The 18th Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion, & Disability

Agenda

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  • Tuesday, April 17, 2018
  •  
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Bridging Disability Studies with Marginalized Communities, Movements, and Fields
    Pfahl Hall 140
    Exploring Intersections of Aging and Disability through the "Greying" of Disability Studies. Hailee Yoshizaki-Gibbons, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Identifying as an Autistic Person of Color. Timotheus "TJ" Gordon, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Mad Studies and Disability Studies: Potential Connections for Community Building and Social Transformation. Meghann O'Leary, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Moderator: Michelle Nario-Redmond, Hiram College


    As a highly interdisciplinary and critical field, Disability Studies provides numerous opportunities to disrupt oppressive discourses and structures through a “radical re-imagining of possibilities” (Erevelles). Despite this, Disability Studies has only recently began engaging in intersectional analyses related to race, madness, and old age. This panel considers future directions of Disability Studies by exploring the complex and critical intersections between: aging and disability, Black and Autistic identity, Disability Studies and Mad Studies, and Music Studies and Disability Studies (race, disability, and rap). The authors examine theoretical connections as a way to generate increased activism and community building.
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Disability in Public: Representations, Stereotypes, and Policies
    Pfahl Hall 302
    The Price of Disability Rights: Public Suspicion and the Disability Con. Doron Dorfman, Stanford Law School

    Before the Backlash: Disability and Welfare in Early American Political Culture. Jeff Brune, Gallaudet University

    From Welfare to Urban Planning: The Case of Municipal Accessibility Professionalization. Mariela Yabo, Tel Aviv University

    Complicating Perceived Authenticity of Disability Representations. Nicole Sims, University of Illinois at Chicago


    This session “Disability in Public” addresses the SDS strand theme: what contributions do academic Disability Studies insights make to what becomes public knowledge about disability? Doron Dorfman analyzes the disability con stereotype—faking disabilities and abusing the law—as a phenomenon that dramatically affects both the public legitimacy of disability law and the lives of disabled individuals. Using a mixed-methods approach, this project systematically describes and analyzes public suspicions of disability con, identifies the situations that aggravate the suspicion, and proposes interventions to enhance the public’s trust in disability law. Jeff Brune’s paper focuses on the early-nineteenth-century emergence of a “welfare equilibrium” in American political culture that liberalized pension programs and defended the worthiness of welfare recipients, but also allowed limited fears of fraud to influence the administration of benefits. It undermines current assumptions about the inevitability of fears of welfare fraud. Mariela Yabo uses Tel Aviv-Jaffa municipality as a case study to examine the implementation of disability legislation and translation of the social model of disability into planning practices, arguing that the professionalization of accessibility affects the level of participation of people with disabilities, due to the technical nature of planning professions. Nicole Sims addresses the ways in which pervasive representations of Stephen Hawking have been used to bolster the public’s knowledge of disability as these representations are perceived to be authentic, enlisting Jane Hawking’s two memoirs as locations to study how authenticity is used as a rhetorical tool to inform cultural understandings of disability.
     Optional 
    8:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Recognized Postsecondary and Industry-Recognized Credentials: Pathways to Employment
    Pfahl Hall 340
    A panel of THINK COLLEGE staff will share the types of postsecondary and industry-recognized credentials that are available by attending one of Ohio's Statewide Consortium (OSC) programs. Staff and graduates will share how to gain industry-recognized credentials to gain employment in high skill/high wage careers.
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  11:45 AM
    "Scenes of Subjection": Disability, Race, and the Spectacle of Black Suffering
    Pfahl Hall 140
    Nirmala Erevelles is the recipient of the 2017 Senior Scholar Award from the Society for Disability Studies, recognizing her extraordinary scholarship, service, mentoring, and leadership.

    In this presentation, she troubles the ways that critical scholars of difference turn away from the spectral presence of disability in search of more empowering narratives, and insists on looking at disability in a defiant refusal of ableism as constitutive of other categories of difference within the historical materialist conditions of transnational capitalism.

