs. In turn, students will have the opportunity to learn alongside industry leaders in a real‐world setting. This presentation will describe the process of converting a shopping mall into an urban campus while building public and private community connections. It will address many of the issues faced in planning bioscience research and development facilities in a campus setting.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:15 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Integrated Teaching Environments: A Bridge from Education to Workplace
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      The divide between lecture halls and post‐graduate workplaces can seem incredibly daunting when making that initial leap from school to career. Recent graduates may find themselves navigating a career path that looks nothing like they imagined when studying for finals. How should higher education institutions approach that disparity? In some cases, the answer may be bringing the workplace to the lecture halls. In this session, we’ll look at learning environments that mirror the industries they are preparing students for and, in the case of West Texas A&M University, integrate visible learning displays and actual real‐world applications. Join us and discover how the West Texas A&M Agricultural Sciences Complex grew from an idea rooted in the needs of a region to a sophisticated laboratory facility with far‐reaching implications in West Texas and the Food Science industry.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      12:15 PM  -  1:45 PM
      Lunch with the Sponsors
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      A Welcoming Home for Students: Libraries as the Modern Learning Lab
      Crocket A/B
      The modern‐day University library is evolving from its traditional function as a repository of printed materials and study space for individual‐based research. Rapidly evolving and powerful technologies, the availability of digitized information on the internet, and social technologies are compelling libraries to transform their services and collections to meet the needs and expectations of students and faculty. Today’s library is focused heavily on technology‐rich, flexible instruction and collaboration spaces. Recent initiatives are relocating lesser used library collections to offsite storage facilities, freeing up valuable square footage on campuses to address these changing needs. At the Evans Library at Texas A&M University and the Alkek Library at Texas State University, this transformation is offering not only new types of services to students and staff, but also includes upgraded infrastructure, reconfigured service points, and a wide array of innovative spaces.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Cultivating Campus Community with Live/Learn Neighborhoods
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      North Torrey Pines at the University of California San Diego points to the future of live/learn communities and showcases the latest in sustainability, student wellness, and progressive learning environments. Designed by HKS in partnership with Clark Construction and Safdie Rabines Architects, North Torrey Pines reflects bold aspirations: to be a catalyst for change at the University, to create a distinct ‘neighborhood’ among many University neighborhoods, to break‐down school silos and allow for a seamless student experience, to serve as a living laboratory to guide future projects, and to emphasize human, building, and business performance. The design response prioritizes a sense of community and belonging, encouraging student and faculty connection through shared experience. Join us to learn more about the process for and design of North Torrey Pines and to discuss the future of live/learn neighborhoods on college campuses.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Dream Big: Growing a Diverse Student Body in an Established Market
      Crocket C/D
      For many mid‐market universities, there is an ongoing struggle for the use of limited development dollars. Hard decisions must be made between supporting 1st generation students who are looking for an economical education and appealing to 2nd or 3rd generation students with aspirations of a cutting‐edge industry or graduate level studies. Within the context of an established university, with a modest expansion budget, how do you leverage campus building, site development, and strategic thinking to recruit, retain, and engage a highly diverse student body? What will encourage the 1st generation students to dream bigger than just graduating? Can a mid‐market university compete with larger universities for local top tier students? Panelists Dr. James Marquart, Provost; Katherine Miller, Assistant VP, Lamar University; Rob Roy Parnell, Associate Vice Chancellor of Facilities, TSUS; and Randy Guillot, Principal, Gensler; will discuss these questions, as well as many others in a panel.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Repurposing a Mothballed Hospital Into a Vibrant Health Science Center
      Republic A
      The City of Terrell had a 1950’s mothballed hospital that it needed to turn into an asset to the community instead of an eyesore to kickstart the development of a new commercial development district along a major arterial highway. Trinity Valley Community College was approached by the City to acquire the property for $1 with a million dollars in incentivizing funds to be provided to make improvements and utilize the building. The $11M repurposed 60,000 SF Health Science Center centralizes instruction for Nursing, EMT, and other Allied Health curricula offered by TVCC.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      The Power of Architectural Design to Advance Narrative Medicine
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      It is known that learning environments affect user’s ability to comprehend, collaborate, & retain information, just as healthcare environments contribute to well‐being & healing for patients & their families. But what about a combination of the two, specifically medical education environments? At LSU’s ACGME facility, a focus on wellness & “work‐life” balance for students/physicians elevates the importance of healthy ecosystems for all participants in the healthcare continuum. Engaging future professionals in narrative medicine develops themes of mindfulness, professionalism, & physician wellness during the education process. Narrative medicine, known as the act of listening, reflecting, & responding to patient stories to promote healing, provides the basis for a renewed focus on the humanity of care. When contemplated with depth of purpose, design can contribute to the advancement of narrative medicine & thereby professionalism, thus influencing the development of medical education.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      2:00 PM  -  3:00 PM
