Green Stormwater Infrastructure Series

Agenda

  • Wednesday, October 14, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Green Stormwater Infrastructure, Lessons Learned Through Long Term Research

    This discussion will focus on the practical design, construction, and maintenance lessons learned obtained during the course of long-term research into the long term performance of green stormwater infrastructure.

    Stormwater Management has changed dramatically in the past two decades, as it has moved away from a flood control perspective toward sustainability of our rivers and watersheds. The tools that we use from rain gardens to pervious pavements and green roofs are in engineering terms still relatively new, and we are rapidly learning more on how they work. New lessons tell us to design using the native soil infiltration, and the importance of Evapotranspiration.

    Villanova has been studying these processes both on and off campus for over two decades. Those involved with researching the performance of these sites have the unique opportunity to follow the site from design, through construction, and then to operation, and to contrast the performance of the site with others. Further information on these research sites is available by clicking here.  

    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Putting the “Green” in Green Infrastructure
    Planting Design Recommendations from Green City, Clean Waters

    Plants are the "green" of green infrastructure (GSI). When used effectively, vegetation can stabilize slopes, improve infiltration, and provide numerous economic, environmental, and social benefits to communities. Projects can be beautiful and even garden-like.

    But it's not easy being green. GSI environments present numerous challenges for plants, especially in urban areas. This talk will share planting design recommendations based on design, installation, and maintenance of over 700 vegetated SMPs for Philadelphia’s Green City, Clean Waters GSI program. The presentation will share measured successes at the species-level including percent cover, survivorship, and other field-based observations.

    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, October 28, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Planning and Designing Cost-Effective Green Streets: Case Studies and Lessons Learned
    This presentation will provide an overview of the range of planning, design, and implementation approaches to one of the more rapidly emerging types of green infrastructure, green streets, which employ several different types of green stormwater technologies in order to reduce and/or improve stormwater runoff within the public right-of-way. Many cities are now looking to green streets as a significant part of the solution to combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) issues (e.g., NPDES permits, TMDLs). In addition to stormwater improvements, green streets often align well with other urban greening and community enhancing efforts (e.g. walkability, bike safety, tree canopy goals, enhanced property values, traffic calming, etc).

    The presentation will examine successfully completed green street and alley projects in communities such as Lancaster, PA and Onondaga County (Syracuse), NY. While often thought of as an expensive green infrastructure technique, several case studies will highlight the cost efficiencies and opportunities gained by integrating green streets with other capital improvements, such as traffic improvements, street repaving, utility work, and other streetscape improvements. This presentation will also explore various lessons learned and unique design solutions of successful green street implementation.

    Speakers:
  • Thursday, November 5, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:30 PM
    Planting Green Infrastructure Systems for Success
    Plants are the backbone of green stormwater infrastructure, functioning under tough conditions to clean and infiltrate storm water. Learn how to choose and plant trees, shrubs and perennials that perform in different stormwater zones, while providing habitat for pollinators and wildlife.
    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, November 11, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Choose Certified Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professionals
    To Design, Install, and Maintain Green Infrastructure

    The Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professional program is a two-level, individual, credential creating consistently-trained professionals to design, install, and maintain sustainable landscapes and stormwater practices. This community of over 600 environmental stewards can be a valuable resource for partners and clients working to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay region. This presentation will cover how the certification works, how the professionals are helping communities, and how you can become part of the CBLP network.

    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, November 18, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Stormwater Management Using Modified Soils and Porous Pavement
    Increasing water infiltration into existing soils while growing healthy vegetation is key to successful green infrastructure projects. Learn how to modify existing soils using various techniques such as “scoop and dump”. Explore the use of structural soil, plants for bioswales, and porous pavement from work at Cornell University’s Urban Horticulture Institute.
    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, November 25, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Trees: A Green, Cost Effective Stormwater Management Practice
    Explore how trees are an inexpensive way to manage and reduce stormwater. Tree canopies act like large green umbrellas during rain events, slowing and reducing rainfall that would hit impervious surfaces. Trees also work like large green pumps, moving infiltrated water back into the atmosphere through evapotranspiration. Learn what species and which locations will produce the greatest impact and how increasing a community’s tree canopy can gain stormwater and pollution reduction credit.
    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, December 2, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    How Penn State Extension Master Watershed Stewards Can Help Your Municipality Meet MS-4 Requirements
    The Penn State Master Watershed Stewards are trained, energized citizens in your communities who are available to help your municipality meet its regulatory obligations under the MS-4 program. Stewards are Extension volunteers who have completed formal training in water and natural resource conservation in classroom and on-the-ground settings; they have numerous programs and presentations ready to engage the public – homeowners, municipal staff, and community members – with information and resources essential to the success of your municipality’s MS-4 efforts. Master Watershed Stewards, as committed community-based dedicated volunteers, can be the foundation of a cost-effective, reliable MS-4 program.
    Speakers:
  • Wednesday, December 9, 2020
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Maintaining Vegetated Green Stormwater Infrastructure in the Right of Way
    Maintenance is necessary for continued function of vegetated Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI). Maintenance is also critical for community acceptance of GSI. This talk will focus on what actions the Philadelphia Water Department took to ensure a robust inspection and maintenance program, how that program has changed over time, and the evolution of maintenance strategies.
    Speakers:
Top