    Abstract: In this presentation, Professor Erevelles troubles the ways that critical scholars of difference turn away from the spectral presence of disability in search of more empowering narratives. The alternative narratives they support recreate limiting theorizations of the human/posthuman that continue to support ableist representations of disability. Refusing this disavowal of disability, I insist on looking (not straight but queerly) at disability in a defiant refusal of ableism to argue that disability, rather than being an additive to the discourses of intersectionality, is constitutive of other categories of difference within the historical materialist conditions of transnational capitalism (Erevelles, 2011). Drawing on the work of African American literary scholar Saidiya Hartman and award winning fiction writer Jesmyn Ward, I discuss the implications for re-envisioning futures as if disability as a historical materialist category really matters in public space at the intersections of social difference.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  11:45 AM
    Educational Coaches and Peer Mentors: Recruitment & Training to Support All College Students
    Pfahl Hall 302
    Many of Ohio's programs provide peer mentors and educational coaches to support students enrolled in college. Find out more about successful recruitment and training strategies that prepare all students with the skills needed to navigate college and transition to more inclusive community and employment settings.
     Optional 
    10:15 AM  -  11:45 AM
    Who Wants to Be a Disability Expert?
    Pfahl Hall 340
    This lighthearted and interactive session is loosely modelled after a game show where the prize is the chance to test your knowledge about an eclectic range of topics ranging from basic civil rights concepts to disability rights and etiquette. And be prepared to identify some disability myths along the way.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Lunch & Information Exchange
    Blackwell Hotel Ballrooms

    Registration is required to attend lunch each day.  If you are interested in attending lunch, please select this session during registration.

     

    Plated Chicken Romano

    • Blackwell Salad:  Fresh Field Greens with Seasonal Berries, Roasted Corn, Candied Pecans and Port Wine Vinaigrette
    • Chicken Romano:  Garlic Romano Cheese Crumb Crusted Chicken with Zesty Marinara, Smoked Provolone Glaze, Parmesan Roasted Potatoes, Green Beans, Tomatoes and Heirloom Carrots
    • Freshly Baked Bread and Whipped Butter
    • Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake with Raspberry Coulis and Whipped Cream
    • Crimson Cup Gourmet Coffees, Hot Teas, and Iced Tea
    Fee  Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    College Students with Disabilities and Campus Climate: A Report from the NCCSD
    Pfahl Hall 302

    The National Center for College Students with Disabilities at AHEAD published a 2017 research report reviewing literature on campus climate and college students with disabilities. This presentation will share findings of that work, practical strategies for students, faculty, and administrators, and examples of campuses implementing recommended practices.

    Recommendations are grouped around three main areas:

    • Conducting evaluation of existing disability practices, through campus climate surveys, assessments of disability services and supports, and assessments of campus accessibility
    • Creating diverse ways for the campus community to get information about disability, by developing faculty and staff training programs, including disability in student orientation programming, and creating multiple centers of disability expertise on campus
    • Supporting campus-wide engagement with disability, creating opportunities for disability community and engagement, including faculty and staff with disabilities in recruitment and retention initiatives, streamlining funding mechanisms for accommodations, and encouraging inclusive pedagogies like universal design
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Disrupting the Landscape of Higher Education
    Pfahl Hall 140
    Multiple Perspectives on an Introduction to Disabilities Class: Views from All Parts of the Classroom. Molly Kelly, Ashley Johnson, Sarah Camino, Megan Zahneis, Courtney Hineman, and Anna Hill, Miami University

    The purpose of the “Introduction to Disability Studies” class at Miami University is to challenge dominant assumptions about disability and to critically interrogate the social, cultural and political factors that shape the hegemonic narrative. Much scholarly work is engaged in this course to achieve this goal. The addition of the real-time voices of students who identify as disabled in the form of undergraduate assistants adds a richness to the course experience and brings the critical theory to life in a meaningful way. The addition of a student who took the course and, consequently experienced a transformed sense of identity and empowerment, as co-teacher provides a model for the critical outcome that is the intent of the course. Rooted in critical theory, the course is intended to facilitate real, measurable change in society and the combination of these multiple voices brings that to fruition.

    Resisting Ableism in Higher Education: Applying Intersectional Disability Studies. Elisa Abes and Michelle Wallace, Miami University

    The intersectional narrative study upon which this discussion is based explored the relationship between intersectional ableism and the experiences of college students with physical disabilities. Participants included 13 college students with diverse physical disabilities and diverse racial, gender, and sexual orientation identities. Findings revealed that participants experienced “intersectional erasure” on their campuses. Participants resisted intersectional erasure by searching for elusive homes in their physical bodies and spaces. We will draw on the study results to discuss how higher education professionals can move from accommodation to intersectional inclusion, treat disability as an intersectional social identity, respect the socially constructed and physical realities of disabled bodies, and amplify disabled students’ resistance to ableism. Together, we will generate strategies for creating home on college campuses for diverse disabled students.
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Transition Planning to Support Success in Postsecondary Programs
    Pfahl Hall 340
    Gain an overview of the differences between high school and college supports and services for students with disabilities. Learn about STABLE accounts to help pay for college and the skills that students need to successfully transition to college.
     Optional 
    3:45 PM  -  7:00 PM
    Rectifying the Tilt: Reasonable Accommodation, Affirmative Action, and Disability
    Pfahl Hall 140

    Chai Feldblum, Comissioner, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission presents the 2018 Ken Campbell Lecture on Disability Law and Policy followed by the Student Poster Reception.