      Transforming Laboratory Research at Texas Woman's University
      Seguin A/B
      Like many institutions, TWU's existing Graduate Research Building was built in the 50’s. Existing labs are typical of the era: a highly compartmentalized series of rooms with minimally shared spaces, equipment, & resources. The labs are also comprised of solid walls & outdated infrastructure. For its new research facility, TWU wants to create open, transparent, flexible labs that will maximize infrastructure/resources, encourage collaboration, & serve the university for the next 80 years. This vision presents a major departure from their current organization & culture, which initially caused various concerns for the faculty. This presentation shares the process of transformation of both for their new building. Presenters will address concerns generally associated with open labs & discuss their strategy for consensus. The team will share how the Steering Committee guided/supported the faculty & design team, plus an examination of the new design to reveal conclusions and lessons learned.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:00 PM  -  3:40 PM
      Break Sponsored by Duplantis Design Group
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Community‐Driven Campus Designs Push Flexible, Innovative Learning Spa
      Republic A
      Traditionally, higher‐education buildings have been primarily for students and faculty. Today, institutions value integrating non‐traditional users into the physical and intellectual fabric of campus. As clients continue searching for solutions to increase hands‐on learning and maximize space, they are simultaneously looking to engage the community and industry partners in a tangible, interactive way. Hence, a growing demand for flexible spaces that consider changing user groups, advancing technologies, future pedagogies, and novel programs. At the Health Buildings at the University of Houston, elasticity was a main consideration from the planning and programming stages. It was crucial to initiate a collaborative approach with multiple stakeholders early on to address key concerns and needs. The outcome pushes design boundaries by elevating current programming to expanded user groups while allowing for immediate and long‐term flexibility in space allocation and future use.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Desiging for Autism
      Crocket A/B
      Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disorder affecting a wide range of abilities from proprioception to social and language deficits. To add to the complexity, the built environment has a profound impact on the sensory experience for individuals with ASD and their ability to learn and to interact with both people and the environment. This presents a unique challenge and opportunity for educators, practitioners, and designers. The Burkhart Center for Autism, an extension of Texas Tech University’s College of Education, is a revolutionary education and research facility capable of meeting the needs of individuals with ASD at any age. This presentation will reflect on the planning of the Burkhart Center and its impact on the larger community. It will also discuss the interconnection of autism and design and review the research being conducted around designing facilities as living learning environments for understanding the characteristics of autism from all angles.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Engagement and Flexibility: Transforming 21st Century Learning
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      The West Houston Institute (WHI) at Houston Community College (HCC) was conceived over five years by a team of educators, administrators, faculty, and designers from PBK and HarrisonKornberg Architects. Working on the assumption that technological change will create challenges for our workforce and educational systems, the WHI was designed to incorporate a wide range of synergistic spaces that can adapt as new challenges emerge, while nurturing innovation in all communities served. The concept and design are intended to the reinvent higher education for 21st century learners, to engage students in active learning environments, and to foster creativity in all building users. The building program includes a 10,000 square foot Makerspace, a first of its kind “Collaboratorium”, active learning classrooms, digital media center, Apple Coding and Design School, advanced science research labs, and a specialized “learning commons” to engage students both inside and outside the classrooms.
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Holistic Operation: Getting Facilities and Utilities Working Together
      Crocket C/D
      In 2010, Texas State University facilities staff were faced with a record‐setting enrollment of 30,000 students, an ever‐increasing maintenance backlog, mandated energy conservation goals, and aging utility systems. To meet this challenge, the staff began by obtaining a clear picture of the situation on campus through utility studies to identify weaknesses, an energy audit to locate conservation opportunities, and a building condition assessment. Today, after many in‐building renovations, the campus serves nearly 40,000 students, has a dramatically decreased mechanical deferred maintenance backlog, and has improved utilities operation through energy reduction and refurbished infrastructure. An essential component of this success has been the close coordination between the campus Facilities (buildings) and Utilities (plants) personnel. This case study will illustrate why cooperation between these sometimes “siloed” groups is key to providing the best possible service to the campus.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
      Initiating Campus GIS Mapping: Baylor, TCU, and TCC's Path to Success
      Seguin A/B
      GIS continues to be increasingly utilized by college campuses. But not all paths to success are the same. Baylor University, Texas Christian University, and Tarrant County College tackled different projects and 'quick wins' to initiate their campus GIS endeavors, including capturing as‐built utility info, encroachment/easement surveys, game day operations, and public safety maps. Web mapping apps, CAD‐GIS conversions, GPS collection standards, field validation…and that’s only the beginning!