    The Ken Campbell lecture on disability policy and law was initiated by the Columbus Advisory Committee on Disability to honor Ken Campbell’s lifetime of service. The lecture is a free public lecture and a highlight of The Ohio State University’s annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability. The Ken Campbell Lecture’s focus on disability policy honors Campbell’s work as an advocate, including leading Ohio’s Developmental Disabilities Counsel, Policy Coordinator for The Ohio State University’s Nisonger Center, and over twenty years guiding the City of Columbus’ disability policies as it’s ADA Coordinator. Past speakers include John Wodatch, Victor Pineda, Paul Grossman, Andy Imparato, and Marilyn Bartlett.

    The lecture will be followed by the Multiple Perspectives annual student poster reception, which encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability. The poster presentations may focus on any aspect of disability and may be based on student research, art & performance, class papers, or other projects.

     SDS Posters & Papers

    Speakers:
     Optional 
    7:00 PM  -  11:00 PM
    DISCO Ball: A Celebration with the Society for Disability Studies
    Please note that you will also be asked to fill out a more detailed RSVP for this reception/dance event.

    The DISCO Ball is sponsored by the Ohio State Disability Studies Program; DISCO Graduate Student Caucus; English Department Diversity & Inclusion Committee; Sexuality Studies Program; and Office of the ADA Coordinator. There is no charge for this event. It will include a vegetarian dinner, welcoming address by Mimi Khúc, and the SDS Dance.
     Optional 
  • Wednesday, April 18, 2018
  •  
    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Be Prepared to Lead: Directing Your Path to Employment and Independence
    Pfahl Hall 340
    Ohio's Self-Determination Association and Ohio's Statewide Consortium teach students and adults with IDD the self-advocacy skills needed to live independent and responsible lives. Discover training opportunities across Ohio that teach students the self-advocacy skills to lead their person-centered meetings. Students will present and discuss their person-centered plans and college & career portfolios. Find out more information about Project STIR and OSC trainings to gain the leadership skills to coordinate your own services and supports.
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Resistant Practices: Early Childhood Education and Artful Advocacy from Neurodiversity Perspectives
    Pfahl Hall 302
    Technologies for Autonomy: Supporting Autistic Self-Determination. Anna Williams, University of Florida

    Application of Disability Studies and Neurodiversity Paradigm in Therapeutic and Educational Settings. Melody Latimer, Disability Consultant

    Towards a Neuroqueer Curriculum: Queer Children, Deviant Bodies, and the "Helping Professions." Robin Roscigno, Rutgers University

    Listen2Us: Shifting Misconceptions About Nonspeaking People. DJ Savarese, Open Society Foundations/Human Rights Initiative Youth Fellow

    This panel considers resistant practices in the areas of education and art, which embrace autonomy for autistic children and disrupt societal misconceptions about nonspeaking people. Critical Disability Studies has explored the ways that schools normalize and perpetuate ableism. Disability Studies in Education has emerged as a locale for scholars questioning the medical models of contemporary special education and seeking alternative pedagogies. Out of this work emerges a critical question regarding early childhood education; the question of what exactly “intervening” means in relationship to early intervention services. Anna Williams, Melody Latimer, and Robin Roscigno address the ways that early childhood education for autistic children has been shaped by behaviorism and posit resistance strategies. Through theoretical models such as neuroqueerness and self-determination theory, they will examine new models of early childhood education that embrace autonomy though technologies of accommodation. DJ Savarese’s presentation illustrates the ways in which poetry, visual arts, and filmmaking are used to promote literacy, communication, and self-representation for nonspeaking people. Society’s ignorance of their own ignorance costs nonspeaking people their lives, when they are presumed incompetent and denied training in literacy and communication skills. The Arts can unearth and disrupt societal misconceptions about who we nonspeaking people are and what we hope to do with our lives.
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Teaching/Learning Audio Description: Bringing Together Digital Media Studies and Disability Studies
    Pfahl Hall 140
    This presentation offers an in-depth and practical experience with a topic of critical importance to the disability community: Audio description (AD). This topic has received some scholarly attention, but it relatively rarely comes into play in our own classrooms or even our own conferences. At the same time, AD is a lively topic in disability activism, including actions by the American Council of the Blind (ACB) and other community-based organizations. This roundtable is an effort to share knowledge about AD and also offer participants concrete strategies for engaging AD in their own classrooms, presentations, and other places of work. It reviews both popular and scholarly conversations about AD, including the notorious question of what “bias” or “objectivity” mean when offering descriptions. It also offers a grounding in what AD means in various contexts, including film, live theater, art, television, and other settings. Each participant will share a classroom project in which they produced an audio-described infographic, video, or webtext. The audience will be encouraged to discuss their own pedagogical and practical experiences with, or ideas for, AD. The overall goal is to enable audience members to implement or refine their current practices when they return to their own classrooms, places of work, and activist spaces.
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  12:15 PM
    First HIRES and Employment of those on the Autism Spectrum
    Pfahl Hall 140
    Employment of people with disabilities continues to fall way below the national average, while employment of those on the Autism Spectrum is even lower. Many students find work experience done during college to be a great way to enter the workforce of their field. Student employment, part-time work off-campus, and internships all go on their resumes and from there, job opportunities (theoretically) blossom. To get that resume material, however, students need any work experience to get them started.

    For the population of students at the University of Memphis, like many others, this "foot-in-the-door" start was a big barrier in getting any kind of employment. After a conversation passing between then-DRS Director Susan Te Paske with then-Housing and Residence Life Director Peter Gronendyck, it was decided the two offices should collaborate and pilot a jobs program, First HIRES. First HIRES is targeted to students with disabilities who had never before held a paying job. The students, going through all phases of job searches including interviews and filling out forms, would begin work at the University's Living and Learning Community as front desk support. The students entered the employment of Res Life, already equipped to hire, train, and supervise student employees. While the University of Memphis's First HIRES program is for students with any disability, staff found that more and more students on the Autism Spectrum were participating. This population benefitted from the follow-up by their work supervisors and the DRS staff in weekly academic coaching and "check-in" meetings. During these meetings, staff were able to help the students understand their co-workers and social structures that exist in the workforce. It provided the students with experiences they may not have otherwise had, and provided additional chances for staff to meet and work with people with disabilities. Students discovered new senses of self, confidence, self-pride, and a level of independence they had not known before. Because students are paid for these jobs, several had to create back accounts for direct deposits of paychecks, fill out tax forms, and the like.

    Additional training for staff from Disability Resources for Students assisted the Residence Hall staff in learning how to best work with people on the Autism Spectrum, particularly related to boundary setting, and outlining clear and specific expectations in the workplace.
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Locating Disability Studies in Academia, Social Movements, Science, and Parenting
    Pfahl Hall 302
    "Doctors Say I'm the Illest 'Cause I'm Sufferin' from Realness": Disability Studies, Rap, and Mental Illness. Kylie Boazman, University at Buffalo

    Disability and the Indian Nation-State: Questions of Care and Recognition. Shruti Vaidya, University of Chicago

    How would Blind Scientists Discover the Stars?: Reimagining Basic Scientific Progress. Sheri Wells-Jensen, Bowling Green State University

    Theory, Practice, and Perspectives: Disability Studies and Parenting Children with Dis/abilities. Kelly Vaughan, Purdue University Northwest; Gia Super, University of Illinois at Chicago

    This session “Locating Disability Studies” examines the SDS strand theme: Where has academic Disability Studies not yet fulfilled its promise to enhance perspectives in other disciplines, practices, and social movements? Anita Ghai’s paper traverses the engagement with Disability Studies in the School of Human Studies in Ambedkar University, India. Disability is always understood in India as a concessional category. She addresses the difficulties with bringing disability as an epistemology to academia. Shruti Vaidya explores how insights from theorizations on care, recognition, state, and disability can help us understand the relationship the Indian nation-state has with its disabled citizens. Sheri Wells-Jensen asks how science would have begun and how it would have progressed if early humans who hypothesized about the stars were blind. What impact does reimagining science from a disability perspective have on what questions are considered and how science is approached? Kelly Vaughan and Gia Super use auto-ethnographical reflection to theorize about what parenting from a Disability Studies perspective looks like, and what role parents have in Disability Studies theorizing.
     Optional 
    10:45 AM  -  12:15 PM
    Understanding Healthy Sexuality
    Pfahl Hall 340
    Going to college is an exciting time for people to experience new opportunities and connect to different people. It's also a time when people need to develop the skills, tools, and self-awareness to understand their rights, the rights of others, and the responsibilities that come with greater independence -- particularly when it comes to sexuality. This talk addresses the importance of understanding healthy sexuality among adults with and without disabilities.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    12:30 PM  -  1:45 PM
    Lunch & Information Exchange
    Blackwell Hotel Ballrooms

    Registration is required to attend lunch each day.  If you are interested in attending lunch, please select this session during registration.