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      4:45 PM  -  6:15 PM
      Exhibit Hall Networking and Cocktail Reception
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      6:15 PM  -  7:15 PM
      Barge or Stroll Transport to Fiesta
      Grand Hyatt River Dock
      6:30 PM  -  9:30 PM
      TCUF Fiesta
      La Villita (Downtown San Antonio)
       

      General Informaton

      7:30 AM  -  10:30 AM
      General Registration
      Texas Ballroom Foyer (4th Floor)
    • Sunday, September 23, 2018
    •  

      Education Sessions

      7:30 AM  -  8:15 AM
      Breakfast with Sponsors
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Creating a Campus Gateway, the UNT CVAD Story
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      More than ever, colleges and universities use new and retrofitted campus buildings to influence first impressions of their institutions among students, parents and the community at large. The University of North Texas visualized the new College of Visual Arts and Design building as its “gateway to the Denton campus”. Prior to the addition and renovation, programs were spread between eight buildings across campus, creating isolated environments. The building moves away from the “single purpose” paradigm, and brings interdisciplinary programs under one roof, creating “One College”. This building brings together eight programs, allowing for interaction, collaboration and innovation between disciplines on the student, faculty and community level. This session will provide a window into the design process, community interaction and coordination efforts that created this truly transformational moment in the University’s history.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Innovative Hybrid Project Delivery Method: UTD Engineering Building
      Crocket A/B
      In 2015, the UT System Office of Facilities Planning and Construction proceeded with the implementation of a Hybrid Project Delivery Initiative. This innovative project delivery method was defined after looking at private sector best practices, modified contracting techniques, and early design phase involvement. The UT Dallas Engineering Building was one of three major new projects identified for this pilot program. SmithGroupJJR, as the design lead, was complete with Programming, Schematic Design and approximately 75% complete with Design Development, and The Beck Group was on board, as a CM@R, when the Engineering Building was selected for the program. The design and construction team worked hand in hand with the Owner to implement as many aspects of the program as possible including input on early procurement of long lead items and interviews of major subcontractors during selection. Mechanical, Electrical and Glass subcontractors served in design assist roles.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      To Go Where We Have Not Gone Before–Programming for Modern Pedagogy
      Republic A
      Since 2010,Texas A&M University has experienced rapid enrollment growth, currently accommodating over 64,000 students on the main campus in College Station. This significant growth over a short period has created scheduling demand and increased pressure for classroom space. A new facility will offer over 2,200 classroom seats in a variety of medium and large cohort sizes to support a variety of instructional methods. By offering the opportunity to be innovative and focused on instruction, the 21st Century Classroom Building will become a powerful platform to set the standard for teaching excellence. This session will be a panel discussion presenting challenges and opportunities encountered in programming the building including perspectives of Nick Piwonka, Assistant Registrar and key stakeholder, Yvonne Bryant representing TAMUS Facilities Planning and Construction as well as Jill Bard and Amanda Crawley of Facility Programming and Consulting representing the programmer’s perspective.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Toward 2035: Integrating Generational+Master planning in the Panhandle
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      What does a “Regional Research University” look like? This section focuses on the integration of a “Generational” and Master Plan for West Texas A&M University as it plans toward 2035.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Transformative Collaboration in Interprofessional Health Education
      Seguin A/B
      This session explores strategies for planning collaborative and resilient medical education spaces that mirror real‐world healthcare environments. To accommodate a rapidly changing pedagogy emphasizing team‐based patient care, higher education institutions are challenged to maximize space efficiency and incorporate flexibility into health education facilities. A growing trend is creating learning and research spaces in dedicated interprofessional education buildings where departments share resources for a range of students and educational requirements. When every square foot counts, key ingredients of an integrative academic experience such as flexible labs, simulation learning technology, team‐based classrooms, and informal learning areas must be intentionally planned with attributes that inspire collaboration and build professional identity. Presenters will share best practices in facility design at several higher education institutions, including University of Texas Medical Branch.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      8:30 AM  -  9:30 AM
      Transforming the Residence Life Experience at Baylor University
      Crocket C/D
      The likelihood of success in a project is most often determined in the earliest stages. Program and scope development, along with alignment of expectations and budget, are essential. The project delivery method also plays a critical role in determining many of these factors. We will discuss how we transformed Baylor University’s Martin Hall with a design‐build delivery to meet campus needs relative to residence life programs, amenities, and technology, while being timely and budget conscious. Design‐build delivery offers many advantages, especially when considering a renovation, adaptive reuse, or addition to existing facilities. When a designer and contractor are united from the onset of the project, understanding future occupants, programmatic goals, university and community culture, and requirements, occurs seamlessly and is reflected in the projects outcome. Join us to hear from Baylor Staff, designers, and contractors how design‐build was critical to this projects success.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      9:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