     

    Filet of Beef Sirloin

    • Tomato Basil Soup:  Roasted Tomatoes and Fresh Basil Finished with a Touch of Cream
    • Filet of Beef Sirloin:  Char Grilled Steak, Wild Mushroom Ragout, Roasted Tomato, Broccoli, Smoked Cheddar-Scallion Mashed Yukon Potatoes, Red Wine Sauce
    • Freshly Baked Bread and Whipped Butter
    • House-Made New York Style Cheesecake
    • Crimson Cup Gourmet Coffees, Hot Teas, and Iced Tea
    Fee  Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Digital Access: Considerations in Design Purchase
    Pfahl Hall 302
    What is digital Access? How do individuals with various disabilities experience the Web? How can you create a virtually welcoming environment? Join an informal conversation about the nature of access in the virtual world.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Take Charge: Getting Involved in Campus Life
    Pfahl Hall 340
    Students with and without disabilities will discuss the opportunities available on a college campus that build self-determination and integration into community living. Find out more about the opportunities and benefits of joining student organizations for both students with and without disabilities.
    Speakers:
     Optional 
    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Vulnerability and Storytelling: Transforming Classroom and Campus Communities
    Pfahl Hall 140
    Proposition as Pedagogy: Doran George's 'Can We Have Sex.' Amanda Apgar, UCLA

    "I just want to Help.": Interrogating Paternalism and the Desire to be "Good" in the University Classroom. Mana Hayakawa, UCLA

    Touch and Sports: Vulnerabilities in Practice. Ariel Hernandez, UCLA

    College Students with Disabilities' Stories about Micro-Aggressions and Affirmations. Laura T. Eisenman, University of Delaware

    This panel offers presentations on Disability Studies pedagogy and storytelling by college students from marginalized groups. Centering vulnerability in the community space of the classroom, the speakers address how educators can enable students to embrace vulnerability not only as a means to learning, but also an approach to challenge normative ideals of academic achievement. Exploring questions about the de-sexualization of academic spaces (Amanda Apgar), how to get students to think critically about the concept of “helping” (Mana Hayakawa), and the element of touch in teaching disabled athletes (Ariel Hernandez), they theorize new vulnerabilities and develop pedagogical praxis mindful of power in the classroom. Laura Eisenman highlights the unique nature of stories about campus micro-aggressions and -affirmations told by students with intellectual disability and considers implications for building inclusive campus communities.
     Optional 
    3:45 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Disability in Art and Life: The 2018 Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture on Disability Arts and Culture
    Blackwell Hotel Ballrooms
    The 2018 Ethel Louise Armstrong Lecture on Disability Arts and Culture is presented by artist Riva Lehrer and author Nicola Griffith

    They will read from their upcoming memoirs and engage the audience in a discussion of the representation of disability and its interplay in the creative process.
     Optional 
    5:30 PM  -  10:00 PM
    SDS Salon: Reflections and Connections
    Denney Hall 238 & 250
    All are invited to this gathering with the Society for Disability Studies community to connect, reflect, and look forward. We will showcase a reading by Anne Finger from her new novel, along with workshops, discussions, and a membership visioning session. Dinner will be provided.

    Please note that you will also need to register via Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sds-salon-at-multiple-perspectives-tickets-44665530805. Space at the Salon is limited and registration closes April 9th. There is no charge for this event, but donations are most welcome. Questions? Please contact joanne@disstudies.org.

    But Captions are So Intrusive and Other Anti-Access Microaggressions. Cheryl Green
    Captions, audio description, and transcription are becoming more common; however, they gain traction primarily when the media is disability themed, or access is added to boost views. We discuss microaggressions around media access, disability space where access is denied, and putting access tools into more people's toolkits. We will unpack examples, hesitations, points of resistance, and defenses, and discuss ways that Disability Studies scholars and practitioners can help the broader community increase accessibility. We will explore legal requirements around access but more so, access as part of a welcoming disability aesthetic. The discussion will wrap up with practical, affordable options for incorporating media access.

    Disabling Borders and Enabling Bridges: Disability Justice in Scholarly Activism. Holly Pearson, Sara Acevedo, Emily Nusbaum, Nicola McClung
    In this discussion, we will explore the relationship between community, knowledge production, sustainability, and activism in the context of disrupting the boundaries between the academy and its surroundings and digital communities. Together, we will formulate bridging strategies between grassroots communities in knowledge production and activist scholars in the academy.

    To Give a Voice: Photographic Portraits and Oral History Recordings of the Disability Community. Mark Wittig
     Optional 
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