      Break Sponsored by 4b Technology Group
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      A Transformational Change for CTE Education With TSTC Abilene
      Republic A
      In 2014, TSTC West Texas adopted a multi‐campus master plan based upon regional economy and workforce analysis, identifying a clear gap in TSTC program opportunities in the Abilene area. In response, in 2016, TSTC master planned a new 52‐acre campus adjacent to the Abilene Regional Airport consisting of approximately 500,000 GSF dedicated for sophisticated technical and vocational training. The first building to this campus – the sleek, modern Industrial Technology Center (ITC) – provides student services space, lab and support space for industrial maintenance, welding, emergency medical services, electrical trades, and power and transmission servicing. The 60,000 GSF two‐story facility, scheduled to open in June 2018, establishes the precedent for future development on one of TSTC’s newest campuses. This presentation explores the course from regional analysis and planning, through programming, design response and construction, to bring the TSTC Abilene Campus to reality.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      An Urban Bayou Education
      Seguin A/B
      This session will take a look at the multi‐faceted design approach to education carried out by an urban campus. The new Science and Technology building not only provides formal education but also lends itself to an educational experience for both students and faculty alike. Educational and sustainable moments are showcased throughout the design, allowing the program to practice what it teaches. The site is designed to react to the floodplain by the use of paving quantities and site location, and a resilient landscape is achieved through the use of native plants as well as a water filtration system that is made of existing recycled concrete. The program ties into the design by using native plants as learning opportunities and educational graphics throughout the project. As a downtown campus, the building is connected to the existing hike and bike trail, as well as the urban edge along Main Street. This location enhances pedestrian activity and increases health and wellness.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Design of an Experimental Theater and Intimate Performing Arts Venue
      Crocket C/D
      The University of Mary Hardin Baylor is a Central Texas private faith based university founded in 1845 with an enrollment of 3,900 students. The campus had a number of larger performance venues on campus but was looking to build a smaller more intimate venue with an emphasis for music, opera, voice, choir and orchestral performances. They had discontinued their drama department several years back but were interested in bringing it back as a curriculum offering. The University needed a venue that could meet the highly diverse needs of the various music performances as well as theater. The Mayborn Performing Arts Center with its Fikes Chamber Hall/Experimental Theater provides a flexible venue for the performance of both music and theatre arts. The ability of this venue to meet multiple performance requirements is both cost effective and transformational for the University.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Higher Education’s Transformation to an Agile Workplace
      Crocket A/B
      Higher education institutions strongly encourage the utilization of collaborative space and open concept learning to all students on a daily basis. The University of North Texas (UNT) has embarked on a project to promote innovation and collaboration in an agile workspace among campus staff within a number of high profile university services. An old, abandoned grocery store on the edge of the UNT campus is undergoing an incredible transformation to an innovative, agile environment designed to promote effective communication and synchronized goals along with providing spaces for analytical thinking and the development of creative solutions to complicated challenges.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      Making Room: Furniture is not an Afterthought
      Republic B (4th Floor)
      Traditionally, furniture has been selected at the very end of the design process and many times did not involve the architect or the end‐user. This session, through a deep dive into West Texas A&M University's New College of Agricultural Sciences building, will explore how a collaborative design process can allow for the creation of unique and engaging learning spaces. By addressing the issue of furniture early in the design process, educators should think about not just having the right number of seats but the types of spatial arrangements and the quality of environments that engage all types of learners both in a formal and informal education setting. Attendees will learn the value of considering the design and layout of furniture as part of the early design process, and some of the strategies for optimizing the spatial and educational experience. Also, quantifying, qualifying, selection, integration, and specifying will be discussed as a modern furniture design methodology.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      10:00 AM  -  11:00 AM
      The Evolution of Parking Garages: Planning for the Next 80 Years
      Republic C (4th Floor)
      With the inevitability of autonomous vehicles and a drastic increase in ride sharing programs, the student experience and interface with the campus is evolving. Curb side space “drop‐off” space is becoming a focal‐point, with parking garages serving as a storage facility rather than a point of destination. How do you accommodate current parking needs, while building adaptive structures for the next 80 years? And how do institutions protect their investment in new parking garages with the risk of decreased parking demand caused by disruptive innovations in transportation? Corgan and UT System will investigate the possibility of future adaptation of garage structures and creating future‐ready, flexible solutions.
      Concurrent Session Presenters:
      11:00 AM  -  12:15 PM
      Exhibit Hall Networking and Prize Giveaway
      Texas Ballroom (4th Floor)
      12:15 PM 
      Conference Ends - See you for TCUF 2020 (Nov 4-6, 2020)
      Embassy Suites Frisco, Texas
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